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REINE DE NAPLES CŒUR ETERNAL LOVE BY BREGUET
1001

REINE DE NAPLES CŒUR ETERNAL LOVE BY BREGUET

Watches With delicacy and subtlety, and as Valentine's Day approaches, Breguet enlivens the face of the Reine de Naples with a new invention: a hand in the shape of a changing heart. Its curves expand or contract, as if by magic and very gently, as it makes its way around the elongated oval dial. Rose gold and diamonds add to the radiance of this sleek creation, with a hint of vermilion. This exclusive Cœur, or Heart edition, limited to 28 numbered pieces and accompanied by a matching clutch as its case, is reserved for a selection of Breguet boutiques.     The first wristwatch ever made, the model no. 2639 was a treasure trove of ingenuity right from its origins in 1810. Breguet was inspired by this innovative watch and by the client, Caroline Murat, Queen of Naples, who commissioned it, for its iconic contemporary collection. Today, for its new creation dedicated to women and to love, the House of Breguet has designed a new system protected by several patents. The magic of an innovative mechanism changes the heart shape of the minute hand – off-center at 6 o’clock – depending on its position on the oval dial. Breguet, which has always developed special watches dedicated to women, is thus faithful to its history and its practice. For this new creation, its curves stretch as the hand moves across the top half of the dial, and become more rounded at the bottom. A real heart that beats... A pared-down dial highlights the delicate elegance and great romanticism of this piece. Touches of vermilion red add to the intensity of the lines of the hours chapter, the leather strap, and the crown, which is adorned with a ruby. This luxurious and exclusive composition is brought to perfection with rose gold and diamonds. This model, reserved for brand boutiques, is presented in an envelope clutch bag finished in grained calfskin leather and dyed vermilion red to match the strap of the Reine de Naples Coeur.     Celebrating Delicacy and Romance:     For the face of this new Reine de Naples, Breguet has opted for understated elegance. The heart-shaped minute hand moves over a sapphire-crystal dial, lacquered in white for a very soft and subtle translucent effect. Its tip, marked by a subtle red heart, indicates the minutes on the hours chapter, punctuated by tiny hearts every five minutes. For better readability, something dear to Breguet, the quarter numerals are distinguished by their size and their outline, lacquered with vermilion. The hour, indicated by a drop of purple lacquer, appears in the center through a window. The rose gold of the dial flange and bezel is set with 128 diamonds. The setting of the folding buckle, also in gold, echoes the brilliance of the case, amounting to a total of approximately 0.94 carats.     The Magic of a Vibrant Heart, an ode to love:     The latest invention of the House of Breguet is a minute hand composed of two independent arms, capable of twisting thanks to an ingenious set of gears to create a heart that is extended at 12 o’clock and more rounded at 6 o’clock. Equipped with an oval-shaped cam – mirroring the curves so characteristic of the Reine de Naples – the mechanism allows each of these arms to move at different speeds. This innovation, created exclusively for the Reine de Naples, is protected by four patents. The gears of this complication, like all the components of the caliber, are all carefully hand-finished in the Breguet tradition – whether visible or invisible to the eye. The sapphire-crystal caseback of the rose gold case reveals the movement of the caliber, the 78A0. On the gold rim, the individual number of the watch is engraved, recorded in the archives of the House of Breguet, which have been maintained since the end of the eighteenth century.     With the Reine de Naples Cœur, Breguet conjures up the magic of love, thanks to an innovative hand that traces a heart of ever-changing shape. The delicate and unexpected combination of technique and romanticism.   With delicacy and subtlety, and as Valentine's Day approaches, Breguet enlivens the face of the Reine de Naples with a new invention: a hand in the shape of a changing heart. Its curves expand or contract, as if by magic and very gently, as it makes its way around the elongated oval dial. Rose gold and diamonds add to the radiance of this sleek creation, with a hint of vermilion. This exclusive Cœur, or Heart edition, limited to 28 numbered pieces and accompanied by a matching clutch as its case, is reserved for a selection of Breguet boutiques.     The first wristwatch ever made, the model no. 2639 was a treasure trove of ingenuity right from its origins in 1810. Breguet was inspired by this innovative watch and by the client, Caroline Murat, Queen of Naples, who commissioned it, for its iconic contemporary collection. Today, for its new creation dedicated to women and to love, the House of Breguet has designed a new system protected by several patents. The magic of an innovative mechanism changes the heart shape of the minute hand – off-center at 6 o’clock – depending on its position on the oval dial. Breguet, which has always developed special watches dedicated to women, is thus faithful to its history and its practice. For this new creation, its curves stretch as the hand moves across the top half of the dial, and become more rounded at the bottom. A real heart that beats... A pared-down dial highlights the delicate elegance and great romanticism of this piece. Touches of vermilion red add to the intensity of the lines of the hours chapter, the leather strap, and the crown, which is adorned with a ruby. This luxurious and exclusive composition is brought to perfection with rose gold and diamonds. This model, reserved for brand boutiques, is presented in an envelope clutch bag finished in grained calfskin leather and dyed vermilion red to match the strap of the Reine de Naples Coeur.     Celebrating Delicacy and Romance:     For the face of this new Reine de Naples, Breguet has opted for understated elegance. The heart-shaped minute hand moves over a sapphire-crystal dial, lacquered in white for a very soft and subtle translucent effect. Its tip, marked by a subtle red heart, indicates the minutes on the hours chapter, punctuated by tiny hearts every five minutes. For better readability, something dear to Breguet, the quarter numerals are distinguished by their size and their outline, lacquered with vermilion. The hour, indicated by a drop of purple lacquer, appears in the center through a window. The rose gold of the dial flange and bezel is set with 128 diamonds. The setting of the folding buckle, also in gold, echoes the brilliance of the case, amounting to a total of approximately 0.94 carats.     The Magic of a Vibrant Heart, an ode to love:     The latest invention of the House of Breguet is a minute hand composed of two independent arms, capable of twisting thanks to an ingenious set of gears to create a heart that is extended at 12 o’clock and more rounded at 6 o’clock. Equipped with an oval-shaped cam – mirroring the curves so characteristic of the Reine de Naples – the mechanism allows each of these arms to move at different speeds. This innovation, created exclusively for the Reine de Naples, is protected by four patents. The gears of this complication, like all the components of the caliber, are all carefully hand-finished in the Breguet tradition – whether visible or invisible to the eye. The sapphire-crystal caseback of the rose gold case reveals the movement of the caliber, the 78A0. On the gold rim, the individual number of the watch is engraved, recorded in the archives of the House of Breguet, which have been maintained since the end of the eighteenth century.     With the Reine de Naples Cœur, Breguet conjures up the magic of love, thanks to an innovative hand that traces a heart of ever-changing shape. The delicate and unexpected combination of technique and romanticism.  

