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In conversation with Lost Frequencies
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In conversation with Lost Frequencies

Music Felix De Laet, better known by his moniker Lost Frequencies, has soared to success in the international music industry on many levels. Releasing his global smash hit ‘Are You With Me’ back in 2014 and quickly cementing himself as a name to watch, the track rapidly ascended by hitting multi-platinum status and taking the #1 spot in 18 countries.  Lost Frequencies was the first Belgian artist to secure his first 5 hit singles charting at the #1 spot on the Ultra top official Belgian charts, as well as the first Belgian artist to hit #1 in the UK, he went on to release his long-awaited debut album ‘Less Is More’ in 2016 via Armin Van Buuren’s iconic Armada imprint that dazzled globally, certifying a future star for the next generation. Lost Frequencies also firmly established himself as one of the strongest, fastest rising talents with his debut entry into the 2017 DJ Mag poll at #26, the highest new entry of any artist that year. You touch people's hearts with your music, which's great. I would like to ask you about the show, since this was your first live tour. What could you tell us about it?  Yeah, it's different from what you're used to, because all three of us were going to be on stage; the drummer, a guitarist and I. Everything was more electronic sounding and I had two guest singers coming up and down from the stage. So in total five and it's a completely different approach. I was playing 100 % Lost Frequencies music, including also some remixes that I did for some artists.   How did you mix that the way you did? Like where did it come from as a new show?  It was hard to put everything in session.When I was in Miami with my manager we were going from A to B during Miami music week and then suddenly a track comes up and he goes like »this is a good track to remix«. So I started talking with some guys in London, where they will record everything, like the vocals, the trunk beds, the guitars, everything. And so I get all the stems and I can really work out an umbilical remix.    You released your second album »Alive and Feeling Fine« in October 2019. Could you tell us more about this album and your new projects?  So under the new album I wanted to put two CDs. There is one CD, which is more straightforward, more of the typical Lost Frequencies sound. Like maybe you are expecting it with a little bit more electronic sounding strikes. And then on the second CD it's more the Lost Frequencies sound in the clubs and festivals, in any of the live shows, which is really more electronic music, but still with the end vocals. Now for the last two, three years I've been playing more electro in my sets than on my first album. And I think people got used to it now.   You have also released your own label under Armada, »Found Frequencies«. How do you source talent yourself for finding new DJs and new talents?  I tried to work also with bigger acts to release tracks on the label. But I have a demo address, where I get a lot of demos from everywhere in the world. But it's funny, because most of the artists I sign, they don't come through demos, they come through connections from people like »Hey, maybe you should listen to this« or »Oh, this guy on SoundCloud's putting up some tracks and it sounds nice«. So we signed him and we released some music, but it's mostly if I like the music then I'm going to release it. It can be very indie dance and it can be more deep house. It stays very melodic and for me it's important that I have to be able to play the message.    What is your integral role with Tomorrowland and how does it make you feel performing at such a big festival?  My manager works with Tomorrowland, so he has a good connection with the guys and thanks to that I've been able to perform for the last four or five years at Tomorrowland. For me, of course, it's an amazing experience because it's only 40 minutes away from my home, in my homecountry. It's one of the biggest festivals, atrium music in the world. It's an amazing festival and the vibe is really great. I've never been as a festival goer, so the first time I went as an artist and I played. I was so scared, I was just looking at the texts for the most of the set. Now, I know the guys from the organization, so I go there and it's super relaxed and I have such a great time. It's bigger and bigger every year, it's crazy.    Based on your social media and everything you are very fashion involved as well. Could you perhaps say, where do you source your inspiration for fashion from?  I have the chance to travel a lot and every time I travel maybe someone promotes a store, like which is the store I need to go to. Then if I find something I like, it is it. There's one really good one called Four, it's one of the best I think and would highly recommend it.    What else can we expect from you after your new album and your tour? Is there anything else exciting coming up? I want to challenge myself and I've been in contact with more underground people in the last few months. It's funny because I feel like all the boundaries between genres are kind of blurring and going away, because the techno scene before was really like you have to be a techno DJ to be able to be in that scene. But now I have some techno guys or melodic upcoming underground guys that talk to me and they say »Oh, we like your music« even though it's not completely their genre. I'm going to try to work with them and try to do something out of the box for me and most of them and try to do a little EP, like four tracks, which will be more clubby.   Lost Frequencies is such a cool name. I know a little bit about the story behind it, but can you tell me yourself?  In the very beginning, I had a few different projects and then at some point I really wanted to work with vocals, but I was only a bedroom producer. So the only way for me to get vocals, it was to do remixes. So I started to do releases of all tracks that I used to love and take them back and do like a clubby version of those tracks. And those old tracks would be the Lost Frequencies.   At what age did you realize you were passionate about music and when did you start to produce by yourself?  In Belgium and also in Ireland illustrate music is really big. So since I was very young, when I was 11 or 12 years old, I was the only one in my class listening to electronic music. It was when Fedde Le Grand came out with Put your hands up for Detroit. I was like »this kind of music is pretty nice« and so I really started to get into it. Then I went to boarding school and when I was at the boarding school, there were only boys. Everybody was really into electronic music, I had five DJs in my room. It was a thing to go back home for the weekend, then you came back and everybody had new tracks, we shared a lot of this music and that was when Avicii and all those guys were coming up and it was really an exciting moment, you know. And then when I came back from boarding school, I got my first laptop and on there was GarageBand, so I started working on GarageBand, finding out how everything worked. My piano teacher was also a sound engineer and since I'm a keyboard player, that really helped me.   If you weren't a DJ, what else would you do in life?  