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Max Mara releases the Whitney bag
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Max Mara releases the Whitney bag

Accessories To reinvent oneself. To continually renew the message. This is the goal of every artist and every museum. A case in point is the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, founded in 1930 by the sculptor and art patron Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. A museum that emerged in 2015 as one of the cultural epicenters of downtown New York when it moved into the futuristic Renzo Piano designed building that faces the High Line at 99 Gansevoort Street and is now celebrating its 5th anniversary.   It just happens to be the anniversary shared by another notable icon, the Whitney Bag, created by Max Mara in collaboration with the Renzo Piano Building Workshop to celebrate the opening of the Whitney Museum of American Art. Crafted in soft, quality leather, the hallmark of the “Whitney Bag” – as indeed the architectural structure of the building – is its elegant surface, featuring distinctive ribbing that gradually becomes fine lines, directly recalling the steel tie- beamed exterior of the new Whitney Museum. These graphic lines are created using traditional leather craft with innovative industrial techniques. Brass plates are used to mold the strips of leather that are then topstitched together to construct the pattern on the bag. In describing the Whitney Bag, all metal detailing is based on the observation of the structural metal components of the architectural project by the Renzo Piano Building Workshop. The façade of the building is used as inspiration for the buckles, while the inside pocket and the unmistakable snap hook act as a signature feature of the bag.   “The Whitney bag has been designed to be timeless, and after five years it still represents a modern, elegant and simple way to design, where details and craftsmanship really matter.” Elisabetta Trezzani, partner RPBW.   To celebrate its 5th anniversary, the cult bag has been revived in a special edition version dedicated to the American painter Florine Stettheimer who boasts an important presence at the Whitney. A feminist and activist ante-litteram (1871-1944), Stettheimer’s work “Sun”, created in 1931, inspired the bag’s five new color variants and the design of the floral printed lining. Indeed an anniversary issue, or better yet five, to collect like works of art.   Florine Stettheimer (1871 – 1944) was a pioneer of modern art. A native New Yorker, Stettheimer embraced New York City’s emergent modern art community where she established herself as a painter, poet and theatrical designer. An early feminist, Stettheimer is credited with painting the first female nude self-portrait. She received widespread acclaim for her costume and set designs, notably for Gertrude Stein and Virgil Thomson’s opera, “Four Saints in Three Acts”. Stettheimer’s avant-garde painting style often focused on societal quirks with her family and friends as the subjects. Her work has been showcased in more than 40 international exhibitions.   The Whitney Museum of American Art, founded in 1930 by the artist and philanthropist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875– 1942), houses the foremost collection of American art from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Mrs. Whitney, an early and ardent supporter of modern American art, nurtured groundbreaking artists at a time when audiences were still largely preoccupied with the Old Masters. From her vision arose the Whitney Museum of American Art, which has been championing the most innovative art of the United States for more than eighty years. The core of the Whitney’s mission is to collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit American art of our time and serve a wide variety of audiences in celebration of the complexity and diversity of art and culture in the United States. Through this mission and a steadfast commitment to artists themselves, the Whitney has long been a powerful force in support of modern and contemporary art and continues to help define what is innovative and influential in American art today.   To reinvent oneself. To continually renew the message. This is the goal of every artist and every museum. A case in point is the Whitney Museum of American Art in New York, founded in 1930 by the sculptor and art patron Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney. A museum that emerged in 2015 as one of the cultural epicenters of downtown New York when it moved into the futuristic Renzo Piano designed building that faces the High Line at 99 Gansevoort Street and is now celebrating its 5th anniversary.   It just happens to be the anniversary shared by another notable icon, the Whitney Bag, created by Max Mara in collaboration with the Renzo Piano Building Workshop to celebrate the opening of the Whitney Museum of American Art. Crafted in soft, quality leather, the hallmark of the “Whitney Bag” – as indeed the architectural structure of the building – is its elegant surface, featuring distinctive ribbing that gradually becomes fine lines, directly recalling the steel tie- beamed exterior of the new Whitney Museum. These graphic lines are created using traditional leather craft with innovative industrial techniques. Brass plates are used to mold the strips of leather that are then topstitched together to construct the pattern on the bag. In describing the Whitney Bag, all metal detailing is based on the observation of the structural metal components of the architectural project by the Renzo Piano Building Workshop. The façade of the building is used as inspiration for the buckles, while the inside pocket and the unmistakable snap hook act as a signature feature of the bag.   “The Whitney bag has been designed to be timeless, and after five years it still represents a modern, elegant and simple way to design, where details and craftsmanship really matter.” Elisabetta Trezzani, partner RPBW.   To celebrate its 5th anniversary, the cult bag has been revived in a special edition version dedicated to the American painter Florine Stettheimer who boasts an important presence at the Whitney. A feminist and activist ante-litteram (1871-1944), Stettheimer’s work “Sun”, created in 1931, inspired the bag’s five new color variants and the design of the floral printed lining. Indeed an anniversary issue, or better yet five, to collect like works of art.   Florine Stettheimer (1871 – 1944) was a pioneer of modern art. A native New Yorker, Stettheimer embraced New York City’s emergent modern art community where she established herself as a painter, poet and theatrical designer. An early feminist, Stettheimer is credited with painting the first female nude self-portrait. She received widespread acclaim for her costume and set designs, notably for Gertrude Stein and Virgil Thomson’s opera, “Four Saints in Three Acts”. Stettheimer’s avant-garde painting style often focused on societal quirks with her family and friends as the subjects. Her work has been showcased in more than 40 international exhibitions.   The Whitney Museum of American Art, founded in 1930 by the artist and philanthropist Gertrude Vanderbilt Whitney (1875– 1942), houses the foremost collection of American art from the twentieth and twenty-first centuries. Mrs. Whitney, an early and ardent supporter of modern American art, nurtured groundbreaking artists at a time when audiences were still largely preoccupied with the Old Masters. From her vision arose the Whitney Museum of American Art, which has been championing the most innovative art of the United States for more than eighty years. The core of the Whitney’s mission is to collect, preserve, interpret, and exhibit American art of our time and serve a wide variety of audiences in celebration of the complexity and diversity of art and culture in the United States. Through this mission and a steadfast commitment to artists themselves, the Whitney has long been a powerful force in support of modern and contemporary art and continues to help define what is innovative and influential in American art today.  