The Quest for Nature with Tudor
995

The Quest for Nature with Tudor

Watches TUDOR joins Morgan Bourc’his in an ambitious new project, a documentary that takes him from the temperate waters of the Mediterranean to the icy fjords of Norway in search of whales.     In The Quest for Nature, a documentary lm initiated by underwater chief operator and director Jean-Charles Granjon, world freediving champion and friend of TUDOR, Morgan Bourc’his travels to northern Norway on a quest to reconnect with the wild. Like every hero on a quest, Morgan must leave the “ordinary world” behind before setting o on this adventure. His challenge is to locate, then swim with some of the ocean’s most powerful wild creatures - and some of the best adapted to their environment - in dark, bitterly cold winter seas. On his quest for the perfect meeting with orcas and whales, he goes in search of those for whom these animals are part of their daily lives. Spildra, a mysterious island steeped in history and legend, lies at the heart of all his encounters. On Spildra, Morgan meets an authentic character who knows remote ords like the back of his hand; a “gatekeeper” who will introduce him to the people and animals that are vital to his mission. Audun Rikardsen, a former whaler, is one of them. Now a marine biologist, he has become an expert in his eld. He helps Morgan to understand the importance of fully accepting your cultural heritage in order to transform it and use it to the bene t of living creatures. He also understands the subtle ties that connect us to marine mammals, ones that could turn any of us into a participant either in their demise or in the regeneration of their population.     The history of TUDOR is scattered with adventurers who have gone beyond their own limitations and those of humanity: from the vision of Hans Wilsdorf, the brand’s founder and an innovator of early wristwatches, to the determination of the explorers of Greenland’s icy terrain in the 1950s and the bravery of professional divers who explore the ve oceans. Today, Morgan Bourc’his embodies this pioneering spirit and, The Quest for Nature, is helping to continue this tradition. A friend of TUDOR and an accomplished athlete with multiple world championship titles, here he reinvents himself as an observer of the natural world and documentary maker in one of the most hostile environments imaginable for a diver, in contact with some of the biggest creatures on the planet. TUDOR joins Morgan Bourc’his in an ambitious new project, a documentary that takes him from the temperate waters of the Mediterranean to the icy fjords of Norway in search of whales.     In The Quest for Nature, a documentary lm initiated by underwater chief operator and director Jean-Charles Granjon, world freediving champion and friend of TUDOR, Morgan Bourc’his travels to northern Norway on a quest to reconnect with the wild. Like every hero on a quest, Morgan must leave the “ordinary world” behind before setting o on this adventure. His challenge is to locate, then swim with some of the ocean’s most powerful wild creatures - and some of the best adapted to their environment - in dark, bitterly cold winter seas. On his quest for the perfect meeting with orcas and whales, he goes in search of those for whom these animals are part of their daily lives. Spildra, a mysterious island steeped in history and legend, lies at the heart of all his encounters. On Spildra, Morgan meets an authentic character who knows remote ords like the back of his hand; a “gatekeeper” who will introduce him to the people and animals that are vital to his mission. Audun Rikardsen, a former whaler, is one of them. Now a marine biologist, he has become an expert in his eld. He helps Morgan to understand the importance of fully accepting your cultural heritage in order to transform it and use it to the bene t of living creatures. He also understands the subtle ties that connect us to marine mammals, ones that could turn any of us into a participant either in their demise or in the regeneration of their population.     The history of TUDOR is scattered with adventurers who have gone beyond their own limitations and those of humanity: from the vision of Hans Wilsdorf, the brand’s founder and an innovator of early wristwatches, to the determination of the explorers of Greenland’s icy terrain in the 1950s and the bravery of professional divers who explore the ve oceans. Today, Morgan Bourc’his embodies this pioneering spirit and, The Quest for Nature, is helping to continue this tradition. A friend of TUDOR and an accomplished athlete with multiple world championship titles, here he reinvents himself as an observer of the natural world and documentary maker in one of the most hostile environments imaginable for a diver, in contact with some of the biggest creatures on the planet.

Find Your Balance: Montblanc Summit Lite
899

Find Your Balance: Montblanc Summit Lite

Watches Montblanc expands its wearable assortment with a sleek smartwatch built for those who strive for better health, physical performance and overall wellbeing     With the introduction of the Summit Lite smartwatch Montblanc brings a burst of energy to its expanding Summit smartwatch line-up. Conceived for an emerging generation of luxury smartwatch users seeking wearables that match their healthy and active lifestyles, the watch distinguishes itself from other Montblanc wearables with its fresh, disruptive design and streamlined functionalities to assist with fitness, performance and wellbeing.     “With the renewed focus on health, fitness, mindfulness and wellbeing we are witnessing today, our goal was to create a smartwatch that had just the right tools to support its owner throughout the day, in a way that was instinctive and effortless for today’s business lifestyle customer. Named Summit Lite after its lightweight design, it aligns with its wearer’s activities and is built for high performing individuals who are constantly on the move and blend their workout routine with their work routine,” explains Nicolas Baretzki, Montblanc CEO.     The smartwatch’s lightweight 43 mm case is crafted from recycled aluminium and robust stainless steel giving it its active, high performance appearance, while the eye-catching form is modern and sleek. The case comes in either a matte black or matte silver-grey colour, and is paired with either a sporty fabric or rubber strap, creating four different design variations. Each smartwatch features a crisp 1.19“ AMOLED display with Gorilla Cover Glass. It also offers an updated heart rate monitor and GPS, and is water-resistant to 5 ATM. Like other Summit watches, the technology and software is powered with Wear OS by Google which is compatible with both Android and iOS smartphones.     In addition to the full Wear OS by Google ecosystem of apps and services, Montblanc has developed proprietary apps based on proven algorithms that distinguish the Summit Lite smartwatch and add dedicated value for its owner. They include:    Cardio Coach - The Cardio Coach app gives personalized workout recommendations based on your current fitness level (VO2 max) and live coaching advice. It keeps track of the users' progress and adjusts accordingly. The users get to improve their fitness according to their own goals and at the wanted pace – for ideal healthy and long-lasting results.   Body Energy – The app tracks mental and physical exhaustion to show the users’ current energy level. It incorporates data from your sleep, activity and stress level. The users see the influence of their behavior, on their energy level and can therefore adapt their plans to optimize their daily energy use.   Sleep – The app tracks the users’ sleep in detail: length, quality and sleep phases. It issues personalized recommendations to improve the sleep quality and thus the daily energy level. The user gets a clear understanding of their sleeping patterns and are enabled to try to actively improve them.   Stress - The app tracks physical and mental stress levels and gives advice at strategic times. The users get more clarity over their body’s response to stressful events and are provided proactive recommendations to do breathing exercises during stressful times.       The Summit Lite smartwatch was developed with Montblanc’s sustainability goals in mind featuring a case crafted out of recycled aluminium, and sustainable packaging made from 100% paper.     The Montblanc Summit Lite smart watch is available as of January 2021 in selected markets from Montblanc boutiques. For more information visit www.montblanc.com     Montblanc expands its wearable assortment with a sleek smartwatch built for those who strive for better health, physical performance and overall wellbeing     With the introduction of the Summit Lite smartwatch Montblanc brings a burst of energy to its expanding Summit smartwatch line-up. Conceived for an emerging generation of luxury smartwatch users seeking wearables that match their healthy and active lifestyles, the watch distinguishes itself from other Montblanc wearables with its fresh, disruptive design and streamlined functionalities to assist with fitness, performance and wellbeing.     “With the renewed focus on health, fitness, mindfulness and wellbeing we are witnessing today, our goal was to create a smartwatch that had just the right tools to support its owner throughout the day, in a way that was instinctive and effortless for today’s business lifestyle customer. Named Summit Lite after its lightweight design, it aligns with its wearer’s activities and is built for high performing individuals who are constantly on the move and blend their workout routine with their work routine,” explains Nicolas Baretzki, Montblanc CEO.     The smartwatch’s lightweight 43 mm case is crafted from recycled aluminium and robust stainless steel giving it its active, high performance appearance, while the eye-catching form is modern and sleek. The case comes in either a matte black or matte silver-grey colour, and is paired with either a sporty fabric or rubber strap, creating four different design variations. Each smartwatch features a crisp 1.19“ AMOLED display with Gorilla Cover Glass. It also offers an updated heart rate monitor and GPS, and is water-resistant to 5 ATM. Like other Summit watches, the technology and software is powered with Wear OS by Google which is compatible with both Android and iOS smartphones.     In addition to the full Wear OS by Google ecosystem of apps and services, Montblanc has developed proprietary apps based on proven algorithms that distinguish the Summit Lite smartwatch and add dedicated value for its owner. They include:    Cardio Coach - The Cardio Coach app gives personalized workout recommendations based on your current fitness level (VO2 max) and live coaching advice. It keeps track of the users' progress and adjusts accordingly. The users get to improve their fitness according to their own goals and at the wanted pace – for ideal healthy and long-lasting results.   Body Energy – The app tracks mental and physical exhaustion to show the users’ current energy level. It incorporates data from your sleep, activity and stress level. The users see the influence of their behavior, on their energy level and can therefore adapt their plans to optimize their daily energy use.   Sleep – The app tracks the users’ sleep in detail: length, quality and sleep phases. It issues personalized recommendations to improve the sleep quality and thus the daily energy level. The user gets a clear understanding of their sleeping patterns and are enabled to try to actively improve them.   Stress - The app tracks physical and mental stress levels and gives advice at strategic times. The users get more clarity over their body’s response to stressful events and are provided proactive recommendations to do breathing exercises during stressful times.       The Summit Lite smartwatch was developed with Montblanc’s sustainability goals in mind featuring a case crafted out of recycled aluminium, and sustainable packaging made from 100% paper.     The Montblanc Summit Lite smart watch is available as of January 2021 in selected markets from Montblanc boutiques. For more information visit www.montblanc.com    