Now with the live show, I discovered something that I really like is a front house sound engineer, mixing the show. Like when we mix the live show, I go in front of house, I listen to the mix and I do the mixed show. You can do a kick louder, you put the vocal rebuttal, you compress little things and I really love to play with the sounds. Long story short; I think I would still be in the music industry. For tour schedule please visit - https://www.facebook.com/LostFrequenciesMusic/app/123966167614127/ Felix De Laet, better known by his moniker Lost Frequencies, has soared to success in the international music industry on many levels. Releasing his global smash hit ‘Are You With Me’ back in 2014 and quickly cementing himself as a name to watch, the track rapidly ascended by hitting multi-platinum status and taking the #1 spot in 18 countries.  Lost Frequencies was the first Belgian artist to secure his first 5 hit singles charting at the #1 spot on the Ultra top official Belgian charts, as well as the first Belgian artist to hit #1 in the UK, he went on to release his long-awaited debut album ‘Less Is More’ in 2016 via Armin Van Buuren’s iconic Armada imprint that dazzled globally, certifying a future star for the next generation. Lost Frequencies also firmly established himself as one of the strongest, fastest rising talents with his debut entry into the 2017 DJ Mag poll at #26, the highest new entry of any artist that year. You touch people's hearts with your music, which's great. I would like to ask you about the show, since this was your first live tour. What could you tell us about it?  Yeah, it's different from what you're used to, because all three of us were going to be on stage; the drummer, a guitarist and I. Everything was more electronic sounding and I had two guest singers coming up and down from the stage. So in total five and it's a completely different approach. I was playing 100 % Lost Frequencies music, including also some remixes that I did for some artists.   How did you mix that the way you did? Like where did it come from as a new show?  It was hard to put everything in session.When I was in Miami with my manager we were going from A to B during Miami music week and then suddenly a track comes up and he goes like »this is a good track to remix«. So I started talking with some guys in London, where they will record everything, like the vocals, the trunk beds, the guitars, everything. And so I get all the stems and I can really work out an umbilical remix.    You released your second album »Alive and Feeling Fine« in October 2019. Could you tell us more about this album and your new projects?  So under the new album I wanted to put two CDs. There is one CD, which is more straightforward, more of the typical Lost Frequencies sound. Like maybe you are expecting it with a little bit more electronic sounding strikes. And then on the second CD it's more the Lost Frequencies sound in the clubs and festivals, in any of the live shows, which is really more electronic music, but still with the end vocals. Now for the last two, three years I've been playing more electro in my sets than on my first album. And I think people got used to it now.   You have also released your own label under Armada, »Found Frequencies«. How do you source talent yourself for finding new DJs and new talents?  I tried to work also with bigger acts to release tracks on the label. But I have a demo address, where I get a lot of demos from everywhere in the world. But it's funny, because most of the artists I sign, they don't come through demos, they come through connections from people like »Hey, maybe you should listen to this« or »Oh, this guy on SoundCloud's putting up some tracks and it sounds nice«. So we signed him and we released some music, but it's mostly if I like the music then I'm going to release it. It can be very indie dance and it can be more deep house. It stays very melodic and for me it's important that I have to be able to play the message.    What is your integral role with Tomorrowland and how does it make you feel performing at such a big festival?  My manager works with Tomorrowland, so he has a good connection with the guys and thanks to that I've been able to perform for the last four or five years at Tomorrowland. For me, of course, it's an amazing experience because it's only 40 minutes away from my home, in my homecountry. It's one of the biggest festivals, atrium music in the world. It's an amazing festival and the vibe is really great. I've never been as a festival goer, so the first time I went as an artist and I played. I was so scared, I was just looking at the texts for the most of the set. Now, I know the guys from the organization, so I go there and it's super relaxed and I have such a great time. It's bigger and bigger every year, it's crazy.    Based on your social media and everything you are very fashion involved as well. Could you perhaps say, where do you source your inspiration for fashion from?  I have the chance to travel a lot and every time I travel maybe someone promotes a store, like which is the store I need to go to. Then if I find something I like, it is it. There's one really good one called Four, it's one of the best I think and would highly recommend it.    What else can we expect from you after your new album and your tour? Is there anything else exciting coming up? I want to challenge myself and I've been in contact with more underground people in the last few months. It's funny because I feel like all the boundaries between genres are kind of blurring and going away, because the techno scene before was really like you have to be a techno DJ to be able to be in that scene. But now I have some techno guys or melodic upcoming underground guys that talk to me and they say »Oh, we like your music« even though it's not completely their genre. I'm going to try to work with them and try to do something out of the box for me and most of them and try to do a little EP, like four tracks, which will be more clubby.   Lost Frequencies is such a cool name. I know a little bit about the story behind it, but can you tell me yourself?  In the very beginning, I had a few different projects and then at some point I really wanted to work with vocals, but I was only a bedroom producer. So the only way for me to get vocals, it was to do remixes. So I started to do releases of all tracks that I used to love and take them back and do like a clubby version of those tracks. And those old tracks would be the Lost Frequencies.   At what age did you realize you were passionate about music and when did you start to produce by yourself?  In Belgium and also in Ireland illustrate music is really big. So since I was very young, when I was 11 or 12 years old, I was the only one in my class listening to electronic music. It was when Fedde Le Grand came out with Put your hands up for Detroit. I was like »this kind of music is pretty nice« and so I really started to get into it. Then I went to boarding school and when I was at the boarding school, there were only boys. Everybody was really into electronic music, I had five DJs in my room. It was a thing to go back home for the weekend, then you came back and everybody had new tracks, we shared a lot of this music and that was when Avicii and all those guys were coming up and it was really an exciting moment, you know. And then when I came back from boarding school, I got my first laptop and on there was GarageBand, so I started working on GarageBand, finding out how everything worked. My piano teacher was also a sound engineer and since I'm a keyboard player, that really helped me.   If you weren't a DJ, what else would you do in life?  Now with the live show, I discovered something that I really like is a front house sound engineer, mixing the show. Like when we mix the live show, I go in front of house, I listen to the mix and I do the mixed show. You can do a kick louder, you put the vocal rebuttal, you compress little things and I really love to play with the sounds. Long story short; I think I would still be in the music industry. For tour schedule please visit - https://www.facebook.com/LostFrequenciesMusic/app/123966167614127/