DIOR for Fall & Winter 2020-2021
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DIOR for Fall & Winter 2020-2021

Fashion Week “It doesn’t matter where we start from1...” Carla Lonzi, Autoritratto, 1969. Autobiography, self-portrait, story. Associating places, images, words. Freely, with fresh eyes. For this fall-winter 2020- 2021 ready-to-wear collection, Maria Grazia Chiuri maps out an atlas of emotions through the prism of her teenage diary. Two photos of her mother transport her back to this time in her life, a laboratory brimming with possibilities of what the future may hold. Images reappear, including photos of actresses who served as inspiration for clients of her mother’s couture atelier, as well as for the Creative Director herself, who used fashion as a way of asserting herself, of rebelling, and communicating to others how she wanted to be perceived. Next came other photos from the past that she revisits with her vision today: Germana Marucelli’s studio in Milan, designed by artist Paolo Scheggi; that of Mila Schön by Ugo Mulas and, lastly, portraits of Carla Accardi. This arborescent diagram inspired Maria Grazia Chiuri’s very own The Little Dictionary of Fashion2, with jeans, as well as the checks that Monsieur Dior was so fond of. “I love checks. They can be fancy and simple; elegant and easy; young and always right3.” Checks resurface on an ensemble designed by Marc Bohan: it’s this outfit, with the motif placed on the bias, that inspired the structure of the collection’s skirts. There’s also the pea coat and pleated skirts. Little collars with ties. Black and white. All this is at the heart of a perfectly balanced collection. A polka dot scarf found in the Dior archives serves as the starting point for a series of dresses in various lengths that explore the print’s infinite possibilities. As Christian Dior writes in his The Little Dictionary of Fashion: “I would say the same about dots as about checks. They are lovely, elegant, easy and always in fashion.3” Not to mention fringes, which provide mobile ornamentation on long skirts. Knitwear spans all the wardrobe essentials: sweaters, jackets, skirts, and pants. The show venue was designed in collaboration with the Claire Fontaine collective, which has exhibited at the National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art in Rome. The museum is also home to the archives of Carla Lonzi, a charismatic figure who was an art critic before committing to the feminist cause. “Io Dico Io – I Say I4”, the title of an upcoming exhibition dedicated to Italian women artists, supported by Dior, becomes the starting point for a series of manifesto-like phrases. Evoking these words in English – “I Say I” – right at the show’s entrance brings to life a story of powerful self-assertion. They are the symbol of a joyful singularity, as well as a creative and collective way of approaching the multiple aspects of feminine subjectivity — and the infinite project that femininity represents.   “It doesn’t matter where we start from1...” Carla Lonzi, Autoritratto, 1969. Autobiography, self-portrait, story. Associating places, images, words. Freely, with fresh eyes. For this fall-winter 2020- 2021 ready-to-wear collection, Maria Grazia Chiuri maps out an atlas of emotions through the prism of her teenage diary. Two photos of her mother transport her back to this time in her life, a laboratory brimming with possibilities of what the future may hold. Images reappear, including photos of actresses who served as inspiration for clients of her mother’s couture atelier, as well as for the Creative Director herself, who used fashion as a way of asserting herself, of rebelling, and communicating to others how she wanted to be perceived. Next came other photos from the past that she revisits with her vision today: Germana Marucelli’s studio in Milan, designed by artist Paolo Scheggi; that of Mila Schön by Ugo Mulas and, lastly, portraits of Carla Accardi. This arborescent diagram inspired Maria Grazia Chiuri’s very own The Little Dictionary of Fashion2, with jeans, as well as the checks that Monsieur Dior was so fond of. “I love checks. They can be fancy and simple; elegant and easy; young and always right3.” Checks resurface on an ensemble designed by Marc Bohan: it’s this outfit, with the motif placed on the bias, that inspired the structure of the collection’s skirts. There’s also the pea coat and pleated skirts. Little collars with ties. Black and white. All this is at the heart of a perfectly balanced collection. A polka dot scarf found in the Dior archives serves as the starting point for a series of dresses in various lengths that explore the print’s infinite possibilities. As Christian Dior writes in his The Little Dictionary of Fashion: “I would say the same about dots as about checks. They are lovely, elegant, easy and always in fashion.3” Not to mention fringes, which provide mobile ornamentation on long skirts. Knitwear spans all the wardrobe essentials: sweaters, jackets, skirts, and pants. The show venue was designed in collaboration with the Claire Fontaine collective, which has exhibited at the National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art in Rome. The museum is also home to the archives of Carla Lonzi, a charismatic figure who was an art critic before committing to the feminist cause. “Io Dico Io – I Say I4”, the title of an upcoming exhibition dedicated to Italian women artists, supported by Dior, becomes the starting point for a series of manifesto-like phrases. Evoking these words in English – “I Say I” – right at the show’s entrance brings to life a story of powerful self-assertion. They are the symbol of a joyful singularity, as well as a creative and collective way of approaching the multiple aspects of feminine subjectivity — and the infinite project that femininity represents.  