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Montblanc appoints Laurent Lecamp as Managing Director for the Watch Division
992

Montblanc appoints Laurent Lecamp as Managing Director for the Watch Division

Watches The Maison has appointed Laurent Lecamp as Managing Director Watch Division, effective from January 1st 2021. Laurent will be taking over from Davide Cerrato who will pursue new professional challenges outside the Richemont group.     Montblanc is pleased to announce that Laurent Lecamp, previously International Sales Director and Board Member at Carl F. Bucherer, will now assume the role of Managing Director Watch Division, bringing new views in terms of strategy, design and innovation to the maison.     Laurent Lecamp began his professional career at LVMH as Brand Manager Wine & Spirits in Switzerland, and since then has held various entrepreneurial and leadership roles within the watch industry. Besides co- founding his own watch brand Cyrus Watches in 2010; which he left after having selling his equity in 2014. Furthermore, Laurent has carried out numerous research projects and published books, before joining Carl F. Bucherer as Executive Vice President of Sales in 2014.       Nicolas Baretzki, CEO of Montblanc, stated:   “I am delighted that Laurent has decided to join Montblanc as our new Managing Director Watch Division and that we are able to embark on this exciting new chapter together. With his extensive watchmaking expertise he will play a vital role in continuing the successful strategy of rooting Minerva deeply into Montblanc’s watch division, driving the Maison’s important watchmaking pillar into the future.”     “I am convinced that the success of Montblanc’s watch division is measured equally by its innovation as well as its strong emotional bond with its customers, press and watch aficionados. I will strive to further build on these two drivers, relying on Minerva’s outstanding heritage, passionate collaborators and an unparalleled craftsmanship” explains Lecamp. The Maison has appointed Laurent Lecamp as Managing Director Watch Division, effective from January 1st 2021. Laurent will be taking over from Davide Cerrato who will pursue new professional challenges outside the Richemont group.     Montblanc is pleased to announce that Laurent Lecamp, previously International Sales Director and Board Member at Carl F. Bucherer, will now assume the role of Managing Director Watch Division, bringing new views in terms of strategy, design and innovation to the maison.     Laurent Lecamp began his professional career at LVMH as Brand Manager Wine & Spirits in Switzerland, and since then has held various entrepreneurial and leadership roles within the watch industry. Besides co- founding his own watch brand Cyrus Watches in 2010; which he left after having selling his equity in 2014. Furthermore, Laurent has carried out numerous research projects and published books, before joining Carl F. Bucherer as Executive Vice President of Sales in 2014.       Nicolas Baretzki, CEO of Montblanc, stated:   “I am delighted that Laurent has decided to join Montblanc as our new Managing Director Watch Division and that we are able to embark on this exciting new chapter together. With his extensive watchmaking expertise he will play a vital role in continuing the successful strategy of rooting Minerva deeply into Montblanc’s watch division, driving the Maison’s important watchmaking pillar into the future.”     “I am convinced that the success of Montblanc’s watch division is measured equally by its innovation as well as its strong emotional bond with its customers, press and watch aficionados. I will strive to further build on these two drivers, relying on Minerva’s outstanding heritage, passionate collaborators and an unparalleled craftsmanship” explains Lecamp.

 VALENTINE'S DAY, THE BVLGARI WAY
880

VALENTINE'S DAY, THE BVLGARI WAY

Accessories Your dreams, brought to life with love. This year, Bvlgari indulges the fantasy and electricity of Valentine's Day with signature Roman style. Inspiring us all to give in to dreams and take a chance on love, the Italian Maison extends its exuberant spirit and daring creativity to the most romantic holiday of the year. It is a natural fit, because true love — like Bvlgari design — breaks all the rules.     Capturing the purest of emotions and coursing with that Roman passion for life, Bvlgari Valentine's Day gifts are as striking as love itself. From breath-taking jewels to iconic timepieces, stunning bags, accessories and other irresistible charms, each creation celebrates love with an unapologetic spirit and audacious touch. These are pieces to fall for, again and again.     The force behind Bvlgari's unbridled passion? A single wish: to create gorgeous, unforgettable, joy-filled moments for you and your love.     Your dreams, brought to life with love. This year, Bvlgari indulges the fantasy and electricity of Valentine's Day with signature Roman style. Inspiring us all to give in to dreams and take a chance on love, the Italian Maison extends its exuberant spirit and daring creativity to the most romantic holiday of the year. It is a natural fit, because true love — like Bvlgari design — breaks all the rules.     Capturing the purest of emotions and coursing with that Roman passion for life, Bvlgari Valentine's Day gifts are as striking as love itself. From breath-taking jewels to iconic timepieces, stunning bags, accessories and other irresistible charms, each creation celebrates love with an unapologetic spirit and audacious touch. These are pieces to fall for, again and again.     The force behind Bvlgari's unbridled passion? A single wish: to create gorgeous, unforgettable, joy-filled moments for you and your love.    

