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Swiss Haute Horlogerie meets Chinese zodiac tradition
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Swiss Haute Horlogerie meets Chinese zodiac tradition

Watches Steeped in the aesthetic codes of Chinese culture, the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen is the first L.U.C timepiece to display the traditional Chinese timekeeping system, Shí Chen. The animals of the zodiac that symbolises them parade slowly by on an Urushi lacquer disc, accompanied by the symbol of prosperity and its god Lu Xing. This creative new complication exists as an 88-piece limited edition. Its L.U.C 96.29-L Chopard Manufacture movement is housed in a 40 mm ethical 18-carat rose gold case of peerless symbolic and physical finesse.     Carved from a block of ethical 18-carat rose gold, the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen is a talisman timepiece, an allegory of beliefs related to the Chinese zodiac and luck. It represents the first time that an Haute Horlogerie watch displays Shí Chen, the traditional Chinese time system, as a complication. It consists of twelve two-hour units, each one represented by an animal from the zodiac cycle. The day thus begins at 11pm with the hour of the Rat and ends with the hour of the Pig, while noon is in the middle of the hour of the Horse.       The Chinese zodiac bestiary enhanced by the art of Urushi:     The procession of 12 animals slowly parades through a large aperture at 12 o’clock, enabling a dual time read-off: one traditional and the other based on the international system. This succession of zodiac signs also underlines the creativity and mastery of the Chopard Manufacture artisans. In addition, the dial and Shí Chen disc of this timepiece are made of Japanese lacquer. Faithful to Asian traditions, Chopard has worked right from the start with the finest Japanese lacquer artisans, who craft dials using the traditional Urushi lacquer technique.     The 88 dials of the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen are produced by the workshops of the century-old Yamada Heiando company and crafted by Master lacquer specialist Minori Koizumi. In accordance with the distinctive Maki-e technique, gold flakes sprinkled between the layers of lacquer illuminate the 40 mm ethical 18-carat rose gold case from within. Steeped in the aesthetic codes of Chinese culture, the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen is the first L.U.C timepiece to display the traditional Chinese timekeeping system, Shí Chen. The animals of the zodiac that symbolises them parade slowly by on an Urushi lacquer disc, accompanied by the symbol of prosperity and its god Lu Xing. This creative new complication exists as an 88-piece limited edition. Its L.U.C 96.29-L Chopard Manufacture movement is housed in a 40 mm ethical 18-carat rose gold case of peerless symbolic and physical finesse.     Carved from a block of ethical 18-carat rose gold, the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen is a talisman timepiece, an allegory of beliefs related to the Chinese zodiac and luck. It represents the first time that an Haute Horlogerie watch displays Shí Chen, the traditional Chinese time system, as a complication. It consists of twelve two-hour units, each one represented by an animal from the zodiac cycle. The day thus begins at 11pm with the hour of the Rat and ends with the hour of the Pig, while noon is in the middle of the hour of the Horse.       The Chinese zodiac bestiary enhanced by the art of Urushi:     The procession of 12 animals slowly parades through a large aperture at 12 o’clock, enabling a dual time read-off: one traditional and the other based on the international system. This succession of zodiac signs also underlines the creativity and mastery of the Chopard Manufacture artisans. In addition, the dial and Shí Chen disc of this timepiece are made of Japanese lacquer. Faithful to Asian traditions, Chopard has worked right from the start with the finest Japanese lacquer artisans, who craft dials using the traditional Urushi lacquer technique.     The 88 dials of the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen are produced by the workshops of the century-old Yamada Heiando company and crafted by Master lacquer specialist Minori Koizumi. In accordance with the distinctive Maki-e technique, gold flakes sprinkled between the layers of lacquer illuminate the 40 mm ethical 18-carat rose gold case from within.

MONTBLANC M_GRAM 4810 COLLECTION
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MONTBLANC M_GRAM 4810 COLLECTION

Watches “While Montblanc is an iconic brand that carries so much meaning to so many people, we felt it was time to introduce a new signature logo pattern to give a new generation of Montblanc customers an exciting identity to rally around. Our M_Gram 4810 collection has a distinctive identity that is unmistakably Montblanc, owning all the qualities of an icon in-the-making,” says Nicolas Baretzki, Montblanc CEO.     The two-colour tone M pattern is inspired by the geometry and lettering of graphics from the Montblanc archives, underscoring the richness of the Maison’s heritage. It is derived from the Montblanc wordmark developed in the 1920s and used – only slightly altered - in the Maison’s communications alongside the iconic Montblanc logo until this day. The bold and pointed shape of the letter with its geometric look captures the Art Deco style of the 1920s, one of the most important periods for the brand. In addition to the development of a very distinctive look, it was during that decade that Montblanc launched into new categories, including its foray into leather goods from 1926 onwards.     “What differentiates our graphic typography from other logo-driven monograms is the idea of not constructing something entirely new but rather converting existing typography through inspiration,’ explains Zaim Kamal, Montblanc Creative Director. “With a heritage that spans nearly 115 years, there was so much to draw from to create a new pattern that is certainly inspired by history but that looks to the future of the Maison. The new design is a connection point to the Montblanc community, a badge of belonging that each owner can interpret anyway he or she likes.”     The PVC coated-canvas resistant to scratchesandeverydaywearispairedwithblack leather trimming details to enhance the craftsmanship of the Montblanc M_Gram 4810 collection, while giving it a sophisticated design twist. The Montblanc logo script in white on the front of each piece stands out against the elegant black and blue combination to emphasize the Maison’s brand identity.     Pieces from the new collection take center stage in What Moves You, Makes You, Montblanc’s new global brand campaign that spotlights the exceptional individuals who are rede ning what success means today, driven by a higher purpose and a love of what they do. Actor Taron Egerton is featured with his Montblanc M_Gram 4810 Backpack, while singer, actor and writer Chen Kun sports his Montblanc M_Gram 4810 Beltbag. Whether a Backpack with a ap, a Document Case, a Tote, a Belt Bag, a Medium Pouch, a Duf e Bag, an Envelope or a Sling Backpack - the relaxed elegance of Montblanc M_Gram 4810 collection makes each piece a perfect companion for seamlessly moving through the day and into the evening, from business meetings to leisure pursuits. Montblanc’s latest technology innovations pieces have also received the Montblanc M_Gram 4810 treatment, with the pattern embossed on the new Montblanc MB 01 Headphones as well as being featured on the dial and PVC canvas watchstrap of the Montblanc’s Summit 2 smartwatch. “While Montblanc is an iconic brand that carries so much meaning to so many people, we felt it was time to introduce a new signature logo pattern to give a new generation of Montblanc customers an exciting identity to rally around. Our M_Gram 4810 collection has a distinctive identity that is unmistakably Montblanc, owning all the qualities of an icon in-the-making,” says Nicolas Baretzki, Montblanc CEO.     The two-colour tone M pattern is inspired by the geometry and lettering of graphics from the Montblanc archives, underscoring the richness of the Maison’s heritage. It is derived from the Montblanc wordmark developed in the 1920s and used – only slightly altered - in the Maison’s communications alongside the iconic Montblanc logo until this day. The bold and pointed shape of the letter with its geometric look captures the Art Deco style of the 1920s, one of the most important periods for the brand. In addition to the development of a very distinctive look, it was during that decade that Montblanc launched into new categories, including its foray into leather goods from 1926 onwards.     “What differentiates our graphic typography from other logo-driven monograms is the idea of not constructing something entirely new but rather converting existing typography through inspiration,’ explains Zaim Kamal, Montblanc Creative Director. “With a heritage that spans nearly 115 years, there was so much to draw from to create a new pattern that is certainly inspired by history but that looks to the future of the Maison. The new design is a connection point to the Montblanc community, a badge of belonging that each owner can interpret anyway he or she likes.”     The PVC coated-canvas resistant to scratchesandeverydaywearispairedwithblack leather trimming details to enhance the craftsmanship of the Montblanc M_Gram 4810 collection, while giving it a sophisticated design twist. The Montblanc logo script in white on the front of each piece stands out against the elegant black and blue combination to emphasize the Maison’s brand identity.     Pieces from the new collection take center stage in What Moves You, Makes You, Montblanc’s new global brand campaign that spotlights the exceptional individuals who are rede ning what success means today, driven by a higher purpose and a love of what they do. Actor Taron Egerton is featured with his Montblanc M_Gram 4810 Backpack, while singer, actor and writer Chen Kun sports his Montblanc M_Gram 4810 Beltbag. Whether a Backpack with a ap, a Document Case, a Tote, a Belt Bag, a Medium Pouch, a Duf e Bag, an Envelope or a Sling Backpack - the relaxed elegance of Montblanc M_Gram 4810 collection makes each piece a perfect companion for seamlessly moving through the day and into the evening, from business meetings to leisure pursuits. Montblanc’s latest technology innovations pieces have also received the Montblanc M_Gram 4810 treatment, with the pattern embossed on the new Montblanc MB 01 Headphones as well as being featured on the dial and PVC canvas watchstrap of the Montblanc’s Summit 2 smartwatch.

