@
Exclusive Editorial in collaboration with Calvin Klein, captured by Victor Vergara
400

Exclusive Editorial in collaboration with Calvin Klein, captured by Victor Vergara

Fashion Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Calvin Klein, lensed and styled by Victor Vergara.     TEAM CREDITS: photography and styling by Victor Vergara make-up and hair by Wout Philippo casting by Timotej Letonja models: Meerle Haket at Known, Matthijs Pol at Elvis Models, Louis Dercon at The Coven. assistant hair and make-up artist: Anh Nguyaen styling assistant: Michael Geertzen special thanks to Parq Studio Amsterdam - Kim Zeeman   #CK  Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Calvin Klein, lensed and styled by Victor Vergara.     TEAM CREDITS: photography and styling by Victor Vergara make-up and hair by Wout Philippo casting by Timotej Letonja models: Meerle Haket at Known, Matthijs Pol at Elvis Models, Louis Dercon at The Coven. assistant hair and make-up artist: Anh Nguyaen styling assistant: Michael Geertzen special thanks to Parq Studio Amsterdam - Kim Zeeman   #CK 

Exclusive editorial "Forces of Nature"
398

Exclusive editorial "Forces of Nature"

Fashion Head: Forces of Nature   Exclusive new editorial by Stephanie Galea. Youthful silhouettes and playful layering - natural motifs will forever be fashion’s feel-good trend.     TEAM CREDITS: Photography: Stephanie Galea Fashion Editor: Keanoush Zargham Art editor: Richa Konde   Hair stylist: Sharon Robinson using Oribe   Make-up artist: Anna Payne   Model: Yacine Diop at The Hive Management   Casting director: Miro Raynov   Fashion assistant: Chrissie McKenna   Casting assistant: Naima Labiad Head: Forces of Nature   Exclusive new editorial by Stephanie Galea. Youthful silhouettes and playful layering - natural motifs will forever be fashion’s feel-good trend.     TEAM CREDITS: Photography: Stephanie Galea Fashion Editor: Keanoush Zargham Art editor: Richa Konde   Hair stylist: Sharon Robinson using Oribe   Make-up artist: Anna Payne   Model: Yacine Diop at The Hive Management   Casting director: Miro Raynov   Fashion assistant: Chrissie McKenna   Casting assistant: Naima Labiad

Exclusive editorial by Denis Koval
399

Exclusive editorial by Denis Koval

Jewelry Exclusive editorial captured by Denis Koval.     TEAM CREDITS: Photography:    Denis Koval @ Unit CMA Concept, Art direction and Styling: Analik Brouwer MUA: Anita Jolles @ Every Inch Agency Model: Yu Lun @ the Movement models Retouching: Michael Frahm Exclusive editorial captured by Denis Koval.     TEAM CREDITS: Photography:    Denis Koval @ Unit CMA Concept, Art direction and Styling: Analik Brouwer MUA: Anita Jolles @ Every Inch Agency Model: Yu Lun @ the Movement models Retouching: Michael Frahm

Advertising
Advertising
GUCCI X MYTHERESA: MYTHERESA LAUNCHES THE FIRST EXCLUSIVE GUCCI MENSWEAR CAPSULE COLLECTION WITH CAMPAIGN FEATURING AUSTRALIAN BAND PARCELS
396

GUCCI X MYTHERESA: MYTHERESA LAUNCHES THE FIRST EXCLUSIVE GUCCI MENSWEAR CAPSULE COLLECTION WITH CAMPAIGN FEATURING AUSTRALIAN BAND PARCELS