Swiss Haute Horlogerie meets Chinese zodiac tradition
876

Swiss Haute Horlogerie meets Chinese zodiac tradition

Watches Steeped in the aesthetic codes of Chinese culture, the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen is the first L.U.C timepiece to display the traditional Chinese timekeeping system, Shí Chen. The animals of the zodiac that symbolises them parade slowly by on an Urushi lacquer disc, accompanied by the symbol of prosperity and its god Lu Xing. This creative new complication exists as an 88-piece limited edition. Its L.U.C 96.29-L Chopard Manufacture movement is housed in a 40 mm ethical 18-carat rose gold case of peerless symbolic and physical finesse.     Carved from a block of ethical 18-carat rose gold, the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen is a talisman timepiece, an allegory of beliefs related to the Chinese zodiac and luck. It represents the first time that an Haute Horlogerie watch displays Shí Chen, the traditional Chinese time system, as a complication. It consists of twelve two-hour units, each one represented by an animal from the zodiac cycle. The day thus begins at 11pm with the hour of the Rat and ends with the hour of the Pig, while noon is in the middle of the hour of the Horse.       The Chinese zodiac bestiary enhanced by the art of Urushi:     The procession of 12 animals slowly parades through a large aperture at 12 o’clock, enabling a dual time read-off: one traditional and the other based on the international system. This succession of zodiac signs also underlines the creativity and mastery of the Chopard Manufacture artisans. In addition, the dial and Shí Chen disc of this timepiece are made of Japanese lacquer. Faithful to Asian traditions, Chopard has worked right from the start with the finest Japanese lacquer artisans, who craft dials using the traditional Urushi lacquer technique.     The 88 dials of the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen are produced by the workshops of the century-old Yamada Heiando company and crafted by Master lacquer specialist Minori Koizumi. In accordance with the distinctive Maki-e technique, gold flakes sprinkled between the layers of lacquer illuminate the 40 mm ethical 18-carat rose gold case from within. Steeped in the aesthetic codes of Chinese culture, the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen is the first L.U.C timepiece to display the traditional Chinese timekeeping system, Shí Chen. The animals of the zodiac that symbolises them parade slowly by on an Urushi lacquer disc, accompanied by the symbol of prosperity and its god Lu Xing. This creative new complication exists as an 88-piece limited edition. Its L.U.C 96.29-L Chopard Manufacture movement is housed in a 40 mm ethical 18-carat rose gold case of peerless symbolic and physical finesse.     Carved from a block of ethical 18-carat rose gold, the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen is a talisman timepiece, an allegory of beliefs related to the Chinese zodiac and luck. It represents the first time that an Haute Horlogerie watch displays Shí Chen, the traditional Chinese time system, as a complication. It consists of twelve two-hour units, each one represented by an animal from the zodiac cycle. The day thus begins at 11pm with the hour of the Rat and ends with the hour of the Pig, while noon is in the middle of the hour of the Horse.       The Chinese zodiac bestiary enhanced by the art of Urushi:     The procession of 12 animals slowly parades through a large aperture at 12 o’clock, enabling a dual time read-off: one traditional and the other based on the international system. This succession of zodiac signs also underlines the creativity and mastery of the Chopard Manufacture artisans. In addition, the dial and Shí Chen disc of this timepiece are made of Japanese lacquer. Faithful to Asian traditions, Chopard has worked right from the start with the finest Japanese lacquer artisans, who craft dials using the traditional Urushi lacquer technique.     The 88 dials of the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen are produced by the workshops of the century-old Yamada Heiando company and crafted by Master lacquer specialist Minori Koizumi. In accordance with the distinctive Maki-e technique, gold flakes sprinkled between the layers of lacquer illuminate the 40 mm ethical 18-carat rose gold case from within.

MONTBLANC M_GRAM 4810 COLLECTION
862

MONTBLANC M_GRAM 4810 COLLECTION

Watches “While Montblanc is an iconic brand that carries so much meaning to so many people, we felt it was time to introduce a new signature logo pattern to give a new generation of Montblanc customers an exciting identity to rally around. Our M_Gram 4810 collection has a distinctive identity that is unmistakably Montblanc, owning all the qualities of an icon in-the-making,” says Nicolas Baretzki, Montblanc CEO.     The two-colour tone M pattern is inspired by the geometry and lettering of graphics from the Montblanc archives, underscoring the richness of the Maison’s heritage. It is derived from the Montblanc wordmark developed in the 1920s and used – only slightly altered - in the Maison’s communications alongside the iconic Montblanc logo until this day. The bold and pointed shape of the letter with its geometric look captures the Art Deco style of the 1920s, one of the most important periods for the brand. In addition to the development of a very distinctive look, it was during that decade that Montblanc launched into new categories, including its foray into leather goods from 1926 onwards.     “What differentiates our graphic typography from other logo-driven monograms is the idea of not constructing something entirely new but rather converting existing typography through inspiration,’ explains Zaim Kamal, Montblanc Creative Director. “With a heritage that spans nearly 115 years, there was so much to draw from to create a new pattern that is certainly inspired by history but that looks to the future of the Maison. The new design is a connection point to the Montblanc community, a badge of belonging that each owner can interpret anyway he or she likes.”     The PVC coated-canvas resistant to scratchesandeverydaywearispairedwithblack leather trimming details to enhance the craftsmanship of the Montblanc M_Gram 4810 collection, while giving it a sophisticated design twist. The Montblanc logo script in white on the front of each piece stands out against the elegant black and blue combination to emphasize the Maison’s brand identity.     Pieces from the new collection take center stage in What Moves You, Makes You, Montblanc’s new global brand campaign that spotlights the exceptional individuals who are rede ning what success means today, driven by a higher purpose and a love of what they do. Actor Taron Egerton is featured with his Montblanc M_Gram 4810 Backpack, while singer, actor and writer Chen Kun sports his Montblanc M_Gram 4810 Beltbag. Whether a Backpack with a ap, a Document Case, a Tote, a Belt Bag, a Medium Pouch, a Duf e Bag, an Envelope or a Sling Backpack - the relaxed elegance of Montblanc M_Gram 4810 collection makes each piece a perfect companion for seamlessly moving through the day and into the evening, from business meetings to leisure pursuits. Montblanc’s latest technology innovations pieces have also received the Montblanc M_Gram 4810 treatment, with the pattern embossed on the new Montblanc MB 01 Headphones as well as being featured on the dial and PVC canvas watchstrap of the Montblanc’s Summit 2 smartwatch. “While Montblanc is an iconic brand that carries so much meaning to so many people, we felt it was time to introduce a new signature logo pattern to give a new generation of Montblanc customers an exciting identity to rally around. Our M_Gram 4810 collection has a distinctive identity that is unmistakably Montblanc, owning all the qualities of an icon in-the-making,” says Nicolas Baretzki, Montblanc CEO.     The two-colour tone M pattern is inspired by the geometry and lettering of graphics from the Montblanc archives, underscoring the richness of the Maison’s heritage. It is derived from the Montblanc wordmark developed in the 1920s and used – only slightly altered - in the Maison’s communications alongside the iconic Montblanc logo until this day. The bold and pointed shape of the letter with its geometric look captures the Art Deco style of the 1920s, one of the most important periods for the brand. In addition to the development of a very distinctive look, it was during that decade that Montblanc launched into new categories, including its foray into leather goods from 1926 onwards.     “What differentiates our graphic typography from other logo-driven monograms is the idea of not constructing something entirely new but rather converting existing typography through inspiration,’ explains Zaim Kamal, Montblanc Creative Director. “With a heritage that spans nearly 115 years, there was so much to draw from to create a new pattern that is certainly inspired by history but that looks to the future of the Maison. The new design is a connection point to the Montblanc community, a badge of belonging that each owner can interpret anyway he or she likes.”     The PVC coated-canvas resistant to scratchesandeverydaywearispairedwithblack leather trimming details to enhance the craftsmanship of the Montblanc M_Gram 4810 collection, while giving it a sophisticated design twist. The Montblanc logo script in white on the front of each piece stands out against the elegant black and blue combination to emphasize the Maison’s brand identity.     Pieces from the new collection take center stage in What Moves You, Makes You, Montblanc’s new global brand campaign that spotlights the exceptional individuals who are rede ning what success means today, driven by a higher purpose and a love of what they do. Actor Taron Egerton is featured with his Montblanc M_Gram 4810 Backpack, while singer, actor and writer Chen Kun sports his Montblanc M_Gram 4810 Beltbag. Whether a Backpack with a ap, a Document Case, a Tote, a Belt Bag, a Medium Pouch, a Duf e Bag, an Envelope or a Sling Backpack - the relaxed elegance of Montblanc M_Gram 4810 collection makes each piece a perfect companion for seamlessly moving through the day and into the evening, from business meetings to leisure pursuits. Montblanc’s latest technology innovations pieces have also received the Montblanc M_Gram 4810 treatment, with the pattern embossed on the new Montblanc MB 01 Headphones as well as being featured on the dial and PVC canvas watchstrap of the Montblanc’s Summit 2 smartwatch.