Chopard  launches new timepieces for the Mille Miglia collection
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Chopard launches new timepieces for the Mille Miglia collection

Watches Since 1988, Chopard has been the main partner and official timekeeper of the famous endurance 1000 Miglia race, a close collaboration born of the Scheufele family's longstanding passion for classic cars, which Karl-Friedrich Scheufele – Co-President of the Maison – both collects and drives, including at various motorsports events.     Founded in 1927, the 1000 Miglia is one of the most famous automobile events in the world. Originally, the 1,618 km route – the equivalent of 1,005 Roman miles – was a speed race that started and ended in Brescia, with a passage through Rome. After its original formula was interrupted in 1957, the 1000 Miglia was relaunched in 1977 as an endurance race for cars built between 1927 and 1957, still covering 1,000 miles. Over the years, the original route has undergone a few changes, but has remained faithful to the route designed 93 years ago by the original organisers, criss-crossing Italian scenery that has remained virtually unchanged since the beginning of the 20th century.      Chopard is proud to present a new series of watches. The Mille Miglia Race Edition chronograph is available in a 250-piece limited edition with a 42 mm-diameter case in bead-blasted DLC stainless steel and ethical rose gold with black leather strap and dial; and in 1,000 pieces entirely in bead-blasted DLC stainless steel, each powered by a chronometer-certified mechanical movement with automatic winding. Since 1988, Chopard has been the main partner and official timekeeper of the famous endurance 1000 Miglia race, a close collaboration born of the Scheufele family's longstanding passion for classic cars, which Karl-Friedrich Scheufele – Co-President of the Maison – both collects and drives, including at various motorsports events.     Founded in 1927, the 1000 Miglia is one of the most famous automobile events in the world. Originally, the 1,618 km route – the equivalent of 1,005 Roman miles – was a speed race that started and ended in Brescia, with a passage through Rome. After its original formula was interrupted in 1957, the 1000 Miglia was relaunched in 1977 as an endurance race for cars built between 1927 and 1957, still covering 1,000 miles. Over the years, the original route has undergone a few changes, but has remained faithful to the route designed 93 years ago by the original organisers, criss-crossing Italian scenery that has remained virtually unchanged since the beginning of the 20th century.      Chopard is proud to present a new series of watches. The Mille Miglia Race Edition chronograph is available in a 250-piece limited edition with a 42 mm-diameter case in bead-blasted DLC stainless steel and ethical rose gold with black leather strap and dial; and in 1,000 pieces entirely in bead-blasted DLC stainless steel, each powered by a chronometer-certified mechanical movement with automatic winding.

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Arceau Grande Lune
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Arceau Grande Lune

Watches The new Arceau Grande Lune featuring a deep blue dial with a sunburst motif highlights the creativity of a timeless model. In 1978, Henri d’Origny freed the round watch from established aesthetic codes by imagining a classic and singular curve: the Arceau watch was born. Its case with asymmetrical stirrup-shaped attachments and sloping Arabic numerals evoking a galloping horse reveal a discreet and enduring elegance that lends itself to every possible expression of Hermès creativity and know-how.     The sunburst blue face of the new Arceau Grande Lune is paired with a matching Abyss blue alligator strap, an intense colour accentuated by the casual elegance of the steel case and sapphire caseback.     Swept over by slender hands and enlivened by sloping numerals creating an in-motion effect, this dynamic-looking display is complemented by a moon phase and date counter adorned with a starry sky, as well as a double day and month window appearing beneath the Hermès logo. Hours, minutes, seconds and complete calendar indications are displayed to the rhythm of a mechanical self-winding movement housed in a case crafted in the Hermès watchmaking workshops, as are the dial and strap. The new Arceau Grande Lune featuring a deep blue dial with a sunburst motif highlights the creativity of a timeless model. In 1978, Henri d’Origny freed the round watch from established aesthetic codes by imagining a classic and singular curve: the Arceau watch was born. Its case with asymmetrical stirrup-shaped attachments and sloping Arabic numerals evoking a galloping horse reveal a discreet and enduring elegance that lends itself to every possible expression of Hermès creativity and know-how.     The sunburst blue face of the new Arceau Grande Lune is paired with a matching Abyss blue alligator strap, an intense colour accentuated by the casual elegance of the steel case and sapphire caseback.     Swept over by slender hands and enlivened by sloping numerals creating an in-motion effect, this dynamic-looking display is complemented by a moon phase and date counter adorned with a starry sky, as well as a double day and month window appearing beneath the Hermès logo. Hours, minutes, seconds and complete calendar indications are displayed to the rhythm of a mechanical self-winding movement housed in a case crafted in the Hermès watchmaking workshops, as are the dial and strap.

PANERAI LUMINOR WORN BY SYLVESTER STALLONE IN FILM DAYLIGHT SELLS FOR $214,200 AFTER LESS THAN 5 MINUTES OF BIDDING
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PANERAI LUMINOR WORN BY SYLVESTER STALLONE IN FILM DAYLIGHT SELLS FOR $214,200 AFTER LESS THAN 5 MINUTES OF BIDDING

Watches Panerai is pleased to announce the auction sale of three important Panerai watches through Phillips in association with Bacs and Russo, at the much anticipated December Racing Pulse Flagship Auction.     The exciting hero of the auction – the famous Panerai Luminor PAM5218-201/A (Lot 47) consigned personally by multiple Academy Award™ nominee and Golden Globe™ winner, Sylvester Stallone sold for an unprecedented $214,200, after less than 5 minutes of bidding.     This selling price was a nod not only to the incredible provenance of the timepiece, but also to the immense fascination the brand’s early history continues to hold for collectors.     The watch achieved almost fabled status amongst enthusiasts and is widely acknowledged as the catalyst for Panerai’s launch on global stage as it changed the brand forever.     “We are excited to bear witness to a historic moment so inextricably connected to both Panerai’s beginning and future,” said Jean-Marc Pontroué, Panerai CEO.     “As a brand, we have always looked to the horizon of what is possible while keeping one foot firmly grounded in the principles and foundation of our past. After the success of the first Phillips auction in Hong Kong a couple of weeks ago, this is a strong signal that Panerai remains in the heart of the collectors’ community. We are proud to have partnered with Phillips to offer watchmaking enthusiasts worldwide a unique timepiece so representative of our pioneering spirit.” Panerai is pleased to announce the auction sale of three important Panerai watches through Phillips in association with Bacs and Russo, at the much anticipated December Racing Pulse Flagship Auction.     The exciting hero of the auction – the famous Panerai Luminor PAM5218-201/A (Lot 47) consigned personally by multiple Academy Award™ nominee and Golden Globe™ winner, Sylvester Stallone sold for an unprecedented $214,200, after less than 5 minutes of bidding.     This selling price was a nod not only to the incredible provenance of the timepiece, but also to the immense fascination the brand’s early history continues to hold for collectors.     The watch achieved almost fabled status amongst enthusiasts and is widely acknowledged as the catalyst for Panerai’s launch on global stage as it changed the brand forever.     “We are excited to bear witness to a historic moment so inextricably connected to both Panerai’s beginning and future,” said Jean-Marc Pontroué, Panerai CEO.     “As a brand, we have always looked to the horizon of what is possible while keeping one foot firmly grounded in the principles and foundation of our past. After the success of the first Phillips auction in Hong Kong a couple of weeks ago, this is a strong signal that Panerai remains in the heart of the collectors’ community. We are proud to have partnered with Phillips to offer watchmaking enthusiasts worldwide a unique timepiece so representative of our pioneering spirit.”