Fashion Luxury online retailer Mytheresa is set to launch an exclusive menswearcapsule collec on with renowned Italian fashion House Gucci, which will be available globally on Mytheresa.com from July 15th, 2020. This collec on marks a milestone for menswear at Mytheresa as the largest exclusive collec on debut since the retailer’s category launch in January 2020.     Taking inspira on from the House’s Pre-Fall 2020 season, a total of 46 pieces are featured and range ready-to-wear, accessories and footwear. A 70s a tude is represented through themes of new tailoring, iconic details and denim; with a color pale e that fuses tones of limestone, bo le, coral, lime green, brick, avio, sky and baby blue with neutral shades of black, ivory, camel, dark brown, taupe, bordeaux and milk. True to the brand’s unique and eclec c aesthe c, addi onal nishing touches include leave-on cu labels, playful mo fs and pa erns, stand-out gold bu ons and quintessen al GG logo elements.     Tailoring drives overall styling in this collec on with suits found in crinkle corduroy, GG windowpane pa ern, striped classic chalk; and with double breasted jackets in two-tone yarn dyed annel, striped retro regimental and linen co on canvas. Pants are true to the vintage feel of the collec on as cropped ares in tailored military twill, wool cover and washed denim. Accessories include mo f necklaces, vintage shaped sunglasses, silk carrés, printed es with paisley or chains mo fs, bucket hats and baseball caps, a leather du e bag and a north/south mini bag with Horsebit detail. Leather sole tassel moccasins, with the iconic Gucci green-red-green Web, feature in black, cognac and bordeaux in either smooth leather or embossed crocodile.     The campaign, shot by photographer Bella Lieberberg and art directed by Mytheresa Global Crea ve Director Julian Paul, features notable Australian electropop band Parcels. Selected as crea ves and for their collec ve retro style, keyboardists Louie Swain and Patrick Hetherington, bassist Noah Hill, drummer Anatole Serret and guitarist Jules Crommelin have come together to infuse the dis nct look and feel of the collec on for this campaign. Captured as live performers in a grand upmarket restaurant se ng, the campaign conveys a truly energe c yet luxurious atmosphere. Luxury online retailer Mytheresa is set to launch an exclusive menswearcapsule collec on with renowned Italian fashion House Gucci, which will be available globally on Mytheresa.com from July 15th, 2020. This collec on marks a milestone for menswear at Mytheresa as the largest exclusive collec on debut since the retailer’s category launch in January 2020.     Taking inspira on from the House’s Pre-Fall 2020 season, a total of 46 pieces are featured and range ready-to-wear, accessories and footwear. A 70s a tude is represented through themes of new tailoring, iconic details and denim; with a color pale e that fuses tones of limestone, bo le, coral, lime green, brick, avio, sky and baby blue with neutral shades of black, ivory, camel, dark brown, taupe, bordeaux and milk. True to the brand’s unique and eclec c aesthe c, addi onal nishing touches include leave-on cu labels, playful mo fs and pa erns, stand-out gold bu ons and quintessen al GG logo elements.     Tailoring drives overall styling in this collec on with suits found in crinkle corduroy, GG windowpane pa ern, striped classic chalk; and with double breasted jackets in two-tone yarn dyed annel, striped retro regimental and linen co on canvas. Pants are true to the vintage feel of the collec on as cropped ares in tailored military twill, wool cover and washed denim. Accessories include mo f necklaces, vintage shaped sunglasses, silk carrés, printed es with paisley or chains mo fs, bucket hats and baseball caps, a leather du e bag and a north/south mini bag with Horsebit detail. Leather sole tassel moccasins, with the iconic Gucci green-red-green Web, feature in black, cognac and bordeaux in either smooth leather or embossed crocodile.     The campaign, shot by photographer Bella Lieberberg and art directed by Mytheresa Global Crea ve Director Julian Paul, features notable Australian electropop band Parcels. Selected as crea ves and for their collec ve retro style, keyboardists Louie Swain and Patrick Hetherington, bassist Noah Hill, drummer Anatole Serret and guitarist Jules Crommelin have come together to infuse the dis nct look and feel of the collec on for this campaign. Captured as live performers in a grand upmarket restaurant se ng, the campaign conveys a truly energe c yet luxurious atmosphere.