Chopard  launches new timepieces for the Mille Miglia collection
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Chopard launches new timepieces for the Mille Miglia collection

Watches Since 1988, Chopard has been the main partner and official timekeeper of the famous endurance 1000 Miglia race, a close collaboration born of the Scheufele family's longstanding passion for classic cars, which Karl-Friedrich Scheufele – Co-President of the Maison – both collects and drives, including at various motorsports events.     Founded in 1927, the 1000 Miglia is one of the most famous automobile events in the world. Originally, the 1,618 km route – the equivalent of 1,005 Roman miles – was a speed race that started and ended in Brescia, with a passage through Rome. After its original formula was interrupted in 1957, the 1000 Miglia was relaunched in 1977 as an endurance race for cars built between 1927 and 1957, still covering 1,000 miles. Over the years, the original route has undergone a few changes, but has remained faithful to the route designed 93 years ago by the original organisers, criss-crossing Italian scenery that has remained virtually unchanged since the beginning of the 20th century.      Chopard is proud to present a new series of watches. The Mille Miglia Race Edition chronograph is available in a 250-piece limited edition with a 42 mm-diameter case in bead-blasted DLC stainless steel and ethical rose gold with black leather strap and dial; and in 1,000 pieces entirely in bead-blasted DLC stainless steel, each powered by a chronometer-certified mechanical movement with automatic winding. Since 1988, Chopard has been the main partner and official timekeeper of the famous endurance 1000 Miglia race, a close collaboration born of the Scheufele family's longstanding passion for classic cars, which Karl-Friedrich Scheufele – Co-President of the Maison – both collects and drives, including at various motorsports events.     Founded in 1927, the 1000 Miglia is one of the most famous automobile events in the world. Originally, the 1,618 km route – the equivalent of 1,005 Roman miles – was a speed race that started and ended in Brescia, with a passage through Rome. After its original formula was interrupted in 1957, the 1000 Miglia was relaunched in 1977 as an endurance race for cars built between 1927 and 1957, still covering 1,000 miles. Over the years, the original route has undergone a few changes, but has remained faithful to the route designed 93 years ago by the original organisers, criss-crossing Italian scenery that has remained virtually unchanged since the beginning of the 20th century.      Chopard is proud to present a new series of watches. The Mille Miglia Race Edition chronograph is available in a 250-piece limited edition with a 42 mm-diameter case in bead-blasted DLC stainless steel and ethical rose gold with black leather strap and dial; and in 1,000 pieces entirely in bead-blasted DLC stainless steel, each powered by a chronometer-certified mechanical movement with automatic winding.

Arceau Grande Lune
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Arceau Grande Lune

Watches The new Arceau Grande Lune featuring a deep blue dial with a sunburst motif highlights the creativity of a timeless model. In 1978, Henri d’Origny freed the round watch from established aesthetic codes by imagining a classic and singular curve: the Arceau watch was born. Its case with asymmetrical stirrup-shaped attachments and sloping Arabic numerals evoking a galloping horse reveal a discreet and enduring elegance that lends itself to every possible expression of Hermès creativity and know-how.     The sunburst blue face of the new Arceau Grande Lune is paired with a matching Abyss blue alligator strap, an intense colour accentuated by the casual elegance of the steel case and sapphire caseback.     Swept over by slender hands and enlivened by sloping numerals creating an in-motion effect, this dynamic-looking display is complemented by a moon phase and date counter adorned with a starry sky, as well as a double day and month window appearing beneath the Hermès logo. Hours, minutes, seconds and complete calendar indications are displayed to the rhythm of a mechanical self-winding movement housed in a case crafted in the Hermès watchmaking workshops, as are the dial and strap. The new Arceau Grande Lune featuring a deep blue dial with a sunburst motif highlights the creativity of a timeless model. In 1978, Henri d’Origny freed the round watch from established aesthetic codes by imagining a classic and singular curve: the Arceau watch was born. Its case with asymmetrical stirrup-shaped attachments and sloping Arabic numerals evoking a galloping horse reveal a discreet and enduring elegance that lends itself to every possible expression of Hermès creativity and know-how.     The sunburst blue face of the new Arceau Grande Lune is paired with a matching Abyss blue alligator strap, an intense colour accentuated by the casual elegance of the steel case and sapphire caseback.     Swept over by slender hands and enlivened by sloping numerals creating an in-motion effect, this dynamic-looking display is complemented by a moon phase and date counter adorned with a starry sky, as well as a double day and month window appearing beneath the Hermès logo. Hours, minutes, seconds and complete calendar indications are displayed to the rhythm of a mechanical self-winding movement housed in a case crafted in the Hermès watchmaking workshops, as are the dial and strap.

PANERAI LUMINOR WORN BY SYLVESTER STALLONE IN FILM DAYLIGHT SELLS FOR $214,200 AFTER LESS THAN 5 MINUTES OF BIDDING
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PANERAI LUMINOR WORN BY SYLVESTER STALLONE IN FILM DAYLIGHT SELLS FOR $214,200 AFTER LESS THAN 5 MINUTES OF BIDDING

Watches Panerai is pleased to announce the auction sale of three important Panerai watches through Phillips in association with Bacs and Russo, at the much anticipated December Racing Pulse Flagship Auction.     The exciting hero of the auction – the famous Panerai Luminor PAM5218-201/A (Lot 47) consigned personally by multiple Academy Award™ nominee and Golden Globe™ winner, Sylvester Stallone sold for an unprecedented $214,200, after less than 5 minutes of bidding.     This selling price was a nod not only to the incredible provenance of the timepiece, but also to the immense fascination the brand’s early history continues to hold for collectors.     The watch achieved almost fabled status amongst enthusiasts and is widely acknowledged as the catalyst for Panerai’s launch on global stage as it changed the brand forever.     “We are excited to bear witness to a historic moment so inextricably connected to both Panerai’s beginning and future,” said Jean-Marc Pontroué, Panerai CEO.     “As a brand, we have always looked to the horizon of what is possible while keeping one foot firmly grounded in the principles and foundation of our past. After the success of the first Phillips auction in Hong Kong a couple of weeks ago, this is a strong signal that Panerai remains in the heart of the collectors’ community. We are proud to have partnered with Phillips to offer watchmaking enthusiasts worldwide a unique timepiece so representative of our pioneering spirit.” Panerai is pleased to announce the auction sale of three important Panerai watches through Phillips in association with Bacs and Russo, at the much anticipated December Racing Pulse Flagship Auction.     The exciting hero of the auction – the famous Panerai Luminor PAM5218-201/A (Lot 47) consigned personally by multiple Academy Award™ nominee and Golden Globe™ winner, Sylvester Stallone sold for an unprecedented $214,200, after less than 5 minutes of bidding.     This selling price was a nod not only to the incredible provenance of the timepiece, but also to the immense fascination the brand’s early history continues to hold for collectors.     The watch achieved almost fabled status amongst enthusiasts and is widely acknowledged as the catalyst for Panerai’s launch on global stage as it changed the brand forever.     “We are excited to bear witness to a historic moment so inextricably connected to both Panerai’s beginning and future,” said Jean-Marc Pontroué, Panerai CEO.     “As a brand, we have always looked to the horizon of what is possible while keeping one foot firmly grounded in the principles and foundation of our past. After the success of the first Phillips auction in Hong Kong a couple of weeks ago, this is a strong signal that Panerai remains in the heart of the collectors’ community. We are proud to have partnered with Phillips to offer watchmaking enthusiasts worldwide a unique timepiece so representative of our pioneering spirit.”