Ninamounah's Collection 005
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Ninamounah's Collection 005

Fashion Week Ninamounah is an Amsterdam-based label headed by creative director and designer Ninamounah Langestraat and brand director Robin Burggraaf, using biological methods to dissect the deeper layers of the cultural mantle found in fashion design. Emphasizing instinctive and experimental strengths that transcend bodily and mental conventions and constructs. Ninamounah is making the unusual usual—transgressing comfort zones in fashion and exploring humans animalistic side.   The second act of Ninamounah's fifth collection continues to transfigure the concept of Metamorphosis following previous conceptual explorations of the intersection between biology and fashion design. Bypassing evolution by synthesizing traits of our animal ancestors and our techno-future. Instinct lead the way, forced by a collective memory between all species.   Meta·​mor·​pho·​sis: a morphological mutation, a time of dramatic change in form and appearance, affecting the core of one's being. After the completed metamorphosis the transformation becomes visible. From larva to cocoon, the organism finally enters its final stage. A time of sexual maturity.   Shapes and proportions carry both robust stillness and fluid movement, like metamorphosing lobster. Adapting to its surroundings, our muse represents an infinite of possibilities. Motor references are visible in office wear, a shirt transforms into a high cut bodysuit. Draped looks are liquified into momentous designs.   Traditional shirting and tailoring comes with an exoskeleton of boning, creating dominant silhouettes and strong shoulders. A layered suit and a sleeveless puffer coat reference a protective shell still in the process of growth. Capturing a freedom of spirit, stereotypical staples are reinterpreted with a luxurious punk attitude. A matching shirt and tie combo paired with a hybrid of a pleated skirt and tailored trousers.   A disfigurement of the artisanal tradition. Pinstripe blues and blacks, herringbone browns and green and grey checks come in pure virgin wool and luxurious silks. Reinterpretations of the label's key pieces, the garments are a natural extension of their archival counterparts. Ninamounah does not aim to reinvent itself drastically every new season, but chooses to slowly grow with time, opting to perfect and reinterpret its own core pieces.   A hybrid of past and future.   PRODUCTION Made in Amsterdam, Ninamounah is committed to have a positive impact on its production chain. Working closely with local ateliers, they are perfectly equipped to ensure the integrity of both the garments and the teams producing them.    Deadstock garments are heavily reworked and re-tailored into sensual and subversive shapes. By embracing the method of recycling and using materials with a specific user's history for our designs, Ninamounah synthesizes traces of a forlorn past with future realities while pushing fashion into aa sustainable practice.    Tailoring grows the body strong, motor garments keep the spirit restless   ARTIST COLLABORATION STEF VAN LOOVEREN Stef Van Looveren (1992) is an Antwerp based multidisciplinary genderfluid artist. They studied Fine Arts at Central Saint Martins, London and Sint Lucas, Antwerp.   Stef Van Looveren's practice translates itself into video installation, photo, sculpture and performance. Van Looveren uses the installations as an attempt to reflect and dismantle the performativity of our human behaviour, primarily within the notion of gender. Playfully mimicking our social conducts along with visual culture, their work moves towards a surreal gesture.   His DPA Bags are modelled on genitalia and are moulded on a diverse range of body types in order to be as inclusive as possible. The bags support their vision that 'sex' should be seen as an interchangeable, wearable accessory, something that the wearer can play around with. Celebrating the distinction between 'sex' and 'gender'. Ninamounah is an Amsterdam-based label headed by creative director and designer Ninamounah Langestraat and brand director Robin Burggraaf, using biological methods to dissect the deeper layers of the cultural mantle found in fashion design. Emphasizing instinctive and experimental strengths that transcend bodily and mental conventions and constructs. Ninamounah is making the unusual usual—transgressing comfort zones in fashion and exploring humans animalistic side.   The second act of Ninamounah's fifth collection continues to transfigure the concept of Metamorphosis following previous conceptual explorations of the intersection between biology and fashion design. Bypassing evolution by synthesizing traits of our animal ancestors and our techno-future. Instinct lead the way, forced by a collective memory between all species.   Meta·​mor·​pho·​sis: a morphological mutation, a time of dramatic change in form and appearance, affecting the core of one's being. After the completed metamorphosis the transformation becomes visible. From larva to cocoon, the organism finally enters its final stage. A time of sexual maturity.   Shapes and proportions carry both robust stillness and fluid movement, like metamorphosing lobster. Adapting to its surroundings, our muse represents an infinite of possibilities. Motor references are visible in office wear, a shirt transforms into a high cut bodysuit. Draped looks are liquified into momentous designs.   Traditional shirting and tailoring comes with an exoskeleton of boning, creating dominant silhouettes and strong shoulders. A layered suit and a sleeveless puffer coat reference a protective shell still in the process of growth. Capturing a freedom of spirit, stereotypical staples are reinterpreted with a luxurious punk attitude. A matching shirt and tie combo paired with a hybrid of a pleated skirt and tailored trousers.   A disfigurement of the artisanal tradition. Pinstripe blues and blacks, herringbone browns and green and grey checks come in pure virgin wool and luxurious silks. Reinterpretations of the label's key pieces, the garments are a natural extension of their archival counterparts. Ninamounah does not aim to reinvent itself drastically every new season, but chooses to slowly grow with time, opting to perfect and reinterpret its own core pieces.   A hybrid of past and future.   PRODUCTION Made in Amsterdam, Ninamounah is committed to have a positive impact on its production chain. Working closely with local ateliers, they are perfectly equipped to ensure the integrity of both the garments and the teams producing them.    Deadstock garments are heavily reworked and re-tailored into sensual and subversive shapes. By embracing the method of recycling and using materials with a specific user's history for our designs, Ninamounah synthesizes traces of a forlorn past with future realities while pushing fashion into aa sustainable practice.    Tailoring grows the body strong, motor garments keep the spirit restless   ARTIST COLLABORATION STEF VAN LOOVEREN Stef Van Looveren (1992) is an Antwerp based multidisciplinary genderfluid artist. They studied Fine Arts at Central Saint Martins, London and Sint Lucas, Antwerp.   Stef Van Looveren's practice translates itself into video installation, photo, sculpture and performance. Van Looveren uses the installations as an attempt to reflect and dismantle the performativity of our human behaviour, primarily within the notion of gender. Playfully mimicking our social conducts along with visual culture, their work moves towards a surreal gesture.   His DPA Bags are modelled on genitalia and are moulded on a diverse range of body types in order to be as inclusive as possible. The bags support their vision that 'sex' should be seen as an interchangeable, wearable accessory, something that the wearer can play around with. Celebrating the distinction between 'sex' and 'gender'.