JACQUEMUS Spring/Summer 2021 collection « L’Amour
395

JACQUEMUS Spring/Summer 2021 collection « L’Amour

Fashion Week "As an idea for this collection, L’Amour began as something different. I imagined people gathered together celebrating love. Alexander Ekman’s choreography of wheat tossed passionately through the air. Emir Kursturica’s film, Time of the Gypsieswith its enchanting realism. These scenes of ceremony large and small. But what’s so beautiful about L’Amour is how it can endure—sometimes even grow stronger—in the absence of people being together. Not long after my team was separated from each other, we were all in our homes feeling the desire to work, and a new vision of the collection emerged. We became a human chain, every step of the creative process executed with love. In fact, every decision I make concerning JACQUEMUS is motivated first by love and common sense. It’s why we shifted to a more sustainable rhythm last year, with two shows combining menswear and womenswear, held in January and June. This decision ended up saving us this season, since we had received all our fabric orders ahead of the confinement. Deciding to go ahead with our usual collection schedule and with a show is at the heart of our visual identity, our commercial strategy. With this smaller collection, presented mainly to our family and friends, we bring our interior worlds out into the open, interpreting the humble fabrics and objects we live with that have their own poems to tell. Within the home, L’Amour reveals itself in small wonders. Separate but collectively, we realized that the home is a place of endless inspiration. These impressions are what I wanted to recreate in this setting today, where we have been fully sensitive to the circumstances. My team has put in an enormous effort these last few months, and I am so grateful that we arrived here, that we are gathered together in the end. For me, it is important for people to see that a true celebration of L’Amour is universal."     As JACQUEMUS is committed to developing its production in the most progressive, sensitive and sustainable ways, the SS21 collection will be available for pre-order online, exclusively through Jacquemus.com, the morning after the show. Beyond creating a valuable connection with consumers, this helps ensure that production corresponds more directly to demand, ultimately establishing a positive commercial model for all.     Linen is the fabric of L’Amour: Natural, pure, everlasting, honest. It follows the curves of the body as a sensuous dress; it can be tailored with light construction as a pair of high-waisted pants or a summery suit. Linen represents French heritage, family heirlooms, household articles and, through both men’s and women’s collections, a fresh perspective in design. Linen lends itself to surface treatments, spanning delicate and traditional broderie anglaise and jour echelle (ladder stitching) to a tenderly contemporary array of laser-cut hearts. Appliqués and incrustations include borders of braided raffia or cotton herringbone tape and embroideries in micro-beaded wheat sheaves. Pillows are transformed into tops and bags alike—a cushioned nod to comfort beyond the home.     Silhouettes for women continue to explore and integrate notions of lingerie: twisted bra tops and bustier t-shirts; shirts and jackets featuring wraparound straps and delicate metal adjusters. Pencil skirts signal archetypal femininity. Silhouettes for men broaden out beyond workwear, adapting a more sensual attitude conveyed in the women’s looks. Jackets and shirts move through various lightweight volumes: rounded and rustic, reconstructed with asymmetric focus, loose like a deconstructed pea coat. The palette is warm and earthy, with muted yellow, olive and crisp blue conjuring the tones of faded linens and baked ceramics inspired by Peter Schlesinger’s work.     Prints take cue from kitchen tiles, vegetal motifs on ceramics, torchon (dishcloth) checks and the inky abstract drawings of Joan Miró. Painterly still life scenes—a plate of white asparagus, a strainer filled with cherries – float across men’s shirts in linen and crisp cotton. Patterns inspired by Picasso’s frescoes at the Château de Castille stand out playfully, drawn directly on the fabric.     Objects found around the home are reimagined as whimsical accessories: Miniature cutlery and tools crafted in leather dangle from suits, keychains are accented with tiny tablecloths and cuffs are fashioned from old door handles. Real mini Marseille soaps turn up as charms on necklaces and bracelets. Other jewellery pieces signal handcraft through hammered and bent metal shapes, at once artisanal and artistic. Pillows and plates become portable, carried as a tote or secured in a leather harness. In terms of footwear, women wear sandals that wrap around the ankle and flip-flops on a gentle platform; men, an espadrille- style shoe that conjures the countryside.     The Chiquito finds new expression yet again. Chrome-free vegetal tones of vibrant rose, orange and blue show early signs of natural patina, while linen offers an alternative to leather. The Chiquito Nœud features an extra-long top-handle that can be looped or worn on the shoulder. Triangular prism and cube shapes for women, and a toolbox-style case for men expand upon the recognizable references of JACQUEMUS bags. Lastly, as if the Chiquito couldn’t get any smaller, it now appears as a single earring stud. "As an idea for this collection, L’Amour began as something different. I imagined people gathered together celebrating love. Alexander Ekman’s choreography of wheat tossed passionately through the air. Emir Kursturica’s film, Time of the Gypsieswith its enchanting realism. These scenes of ceremony large and small. But what’s so beautiful about L’Amour is how it can endure—sometimes even grow stronger—in the absence of people being together. Not long after my team was separated from each other, we were all in our homes feeling the desire to work, and a new vision of the collection emerged. We became a human chain, every step of the creative process executed with love. In fact, every decision I make concerning JACQUEMUS is motivated first by love and common sense. It’s why we shifted to a more sustainable rhythm last year, with two shows combining menswear and womenswear, held in January and June. This decision ended up saving us this season, since we had received all our fabric orders ahead of the confinement. Deciding to go ahead with our usual collection schedule and with a show is at the heart of our visual identity, our commercial strategy. With this smaller collection, presented mainly to our family and friends, we bring our interior worlds out into the open, interpreting the humble fabrics and objects we live with that have their own poems to tell. Within the home, L’Amour reveals itself in small wonders. Separate but collectively, we realized that the home is a place of endless inspiration. These impressions are what I wanted to recreate in this setting today, where we have been fully sensitive to the circumstances. My team has put in an enormous effort these last few months, and I am so grateful that we arrived here, that we are gathered together in the end. For me, it is important for people to see that a true celebration of L’Amour is universal."     As JACQUEMUS is committed to developing its production in the most progressive, sensitive and sustainable ways, the SS21 collection will be available for pre-order online, exclusively through Jacquemus.com, the morning after the show. Beyond creating a valuable connection with consumers, this helps ensure that production corresponds more directly to demand, ultimately establishing a positive commercial model for all.     Linen is the fabric of L’Amour: Natural, pure, everlasting, honest. It follows the curves of the body as a sensuous dress; it can be tailored with light construction as a pair of high-waisted pants or a summery suit. Linen represents French heritage, family heirlooms, household articles and, through both men’s and women’s collections, a fresh perspective in design. Linen lends itself to surface treatments, spanning delicate and traditional broderie anglaise and jour echelle (ladder stitching) to a tenderly contemporary array of laser-cut hearts. Appliqués and incrustations include borders of braided raffia or cotton herringbone tape and embroideries in micro-beaded wheat sheaves. Pillows are transformed into tops and bags alike—a cushioned nod to comfort beyond the home.     Silhouettes for women continue to explore and integrate notions of lingerie: twisted bra tops and bustier t-shirts; shirts and jackets featuring wraparound straps and delicate metal adjusters. Pencil skirts signal archetypal femininity. Silhouettes for men broaden out beyond workwear, adapting a more sensual attitude conveyed in the women’s looks. Jackets and shirts move through various lightweight volumes: rounded and rustic, reconstructed with asymmetric focus, loose like a deconstructed pea coat. The palette is warm and earthy, with muted yellow, olive and crisp blue conjuring the tones of faded linens and baked ceramics inspired by Peter Schlesinger’s work.     Prints take cue from kitchen tiles, vegetal motifs on ceramics, torchon (dishcloth) checks and the inky abstract drawings of Joan Miró. Painterly still life scenes—a plate of white asparagus, a strainer filled with cherries – float across men’s shirts in linen and crisp cotton. Patterns inspired by Picasso’s frescoes at the Château de Castille stand out playfully, drawn directly on the fabric.     Objects found around the home are reimagined as whimsical accessories: Miniature cutlery and tools crafted in leather dangle from suits, keychains are accented with tiny tablecloths and cuffs are fashioned from old door handles. Real mini Marseille soaps turn up as charms on necklaces and bracelets. Other jewellery pieces signal handcraft through hammered and bent metal shapes, at once artisanal and artistic. Pillows and plates become portable, carried as a tote or secured in a leather harness. In terms of footwear, women wear sandals that wrap around the ankle and flip-flops on a gentle platform; men, an espadrille- style shoe that conjures the countryside.     The Chiquito finds new expression yet again. Chrome-free vegetal tones of vibrant rose, orange and blue show early signs of natural patina, while linen offers an alternative to leather. The Chiquito Nœud features an extra-long top-handle that can be looped or worn on the shoulder. Triangular prism and cube shapes for women, and a toolbox-style case for men expand upon the recognizable references of JACQUEMUS bags. Lastly, as if the Chiquito couldn’t get any smaller, it now appears as a single earring stud.