In conversation with Christoph Grainger-Herr, CEO of IWC
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In conversation with Christoph Grainger-Herr, CEO of IWC

Watches We had a deligt speaking with the CEO of IWC, Christoph Grainger-Herr.       Tell us about your experience in several different departments and divisions at IWC. Where did it all start and how were the transitions like into new departments?   Well, that's an interesting thing. You know, I think I had probably 13 or so jobs, but I've always done the same. So to the present day, it hasn't really changed. I've started in trademarketing on the exhibitions and boutiques. Back in the day, I’ve really just been hired as a project manager. And then I started to design the stuff from a laptop and drive our creative director absolutely crazy, because I started to change things. I did thisa couple of years, and then the trademarketing things,which really is all of that plus visual merchandising, architecture, exhibitions and so on. What I’ve learned from all of that, I'd be seeing different countries, different cultures, what our clients are looking for, the building specifics in all of these different countries, which is super interesting. And also you get to meet all of the global teams. After that, I did a little bit of a stint in marketing. This was basically everything apart from Corp comms, but all of the print marketing, consumer marketing, catalogues, websiteand all that. And from there, I started to work quite heavily on other brands within the group. We did the retail concept, we would agree to BM concept for merch. Then in the end, I returned to retail here in Switzerland, did that for about two months. Then I did the sales director role for about 10 days, four to six weeks or something. And then the announcement came. So it was quite linear in the end and quite fast and quite scary. But, here we are.   And I think really, what have I taken from it? I think, it's when you work transversally, it's very, very, very interesting because you get to learn the entire organization inside out, including different countries. I think that gives you a really good head start to then pick up all sorts of different tasks and challenges. But once you understand what production takes, you know I worked for six years on the manufacturer design here for the new manufacturing building, that really gives you the inside out view of how, what comes together. And after that you see the whole commercial side for the boutiques and the exhibitions and that in the end gives you quite a good understanding of the global picture.   And you learn. I mean, at the end of the day you learned that in luxury brand you're telling an aesthetic story and that story has to be consistent across all the different touch points. And the more you are able to combine the unique different requirements of social media versus physical stores versus production facilities into a consistent story that both your colleagues, as well as your clients and everybody can buy into mentally, the easier job you have to explain what your brand stands for and what is on brand and what is not on brand. And I think one of the most difficult things is if you have brands that are completely inconsistently implemented and then have like a front of house in the back of house, it sometimes becomes confusing to take the right decisions. Whereas I think if you have this consistency, then after that, it's much easier for people to make their own judgmentson what's the right thing to do or not, because we're not in a business that's based on purely data and research. I mean, it is increasingly luckily based on some data inside, but you know, the best creations in the world of luxury are not derived by data analytics or marketing briefing or anything like that. It takes a moment of creativity and then you have to do a call whether this is something that fits your brand or not. And that's the decision between hopefully a hit product and something that ends up in the door.     When you say creativity, how important do you think is innovation in the luxury segment, particularly for watches?   Well, if you think about the fact that we're basically in a moment central business, we don't make something that is based on purely functional need, on just functional characteristics. So that moves it away from the ins and outs of checklists, right or wrong assessment of what you're doing. And you're into an area where it's all about the emotion you evoke, it's about things like scarcity, it's about things like perceived hotness and exclusivity and that you can only do by creating. I wouldn't necessarily always call it purely sort of innovation in terms of technical content, but it is really in the entire brand universe, from products to communication, to retail experience, to the way you talk about the brand, of what it activates. Creativity is absolutely key. And keeping that fascination, that’s not killing off the brand into something too predictable or even too boring, it's always this balancing act between newness and the sort of preserving the icons that we've been familiar with for the last 18 years or longer. And that's at the end of the day heritage and DNA versus newness and supply versus scarcity. That's kind of the leavers, which we have to play in our industry to keep our brands relevant and keep our fans.     When did your first interest for watches arise?   The first time I showed interest for watches was kind of a forced situation. My dad was buying his first Patek Nautilus back in the eighties. It felt to me like it took all day and I was sitting there looking at all these watches and I apparently knew this was a quality of mine when I was younger. I must've lost that, I was incredibly patient and waited there for hours on end. And in the end they bought me a Bernese dog cuddly toy. That was kinda my first contact with watches. Then I think I really picked it up again at the university. In my gap year I had the chance to work not only in fashion stores about men's jewelry and accessories, but also in the heart of London.   I think that's the first time when I really started to look into the beauty of these objects, when the shop kind of becomes an art gallery. And I think this is the thing with hard luxury. It's almost like a sculpture museum space rather than just a shop. It's very different from a fashion store. And I started to like that because the complexity that goes into something very simple, it's all about presentation, lighting, quality, etc., but you have all of the requirements of security materials, automation, all of this stuff behind. I really started to enjoy that sort of work. And I walked past the jewelers near my university in Bournemouth. And I started to really feel quite interested in IWC back in the day, because I loved the purity of detail.   I love that engineering approach to the design, that understated confidence in the brand quite a lot. And then it will only be a couple of years later when I moved to Switzerland and I started to go privately to shows like Baselworldand become actually interested in IWC and the first watch that really caught me at the end was 2004 generation of the Aquatimer, which was made about the time when I moved to Switzerland. And then a couple of years into my university and professional experience here, there was a phone call whether we wanted to design an IWC museum. I loved that idea and jumped at itand that was it. I walked into the door here and thoughtI like it and that's never changed.     I’ve also read and found quite interesting that you were a former military athlete. How do you manage to stay in shape nowadays, with such a time consuming job?   I think you have to define at some point what do you mean by staying in shape for yourself. Because in the beginning, when you're at university, you have the time to properly train for competitions and so on. And especially when you're in the world of mountain running, trail running, any series of skiing. Whatever it is, it takes a tremendous amount of prep time. And at some point in your professional life you have to realize that can't be objective anymore. I mean, I admire all of the CEOs that do on eIronman after another. Literally, I'm not that angry at myself that I would get up at three o'clock every morning and do triathlon training. I think once you're in this mode in your life, it never goes away, but you have to realize at some point that you're going to be mildly ambitious. These days, I do about one bigger thing a year, be that a competition or a ride or something else. But I do this for the fun of it and not for beating the world record. It's changed quite a bit.    I don't know how I do it. Well, actually when you're traveling outside of the current lockdown, it's easy. Cause I only have myself to look after when I'm traveling. I enjoy running, whether it’s in Central park, Hong Kong, Red Rock Canyon or Vegas. There's plenty of stunning runs in South beach, Miami. I often pick my hotels in a way that they're convenient for exercising. Just recently, on the last trip before lockdown, it was my first time to Dallas. And we really needed to look at hotels so that they're close to the most promising running routes. Here at home, I try and fit it in whenever I can.      What are your thoughts on sustainability in the watch industry? Is there anything particularly that you are doing to do more sustainable and responsible to the environment?   I think it starts really with the product itself. When I look today at what we have done as humankind over the last 30, 40 years, we we've gone into quite a questionable cycle of throwaway consumption, times where things are being bought and replaced really frequently. We buy clothes and devices and we replace some of them and throw them away. And I think that mechanical watches have always made quite a powerful statement about sustainability, because you creating something that a is not in fashion, but that is timeless beauty. You build it in a way that it's designed to last forever and you maintain it for sometimes hundreds and hundreds of years. There’s really trust in where they’re made in, in one place in the heart of Europe that is preserving jobs, preserving craftsmanship and skills.    At the same time, you are not shipping products 16 times around the planet before they get to end consumers. When you come to Schaffhausen, we were set up right here where I'm sitting in my office. Florentine Ariosto Jones came from America and he set up IWC here and we're still here today, taking the same power from the river that Jones took directly via boats. We take it from the hydroponic station, but it's still the same thing.   When you come to Chicago, I can show you everybody from the initial watch designer to every step of the process of construction, to every step of manufacturing and even to the people who write the advertising headline, who create the movies and design the boutiques. I don't think that today there's many industries in many businesses, where you can still go to a single place and see the creation of something from start to finish. And when you buy it, you have something which really is absolutely unique to that process.    And then on top of that, I think my approach to sustainability is always that for us, it's a mindset. And that's a constant striving for trying to do things better than we did before. Nobody is perfect, but if we can improve our sourcing like we did with the gold sourcing, where we came out on top of the WWF study a couple of years ago, if we start launching sustainability reports, if we reduce the packaging that we ship around, eliminate plastic and non-recycled materials, eliminate plastic as much as we can from the supply chain in the brand globally, then bit by bit you're creating a product that people can feel genuinely good about.    One of the key things for us is that I don't run a front of house, back of house operations. So we welcome up to 10.000 people a year here in Schaffhausenand we show them everything and they can meet the people behind the process. And there's no double floors or hidden dark room. That's really important, because I think increasingly consumers demand, rightfully, to know where things are coming from, how things are being made and what the impact is.   It's something that is also coming out of the current situation. If we question a little bit the way we consume and the way we focus on things that really mean something to us and that we enjoy every time we use them. We wear them and we look after them and we repair them and fix them and maintain them. I do think that there is something to be learned from a throwaway consumption culture. When you think about the fact that all humans on the planet can probably fit into one cubic kilometer, if we pack them in tightly, it the end we deplete all of the resources on that very quickly. It's something to reconsider. And I think making things that are designed to be beautiful in hundreds of years and designed to last, can only be a good thing in that context.     Have you ever been to Amsterdam and if so, how would you describe the experience?   Yes, I've been to Amsterdam a few times. It looks like it has abeautiful quality of life and the right balance between urban density, sort of design, art, expression and instill kind of energy, which I like. Our e-com shipping center for Europe actually sits right in the heart of Amsterdam and there are some practical challenges when you are in an old, historic building in the heart of the city and you're trying to adapt that to modern automated warehouse standards. It’s a beautiful city to be in.    But I would change your airport, I think the distance between the runway and the terminal at Schipol is just ridiculous. To get from your gate to the exit of Schipol youcan probably easily walk for 40 minutes. The craziest spread out airport terminals anywhere on the planet. Zurich is literally, and I'm not saying that because we use it here, one of the most efficient airports where you can fly direct to almost anywhere, but you can get from the aircraft door to your car in literally seven minutes, if you don't have checked luggage, so it's ultra efficient in and out.      What do you have planned in the future, not after Corona really but in general?   As you know and as you're experiencing yourself, we just had a crash course in all sorts of video, remote technology. And that's really driven a whole range of innovation projects very quickly. So we're excited about all the possibilities that we've discovered through remote events and streaming and being able to extend sort of everything that we do or have done traditionally physically into the digital space, where we're suddenly creating a much broader reach and a much better experience for people who weren't able to travel halfway around the globe to take part in something previously. I think there's a lot of exciting things to come and the habits that have been formed in the last couple of months will surely stay with us and are really accelerating that process towards a more integrated world of physical and digital. And I'm very excited about that, because at the end of the day, that's just going to make our brands a better experience and we will be able to provide a better service.         