Advertising
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Japan
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Japan

Travel Exclusive images of Japan, photographed by Ashley Soong. Exclusive images of Japan, photographed by Ashley Soong.

Beyond Sensation
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Beyond Sensation

Music Dance-lovers can indulge themselves! Legendary promoters ID&T stir millions of memories this week as they announce that on Saturday night July 4th 2020, they will bring a brand new show to the Johan Cruijff ArenA: Beyond Sensation. Inspired by the most groundbreaking dance concepts of the organization, ID&T is taking the next step with Beyond Sensation. It will be a premium dance experience that focuses even more on live entertainment, show and spectacular production. Beyond Sensation marks the start of a new chapter for ID&T and will be the prologue of something even bigger. On the 4th of July, the creators of Sensation will give a preview of how they envision the future of live entertainment. Organizer Eric Keijer: “When we started the Sensation adventure in 2000, we had no idea it would become that big. In 2017 we stopped at our peak because we felt it was time for something new. With Beyond Sensation we’re going to take the first step in that direction.” Register now on the website to be the first to get your tickets in February & March. Hotel packages are available from December 16th. More information and details about the event can be found at Sensation. Dance-lovers can indulge themselves! Legendary promoters ID&T stir millions of memories this week as they announce that on Saturday night July 4th 2020, they will bring a brand new show to the Johan Cruijff ArenA: Beyond Sensation. Inspired by the most groundbreaking dance concepts of the organization, ID&T is taking the next step with Beyond Sensation. It will be a premium dance experience that focuses even more on live entertainment, show and spectacular production. Beyond Sensation marks the start of a new chapter for ID&T and will be the prologue of something even bigger. On the 4th of July, the creators of Sensation will give a preview of how they envision the future of live entertainment. Organizer Eric Keijer: “When we started the Sensation adventure in 2000, we had no idea it would become that big. In 2017 we stopped at our peak because we felt it was time for something new. With Beyond Sensation we’re going to take the first step in that direction.” Register now on the website to be the first to get your tickets in February & March. Hotel packages are available from December 16th. More information and details about the event can be found at Sensation.

The Stedelijk presents The Future is Now by Nam June Paik
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The Stedelijk presents The Future is Now by Nam June Paik

Art The Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam presents The Future is Now, a major exhibition of the work of artist Nam June Paik, which opens on 14 March. Paik’s multidisciplinary, radical, innovative and playful work continues to inspire a new generation of artists. He was one of the pioneers of contemporary video art and predicted the power of mass media to shape our lives. Fanning out over 16 rooms, the survey is the biggest and most ambitious retrospective in years.   Born in South Korea, Nam June Paik (1932-2006) grew up in Japan, studied music in Germany and collaborated in Fluxus, an international network of avant-garde artists. Paik introduced the term ‘electronic superhighway’ to foretell the future of communication in an internet age. The artist erased the boundaries between art and technology, between East and West, and investigated technology’s impact on globalization and everyday life.   The Stedelijk’s relationship with Nam June Paik dates back to 1977 when the museum mounted his first major show in the Netherlands. In 1984 Paik also took part in The Luminous Image, an ambitious survey of contemporary video art. The Stedelijk not only championed the new discipline by giving it a platform, but also purchased video art, including that of Paik, for its collection—one of the first museums to do so. An iconic installation from the Stedelijk collection is TV-Buddha (1974), in which an 18th-century wooden Buddha appears to ‘watch’ itself on a modern television, and typifies the influence of (Zen) Buddhist philosophies on Paik’s approach to art and technology. Curator Leontine Coelewij: The work of Nam June Paik stimulates the viewer’s senses through a multisensory sound and image experience. Paik was one of the first video artists. He began testing the boundaries of television as a medium as early as the 1970s and explored its role as a transcendent mode of communication able to connect the world's population at the touch of a button. With social media and online video platforms we’re living in the world that Paik foretold, which makes this exhibition more topical than ever. The Future is Now takes a definitive look at the artist’s interdisciplinary oeuvre: video, sculpture, music, dance and performance. And features two spectacular room-filling installations: TV Garden of 1974-77, where television sets seem to flourish among abundant foliage, and Sistine Chapel of 1993, the iconic culmination of the exhibition in the IMC Hall of Honour, a mesmerising riot of images from 34 projectors, for which Paik received the prestigious Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale in 1993. The exhibition also highlights his collaborations with other artists such as composer John Cage, choreographer Merce Cunningham, cellist Charlotte Moorman and artist Joseph Beuys. Additionally, Paik strongly emphasised the interactive qualities of art, and the exhibition also includes art works in which visitors can participate by physically interacting with the work. The exhibition will tour to five international venues; Tate Modern, London, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and National Gallery Singapore. The Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam presents The Future is Now, a major exhibition of the work of artist Nam June Paik, which opens on 14 March. Paik’s multidisciplinary, radical, innovative and playful work continues to inspire a new generation of artists. He was one of the pioneers of contemporary video art and predicted the power of mass media to shape our lives. Fanning out over 16 rooms, the survey is the biggest and most ambitious retrospective in years.   Born in South Korea, Nam June Paik (1932-2006) grew up in Japan, studied music in Germany and collaborated in Fluxus, an international network of avant-garde artists. Paik introduced the term ‘electronic superhighway’ to foretell the future of communication in an internet age. The artist erased the boundaries between art and technology, between East and West, and investigated technology’s impact on globalization and everyday life.   The Stedelijk’s relationship with Nam June Paik dates back to 1977 when the museum mounted his first major show in the Netherlands. In 1984 Paik also took part in The Luminous Image, an ambitious survey of contemporary video art. The Stedelijk not only championed the new discipline by giving it a platform, but also purchased video art, including that of Paik, for its collection—one of the first museums to do so. An iconic installation from the Stedelijk collection is TV-Buddha (1974), in which an 18th-century wooden Buddha appears to ‘watch’ itself on a modern television, and typifies the influence of (Zen) Buddhist philosophies on Paik’s approach to art and technology. Curator Leontine Coelewij: The work of Nam June Paik stimulates the viewer’s senses through a multisensory sound and image experience. Paik was one of the first video artists. He began testing the boundaries of television as a medium as early as the 1970s and explored its role as a transcendent mode of communication able to connect the world's population at the touch of a button. With social media and online video platforms we’re living in the world that Paik foretold, which makes this exhibition more topical than ever. The Future is Now takes a definitive look at the artist’s interdisciplinary oeuvre: video, sculpture, music, dance and performance. And features two spectacular room-filling installations: TV Garden of 1974-77, where television sets seem to flourish among abundant foliage, and Sistine Chapel of 1993, the iconic culmination of the exhibition in the IMC Hall of Honour, a mesmerising riot of images from 34 projectors, for which Paik received the prestigious Golden Lion at the Venice Biennale in 1993. The exhibition also highlights his collaborations with other artists such as composer John Cage, choreographer Merce Cunningham, cellist Charlotte Moorman and artist Joseph Beuys. Additionally, Paik strongly emphasised the interactive qualities of art, and the exhibition also includes art works in which visitors can participate by physically interacting with the work. The exhibition will tour to five international venues; Tate Modern, London, Stedelijk Museum, Amsterdam, Museum of Contemporary Art, Chicago, San Francisco Museum of Modern Art and National Gallery Singapore.