GUCCI Epilogue live now
394

GUCCI Epilogue live now

Fashion Week #GucciEpilogue debuts in a narrative feature to commence on Friday, July 17 at 2:00pm CEST on Gucci.com, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Weibo, the Gucci App and on the @cameramoda official channels.   The full event, including a 12-hour live streaming, will be broadcast from 8:00am CEST on Gucci.com, YouTube, Twitter, Weibo and the Gucci App and from 12:00pm on Gucci Facebook.   @alessandro_michele #AlessandroMichele #mfw #MilanoDigitalFashionWeek   You can watch the livestream also on our website.   Watch it live here: https://youtu.be/9jIrysawtO4     #GucciEpilogue debuts in a narrative feature to commence on Friday, July 17 at 2:00pm CEST on Gucci.com, YouTube, Twitter, Instagram, Facebook, Weibo, the Gucci App and on the @cameramoda official channels.   The full event, including a 12-hour live streaming, will be broadcast from 8:00am CEST on Gucci.com, YouTube, Twitter, Weibo and the Gucci App and from 12:00pm on Gucci Facebook.   @alessandro_michele #AlessandroMichele #mfw #MilanoDigitalFashionWeek   You can watch the livestream also on our website.   Watch it live here: https://youtu.be/9jIrysawtO4    

Exclusive Editorial by Max vom Hofe
392

Exclusive Editorial by Max vom Hofe

Fashion Exclusive digital editorial captured by Max vom Hofe.     TEAM CREDITS: photography: Max vom Hofe model: Lou Schoof at Le Management styling: Tim Tobias Zimmermann make-up: Patrick Glatthaar hair by: Helge Henry Branscheidt   Exclusive digital editorial captured by Max vom Hofe.     TEAM CREDITS: photography: Max vom Hofe model: Lou Schoof at Le Management styling: Tim Tobias Zimmermann make-up: Patrick Glatthaar hair by: Helge Henry Branscheidt  

GUCCI TO PRESENT THE EPILOGUE  COLLECTION THROUGH A LIVE STREAMING
393

GUCCI TO PRESENT THE EPILOGUE COLLECTION THROUGH A LIVE STREAMING

Fashion Week Gucci is pleased to announce that Creative Director Alessandro Michele will present his Epilogue collection through a special live streaming and the release of a visual narrative feature.      The event will be broadcast on Friday, July 17, 2020, the last day of the inaugural Milan Digital Fashion Week, on several digital platforms worldwide. The exclusive narrative feature will be shared at 2:00pm CEST during the 12-hour live streaming starting at 8:00am CEST. Tomorrow you can livestream it on our website.     As previously announced, Alessandro Michele wanted to write an Epilogue: a conclusive chapter in the narrative arc that began with his last show “An Unrepeatable Ritual”, when he started celebrating the magic of fashion by unveiling what lies behind the curtains of a beloved liturgy. On July 17th, he is presenting the final act of this path, a further playful experimentation aimed at reversing traditional fashion rules and perspectives.     Casting the team from his design office, the Epilogue will be presented through a unified collection, with the seeds of what will be the near, imminent future. Gucci is pleased to announce that Creative Director Alessandro Michele will present his Epilogue collection through a special live streaming and the release of a visual narrative feature.      The event will be broadcast on Friday, July 17, 2020, the last day of the inaugural Milan Digital Fashion Week, on several digital platforms worldwide. The exclusive narrative feature will be shared at 2:00pm CEST during the 12-hour live streaming starting at 8:00am CEST. Tomorrow you can livestream it on our website.     As previously announced, Alessandro Michele wanted to write an Epilogue: a conclusive chapter in the narrative arc that began with his last show “An Unrepeatable Ritual”, when he started celebrating the magic of fashion by unveiling what lies behind the curtains of a beloved liturgy. On July 17th, he is presenting the final act of this path, a further playful experimentation aimed at reversing traditional fashion rules and perspectives.     Casting the team from his design office, the Epilogue will be presented through a unified collection, with the seeds of what will be the near, imminent future.