We had a deligt speaking with the CEO of IWC, Christoph Grainger-Herr.       Tell us about your experience in several different departments and divisions at IWC. Where did it all start and how were the transitions like into new departments?   Well, that's an interesting thing. You know, I think I had probably 13 or so jobs, but I've always done the same. So to the present day, it hasn't really changed. I've started in trademarketing on the exhibitions and boutiques. Back in the day, I’ve really just been hired as a project manager. And then I started to design the stuff from a laptop and drive our creative director absolutely crazy, because I started to change things. I did thisa couple of years, and then the trademarketing things,which really is all of that plus visual merchandising, architecture, exhibitions and so on. What I’ve learned from all of that, I'd be seeing different countries, different cultures, what our clients are looking for, the building specifics in all of these different countries, which is super interesting. And also you get to meet all of the global teams. After that, I did a little bit of a stint in marketing. This was basically everything apart from Corp comms, but all of the print marketing, consumer marketing, catalogues, websiteand all that. And from there, I started to work quite heavily on other brands within the group. We did the retail concept, we would agree to BM concept for merch. Then in the end, I returned to retail here in Switzerland, did that for about two months. Then I did the sales director role for about 10 days, four to six weeks or something. And then the announcement came. So it was quite linear in the end and quite fast and quite scary. But, here we are.   And I think really, what have I taken from it? I think, it's when you work transversally, it's very, very, very interesting because you get to learn the entire organization inside out, including different countries. I think that gives you a really good head start to then pick up all sorts of different tasks and challenges. But once you understand what production takes, you know I worked for six years on the manufacturer design here for the new manufacturing building, that really gives you the inside out view of how, what comes together. And after that you see the whole commercial side for the boutiques and the exhibitions and that in the end gives you quite a good understanding of the global picture.   And you learn. I mean, at the end of the day you learned that in luxury brand you're telling an aesthetic story and that story has to be consistent across all the different touch points. And the more you are able to combine the unique different requirements of social media versus physical stores versus production facilities into a consistent story that both your colleagues, as well as your clients and everybody can buy into mentally, the easier job you have to explain what your brand stands for and what is on brand and what is not on brand. And I think one of the most difficult things is if you have brands that are completely inconsistently implemented and then have like a front of house in the back of house, it sometimes becomes confusing to take the right decisions. Whereas I think if you have this consistency, then after that, it's much easier for people to make their own judgmentson what's the right thing to do or not, because we're not in a business that's based on purely data and research. I mean, it is increasingly luckily based on some data inside, but you know, the best creations in the world of luxury are not derived by data analytics or marketing briefing or anything like that. It takes a moment of creativity and then you have to do a call whether this is something that fits your brand or not. And that's the decision between hopefully a hit product and something that ends up in the door.     When you say creativity, how important do you think is innovation in the luxury segment, particularly for watches?   Well, if you think about the fact that we're basically in a moment central business, we don't make something that is based on purely functional need, on just functional characteristics. So that moves it away from the ins and outs of checklists, right or wrong assessment of what you're doing. And you're into an area where it's all about the emotion you evoke, it's about things like scarcity, it's about things like perceived hotness and exclusivity and that you can only do by creating. I wouldn't necessarily always call it purely sort of innovation in terms of technical content, but it is really in the entire brand universe, from products to communication, to retail experience, to the way you talk about the brand, of what it activates. Creativity is absolutely key. And keeping that fascination, that’s not killing off the brand into something too predictable or even too boring, it's always this balancing act between newness and the sort of preserving the icons that we've been familiar with for the last 18 years or longer. And that's at the end of the day heritage and DNA versus newness and supply versus scarcity. That's kind of the leavers, which we have to play in our industry to keep our brands relevant and keep our fans.     When did your first interest for watches arise?   The first time I showed interest for watches was kind of a forced situation. My dad was buying his first Patek Nautilus back in the eighties. It felt to me like it took all day and I was sitting there looking at all these watches and I apparently knew this was a quality of mine when I was younger. I must've lost that, I was incredibly patient and waited there for hours on end. And in the end they bought me a Bernese dog cuddly toy. That was kinda my first contact with watches. Then I think I really picked it up again at the university. In my gap year I had the chance to work not only in fashion stores about men's jewelry and accessories, but also in the heart of London.   I think that's the first time when I really started to look into the beauty of these objects, when the shop kind of becomes an art gallery. And I think this is the thing with hard luxury. It's almost like a sculpture museum space rather than just a shop. It's very different from a fashion store. And I started to like that because the complexity that goes into something very simple, it's all about presentation, lighting, quality, etc., but you have all of the requirements of security materials, automation, all of this stuff behind. I really started to enjoy that sort of work. And I walked past the jewelers near my university in Bournemouth. And I started to really feel quite interested in IWC back in the day, because I loved the purity of detail.   I love that engineering approach to the design, that understated confidence in the brand quite a lot. And then it will only be a couple of years later when I moved to Switzerland and I started to go privately to shows like Baselworldand become actually interested in IWC and the first watch that really caught me at the end was 2004 generation of the Aquatimer, which was made about the time when I moved to Switzerland. And then a couple of years into my university and professional experience here, there was a phone call whether we wanted to design an IWC museum. I loved that idea and jumped at itand that was it. I walked into the door here and thoughtI like it and that's never changed.     I’ve also read and found quite interesting that you were a former military athlete. How do you manage to stay in shape nowadays, with such a time consuming job?   I think you have to define at some point what do you mean by staying in shape for yourself. Because in the beginning, when you're at university, you have the time to properly train for competitions and so on. And especially when you're in the world of mountain running, trail running, any series of skiing. Whatever it is, it takes a tremendous amount of prep time. And at some point in your professional life you have to realize that can't be objective anymore. I mean, I admire all of the CEOs that do on eIronman after another. Literally, I'm not that angry at myself that I would get up at three o'clock every morning and do triathlon training. I think once you're in this mode in your life, it never goes away, but you have to realize at some point that you're going to be mildly ambitious. These days, I do about one bigger thing a year, be that a competition or a ride or something else. But I do this for the fun of it and not for beating the world record. It's changed quite a bit.    I don't know how I do it. Well, actually when you're traveling outside of the current lockdown, it's easy. Cause I only have myself to look after when I'm traveling. I enjoy running, whether it’s in Central park, Hong Kong, Red Rock Canyon or Vegas. There's plenty of stunning runs in South beach, Miami. I often pick my hotels in a way that they're convenient for exercising. Just recently, on the last trip before lockdown, it was my first time to Dallas. And we really needed to look at hotels so that they're close to the most promising running routes. Here at home, I try and fit it in whenever I can.      What are your thoughts on sustainability in the watch industry? Is there anything particularly that you are doing to do more sustainable and responsible to the environment?   I think it starts really with the product itself. When I look today at what we have done as humankind over the last 30, 40 years, we we've gone into quite a questionable cycle of throwaway consumption, times where things are being bought and replaced really frequently. We buy clothes and devices and we replace some of them and throw them away. And I think that mechanical watches have always made quite a powerful statement about sustainability, because you creating something that a is not in fashion, but that is timeless beauty. You build it in a way that it's designed to last forever and you maintain it for sometimes hundreds and hundreds of years. There’s really trust in where they’re made in, in one place in the heart of Europe that is preserving jobs, preserving craftsmanship and skills.    At the same time, you are not shipping products 16 times around the planet before they get to end consumers. When you come to Schaffhausen, we were set up right here where I'm sitting in my office. Florentine Ariosto Jones came from America and he set up IWC here and we're still here today, taking the same power from the river that Jones took directly via boats. We take it from the hydroponic station, but it's still the same thing.   When you come to Chicago, I can show you everybody from the initial watch designer to every step of the process of construction, to every step of manufacturing and even to the people who write the advertising headline, who create the movies and design the boutiques. I don't think that today there's many industries in many businesses, where you can still go to a single place and see the creation of something from start to finish. And when you buy it, you have something which really is absolutely unique to that process.    And then on top of that, I think my approach to sustainability is always that for us, it's a mindset. And that's a constant striving for trying to do things better than we did before. Nobody is perfect, but if we can improve our sourcing like we did with the gold sourcing, where we came out on top of the WWF study a couple of years ago, if we start launching sustainability reports, if we reduce the packaging that we ship around, eliminate plastic and non-recycled materials, eliminate plastic as much as we can from the supply chain in the brand globally, then bit by bit you're creating a product that people can feel genuinely good about.    One of the key things for us is that I don't run a front of house, back of house operations. So we welcome up to 10.000 people a year here in Schaffhausenand we show them everything and they can meet the people behind the process. And there's no double floors or hidden dark room. That's really important, because I think increasingly consumers demand, rightfully, to know where things are coming from, how things are being made and what the impact is.   It's something that is also coming out of the current situation. If we question a little bit the way we consume and the way we focus on things that really mean something to us and that we enjoy every time we use them. We wear them and we look after them and we repair them and fix them and maintain them. I do think that there is something to be learned from a throwaway consumption culture. When you think about the fact that all humans on the planet can probably fit into one cubic kilometer, if we pack them in tightly, it the end we deplete all of the resources on that very quickly. It's something to reconsider. And I think making things that are designed to be beautiful in hundreds of years and designed to last, can only be a good thing in that context.     Have you ever been to Amsterdam and if so, how would you describe the experience?   Yes, I've been to Amsterdam a few times. It looks like it has abeautiful quality of life and the right balance between urban density, sort of design, art, expression and instill kind of energy, which I like. Our e-com shipping center for Europe actually sits right in the heart of Amsterdam and there are some practical challenges when you are in an old, historic building in the heart of the city and you're trying to adapt that to modern automated warehouse standards. It’s a beautiful city to be in.    But I would change your airport, I think the distance between the runway and the terminal at Schipol is just ridiculous. To get from your gate to the exit of Schipol youcan probably easily walk for 40 minutes. The craziest spread out airport terminals anywhere on the planet. Zurich is literally, and I'm not saying that because we use it here, one of the most efficient airports where you can fly direct to almost anywhere, but you can get from the aircraft door to your car in literally seven minutes, if you don't have checked luggage, so it's ultra efficient in and out.      What do you have planned in the future, not after Corona really but in general?   As you know and as you're experiencing yourself, we just had a crash course in all sorts of video, remote technology. And that's really driven a whole range of innovation projects very quickly. So we're excited about all the possibilities that we've discovered through remote events and streaming and being able to extend sort of everything that we do or have done traditionally physically into the digital space, where we're suddenly creating a much broader reach and a much better experience for people who weren't able to travel halfway around the globe to take part in something previously. I think there's a lot of exciting things to come and the habits that have been formed in the last couple of months will surely stay with us and are really accelerating that process towards a more integrated world of physical and digital. And I'm very excited about that, because at the end of the day, that's just going to make our brands a better experience and we will be able to provide a better service.        