FEST opens flagship store with a cinema in Amsterdam
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FEST opens flagship store with a cinema in Amsterdam

Lifestyle  The new FEST flagship store takes away all doubts about the purchase of your new piece of furniture. By giving free personal interior advice and the possibility to try out a sofa in a mini cinema, the interior brand from Amsterdam wants to help their consumers make the best choices. Femke Furnée (founder of FEST): “A sofa is a big purchase. You do research, you try things out… We understand that it’s a difficult decision, and that’s why we want to advise our customers in a new way, so they are sure they are making the best possible choice.” The newest FEST store, located at De Clercqstraat in Amsterdam-West, is now open.   FEST is the new kid on the block in the traditional furniture industry and is well on its way to becoming a worldwide player. Femke: “We have our own collection of high-end design furniture and home décor without the high-end price tag: affordable luxury. We are a young company, our team is in the middle of our own target group, which allows us to understand the needs of our customers. The purchase of a piece of furniture is a big and important choice, so we want to make this as easy and exciting as possible. An example of this is the mini cinema in our newest flagship store, where you can try out a sofa before buying it.”    Mini Cinema The flagship store is officially open from January 8th. You are welcome to visit the store for free interior advice by appointment or to watch a movie in the FEST cinema, where you get the chance to test any FEST sofa - upholstered in cinema-red velvet. The sofas are upholstered in cinema-red velvet for the occasion. “When you try out a sofa in a store, you are sitting stiffly and straight, while at home, most of us are hanging on the sofa and watching a movie. In our mini cinema, you can experience the real comfort of the sofa before it’s in your house.”, Femke explains.   From €3000 to a multi-million euro company The store in Amsterdam-West is the third brand store owned by the rapidly growing interior brand. Femke Furnée: “I started my company when I was 27. I had no experience, economical background nor start capital. I started with €3000 of savings and throughout the last seven years, I expanded FEST into a multi-billion company. We have our own design collection that’s being sold in over twenty countries, including the MoMa design store in New York and the Centre Pompidou’s museum store in Paris. We also supply the contract market, for instance, our furniture can be found in co-working space The Wing in New York, Los Angeles and London and soon also in Netflix' headquarters in Amsterdam. But I only realised that what we’re doing is really unique last year, when The Financial Times listed us as one of the fastest-growing companies in Europe. Poetry of Space The FEST flagship store is designed by S-P-A-C-E Projects, a company that also did the interior of stores like Ace & Tate and Fabienne Chapot. Femke: “We designed our first two stores ourselves with limited budgets. Until last year, we’ve grown organically, but we now have an investor on board. Because of that, we now have the tools to invest in growth, including a next-level store experience.“ So far, FEST has grown by working really hard, but also by trusting in my intuition. This intuition is one of the most important sources of inspiration for the designer of the newest store. You can see it translated into organic shapes that dominate our shop.” Pepijn Smit from S-P-A-C-E projects: “At FEST,  I strongly believe in the story of intuition. Not only why choices are made, but also how these choices are being made. I’ve tried to translate this to an interior in which everything is connected - like the words of a poem. For me, the store is like a spacious poem: Poetry of Space.  The new FEST flagship store takes away all doubts about the purchase of your new piece of furniture. By giving free personal interior advice and the possibility to try out a sofa in a mini cinema, the interior brand from Amsterdam wants to help their consumers make the best choices. Femke Furnée (founder of FEST): “A sofa is a big purchase. You do research, you try things out… We understand that it’s a difficult decision, and that’s why we want to advise our customers in a new way, so they are sure they are making the best possible choice.” The newest FEST store, located at De Clercqstraat in Amsterdam-West, is now open.   FEST is the new kid on the block in the traditional furniture industry and is well on its way to becoming a worldwide player. Femke: “We have our own collection of high-end design furniture and home décor without the high-end price tag: affordable luxury. We are a young company, our team is in the middle of our own target group, which allows us to understand the needs of our customers. The purchase of a piece of furniture is a big and important choice, so we want to make this as easy and exciting as possible. An example of this is the mini cinema in our newest flagship store, where you can try out a sofa before buying it.”    Mini Cinema The flagship store is officially open from January 8th. You are welcome to visit the store for free interior advice by appointment or to watch a movie in the FEST cinema, where you get the chance to test any FEST sofa - upholstered in cinema-red velvet. The sofas are upholstered in cinema-red velvet for the occasion. “When you try out a sofa in a store, you are sitting stiffly and straight, while at home, most of us are hanging on the sofa and watching a movie. In our mini cinema, you can experience the real comfort of the sofa before it’s in your house.”, Femke explains.   From €3000 to a multi-million euro company The store in Amsterdam-West is the third brand store owned by the rapidly growing interior brand. Femke Furnée: “I started my company when I was 27. I had no experience, economical background nor start capital. I started with €3000 of savings and throughout the last seven years, I expanded FEST into a multi-billion company. We have our own design collection that’s being sold in over twenty countries, including the MoMa design store in New York and the Centre Pompidou’s museum store in Paris. We also supply the contract market, for instance, our furniture can be found in co-working space The Wing in New York, Los Angeles and London and soon also in Netflix' headquarters in Amsterdam. But I only realised that what we’re doing is really unique last year, when The Financial Times listed us as one of the fastest-growing companies in Europe. Poetry of Space The FEST flagship store is designed by S-P-A-C-E Projects, a company that also did the interior of stores like Ace & Tate and Fabienne Chapot. Femke: “We designed our first two stores ourselves with limited budgets. Until last year, we’ve grown organically, but we now have an investor on board. Because of that, we now have the tools to invest in growth, including a next-level store experience.“ So far, FEST has grown by working really hard, but also by trusting in my intuition. This intuition is one of the most important sources of inspiration for the designer of the newest store. You can see it translated into organic shapes that dominate our shop.” Pepijn Smit from S-P-A-C-E projects: “At FEST,  I strongly believe in the story of intuition. Not only why choices are made, but also how these choices are being made. I’ve tried to translate this to an interior in which everything is connected - like the words of a poem. For me, the store is like a spacious poem: Poetry of Space.