PRADA presents Multiple views for their Spring & Summer 2021 collection
392

PRADA presents Multiple views for their Spring & Summer 2021 collection

Fashion Week For Prada Multiple Views SS21, a singular statement is replaced by the perspectives of many: multiple views, by a multitude of global creatives. The collection suggests the approach: different views, for a collection that proposes a myriad interpretations of the Prada man and woman. Congruent yet individually delineated, the collection is proposed in five chapters, which in turn are interpreted by five image-makers and artists. A true conversation.     Terence Nance, Joanna Piotrowska, Martine Syms, Juergen Teller and Willy Vanderperre each propose a film capturing a facet of the Prada collection, distinct and definite in its creative statement and ideology, a point of view on Prada. These inherently and fundamentally echo the traditional fashion show, where each observer has their own physical and ideological vantage-point on the collection, their own opinions, their own observations. It also reflects the reality of this Prada digital presentation: seemingly divergent but again seen by many, this time in their own environments, their own time, their own worlds. This is an embracing and celebration of that multiplicity - when people cannot commune, we can establish a different type of community, united through ideas, goals, beliefs.     Attention is drawn back to clothes - simple clothes, with a use and a value, a longevity and a place within people’s lives. As times become increasingly complex, clothes become straightforward, unostentatious, machines for living and tools for action and activity.     The July 2020 collection focuses on the quintessence of Prada, the meaning. How clothes are worn, where, and why. Often, their meanings are compound and multiplex: simultaneously speaking of sportswear and formality, of classicism and futurism, pieces are paradoxes, situated in multiple worlds - just as their debut here is not only framed by the eye of Prada, but by a panoply of creatives. The silhouette for men is sharp and narrow, fitted, with technologically innovative fabrications of Prada nylon and stretch materials juxtaposed with traditional suiting; for women, the same fabrics are given couture volumes and treatments. Then the reverse: industrial outfits in classic fabrications, leathers, cottons, taffeta, and true sportswear, drawn from Linea Rossa, technically innovative, function dictating form. In simplifying and paring back, a logical conclusion is lingerie: a foundational layer, a vulnerability, a fragility and humanity. Pieces evocative of these clothes in both male and female wardrobes - soft knit, fragile colour, light fabric - are worn as everyday clothing. A coat is clutched over bare skin.     A radicalism is found in purity - simplicity with a complexity, yet an antidote to useless complication in precision and directness. Contradiction is celebrated: in apparent fragility can be found strength, through rigour joy. A sense of lightness not only of physicality but of emotion - the dynamism of sportswear translates throughout, a sense of enjoyment, energy, fun. A reason for fashion. Prada - and fashion - seen with multiple views.     CHAPTER I Willy Vanderperre (b. 1971, Belgium) ‘Prada evolves and changes every season; this season, the part we were shooting and filming felt like an honest collection. Stripped from fashion ideas, which turns that idea into fashion again. It also felt introspective and slightly schizophrenic. A look into the past with the future ahead. I hope that the audience feels that in the movie, a distilled pure and honest presentation of the collection.’     CHAPTER II Juergen Teller (b. 1964, Germany) ‘It was an honour to be asked to photograph and film Miuccia‘s last collection. I thought the men and women looked beautiful, elegant and modern. I enjoyed looking at Miuccia‘s vision and trying to make sense of it as honest and direct as possible.’     CHAPTER III Joanna Piotrowska (b. 1985, Poland) ‘Gesture and physicality are an essential non-verbal form of communication and play a big role in the conceptual and compositional aspects of my work. The finger snap, is a quick and subtle yet attention-demanding action. It is also used to indicate approval or to maintain rhythm. I thought that this short could be an interesting space to work with the snap as a recurring motif that marks the movements and refocuses the viewer’s attention to each new look.’     CHAPTER IV Martine Syms (b. 1988, USA) ‘The video is a collage of multiple formats and features iterative, repetitive movements intercut with beautiful people staring at images of themselves on monitors and screens in Milan and in my studio in Los Angeles. Since the collection pieces have a 60s feeling to them, I tried to include several references to cinema culture and surveillance/sousveillance from that time period to the present. I'm inspired by the way screens have come to make & unmake us, and what it means to be living, breathing, moving fleshy things in a world full of them.’     CHAPTER V Terence Nance (b. 1982, USA) ‘The film that came through was born of speed and play, I have no words through which to decode what the meaning is and was and will be but it may be about ‘time’ - and keeping your organs in that vessel we call a body while it contorts itself to love each second as it goes bye bye.’     #PradaSS21 #PradaMultipleViews For Prada Multiple Views SS21, a singular statement is replaced by the perspectives of many: multiple views, by a multitude of global creatives. The collection suggests the approach: different views, for a collection that proposes a myriad interpretations of the Prada man and woman. Congruent yet individually delineated, the collection is proposed in five chapters, which in turn are interpreted by five image-makers and artists. A true conversation.     Terence Nance, Joanna Piotrowska, Martine Syms, Juergen Teller and Willy Vanderperre each propose a film capturing a facet of the Prada collection, distinct and definite in its creative statement and ideology, a point of view on Prada. These inherently and fundamentally echo the traditional fashion show, where each observer has their own physical and ideological vantage-point on the collection, their own opinions, their own observations. It also reflects the reality of this Prada digital presentation: seemingly divergent but again seen by many, this time in their own environments, their own time, their own worlds. This is an embracing and celebration of that multiplicity - when people cannot commune, we can establish a different type of community, united through ideas, goals, beliefs.     Attention is drawn back to clothes - simple clothes, with a use and a value, a longevity and a place within people’s lives. As times become increasingly complex, clothes become straightforward, unostentatious, machines for living and tools for action and activity.     The July 2020 collection focuses on the quintessence of Prada, the meaning. How clothes are worn, where, and why. Often, their meanings are compound and multiplex: simultaneously speaking of sportswear and formality, of classicism and futurism, pieces are paradoxes, situated in multiple worlds - just as their debut here is not only framed by the eye of Prada, but by a panoply of creatives. The silhouette for men is sharp and narrow, fitted, with technologically innovative fabrications of Prada nylon and stretch materials juxtaposed with traditional suiting; for women, the same fabrics are given couture volumes and treatments. Then the reverse: industrial outfits in classic fabrications, leathers, cottons, taffeta, and true sportswear, drawn from Linea Rossa, technically innovative, function dictating form. In simplifying and paring back, a logical conclusion is lingerie: a foundational layer, a vulnerability, a fragility and humanity. Pieces evocative of these clothes in both male and female wardrobes - soft knit, fragile colour, light fabric - are worn as everyday clothing. A coat is clutched over bare skin.     A radicalism is found in purity - simplicity with a complexity, yet an antidote to useless complication in precision and directness. Contradiction is celebrated: in apparent fragility can be found strength, through rigour joy. A sense of lightness not only of physicality but of emotion - the dynamism of sportswear translates throughout, a sense of enjoyment, energy, fun. A reason for fashion. Prada - and fashion - seen with multiple views.     CHAPTER I Willy Vanderperre (b. 1971, Belgium) ‘Prada evolves and changes every season; this season, the part we were shooting and filming felt like an honest collection. Stripped from fashion ideas, which turns that idea into fashion again. It also felt introspective and slightly schizophrenic. A look into the past with the future ahead. I hope that the audience feels that in the movie, a distilled pure and honest presentation of the collection.’     CHAPTER II Juergen Teller (b. 1964, Germany) ‘It was an honour to be asked to photograph and film Miuccia‘s last collection. I thought the men and women looked beautiful, elegant and modern. I enjoyed looking at Miuccia‘s vision and trying to make sense of it as honest and direct as possible.’     CHAPTER III Joanna Piotrowska (b. 1985, Poland) ‘Gesture and physicality are an essential non-verbal form of communication and play a big role in the conceptual and compositional aspects of my work. The finger snap, is a quick and subtle yet attention-demanding action. It is also used to indicate approval or to maintain rhythm. I thought that this short could be an interesting space to work with the snap as a recurring motif that marks the movements and refocuses the viewer’s attention to each new look.’     CHAPTER IV Martine Syms (b. 1988, USA) ‘The video is a collage of multiple formats and features iterative, repetitive movements intercut with beautiful people staring at images of themselves on monitors and screens in Milan and in my studio in Los Angeles. Since the collection pieces have a 60s feeling to them, I tried to include several references to cinema culture and surveillance/sousveillance from that time period to the present. I'm inspired by the way screens have come to make & unmake us, and what it means to be living, breathing, moving fleshy things in a world full of them.’     CHAPTER V Terence Nance (b. 1982, USA) ‘The film that came through was born of speed and play, I have no words through which to decode what the meaning is and was and will be but it may be about ‘time’ - and keeping your organs in that vessel we call a body while it contorts itself to love each second as it goes bye bye.’     #PradaSS21 #PradaMultipleViews

DIOR PRESENTS THE MEN’S SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION AND THE ARTISTIC COLLABORATION WITH AMOAKO BOAFO
390

DIOR PRESENTS THE MEN’S SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION AND THE ARTISTIC COLLABORATION WITH AMOAKO BOAFO