In conversation with Christoph Grainger-Herr, CEO of IWC
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In conversation with Christoph Grainger-Herr, CEO of IWC

Watches We had a deligt speaking with the CEO of IWC, Christoph Grainger-Herr.       Tell us about your experience in several different departments and divisions at IWC. Where did it all start and how were the transitions like into new departments?   Well, that's an interesting thing. You know, I think I had probably 13 or so jobs, but I've always done the same. So to the present day, it hasn't really changed. I've started in trademarketing on the exhibitions and boutiques. Back in the day, I’ve really just been hired as a project manager. And then I started to design the stuff from a laptop and drive our creative director absolutely crazy, because I started to change things. I did thisa couple of years, and then the trademarketing things,which really is all of that plus visual merchandising, architecture, exhibitions and so on. What I’ve learned from all of that, I'd be seeing different countries, different cultures, what our clients are looking for, the building specifics in all of these different countries, which is super interesting. And also you get to meet all of the global teams. After that, I did a little bit of a stint in marketing. This was basically everything apart from Corp comms, but all of the print marketing, consumer marketing, catalogues, websiteand all that. And from there, I started to work quite heavily on other brands within the group. We did the retail concept, we would agree to BM concept for merch. Then in the end, I returned to retail here in Switzerland, did that for about two months. Then I did the sales director role for about 10 days, four to six weeks or something. And then the announcement came. So it was quite linear in the end and quite fast and quite scary. But, here we are.   And I think really, what have I taken from it? I think, it's when you work transversally, it's very, very, very interesting because you get to learn the entire organization inside out, including different countries. I think that gives you a really good head start to then pick up all sorts of different tasks and challenges. But once you understand what production takes, you know I worked for six years on the manufacturer design here for the new manufacturing building, that really gives you the inside out view of how, what comes together. And after that you see the whole commercial side for the boutiques and the exhibitions and that in the end gives you quite a good understanding of the global picture.   And you learn. I mean, at the end of the day you learned that in luxury brand you're telling an aesthetic story and that story has to be consistent across all the different touch points. And the more you are able to combine the unique different requirements of social media versus physical stores versus production facilities into a consistent story that both your colleagues, as well as your clients and everybody can buy into mentally, the easier job you have to explain what your brand stands for and what is on brand and what is not on brand. And I think one of the most difficult things is if you have brands that are completely inconsistently implemented and then have like a front of house in the back of house, it sometimes becomes confusing to take the right decisions. Whereas I think if you have this consistency, then after that, it's much easier for people to make their own judgmentson what's the right thing to do or not, because we're not in a business that's based on purely data and research. I mean, it is increasingly luckily based on some data inside, but you know, the best creations in the world of luxury are not derived by data analytics or marketing briefing or anything like that. It takes a moment of creativity and then you have to do a call whether this is something that fits your brand or not. And that's the decision between hopefully a hit product and something that ends up in the door.     When you say creativity, how important do you think is innovation in the luxury segment, particularly for watches?   Well, if you think about the fact that we're basically in a moment central business, we don't make something that is based on purely functional need, on just functional characteristics. So that moves it away from the ins and outs of checklists, right or wrong assessment of what you're doing. And you're into an area where it's all about the emotion you evoke, it's about things like scarcity, it's about things like perceived hotness and exclusivity and that you can only do by creating. I wouldn't necessarily always call it purely sort of innovation in terms of technical content, but it is really in the entire brand universe, from products to communication, to retail experience, to the way you talk about the brand, of what it activates. Creativity is absolutely key. And keeping that fascination, that’s not killing off the brand into something too predictable or even too boring, it's always this balancing act between newness and the sort of preserving the icons that we've been familiar with for the last 18 years or longer. And that's at the end of the day heritage and DNA versus newness and supply versus scarcity. That's kind of the leavers, which we have to play in our industry to keep our brands relevant and keep our fans.     When did your first interest for watches arise?   The first time I showed interest for watches was kind of a forced situation. My dad was buying his first Patek Nautilus back in the eighties. It felt to me like it took all day and I was sitting there looking at all these watches and I apparently knew this was a quality of mine when I was younger. I must've lost that, I was incredibly patient and waited there for hours on end. And in the end they bought me a Bernese dog cuddly toy. That was kinda my first contact with watches. Then I think I really picked it up again at the university. In my gap year I had the chance to work not only in fashion stores about men's jewelry and accessories, but also in the heart of London.   I think that's the first time when I really started to look into the beauty of these objects, when the shop kind of becomes an art gallery. And I think this is the thing with hard luxury. It's almost like a sculpture museum space rather than just a shop. It's very different from a fashion store. And I started to like that because the complexity that goes into something very simple, it's all about presentation, lighting, quality, etc., but you have all of the requirements of security materials, automation, all of this stuff behind. I really started to enjoy that sort of work. And I walked past the jewelers near my university in Bournemouth. And I started to really feel quite interested in IWC back in the day, because I loved the purity of detail.   I love that engineering approach to the design, that understated confidence in the brand quite a lot. And then it will only be a couple of years later when I moved to Switzerland and I started to go privately to shows like Baselworldand become actually interested in IWC and the first watch that really caught me at the end was 2004 generation of the Aquatimer, which was made about the time when I moved to Switzerland. And then a couple of years into my university and professional experience here, there was a phone call whether we wanted to design an IWC museum. I loved that idea and jumped at itand that was it. I walked into the door here and thoughtI like it and that's never changed.     I’ve also read and found quite interesting that you were a former military athlete. How do you manage to stay in shape nowadays, with such a time consuming job?   I think you have to define at some point what do you mean by staying in shape for yourself. Because in the beginning, when you're at university, you have the time to properly train for competitions and so on. And especially when you're in the world of mountain running, trail running, any series of skiing. Whatever it is, it takes a tremendous amount of prep time. And at some point in your professional life you have to realize that can't be objective anymore. I mean, I admire all of the CEOs that do on eIronman after another. Literally, I'm not that angry at myself that I would get up at three o'clock every morning and do triathlon training. I think once you're in this mode in your life, it never goes away, but you have to realize at some point that you're going to be mildly ambitious. These days, I do about one bigger thing a year, be that a competition or a ride or something else. But I do this for the fun of it and not for beating the world record. It's changed quite a bit.    I don't know how I do it. Well, actually when you're traveling outside of the current lockdown, it's easy. Cause I only have myself to look after when I'm traveling. I enjoy running, whether it’s in Central park, Hong Kong, Red Rock Canyon or Vegas. There's plenty of stunning runs in South beach, Miami. I often pick my hotels in a way that they're convenient for exercising. Just recently, on the last trip before lockdown, it was my first time to Dallas. And we really needed to look at hotels so that they're close to the most promising running routes. Here at home, I try and fit it in whenever I can.      What are your thoughts on sustainability in the watch industry? Is there anything particularly that you are doing to do more sustainable and responsible to the environment?   I think it starts really with the product itself. When I look today at what we have done as humankind over the last 30, 40 years, we we've gone into quite a questionable cycle of throwaway consumption, times where things are being bought and replaced really frequently. We buy clothes and devices and we replace some of them and throw them away. And I think that mechanical watches have always made quite a powerful statement about sustainability, because you creating something that a is not in fashion, but that is timeless beauty. You build it in a way that it's designed to last forever and you maintain it for sometimes hundreds and hundreds of years. There’s really trust in where they’re made in, in one place in the heart of Europe that is preserving jobs, preserving craftsmanship and skills.    At the same time, you are not shipping products 16 times around the planet before they get to end consumers. When you come to Schaffhausen, we were set up right here where I'm sitting in my office. Florentine Ariosto Jones came from America and he set up IWC here and we're still here today, taking the same power from the river that Jones took directly via boats. We take it from the hydroponic station, but it's still the same thing.   