Taiwan
65

Taiwan

Travel Exclusive travel story photographed by Ashley Soong. Exclusive travel story photographed by Ashley Soong.

A.P.C. & Persol announce collaboration
63

A.P.C. & Persol announce collaboration

Accessories For their first collaboration in half a century, Persol worked with A.P.C. on three color variants for their iconic 649 model. It was originally designed in 1957 for tram-drivers in Torino, Italy, but became legendary when Marcello Mastroianni wore them in the movie Divorce, Italian Style in 1961. With A.P.C., Persol worked on three new acetate colors: transparent green with gradient brown lens, transparent brown with gradient green lens and matte white with grey gradient lens. The sunglasses come in canvas and brown leather cases. A special campaign was shot by Sam Rock at the A.P.C. headquarters with A.P.C. founder Jean Touitou, Metronomy singer Joseph Mount and Sky Ferreira. The campaign is also accompanied by a set of four videos. “I really enjoy wearing sunglasses when it is sunny outside. These ones can be used to simply bare with every day light, just like Kurt Cobain had to. He has become the inspiration for those white frames the venerable Maison Persol agreed to do with us.” — Jean Touitou, A.P.C. “Both the story and philosophy of A.P.C. have much in common with those of Persol. We are two brands granting as much importance to beauty and craft as to simple functionality.” – Niels van Geet, Persol.   In stores from February 7th. For their first collaboration in half a century, Persol worked with A.P.C. on three color variants for their iconic 649 model. It was originally designed in 1957 for tram-drivers in Torino, Italy, but became legendary when Marcello Mastroianni wore them in the movie Divorce, Italian Style in 1961. With A.P.C., Persol worked on three new acetate colors: transparent green with gradient brown lens, transparent brown with gradient green lens and matte white with grey gradient lens. The sunglasses come in canvas and brown leather cases. A special campaign was shot by Sam Rock at the A.P.C. headquarters with A.P.C. founder Jean Touitou, Metronomy singer Joseph Mount and Sky Ferreira. The campaign is also accompanied by a set of four videos. “I really enjoy wearing sunglasses when it is sunny outside. These ones can be used to simply bare with every day light, just like Kurt Cobain had to. He has become the inspiration for those white frames the venerable Maison Persol agreed to do with us.” — Jean Touitou, A.P.C. “Both the story and philosophy of A.P.C. have much in common with those of Persol. We are two brands granting as much importance to beauty and craft as to simple functionality.” – Niels van Geet, Persol.   In stores from February 7th.