Fashion Week THERE IS THE WESTERN WORLD’S PERCEPTION OF AFRICA AND THEN THERE IS ACTUALLY THE REAL AFRICA. THE AFRICA YOU COME FROM OR HAVE REGULARLY VISITED. KIM JONES AND AMOAKO BOAFO REPRESENT BOTH. BOAFO, A PAINTER BORN IN ACCRA, GHANA; JONES, BORN IN LONDON WITH A CHILDHOOD SPENT IN ETHIOPIA, BOTSWANA, KENYA, TANZANIA AND VARIOUS OTHER PLACES IN AFRICA, INCLUDING BOAFO’S NATIVE GHANA. A HOME I IMAGINE HE WAS REMINDED OF WHEN HE CAME ACROSS AMOAKO’S ART IN 2019 AT THE RUBELL MUSEUM IN MIAMI WHERE HE WAS A RESIDENT ARTIST. AMOAKO’S ART DROWNS THE VIEWER IN THE SHIMMERING LIGHT OF THE BLACK GAZE, WHICH WE SO RARELY SEE IN FASHION OR THE ART WORLD. EACH OF HIS SUBJECTS CELEBRATES BLACK LIFE, BLACK SKIN SHROUDED IN EXUBERANT COLORS SPLAYED ACROSS HIS CANVASES. COMBINING HIS TOOLS WITH AMOAKO’S, KIM BRINGS TO LIFE A WARDROBE INTENDED FOR THE PAINTER’S SUBJECTS. PULLING THESE BEAUTIFUL CHARACTERS OFF THE MUSEUM’S AND COLLECTORS’ WALLS WHERE THESE WORKS NORMALLY DWELL AND BRINGING THEM TO A SPACE WHERE AFRICAN CULTURE IS AT TIMES REFERENCED BUT RARELY FULLY ACKNOWLEDGED IS WHERE KIM’S TALENT AS A DESIGNER EXTENDS BEYOND JUST A GARMENT AND ASCENDS TO WHERE ALL ARTISTS ASPIRE TO GO... TO THE HEART OF A STORY, AND THE MOST POWERFUL STORY IS A STORY RARELY TOLD.     A CORNUCOPIA OF STRIPES, FLORALS AND NEONS. THE COLORS, CUTS, PROPORTIONS, PARING, AND LAYERING OF THE GARMENTS ARE ALL ARTFULLY MANIPULATED BY THE BLACK GAZE OF AMOAKO’S PAINTINGS. KIM DOESN’T HIDE HIS HAND, WHICH GUIDES THIS COLLECTION PURPOSELY, BECAUSE THE HAND IS AFRICA, AND THROUGH THAT, EDUCATION IS GAINED, A STORY IS TOLD AND A PAINTER AND HIS SUBJECTS ARE CELEBRATED IN THE CONTEXT OF A DIOR COLLECTION THAT SHOWS ANOTHER CHAMBER OF KIM’S VAST INFLUENCES AND HIS ABILITY TO HARNESS THE CULTURES HE HAS EXPERIENCED IN HIS LIFETIME. THIS ISN’T JUST A COLLECTION; THIS A SYMBIOTIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TWO ARTISTS THAT GIVES BIRTH TO A COLLECTION OF CLOTHING THAT IS MORE THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS. TWO MEN WHO LOVE AFRICA AND ITS PEOPLE, TELLING THEIR STORIES IN SPACES THESE SUBJECTS RARELY GET TO GRACE, AND IN THAT LIES THE POINT OF ALL THIS. THERE IS THE WESTERN WORLD’S PERCEPTION OF AFRICA AND THEN THERE IS ACTUALLY THE REAL AFRICA. THE AFRICA YOU COME FROM OR HAVE REGULARLY VISITED. KIM JONES AND AMOAKO BOAFO REPRESENT BOTH. BOAFO, A PAINTER BORN IN ACCRA, GHANA; JONES, BORN IN LONDON WITH A CHILDHOOD SPENT IN ETHIOPIA, BOTSWANA, KENYA, TANZANIA AND VARIOUS OTHER PLACES IN AFRICA, INCLUDING BOAFO’S NATIVE GHANA. A HOME I IMAGINE HE WAS REMINDED OF WHEN HE CAME ACROSS AMOAKO’S ART IN 2019 AT THE RUBELL MUSEUM IN MIAMI WHERE HE WAS A RESIDENT ARTIST. AMOAKO’S ART DROWNS THE VIEWER IN THE SHIMMERING LIGHT OF THE BLACK GAZE, WHICH WE SO RARELY SEE IN FASHION OR THE ART WORLD. EACH OF HIS SUBJECTS CELEBRATES BLACK LIFE, BLACK SKIN SHROUDED IN EXUBERANT COLORS SPLAYED ACROSS HIS CANVASES. COMBINING HIS TOOLS WITH AMOAKO’S, KIM BRINGS TO LIFE A WARDROBE INTENDED FOR THE PAINTER’S SUBJECTS. PULLING THESE BEAUTIFUL CHARACTERS OFF THE MUSEUM’S AND COLLECTORS’ WALLS WHERE THESE WORKS NORMALLY DWELL AND BRINGING THEM TO A SPACE WHERE AFRICAN CULTURE IS AT TIMES REFERENCED BUT RARELY FULLY ACKNOWLEDGED IS WHERE KIM’S TALENT AS A DESIGNER EXTENDS BEYOND JUST A GARMENT AND ASCENDS TO WHERE ALL ARTISTS ASPIRE TO GO... TO THE HEART OF A STORY, AND THE MOST POWERFUL STORY IS A STORY RARELY TOLD.     A CORNUCOPIA OF STRIPES, FLORALS AND NEONS. THE COLORS, CUTS, PROPORTIONS, PARING, AND LAYERING OF THE GARMENTS ARE ALL ARTFULLY MANIPULATED BY THE BLACK GAZE OF AMOAKO’S PAINTINGS. KIM DOESN’T HIDE HIS HAND, WHICH GUIDES THIS COLLECTION PURPOSELY, BECAUSE THE HAND IS AFRICA, AND THROUGH THAT, EDUCATION IS GAINED, A STORY IS TOLD AND A PAINTER AND HIS SUBJECTS ARE CELEBRATED IN THE CONTEXT OF A DIOR COLLECTION THAT SHOWS ANOTHER CHAMBER OF KIM’S VAST INFLUENCES AND HIS ABILITY TO HARNESS THE CULTURES HE HAS EXPERIENCED IN HIS LIFETIME. THIS ISN’T JUST A COLLECTION; THIS A SYMBIOTIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TWO ARTISTS THAT GIVES BIRTH TO A COLLECTION OF CLOTHING THAT IS MORE THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS. TWO MEN WHO LOVE AFRICA AND ITS PEOPLE, TELLING THEIR STORIES IN SPACES THESE SUBJECTS RARELY GET TO GRACE, AND IN THAT LIES THE POINT OF ALL THIS.