Small things that matter by KOMONO
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Small things that matter by KOMONO

Accessories This holiday season, we invite you to cherish your memories and save them for a special moment. We designed a hardcase gifting box which contains one of our favorite watches, the Harlow or the Lewis, together with an extra complimentary strap and washi tape. This box can be repurposed to collect your precious letters, notes, drawings, photographs or other small things of sentimental value. Seal it off with the washi tape and re-open for a journey back in time. Besides the gifting box, we offer a curated selection of other small things that matter, from precious watches to sleek snow glasses. In our campaign, we recollect our own memories by inviting some of our dearest friends to talk about what matters to them and share their personal stories.     komono.com This holiday season, we invite you to cherish your memories and save them for a special moment. We designed a hardcase gifting box which contains one of our favorite watches, the Harlow or the Lewis, together with an extra complimentary strap and washi tape. This box can be repurposed to collect your precious letters, notes, drawings, photographs or other small things of sentimental value. Seal it off with the washi tape and re-open for a journey back in time. Besides the gifting box, we offer a curated selection of other small things that matter, from precious watches to sleek snow glasses. In our campaign, we recollect our own memories by inviting some of our dearest friends to talk about what matters to them and share their personal stories.     komono.com

BREITLING LAUNCHES INNOVATIVE, SUSTAINABLE WATCH BOX CREATED ENTIRELY FROM UPCYCLED PLASTIC BOTTLES
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BREITLING LAUNCHES INNOVATIVE, SUSTAINABLE WATCH BOX CREATED ENTIRELY FROM UPCYCLED PLASTIC BOTTLES

Watches Breitling is introducing a foldable, reusable watch box created entirely from upcycled plastic bottles. With the new box, Breitling has effectively reinvented packaging in the watch industry – underscoring the brand’s com- mitment to reducing its environmental impact and replacing the large, heavy watch boxes that have long been an industry mainstay with a small, smart, modular alternative. The sustainable packaging has already been awarded the Efficient Solution Label, given by the Solar Impulse Foundation to solutions that have a positive impact on the environment and the economy.     Breitling’s new watch box is made from materials that can be recycled and reused in future projects. From the fabric to the push buttons that open it – the new watch box is made from 100% upcycled PET bottles, which are among the most widely recyclable types of plastic. Following the cradle-to-cradle – or regenerative – prin- ciple, once the box is no longer needed, it can be re- cycled at a dedicated facility where it will be fed back into the rPET cycle. Breitling’s new watch boxes will be available in early 2021.     Breitling CEO Georges Kern is excited about what the in- dustry’s first 100% recycled and recyclable watch box that is both foldable and reusable means to his brand. He says: “Breitling is committed to doing everything within its sphere of influence to reduce the company’s environmental impact. With that in mind, we started working on a sustainable packaging concept with the goal of optimizing the impact on the environment, and the result has exceeded our ambitions. It has evolved into a positively disruptive element that has affected many different aspects of our packaging, ranging from material to transport and even to how customers will use the box.”     A Reduced Footprint and Fewer Materials:   Before introducing the new watch box, Breitling had already explored ways of reducing the environmental footprint of its packaging. The brand created an alter- native box that was about half the size of the industry standard – and that was only the beginning. The next major step was the introduction of the new watch box, which, in turn, is about half the size of Breitling’s current box. At the same time, Breitling reduced the number of elements used in its packaging from an average of 12 to just 3: the box, the pillow, and the quick-start guide.     Optimized Logistics Flows, Minimized CO2 Emissions:   With its revised packaging concept, Breitling is able to ship the new boxes directly to its markets, meaning that the average distance a box travels is reduced by almost 30%. The smaller size has a positive impact on logistics, particularly since the box can be unfolded and shipped flat. The steps that Breitling has taken since the start of its search for an environmentally friendly watch box have meant a reduction in transport-related CO2 emissions of over 60% compared to those generated by the shipment of its original watch box.   These new, ecologically responsible watch boxes com- plement some of Breitling’s other initiatives, including its partnership with the NGO Ocean Conservancy, which is dedicated to solving the most pressing challenges facing the world’s oceans, including ocean plastics.       Added Benefits for Breitling Customers:   In addition, the pillow inside the box has been given a second purpose with a design that allows it to be used as a travel pouch. Breitling started out with the idea of creating a watch box with reduced environmental impact but the project has resulted in some additional benefits. With the innovative design and multiple uses of the box and pillow elements, customers will appre- ciate the packaging for its practicality and versatility.     The Solar Impulse Efficient Solution Label:   Breitling was delighted to see its new sustainable pack- aging concept awarded the Efficient Solution Label, delivered by the Solar Impulse Foundation. The founda- tion has set itself the goal of selecting 1000 solutions that protect the environment in a financially profitable way, presenting them to decision-makers in order to accelerate the transition to a carbon-neutral economy, and has recognized Breitling’s new packaging as one of them. Thanks to a rigorous evaluation process, the Solar Impulse Efficient Solution Label is the only eval- uation that guarantees the economic profitability of products and processes that protect the environment. Considered a recognition for innovators and a credible marker of quality for governments and companies, it enables decision-makers to find efficient solutions to meet their environmental commitments.     Customers Can Choose the Conventional Box – and Support SUGi:   The classic Breitling watch box will still be available to customers who request it. They will be encouraged to offset the environmental impact of their choice by making a voluntary contribution to SUGi. Breitling is proud to be a partner of this people-powered impact venture, which is committed to making the restoration of biodiversity simple, shareable, and societally trans- formative. The funds will be used to restore biodiver- sity and regenerate ecosystems in SUGi Urban Forests around the world.         Breitling is introducing a foldable, reusable watch box created entirely from upcycled plastic bottles. With the new box, Breitling has effectively reinvented packaging in the watch industry – underscoring the brand’s com- mitment to reducing its environmental impact and replacing the large, heavy watch boxes that have long been an industry mainstay with a small, smart, modular alternative. The sustainable packaging has already been awarded the Efficient Solution Label, given by the Solar Impulse Foundation to solutions that have a positive impact on the environment and the economy.     Breitling’s new watch box is made from materials that can be recycled and reused in future projects. From the fabric to the push buttons that open it – the new watch box is made from 100% upcycled PET bottles, which are among the most widely recyclable types of plastic. Following the cradle-to-cradle – or regenerative – prin- ciple, once the box is no longer needed, it can be re- cycled at a dedicated facility where it will be fed back into the rPET cycle. Breitling’s new watch boxes will be available in early 2021.     Breitling CEO Georges Kern is excited about what the in- dustry’s first 100% recycled and recyclable watch box that is both foldable and reusable means to his brand. He says: “Breitling is committed to doing everything within its sphere of influence to reduce the company’s environmental impact. With that in mind, we started working on a sustainable packaging concept with the goal of optimizing the impact on the environment, and the result has exceeded our ambitions. It has evolved into a positively disruptive element that has affected many different aspects of our packaging, ranging from material to transport and even to how customers will use the box.”     A Reduced Footprint and Fewer Materials:   Before introducing the new watch box, Breitling had already explored ways of reducing the environmental footprint of its packaging. The brand created an alter- native box that was about half the size of the industry standard – and that was only the beginning. The next major step was the introduction of the new watch box, which, in turn, is about half the size of Breitling’s current box. At the same time, Breitling reduced the number of elements used in its packaging from an average of 12 to just 3: the box, the pillow, and the quick-start guide.     Optimized Logistics Flows, Minimized CO2 Emissions:   With its revised packaging concept, Breitling is able to ship the new boxes directly to its markets, meaning that the average distance a box travels is reduced by almost 30%. The smaller size has a positive impact on logistics, particularly since the box can be unfolded and shipped flat. The steps that Breitling has taken since the start of its search for an environmentally friendly watch box have meant a reduction in transport-related CO2 emissions of over 60% compared to those generated by the shipment of its original watch box.   These new, ecologically responsible watch boxes com- plement some of Breitling’s other initiatives, including its partnership with the NGO Ocean Conservancy, which is dedicated to solving the most pressing challenges facing the world’s oceans, including ocean plastics.       Added Benefits for Breitling Customers:   In addition, the pillow inside the box has been given a second purpose with a design that allows it to be used as a travel pouch. Breitling started out with the idea of creating a watch box with reduced environmental impact but the project has resulted in some additional benefits. With the innovative design and multiple uses of the box and pillow elements, customers will appre- ciate the packaging for its practicality and versatility.     The Solar Impulse Efficient Solution Label:   Breitling was delighted to see its new sustainable pack- aging concept awarded the Efficient Solution Label, delivered by the Solar Impulse Foundation. The founda- tion has set itself the goal of selecting 1000 solutions that protect the environment in a financially profitable way, presenting them to decision-makers in order to accelerate the transition to a carbon-neutral economy, and has recognized Breitling’s new packaging as one of them. Thanks to a rigorous evaluation process, the Solar Impulse Efficient Solution Label is the only eval- uation that guarantees the economic profitability of products and processes that protect the environment. Considered a recognition for innovators and a credible marker of quality for governments and companies, it enables decision-makers to find efficient solutions to meet their environmental commitments.     Customers Can Choose the Conventional Box – and Support SUGi:   The classic Breitling watch box will still be available to customers who request it. They will be encouraged to offset the environmental impact of their choice by making a voluntary contribution to SUGi. Breitling is proud to be a partner of this people-powered impact venture, which is committed to making the restoration of biodiversity simple, shareable, and societally trans- formative. The funds will be used to restore biodiver- sity and regenerate ecosystems in SUGi Urban Forests around the world.        