When you come to Chicago, I can show you everybody from the initial watch designer to every step of the process of construction, to every step of manufacturing and even to the people who write the advertising headline, who create the movies and design the boutiques. I don't think that today there's many industries in many businesses, where you can still go to a single place and see the creation of something from start to finish. And when you buy it, you have something which really is absolutely unique to that process.    And then on top of that, I think my approach to sustainability is always that for us, it's a mindset. And that's a constant striving for trying to do things better than we did before. Nobody is perfect, but if we can improve our sourcing like we did with the gold sourcing, where we came out on top of the WWF study a couple of years ago, if we start launching sustainability reports, if we reduce the packaging that we ship around, eliminate plastic and non-recycled materials, eliminate plastic as much as we can from the supply chain in the brand globally, then bit by bit you're creating a product that people can feel genuinely good about.    One of the key things for us is that I don't run a front of house, back of house operations. So we welcome up to 10.000 people a year here in Schaffhausenand we show them everything and they can meet the people behind the process. And there's no double floors or hidden dark room. That's really important, because I think increasingly consumers demand, rightfully, to know where things are coming from, how things are being made and what the impact is.   It's something that is also coming out of the current situation. If we question a little bit the way we consume and the way we focus on things that really mean something to us and that we enjoy every time we use them. We wear them and we look after them and we repair them and fix them and maintain them. I do think that there is something to be learned from a throwaway consumption culture. When you think about the fact that all humans on the planet can probably fit into one cubic kilometer, if we pack them in tightly, it the end we deplete all of the resources on that very quickly. It's something to reconsider. And I think making things that are designed to be beautiful in hundreds of years and designed to last, can only be a good thing in that context.     Have you ever been to Amsterdam and if so, how would you describe the experience?   Yes, I've been to Amsterdam a few times. It looks like it has abeautiful quality of life and the right balance between urban density, sort of design, art, expression and instill kind of energy, which I like. Our e-com shipping center for Europe actually sits right in the heart of Amsterdam and there are some practical challenges when you are in an old, historic building in the heart of the city and you're trying to adapt that to modern automated warehouse standards. It’s a beautiful city to be in.    But I would change your airport, I think the distance between the runway and the terminal at Schipol is just ridiculous. To get from your gate to the exit of Schipol youcan probably easily walk for 40 minutes. The craziest spread out airport terminals anywhere on the planet. Zurich is literally, and I'm not saying that because we use it here, one of the most efficient airports where you can fly direct to almost anywhere, but you can get from the aircraft door to your car in literally seven minutes, if you don't have checked luggage, so it's ultra efficient in and out.      What do you have planned in the future, not after Corona really but in general?   As you know and as you're experiencing yourself, we just had a crash course in all sorts of video, remote technology. And that's really driven a whole range of innovation projects very quickly. So we're excited about all the possibilities that we've discovered through remote events and streaming and being able to extend sort of everything that we do or have done traditionally physically into the digital space, where we're suddenly creating a much broader reach and a much better experience for people who weren't able to travel halfway around the globe to take part in something previously. I think there's a lot of exciting things to come and the habits that have been formed in the last couple of months will surely stay with us and are really accelerating that process towards a more integrated world of physical and digital. And I'm very excited about that, because at the end of the day, that's just going to make our brands a better experience and we will be able to provide a better service.         We had a deligt speaking with the CEO of IWC, Christoph Grainger-Herr.       Tell us about your experience in several different departments and divisions at IWC. Where did it all start and how were the transitions like into new departments?   Well, that's an interesting thing. You know, I think I had probably 13 or so jobs, but I've always done the same. So to the present day, it hasn't really changed. I've started in trademarketing on the exhibitions and boutiques. Back in the day, I’ve really just been hired as a project manager. And then I started to design the stuff from a laptop and drive our creative director absolutely crazy, because I started to change things. I did thisa couple of years, and then the trademarketing things,which really is all of that plus visual merchandising, architecture, exhibitions and so on. What I’ve learned from all of that, I'd be seeing different countries, different cultures, what our clients are looking for, the building specifics in all of these different countries, which is super interesting. And also you get to meet all of the global teams. After that, I did a little bit of a stint in marketing. This was basically everything apart from Corp comms, but all of the print marketing, consumer marketing, catalogues, websiteand all that. And from there, I started to work quite heavily on other brands within the group. We did the retail concept, we would agree to BM concept for merch. Then in the end, I returned to retail here in Switzerland, did that for about two months. Then I did the sales director role for about 10 days, four to six weeks or something. And then the announcement came. So it was quite linear in the end and quite fast and quite scary. But, here we are.   And I think really, what have I taken from it? I think, it's when you work transversally, it's very, very, very interesting because you get to learn the entire organization inside out, including different countries. I think that gives you a really good head start to then pick up all sorts of different tasks and challenges. But once you understand what production takes, you know I worked for six years on the manufacturer design here for the new manufacturing building, that really gives you the inside out view of how, what comes together. And after that you see the whole commercial side for the boutiques and the exhibitions and that in the end gives you quite a good understanding of the global picture.   And you learn. I mean, at the end of the day you learned that in luxury brand you're telling an aesthetic story and that story has to be consistent across all the different touch points. And the more you are able to combine the unique different requirements of social media versus physical stores versus production facilities into a consistent story that both your colleagues, as well as your clients and everybody can buy into mentally, the easier job you have to explain what your brand stands for and what is on brand and what is not on brand. And I think one of the most difficult things is if you have brands that are completely inconsistently implemented and then have like a front of house in the back of house, it sometimes becomes confusing to take the right decisions. Whereas I think if you have this consistency, then after that, it's much easier for people to make their own judgmentson what's the right thing to do or not, because we're not in a business that's based on purely data and research. I mean, it is increasingly luckily based on some data inside, but you know, the best creations in the world of luxury are not derived by data analytics or marketing briefing or anything like that. It takes a moment of creativity and then you have to do a call whether this is something that fits your brand or not. And that's the decision between hopefully a hit product and something that ends up in the door.     When you say creativity, how important do you think is innovation in the luxury segment, particularly for watches?   Well, if you think about the fact that we're basically in a moment central business, we don't make something that is based on purely functional need, on just functional characteristics. So that moves it away from the ins and outs of checklists, right or wrong assessment of what you're doing. And you're into an area where it's all about the emotion you evoke, it's about things like scarcity, it's about things like perceived hotness and exclusivity and that you can only do by creating. I wouldn't necessarily always call it purely sort of innovation in terms of technical content, but it is really in the entire brand universe, from products to communication, to retail experience, to the way you talk about the brand, of what it activates. Creativity is absolutely key. And keeping that fascination, that’s not killing off the brand into something too predictable or even too boring, it's always this balancing act between newness and the sort of preserving the icons that we've been familiar with for the last 18 years or longer. And that's at the end of the day heritage and DNA versus newness and supply versus scarcity. That's kind of the leavers, which we have to play in our industry to keep our brands relevant and keep our fans.     When did your first interest for watches arise?   The first time I showed interest for watches was kind of a forced situation. My dad was buying his first Patek Nautilus back in the eighties. It felt to me like it took all day and I was sitting there looking at all these watches and I apparently knew this was a quality of mine when I was younger. I must've lost that, I was incredibly patient and waited there for hours on end. And in the end they bought me a Bernese dog cuddly toy. That was kinda my first contact with watches. Then I think I really picked it up again at the university. In my gap year I had the chance to work not only in fashion stores about men's jewelry and accessories, but also in the heart of London.   