Isabel Marant Spring Summer 2021 Men’s Collection
389

Isabel Marant Spring Summer 2021 Men’s Collection

Fashion Week This summer, the Isabel Marant man escapes from Paris to Pantin. Along the Canal de l’Ourcq, the concrete passagewaysof the CN D echo both the raw energy of the look and the frank geometry of the eece pieces.     Flexibility and freedom come from dancing. This cloakroom of everyday life lives in motion. The long coats’ sleeves as well as those of the shirts and knitwear roll up, revealing the wrists. Multicoloured nylon jackets are tied at the waist, indicating a signature form of irreverence.     Naturally, one print matches another as if they were made for each other. The sportswear codes are mixing with those of ikat pieces which look as though they had been brought back from a trip. On a pastel weave, the bright colours take the wardrobe to the sunny beaches.     He’s there behind the tinted lenses of the rst Isabel Marant sunglasses.     Photo Credits: Photographe : Marton Perlaki Models : Alpha Dia & Braien Vaiksaar Place : Centre National de la Danse à Pantin This summer, the Isabel Marant man escapes from Paris to Pantin. Along the Canal de l’Ourcq, the concrete passagewaysof the CN D echo both the raw energy of the look and the frank geometry of the eece pieces.     Flexibility and freedom come from dancing. This cloakroom of everyday life lives in motion. The long coats’ sleeves as well as those of the shirts and knitwear roll up, revealing the wrists. Multicoloured nylon jackets are tied at the waist, indicating a signature form of irreverence.     Naturally, one print matches another as if they were made for each other. The sportswear codes are mixing with those of ikat pieces which look as though they had been brought back from a trip. On a pastel weave, the bright colours take the wardrobe to the sunny beaches.     He’s there behind the tinted lenses of the rst Isabel Marant sunglasses.     Photo Credits: Photographe : Marton Perlaki Models : Alpha Dia & Braien Vaiksaar Place : Centre National de la Danse à Pantin

Exclusive Editorial in collaboration with CELINE by Jasper Rens van Es
388

Exclusive Editorial in collaboration with CELINE by Jasper Rens van Es

Men  Exclusive editorial inspired by hustlers in the 70's, this Numéro x Celine by Hedi Slimane special is shot exclusively for Numéro online in the iconic Soho House Amsterdam.     TEAM CREDITS: All fashion: Celine by Hedi Slimane Photography Jasper Rens van Es Styling & Creative Direction Gino Gurrieri Casting Timotej Letonja Hair & Make-up Wout Philippo Asisstant make-up artist: Mahis Chaitoe Models Masao Dae Parris via Riches MGMT and Nika Jovanovic via The Troopers Special thanks Soho House Amsterdam and Xavier  Exclusive editorial inspired by hustlers in the 70's, this Numéro x Celine by Hedi Slimane special is shot exclusively for Numéro online in the iconic Soho House Amsterdam.     TEAM CREDITS: All fashion: Celine by Hedi Slimane Photography Jasper Rens van Es Styling & Creative Direction Gino Gurrieri Casting Timotej Letonja Hair & Make-up Wout Philippo Asisstant make-up artist: Mahis Chaitoe Models Masao Dae Parris via Riches MGMT and Nika Jovanovic via The Troopers Special thanks Soho House Amsterdam and Xavier

loading
More articles