A tribute to Terry O'neill
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A tribute to Terry O'neill

Exhibition Eduard Planting Gallery in Amsterdam presents until 21 March 2020 'A tribute to Terry O’Neill'. The exhibition is an homage to the British celebrity photographer. The gallery shows a selection of iconic black and white portraits of screen stars and musicians of the Swinging Sixties and Roaring Seventies.   Terry O’Neill (1938-2019) passed away on 16 November 2019 in his hometown of London. He first picked up a camera in 1958 and pioneered a more intimate, reportage style of celebrity photography, informal and spontaneous. In October 2019, O’Neill was awarded a Commander of the British Empire (CBE) for his services to photography by Prince William.   During 60 years Terry O’Neill has photographed countless legendary stars of film, music and fashion. Iconic books provide an overview of his extensive oeuvre. O’Neill is one of the world’s most published and collected photographers. The National Portrait Gallery in London has nearly 80 portraits in the permanent collection.     Terry O’Neill portrayed The Beatles and The Rolling Stones when they were still struggling young bands. He also photographed Audrey Hepburn, Brigitte Bardot, Faye Dunaway, Raquel Welch, Sophia Loren, Frank Sinatra, Roger Moore, David Bowie, Elton John, Kate Moss, Amy Winehouse and Nelson Mandela.    Gallery opening hours: Wednesday to Saturday: 1 – 6 PM.    Eduard Planting Gallery | Fine Art Photographs Eerste Bloemdwarsstraat 2 in Amsterdam   www.eduardplanting.com Eduard Planting Gallery in Amsterdam presents until 21 March 2020 'A tribute to Terry O’Neill'. The exhibition is an homage to the British celebrity photographer. The gallery shows a selection of iconic black and white portraits of screen stars and musicians of the Swinging Sixties and Roaring Seventies.   Terry O’Neill (1938-2019) passed away on 16 November 2019 in his hometown of London. He first picked up a camera in 1958 and pioneered a more intimate, reportage style of celebrity photography, informal and spontaneous. In October 2019, O’Neill was awarded a Commander of the British Empire (CBE) for his services to photography by Prince William.   During 60 years Terry O’Neill has photographed countless legendary stars of film, music and fashion. Iconic books provide an overview of his extensive oeuvre. O’Neill is one of the world’s most published and collected photographers. The National Portrait Gallery in London has nearly 80 portraits in the permanent collection.     Terry O’Neill portrayed The Beatles and The Rolling Stones when they were still struggling young bands. He also photographed Audrey Hepburn, Brigitte Bardot, Faye Dunaway, Raquel Welch, Sophia Loren, Frank Sinatra, Roger Moore, David Bowie, Elton John, Kate Moss, Amy Winehouse and Nelson Mandela.    Gallery opening hours: Wednesday to Saturday: 1 – 6 PM.    Eduard Planting Gallery | Fine Art Photographs Eerste Bloemdwarsstraat 2 in Amsterdam   www.eduardplanting.com