Brand new: Bvlgari High-Jewelry Serpenti Watches
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Brand new: Bvlgari High-Jewelry Serpenti Watches

Jewelry This year, the Roman jeweler follows the enchantment of the rainbow, letting its good-luck-charm spirit slide its way into countless fresh elds of expression and play withevery imaginable combination in the chromatic palette.     The new Rainbow and Colour Wave Serpenti watches embodies the glamour and panache of Italian Extravagance, brought to life in vibrant colour. In a collection that could only come from the Roman Jeweller of Time, Bvlgari dresses up its most iconic design, Serpenti, in brilliant gems. The result? The Maison’s high-jewellery watchesare infused with exquisite preciousness, as Bvlgari takes up the mantle as the Master of Coloured Gemstones, for which the brand is internationally renowned. Bvlgari has always loved colour, and coloured gemstones in particular, believing them to have aunique power to bring joy. Now, it applies its artistry with coloured gems to high-jewellery watches, reinventing signature styles in a riot of rainbow-coloured gems, and akaleidoscope of cuts and sizes. The new collection represents the pinnacle of Bvlgari watchmaking and jewellery-making expertise, colliding with audacious Bvlgari style.     Beyond the multi-coloured creations that capture all of Sir Isaac Newton’s hues, dégradétone-on-tone models add re nement with a chic approach that feels both modern andtimeless. This year, the Roman jeweler follows the enchantment of the rainbow, letting its good-luck-charm spirit slide its way into countless fresh elds of expression and play withevery imaginable combination in the chromatic palette.     The new Rainbow and Colour Wave Serpenti watches embodies the glamour and panache of Italian Extravagance, brought to life in vibrant colour. In a collection that could only come from the Roman Jeweller of Time, Bvlgari dresses up its most iconic design, Serpenti, in brilliant gems. The result? The Maison’s high-jewellery watchesare infused with exquisite preciousness, as Bvlgari takes up the mantle as the Master of Coloured Gemstones, for which the brand is internationally renowned. Bvlgari has always loved colour, and coloured gemstones in particular, believing them to have aunique power to bring joy. Now, it applies its artistry with coloured gems to high-jewellery watches, reinventing signature styles in a riot of rainbow-coloured gems, and akaleidoscope of cuts and sizes. The new collection represents the pinnacle of Bvlgari watchmaking and jewellery-making expertise, colliding with audacious Bvlgari style.     Beyond the multi-coloured creations that capture all of Sir Isaac Newton’s hues, dégradétone-on-tone models add re nement with a chic approach that feels both modern andtimeless.

 My BOY∙FRIEND BY CHANEL
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My BOY∙FRIEND BY CHANEL

Watches Since 2015, the BOY∙FRIEND watch holds within the art of twisting the elements from the masculine wardrobe so dear to Mademoiselle Chanel. With its enigmatic name it doesn't think twice about shaking up the classic, feminine watchmaking codes.   CHANEL, committed to no longer using exotic leather straps for its watches, presents MY BOY∙FRIEND with a large selection of straps to personalize your BOY∙FRIEND watch. The decision was based on the increasing complexity of sourcing exotic skins that meet CHANEL's high standards in terms of both ethics (traceability guarantee, breeding conditions) and quality.   Combine different watch sizes with colored straps in calfskin, alligator motif or quilted motif, tweed, and tweed motif in beige gold or steel. Play with MY BOY∙FRIEND.     #CHANELBoyFriend #CHANELWatches Since 2015, the BOY∙FRIEND watch holds within the art of twisting the elements from the masculine wardrobe so dear to Mademoiselle Chanel. With its enigmatic name it doesn't think twice about shaking up the classic, feminine watchmaking codes.   CHANEL, committed to no longer using exotic leather straps for its watches, presents MY BOY∙FRIEND with a large selection of straps to personalize your BOY∙FRIEND watch. The decision was based on the increasing complexity of sourcing exotic skins that meet CHANEL's high standards in terms of both ethics (traceability guarantee, breeding conditions) and quality.   Combine different watch sizes with colored straps in calfskin, alligator motif or quilted motif, tweed, and tweed motif in beige gold or steel. Play with MY BOY∙FRIEND.     #CHANELBoyFriend #CHANELWatches

IN THE SPOTLIGHT: BREITLING’S CHRONOMAT FOR WOMEN
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IN THE SPOTLIGHT: BREITLING’S CHRONOMAT FOR WOMEN