I think that's the first time when I really started to look into the beauty of these objects, when the shop kind of becomes an art gallery. And I think this is the thing with hard luxury. It's almost like a sculpture museum space rather than just a shop. It's very different from a fashion store. And I started to like that because the complexity that goes into something very simple, it's all about presentation, lighting, quality, etc., but you have all of the requirements of security materials, automation, all of this stuff behind. I really started to enjoy that sort of work. And I walked past the jewelers near my university in Bournemouth. And I started to really feel quite interested in IWC back in the day, because I loved the purity of detail.   I love that engineering approach to the design, that understated confidence in the brand quite a lot. And then it will only be a couple of years later when I moved to Switzerland and I started to go privately to shows like Baselworldand become actually interested in IWC and the first watch that really caught me at the end was 2004 generation of the Aquatimer, which was made about the time when I moved to Switzerland. And then a couple of years into my university and professional experience here, there was a phone call whether we wanted to design an IWC museum. I loved that idea and jumped at itand that was it. I walked into the door here and thoughtI like it and that's never changed.     I’ve also read and found quite interesting that you were a former military athlete. How do you manage to stay in shape nowadays, with such a time consuming job?   I think you have to define at some point what do you mean by staying in shape for yourself. Because in the beginning, when you're at university, you have the time to properly train for competitions and so on. And especially when you're in the world of mountain running, trail running, any series of skiing. Whatever it is, it takes a tremendous amount of prep time. And at some point in your professional life you have to realize that can't be objective anymore. I mean, I admire all of the CEOs that do on eIronman after another. Literally, I'm not that angry at myself that I would get up at three o'clock every morning and do triathlon training. I think once you're in this mode in your life, it never goes away, but you have to realize at some point that you're going to be mildly ambitious. These days, I do about one bigger thing a year, be that a competition or a ride or something else. But I do this for the fun of it and not for beating the world record. It's changed quite a bit.    I don't know how I do it. Well, actually when you're traveling outside of the current lockdown, it's easy. Cause I only have myself to look after when I'm traveling. I enjoy running, whether it’s in Central park, Hong Kong, Red Rock Canyon or Vegas. There's plenty of stunning runs in South beach, Miami. I often pick my hotels in a way that they're convenient for exercising. Just recently, on the last trip before lockdown, it was my first time to Dallas. And we really needed to look at hotels so that they're close to the most promising running routes. Here at home, I try and fit it in whenever I can.      What are your thoughts on sustainability in the watch industry? Is there anything particularly that you are doing to do more sustainable and responsible to the environment?   I think it starts really with the product itself. When I look today at what we have done as humankind over the last 30, 40 years, we we've gone into quite a questionable cycle of throwaway consumption, times where things are being bought and replaced really frequently. We buy clothes and devices and we replace some of them and throw them away. And I think that mechanical watches have always made quite a powerful statement about sustainability, because you creating something that a is not in fashion, but that is timeless beauty. You build it in a way that it's designed to last forever and you maintain it for sometimes hundreds and hundreds of years. There’s really trust in where they’re made in, in one place in the heart of Europe that is preserving jobs, preserving craftsmanship and skills.    At the same time, you are not shipping products 16 times around the planet before they get to end consumers. When you come to Schaffhausen, we were set up right here where I'm sitting in my office. Florentine Ariosto Jones came from America and he set up IWC here and we're still here today, taking the same power from the river that Jones took directly via boats. We take it from the hydroponic station, but it's still the same thing.   When you come to Chicago, I can show you everybody from the initial watch designer to every step of the process of construction, to every step of manufacturing and even to the people who write the advertising headline, who create the movies and design the boutiques. I don't think that today there's many industries in many businesses, where you can still go to a single place and see the creation of something from start to finish. And when you buy it, you have something which really is absolutely unique to that process.    And then on top of that, I think my approach to sustainability is always that for us, it's a mindset. And that's a constant striving for trying to do things better than we did before. Nobody is perfect, but if we can improve our sourcing like we did with the gold sourcing, where we came out on top of the WWF study a couple of years ago, if we start launching sustainability reports, if we reduce the packaging that we ship around, eliminate plastic and non-recycled materials, eliminate plastic as much as we can from the supply chain in the brand globally, then bit by bit you're creating a product that people can feel genuinely good about.    One of the key things for us is that I don't run a front of house, back of house operations. So we welcome up to 10.000 people a year here in Schaffhausenand we show them everything and they can meet the people behind the process. And there's no double floors or hidden dark room. That's really important, because I think increasingly consumers demand, rightfully, to know where things are coming from, how things are being made and what the impact is.   It's something that is also coming out of the current situation. If we question a little bit the way we consume and the way we focus on things that really mean something to us and that we enjoy every time we use them. We wear them and we look after them and we repair them and fix them and maintain them. I do think that there is something to be learned from a throwaway consumption culture. When you think about the fact that all humans on the planet can probably fit into one cubic kilometer, if we pack them in tightly, it the end we deplete all of the resources on that very quickly. It's something to reconsider. And I think making things that are designed to be beautiful in hundreds of years and designed to last, can only be a good thing in that context.     Have you ever been to Amsterdam and if so, how would you describe the experience?   Yes, I've been to Amsterdam a few times. It looks like it has abeautiful quality of life and the right balance between urban density, sort of design, art, expression and instill kind of energy, which I like. Our e-com shipping center for Europe actually sits right in the heart of Amsterdam and there are some practical challenges when you are in an old, historic building in the heart of the city and you're trying to adapt that to modern automated warehouse standards. It’s a beautiful city to be in.    But I would change your airport, I think the distance between the runway and the terminal at Schipol is just ridiculous. To get from your gate to the exit of Schipol youcan probably easily walk for 40 minutes. The craziest spread out airport terminals anywhere on the planet. Zurich is literally, and I'm not saying that because we use it here, one of the most efficient airports where you can fly direct to almost anywhere, but you can get from the aircraft door to your car in literally seven minutes, if you don't have checked luggage, so it's ultra efficient in and out.      What do you have planned in the future, not after Corona really but in general?   As you know and as you're experiencing yourself, we just had a crash course in all sorts of video, remote technology. And that's really driven a whole range of innovation projects very quickly. So we're excited about all the possibilities that we've discovered through remote events and streaming and being able to extend sort of everything that we do or have done traditionally physically into the digital space, where we're suddenly creating a much broader reach and a much better experience for people who weren't able to travel halfway around the globe to take part in something previously. I think there's a lot of exciting things to come and the habits that have been formed in the last couple of months will surely stay with us and are really accelerating that process towards a more integrated world of physical and digital. And I'm very excited about that, because at the end of the day, that's just going to make our brands a better experience and we will be able to provide a better service.        

Small things that matter by KOMONO
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Small things that matter by KOMONO

Accessories This holiday season, we invite you to cherish your memories and save them for a special moment. We designed a hardcase gifting box which contains one of our favorite watches, the Harlow or the Lewis, together with an extra complimentary strap and washi tape. This box can be repurposed to collect your precious letters, notes, drawings, photographs or other small things of sentimental value. Seal it off with the washi tape and re-open for a journey back in time. Besides the gifting box, we offer a curated selection of other small things that matter, from precious watches to sleek snow glasses. In our campaign, we recollect our own memories by inviting some of our dearest friends to talk about what matters to them and share their personal stories.     komono.com This holiday season, we invite you to cherish your memories and save them for a special moment. We designed a hardcase gifting box which contains one of our favorite watches, the Harlow or the Lewis, together with an extra complimentary strap and washi tape. This box can be repurposed to collect your precious letters, notes, drawings, photographs or other small things of sentimental value. Seal it off with the washi tape and re-open for a journey back in time. Besides the gifting box, we offer a curated selection of other small things that matter, from precious watches to sleek snow glasses. In our campaign, we recollect our own memories by inviting some of our dearest friends to talk about what matters to them and share their personal stories.     komono.com

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