Daily Paper in collaboration with Van Gogh Museum
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Daily Paper in collaboration with Van Gogh Museum

Fashion Capturing the ordinary, making it extraordinary: The Daily Paper x Van Gogh Museum collection launches worldwide on Saturday 15th of February. Inspired by the life and work of Vincent Van Gogh, clothing brand Daily Paper has designed a capsule collection together with the Van Gogh Museum, incorporating several of Van Gogh’s masterpieces into a range of garments. A collaboration which sees the worlds of fashion and art merge.  On Friday 14th of February, Daily Paper and The Van Gogh Museum will open its doors to the public for a first preview of the collaborative collection through an official launch event at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. From Saturday 15th of February, the collection will be available both online via dailypaperclothing.com and the Van Gogh Museum webstore, and physically in the Daily Paper flagship store and the Van Gogh Museum Shop in Amsterdam, alongside selected retailers worldwide.  Capturing the ordinary, making it extraordinary: The Daily Paper x Van Gogh Museum collection launches worldwide on Saturday 15th of February. Inspired by the life and work of Vincent Van Gogh, clothing brand Daily Paper has designed a capsule collection together with the Van Gogh Museum, incorporating several of Van Gogh’s masterpieces into a range of garments. A collaboration which sees the worlds of fashion and art merge.  On Friday 14th of February, Daily Paper and The Van Gogh Museum will open its doors to the public for a first preview of the collaborative collection through an official launch event at the Van Gogh Museum in Amsterdam. From Saturday 15th of February, the collection will be available both online via dailypaperclothing.com and the Van Gogh Museum webstore, and physically in the Daily Paper flagship store and the Van Gogh Museum Shop in Amsterdam, alongside selected retailers worldwide. 

Welcome to IRMA - "Reflecting Forward"
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Welcome to IRMA - "Reflecting Forward"

Art The collaboration between Moco and Studio Irma has resulted in a new immersive digital art exhibition that - although it will first be seen at the Moco Museum - clearly has the ambition to make many a heart beat faster on an international scale. The interactive Studio Irma - “Reflecting Forward” exhibition is now open in the museum at the Museumplein in Amsterdam.   About Studio Irma - “Reflecting Forward” Brightly coloured lights, dance and music drive you through these interactive works of art. These are the ingredients that bring dreams to life: infinitely variable spaces with ever-changing dimensions and ethereal works of art that communicate with each other. You feel a sense of bliss as you wander around the digital and constantly changing spaces: Diamond infinity room, Kaleidoscope, We all live in bubbles, Connecting dotsand Universe. There is no language barrier, allowing every visitor to optimally enjoy this reflecting world in their own way. Here, life is not imitated by art or vice versa; instead, the experience is a captivating celebration of the interplay between man and art, man and man, art and art.   Irma de Vries of Studio Irma: “With 'Reflecting Forward,’ we are introducing a new art movement based on Connectivism.The exhibition emphasises how internet technologies such as web browsers, search engines and social media contribute to a new way of life. In it, the primary goal of art is to connect people in a world without borders.”   Kim Logchies, founder and curator of Moco Museum: “Usually, we reflect by looking back on the past.With this digital art experience and the infinite connections it shows us, we reveal what the future might look like and what your role in it could be.”    The influence of colour: Our early ancestors used colour to recognise ripe food. Hunger pushes one to search for food, while happiness is the reward for finding it. Over the course of millions of generations, colour has become such a reliable predictor of food that the act of eating has gradually evolved to become associated with a feeling of happiness. During the age of colonisation, bright pigments were sometimes considered closely guarded state secrets.  A new colour was developed specifically for Studio Irma's exhibition. It is a shade of pink designed to induce energy and dopamine. The exhibition takes you to a completely new dimension and offers more rooms, so a variety of truly cool experiences. Experience it yourself from today on.   Studio Irma - “Reflecting Forward” is the first of many projects coming to Moco in 2020 to celebrate female artists this year.   IRMA - “Reflecting Forward”: from Monday 10 February 2020 only in Moco. The collaboration between Moco and Studio Irma has resulted in a new immersive digital art exhibition that - although it will first be seen at the Moco Museum - clearly has the ambition to make many a heart beat faster on an international scale. The interactive Studio Irma - “Reflecting Forward” exhibition is now open in the museum at the Museumplein in Amsterdam.   About Studio Irma - “Reflecting Forward” Brightly coloured lights, dance and music drive you through these interactive works of art. These are the ingredients that bring dreams to life: infinitely variable spaces with ever-changing dimensions and ethereal works of art that communicate with each other. You feel a sense of bliss as you wander around the digital and constantly changing spaces: Diamond infinity room, Kaleidoscope, We all live in bubbles, Connecting dotsand Universe. There is no language barrier, allowing every visitor to optimally enjoy this reflecting world in their own way. Here, life is not imitated by art or vice versa; instead, the experience is a captivating celebration of the interplay between man and art, man and man, art and art.   Irma de Vries of Studio Irma: “With 'Reflecting Forward,’ we are introducing a new art movement based on Connectivism.The exhibition emphasises how internet technologies such as web browsers, search engines and social media contribute to a new way of life. In it, the primary goal of art is to connect people in a world without borders.”   Kim Logchies, founder and curator of Moco Museum: “Usually, we reflect by looking back on the past.With this digital art experience and the infinite connections it shows us, we reveal what the future might look like and what your role in it could be.”    The influence of colour: Our early ancestors used colour to recognise ripe food. Hunger pushes one to search for food, while happiness is the reward for finding it. Over the course of millions of generations, colour has become such a reliable predictor of food that the act of eating has gradually evolved to become associated with a feeling of happiness. During the age of colonisation, bright pigments were sometimes considered closely guarded state secrets.  A new colour was developed specifically for Studio Irma's exhibition. It is a shade of pink designed to induce energy and dopamine. The exhibition takes you to a completely new dimension and offers more rooms, so a variety of truly cool experiences. Experience it yourself from today on.   Studio Irma - “Reflecting Forward” is the first of many projects coming to Moco in 2020 to celebrate female artists this year.   IRMA - “Reflecting Forward”: from Monday 10 February 2020 only in Moco.