Watches Lights, camera, double debut: we’re thrilled to present Breitling’s new Spotlight Squad as we launch our line of Chronomat 36 and 32 watches – for women of purpose, action, and style.     “Our inspiration for this new collection is the Breitling woman herself, as represented in our #SQUADONAMISSION campaign: a woman of purpose, action, and style who’s at the top of her game,” says Breitling CEO Georges Kern.     Some people have mastered the art of not only shining in the spotlight, but also shining their light on others and inspiring change in the world. Three of them are on our Spotlight Squad: Charlize Theron, Misty Copeland, and Yao Chen. These extraordinary entertainers are at the top of their game, and have shattered the stereo­ types clinging to their gender and respective fields. Originally from South Africa, Oscar­winner Charlize Theron has proven her versatility in numerous roles and genres. In 2004, she won the Academy Award for Best Actress after playing a serial killer in Monster. In 2019, she starred in and co­produced the dramaBombshell, for which she was nominated for another Academy Award. In 2007, dancer Misty Copeland was only the second African­American woman to be promoted to soloist with American Ballet Theatre (ABT); in 2015, she was the first African­American woman to become a princi­ pal dancer. That year, Time magazine named her one of the world’s 100 most influential people. Chinese TV and film actress Yao Chen has won many awards, including the Audience Choice category of China’s Golden Eagle Award (2010) and Best Actress at the Busan International Film Festival (2016, Asian Content). In 2019, she won the Golden Mulberry Award for Lifetime Achievement at the Far East Film Festival.     A Passion for More:   In addition to excelling on screen and on stage, these three are not afraid to take control of their own story­ lines while trying to improve the lives of others. Indeed, they form a tenacious squad of women who stand up for their beliefs and the issues closest to their hearts. Breitling CEO Georges Kern adds: “Who better than Charlize Theron, Misty Copeland, and Yao Chen to turn the spotlight on major global causes as they redefine what it means to be a strong woman? Three leading stars known for being fierce and pushing boundaries. What binds them together is the Spotlight Squad and Breitling’s dedication to change, diversity, and reshap­ ing the world we live in.” “And now – dedicated to women – the new Chronomat 36 and 32 collection embodies flair, confidence, and an active lifestyle.”     Ready for any Mission:   With its commitment to core values and innovation, Breitling is also about pushing boundaries, whether it is high above the clouds, on the ground, or deep below the ocean waves. As versatile and attractive as the Spotlight Squad, its latest collection – the Chronomat 36 and 32 series – takes women wherever they want to go. Breitling’s first­ever Chronomat designed for women is suitable for any mission. While its roots are in the 1980s, this forward­looking timepiece is dedicated to innovative women of today who are reshaping atti­ tudes and challenging stereotypes. Sporty yet elegant, this modern­retro­inspired watch easily takes its wearer from business meeting to the beach – and everywhere in between. It symbolizes competence and effortless style.     Dutch Ambassadors:   Igone de Jongh trained at the National Ballet Academy in Amsterdam and The Royal Ballet School in London. Subsequently, she is promoted to principal soloist at the age of 24. Trust, perseverance and optimism are her core values. Even when she ended up wrong at twelve with the risk of never being able to dance again, she has not given up on her dream. What followed was an impressive career, which, thanks to her unique way of movement, brought about packed houses and standing ovations.   “For me, time is being in the moment: honest, sincere. Train and practice until my coordination and timing are right - are one. Then you become weightless, as if time stood still. Moments that make everything worthwhile. ”     In addition to being an actress and film maker, Hanna Verboom is also a social entrepreneur. Hanna is the founder of Get It Done (2007), an organization that inspires and activates people to work for others. At the end of 2014, she founded Cinetree, an on-demand film platform that, together with experts, makes a selection of inspiring films and documentaries every month. In addition to her own businesses, Hanna is committed to local, sustainable brands and social initiatives. Big dreams, small steps, this is her entrepreneurial mantra.   “Time is everything, it's the one thing we can't hold on to. It's the one thing we can't control or buy. That is why I consciously choose to only do things that I really believe in. ”     Yootha Wong-Loi-Sing is an actress and singer. She starred in LOVE IS_, a series for the Oprah Winfrey Network, and in REALLY LOVE, for which she received a prestigious acting award at the American festival SXSW. Growth is the great motivator in her life. During the filming of the lead role in 'How expensive was the sugar', an impressive time arose in which she could use her great talent and learned the importance of gathering knowledge. She received a nomination for a Golden Calf for this role.   “For me, time is surrender, showing myself my most vulnerable side. Time is endless and has no beginning and no end. It's about how much you enjoyed something, with your heart, the purest compass. ” Lights, camera, double debut: we’re thrilled to present Breitling’s new Spotlight Squad as we launch our line of Chronomat 36 and 32 watches – for women of purpose, action, and style.     “Our inspiration for this new collection is the Breitling woman herself, as represented in our #SQUADONAMISSION campaign: a woman of purpose, action, and style who’s at the top of her game,” says Breitling CEO Georges Kern.     Some people have mastered the art of not only shining in the spotlight, but also shining their light on others and inspiring change in the world. Three of them are on our Spotlight Squad: Charlize Theron, Misty Copeland, and Yao Chen. These extraordinary entertainers are at the top of their game, and have shattered the stereo­ types clinging to their gender and respective fields. Originally from South Africa, Oscar­winner Charlize Theron has proven her versatility in numerous roles and genres. In 2004, she won the Academy Award for Best Actress after playing a serial killer in Monster. In 2019, she starred in and co­produced the dramaBombshell, for which she was nominated for another Academy Award. In 2007, dancer Misty Copeland was only the second African­American woman to be promoted to soloist with American Ballet Theatre (ABT); in 2015, she was the first African­American woman to become a princi­ pal dancer. That year, Time magazine named her one of the world’s 100 most influential people. Chinese TV and film actress Yao Chen has won many awards, including the Audience Choice category of China’s Golden Eagle Award (2010) and Best Actress at the Busan International Film Festival (2016, Asian Content). In 2019, she won the Golden Mulberry Award for Lifetime Achievement at the Far East Film Festival.     A Passion for More:   In addition to excelling on screen and on stage, these three are not afraid to take control of their own story­ lines while trying to improve the lives of others. Indeed, they form a tenacious squad of women who stand up for their beliefs and the issues closest to their hearts. Breitling CEO Georges Kern adds: “Who better than Charlize Theron, Misty Copeland, and Yao Chen to turn the spotlight on major global causes as they redefine what it means to be a strong woman? Three leading stars known for being fierce and pushing boundaries. What binds them together is the Spotlight Squad and Breitling’s dedication to change, diversity, and reshap­ ing the world we live in.” “And now – dedicated to women – the new Chronomat 36 and 32 collection embodies flair, confidence, and an active lifestyle.”     Ready for any Mission:   With its commitment to core values and innovation, Breitling is also about pushing boundaries, whether it is high above the clouds, on the ground, or deep below the ocean waves. As versatile and attractive as the Spotlight Squad, its latest collection – the Chronomat 36 and 32 series – takes women wherever they want to go. Breitling’s first­ever Chronomat designed for women is suitable for any mission. While its roots are in the 1980s, this forward­looking timepiece is dedicated to innovative women of today who are reshaping atti­ tudes and challenging stereotypes. Sporty yet elegant, this modern­retro­inspired watch easily takes its wearer from business meeting to the beach – and everywhere in between. It symbolizes competence and effortless style.     Dutch Ambassadors:   Igone de Jongh trained at the National Ballet Academy in Amsterdam and The Royal Ballet School in London. Subsequently, she is promoted to principal soloist at the age of 24. Trust, perseverance and optimism are her core values. Even when she ended up wrong at twelve with the risk of never being able to dance again, she has not given up on her dream. What followed was an impressive career, which, thanks to her unique way of movement, brought about packed houses and standing ovations.   “For me, time is being in the moment: honest, sincere. Train and practice until my coordination and timing are right - are one. Then you become weightless, as if time stood still. Moments that make everything worthwhile. ”     In addition to being an actress and film maker, Hanna Verboom is also a social entrepreneur. Hanna is the founder of Get It Done (2007), an organization that inspires and activates people to work for others. At the end of 2014, she founded Cinetree, an on-demand film platform that, together with experts, makes a selection of inspiring films and documentaries every month. In addition to her own businesses, Hanna is committed to local, sustainable brands and social initiatives. Big dreams, small steps, this is her entrepreneurial mantra.   “Time is everything, it's the one thing we can't hold on to. It's the one thing we can't control or buy. That is why I consciously choose to only do things that I really believe in. ”     Yootha Wong-Loi-Sing is an actress and singer. She starred in LOVE IS_, a series for the Oprah Winfrey Network, and in REALLY LOVE, for which she received a prestigious acting award at the American festival SXSW. Growth is the great motivator in her life. During the filming of the lead role in 'How expensive was the sugar', an impressive time arose in which she could use her great talent and learned the importance of gathering knowledge. She received a nomination for a Golden Calf for this role.   “For me, time is surrender, showing myself my most vulnerable side. Time is endless and has no beginning and no end. It's about how much you enjoyed something, with your heart, the purest compass. ”

Kiton x Chopard
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Kiton x Chopard