The Momentum in Voorlinden
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The Momentum in Voorlinden

Art The Momentum. The tipping point that unleashes a tectonic shift. An artist is perpetually in search of that instant. The second in which that one defining insight emerges, paving the way for new ideas. It’s an instant with which we are all familiar: the deciding moment when everything gains momentum. The point at which mass and speed combine to yield an extraordinary impetus.   Their world is poised on the brink of a tipping point as well. They must make choices regarding climate and migration, issues that are impacting our lives more and more intensely.   Momentum brings together forty works that embody this tension. This selection from their collection unites new and established names working in a wide range of media. Together they offer insights into the personal and collective challenges of our time. With works from artists including Anish Kapoor, Rineke Dijkstra, Jacco Olivier, Esther Tielemans, Ryan Gander, Gabriel Rico and Mona Hatoum.   In Voorlinden Museum on display until 20th of September. for more information visit voorlinden.nl The Momentum. The tipping point that unleashes a tectonic shift. An artist is perpetually in search of that instant. The second in which that one defining insight emerges, paving the way for new ideas. It’s an instant with which we are all familiar: the deciding moment when everything gains momentum. The point at which mass and speed combine to yield an extraordinary impetus.   Their world is poised on the brink of a tipping point as well. They must make choices regarding climate and migration, issues that are impacting our lives more and more intensely.   Momentum brings together forty works that embody this tension. This selection from their collection unites new and established names working in a wide range of media. Together they offer insights into the personal and collective challenges of our time. With works from artists including Anish Kapoor, Rineke Dijkstra, Jacco Olivier, Esther Tielemans, Ryan Gander, Gabriel Rico and Mona Hatoum.   In Voorlinden Museum on display until 20th of September. for more information visit voorlinden.nl

Lowlands announce the first line-up for 2020
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Lowlands announce the first line-up for 2020

Music A Campingflight To Lowlands Paradise is exactly what it promises to be: a true backpacker’s Garden Of Eden and Holland’s most adventurous cultural outdoorevent, offering a cutting edge choice of only the best in alternative music, film, stand-up comedy, visual arts, literature and street theatre.  For three days in August, a township with 60,000 inhabitants arises in the middle of the country. The Lowlands festival hosts no less than twelve stages in three large areas (among which a cinema and theatre), about 250 different acts and performances, dozens of restaurants from all corners of the earth, food and drink stalls, a large market with everything from clothes and CD stores to a barber’s shop, sports facilities, a sauna / hottub area, its own currency, a local radio station, a daily newspaper (Dutch only) and, last but not least: seven luxury campsites with hot showers and real, flushable toilets. A Campingflight To Lowlands Paradise really is the ultimate summer holiday extravaganza! This year Lowlands will take place on the 21st, 22nd and 23rd of August. Though Lowlands covers a wide spectrum of different cultural activities, the main focus still is on alternative music: from rock to pop via hip hop; from metal to electro via world music and hereby not neglecting drum ‘n bass, house and techno. Admission tickets for Lowlands 2020 are €220 (€10,- Ticketmaster fee included) and tickets are only available through Ticketmaster Netherlands. Access to the regular camping and the use of our shuttle bus service is always included in the price of a ticket. First line-up is already out and includes incredible artists like: The Chemical Brothers, Stormzy, Bring me the Horizon, Koffee, Noisia, Liam Gallagher, Chromatics, Die Antwoord, London Grammar, Lewis Capaldi and many more. For more updates follow @lowlands_fest on instagram. A Campingflight To Lowlands Paradise is exactly what it promises to be: a true backpacker’s Garden Of Eden and Holland’s most adventurous cultural outdoorevent, offering a cutting edge choice of only the best in alternative music, film, stand-up comedy, visual arts, literature and street theatre.  For three days in August, a township with 60,000 inhabitants arises in the middle of the country. The Lowlands festival hosts no less than twelve stages in three large areas (among which a cinema and theatre), about 250 different acts and performances, dozens of restaurants from all corners of the earth, food and drink stalls, a large market with everything from clothes and CD stores to a barber’s shop, sports facilities, a sauna / hottub area, its own currency, a local radio station, a daily newspaper (Dutch only) and, last but not least: seven luxury campsites with hot showers and real, flushable toilets. A Campingflight To Lowlands Paradise really is the ultimate summer holiday extravaganza! This year Lowlands will take place on the 21st, 22nd and 23rd of August. Though Lowlands covers a wide spectrum of different cultural activities, the main focus still is on alternative music: from rock to pop via hip hop; from metal to electro via world music and hereby not neglecting drum ‘n bass, house and techno. Admission tickets for Lowlands 2020 are €220 (€10,- Ticketmaster fee included) and tickets are only available through Ticketmaster Netherlands. Access to the regular camping and the use of our shuttle bus service is always included in the price of a ticket. First line-up is already out and includes incredible artists like: The Chemical Brothers, Stormzy, Bring me the Horizon, Koffee, Noisia, Liam Gallagher, Chromatics, Die Antwoord, London Grammar, Lewis Capaldi and many more. For more updates follow @lowlands_fest on instagram.

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