Watches With the L.U.C XP Il Sarto Kiton timepiece, Chopard is introducing its first partnership with the Kiton Ateliers, masters of Italian tailoring. This strictly limited edition of 100 ultra-thin watches in beadblasted DLC-coated steel is soberly attired with a houndstooth-patterned dial and a slate-coloured cashmere strap lined with red alligator leather. Mechanical excellence is guaranteed by the L.U.C 96.53-L mechanical movement with automatic winding, equipped with a tungsten micro-rotor and Chopard Twin technology ensuring a power reserve lasting more than two days. The best of Swiss Haute Horlogerie and Italian sprezzatura.     Expertise: Known for its elegance imbued with a spirit of purity and simplicity, the ultra-thin L.U.C XP timepiece is nattily attired in a ‘suit’ made to measure by the artisans of the Kiton Ateliers. The encounter between the Swiss watchmaker and the Neapolitan couturier appears to have been written in the stars. Both representing family Maisons committed to the same vision of craftsmanship and tradition, these two great names in masculine elegance have combined their know-how in creating the L.U.C XP Il Sarto Kiton watch. On the one hand, Karl-Friedrich Scheufele – Co-President of Chopard and the man behind the creation of Chopard Manufacture in 1996 – with his vision of traditional Haute Horlogerie firmly focused on the contemporary world and 21st century innovations. On the other hand, the fertile creativity of the disciples of Ciro Paone, the founder of the Kiton ateliers in 1968, who believed that: "Men are an inexhaustible source of inspiration, each of their steps is a call to creation".    "L.U.C. is a collection of Haute Horlogerie watches that stands out for its distinctive character. Our partnership with Kiton is an entirely logical move, in that over the years our two family Maisons have proven the excellence of their craftsmanship and their fertile creativity”, says Karl-Friedrich Scheufele. The result is a highly exclusive timepiece, produced in a numbered 100-piece limited edition.     Allure:   First and foremost, the L.U.C XP Il Sarto Kiton is perfectly proportioned thanks to a 40 mm diameter case that is a mere 7.2 mm thick. This ultra-thin look enables genuine wearer comfort and imposes an aura of simplicity, two imperatives that sum up the philosophy of the L.U.C collection and contribute to its elegance, thereby echoing Ciro Paone's motto: "Elegance must be associated with simplicity".    The allure of this timepiece also lies in its chromatic uniformity: a beautiful black silhouette, subtly carved out from the slate grey shades of the beadblasted DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon) steel case, dial and strap.   Achieved by galvanic treatment and lacquered finishes, the Kiton Ateliers’ signature is evident at first glance on the brass dial thanks to the Neapolitan tailor's houndstooth motif that has been a firm favourite since it purchased at auction the wardrobe of King Edward VIII of England, who was hailed, if not for his ephemeral reign, at least for his elegance as an acknowledged dandy.    Against this dark background, the golden Arabic numerals matching the hour-markers and fusée-type Dauphine hands make the hours and minutes perfectly legible. The quarter-hour indications and the Kiton logo at 6 o'clock add a subtle red touch that is picked up in the topstitching on the strap. Testimony to the same artisanal approach, the latter is handmade, free of any chemical treatment and comes in a soft blend of Mongolian cashmere, wool and flannel with a slight touch of elastane, ensuring enhanced wearer comfort. This opulent wristband is lined with red alligator leather as is a second black alligator leather strap also sold with the model.     Accuracy:   Because all the timepieces produced in Chopard Manufacture's watchmaking workshops are amply matched by mechanical perfection, the L.U.C XP Il Sarto Kiton incorporates an in-house movement, the L.U.C 96.53-L calibre. Ultra-thin at just 3.3 mm thick, this is an evolution of Chopard Manufacture's first L.U.C 96.01-L movement, synonymous with watchmaking excellence and applied in a multitude of new interpretations since it was first presented in 1996.    Like its illustrious ancestor, and thanks to Chopard Twin technology, the mechanical movement L.U.C 96.53-L with automatic winding is equipped with twin barrels ensuring a 58-hour power reserve. It is powered by a micro-rotor made of tungsten, a high-density alloy facilitating optimal winding. Featuring movement bridges finely decorated with "Côtes de Genève", the L.U.C XP Il Sarto Kiton watch is equally beautiful inside and out, which is precisely why its precious calibre is visible through a transparent case-back.     L.U.C: a collection for gentlemen:   The L.U.C. collection embodies the perfect blend of virility and sensitivity, humility and charisma that define the modern-day gentleman. It epitomises an ideal alliance between aesthetics and mechanics, celebrated by those who make their existence a quest for fine craftsmanship and regard inward and outward beauty as an art of living. It is for them that Chopard – an independent family Maison drawing upon the ancestral expertise of its master-watchmakers – performs all stages of production in its Geneva and Fleurier workshops: from movement design to quality control through product design, case stamping and machining, the manufacture of movement components, as well as their hand decoration, surface treatment, polishing, assembly and adjustment. With the L.U.C XP Il Sarto Kiton timepiece, Chopard is introducing its first partnership with the Kiton Ateliers, masters of Italian tailoring. This strictly limited edition of 100 ultra-thin watches in beadblasted DLC-coated steel is soberly attired with a houndstooth-patterned dial and a slate-coloured cashmere strap lined with red alligator leather. Mechanical excellence is guaranteed by the L.U.C 96.53-L mechanical movement with automatic winding, equipped with a tungsten micro-rotor and Chopard Twin technology ensuring a power reserve lasting more than two days. The best of Swiss Haute Horlogerie and Italian sprezzatura.     Expertise: Known for its elegance imbued with a spirit of purity and simplicity, the ultra-thin L.U.C XP timepiece is nattily attired in a ‘suit’ made to measure by the artisans of the Kiton Ateliers. The encounter between the Swiss watchmaker and the Neapolitan couturier appears to have been written in the stars. Both representing family Maisons committed to the same vision of craftsmanship and tradition, these two great names in masculine elegance have combined their know-how in creating the L.U.C XP Il Sarto Kiton watch. On the one hand, Karl-Friedrich Scheufele – Co-President of Chopard and the man behind the creation of Chopard Manufacture in 1996 – with his vision of traditional Haute Horlogerie firmly focused on the contemporary world and 21st century innovations. On the other hand, the fertile creativity of the disciples of Ciro Paone, the founder of the Kiton ateliers in 1968, who believed that: "Men are an inexhaustible source of inspiration, each of their steps is a call to creation".    "L.U.C. is a collection of Haute Horlogerie watches that stands out for its distinctive character. Our partnership with Kiton is an entirely logical move, in that over the years our two family Maisons have proven the excellence of their craftsmanship and their fertile creativity”, says Karl-Friedrich Scheufele. The result is a highly exclusive timepiece, produced in a numbered 100-piece limited edition.     Allure:   First and foremost, the L.U.C XP Il Sarto Kiton is perfectly proportioned thanks to a 40 mm diameter case that is a mere 7.2 mm thick. This ultra-thin look enables genuine wearer comfort and imposes an aura of simplicity, two imperatives that sum up the philosophy of the L.U.C collection and contribute to its elegance, thereby echoing Ciro Paone's motto: "Elegance must be associated with simplicity".    The allure of this timepiece also lies in its chromatic uniformity: a beautiful black silhouette, subtly carved out from the slate grey shades of the beadblasted DLC (Diamond-Like Carbon) steel case, dial and strap.   Achieved by galvanic treatment and lacquered finishes, the Kiton Ateliers’ signature is evident at first glance on the brass dial thanks to the Neapolitan tailor's houndstooth motif that has been a firm favourite since it purchased at auction the wardrobe of King Edward VIII of England, who was hailed, if not for his ephemeral reign, at least for his elegance as an acknowledged dandy.    Against this dark background, the golden Arabic numerals matching the hour-markers and fusée-type Dauphine hands make the hours and minutes perfectly legible. The quarter-hour indications and the Kiton logo at 6 o'clock add a subtle red touch that is picked up in the topstitching on the strap. Testimony to the same artisanal approach, the latter is handmade, free of any chemical treatment and comes in a soft blend of Mongolian cashmere, wool and flannel with a slight touch of elastane, ensuring enhanced wearer comfort. This opulent wristband is lined with red alligator leather as is a second black alligator leather strap also sold with the model.     Accuracy:   Because all the timepieces produced in Chopard Manufacture's watchmaking workshops are amply matched by mechanical perfection, the L.U.C XP Il Sarto Kiton incorporates an in-house movement, the L.U.C 96.53-L calibre. Ultra-thin at just 3.3 mm thick, this is an evolution of Chopard Manufacture's first L.U.C 96.01-L movement, synonymous with watchmaking excellence and applied in a multitude of new interpretations since it was first presented in 1996.    Like its illustrious ancestor, and thanks to Chopard Twin technology, the mechanical movement L.U.C 96.53-L with automatic winding is equipped with twin barrels ensuring a 58-hour power reserve. It is powered by a micro-rotor made of tungsten, a high-density alloy facilitating optimal winding. Featuring movement bridges finely decorated with "Côtes de Genève", the L.U.C XP Il Sarto Kiton watch is equally beautiful inside and out, which is precisely why its precious calibre is visible through a transparent case-back.     L.U.C: a collection for gentlemen:   The L.U.C. collection embodies the perfect blend of virility and sensitivity, humility and charisma that define the modern-day gentleman. It epitomises an ideal alliance between aesthetics and mechanics, celebrated by those who make their existence a quest for fine craftsmanship and regard inward and outward beauty as an art of living. It is for them that Chopard – an independent family Maison drawing upon the ancestral expertise of its master-watchmakers – performs all stages of production in its Geneva and Fleurier workshops: from movement design to quality control through product design, case stamping and machining, the manufacture of movement components, as well as their hand decoration, surface treatment, polishing, assembly and adjustment.

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