Advertising
Advertising
"It's what you do. Or don't."
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"It's what you do. Or don't."

Fashion With the streetwear campaign “It’s what you do. Or Don’t”, online fashion destination Zalando shows what it really means to express yourself through fashion. In a series of stylish urban films and ads, photographer Vitali Gelwich, director Daniel Wårdh, and stylist Corey Stokes, tell the story of a group of charismatic streetwear personalities in unexpected situations, mixing and matching Zalando streetwear and showing what liberation through fashion really means. In the campaign, we meet a motley crew of expressive streetwear in influencers: Parisian Jean-Jacques N’djoli with his irreplaceable Instagram profile and an impeccable sense of style, Berlin street fashionista and sneaker collector Dilan Kolkilic, the Swedish model Linnea Öhlund with a knack for the street savy model off duty look, and the master of over the top mixing and matching Joël Kurasinski from Valencia. They’re all curating their own eclectic mix of outfits from Zalando, as the campaign inspires people to discover and develop their own streetwear style. On the theme “It’s what you do. Or don’t”, the campaign shows our in influencers in outfits and situations that first look a certain way – but soon turn out to be something completely different. Playing with contrasts, juxtapositions and shifting perspectives. Showing how streetwear is all in the eye of the beholder, all up to you what you want to express, or not. In “Climb mountains. Or don’t”, Jean-Jacques in ski goggles is moving upwards against a blue sky giving the impression that he is hiking, only to reveal he’s actually walking up a set of outdoor stairs in an urban setting. In “Join the running team. Or don’t”, we see Dilan and Linnea tying their sneakers as a bunch of sporty joggers run by – zoom out and it’s clear that running is the last thing they’ll do, the sneakers are just a part of their ever so urban park outfit. “Be a benchwarmer. Or don’t” shows the gang dribbling a basketball on the sidelines of a court. Zoom out, and we see they’re all wearing VR goggles – fully engaged in their own world and definitely not on any bench. And on it goes in“Be fancy. Or don’t”,“Keep it minimal. Or don’t”and so on. With humor and style, the films show that streetwear has no rules, it’s not a set style or specia brands. It’s all about personal choices and maximum individual expression. This is Gen Z fashion for people who go their own way: eclectic, postmodern samplers and collaborators who get their inspiration from everywhere and everyone – and make it their own. Strong characters who mix and match their own unique way, high and low, old and new, niche and mainstream. Always de ning and re-defining themselves, always evolving, always making a statement. Or not. Produced by ACNE, the creative team has been handpicked for their unique mix of strong vision, fashion  and understanding of street culture. Photographer Vitali Gelwich is a Berlin based artist and fashion photographer, known for his raw documentary style and organic mix of high fashion and street culture. Stockholm based director Daniel Wårdh is a Vans sponsored skateboarder who combines the attitude and tempo of street culture with his passion for music and fashion. Stylist Corey Stokes is a super in influencer and art director, stylist and fashion editor at Highsnobiety. Re-imagining fashion for the good of all, the new Zalando campaign “It’s what you do. Or don’t.” is a loud, fun, and highly personal celebration of our differences – the pursuit of individual expression, to the rhythm of the street. Mixing and matching your own way, creating your own unique combinations like no one else. A unique fashion statement that’s individual, liberating and democratic. By highlighting the endless combinations and interpretations curated by the in influencers, the “It’s what you do. Or don’t.” campaign highlights how Zalando’s wide range of streetwear inspires and enables people to express their personality through fashion, combining and creating unique outfits in personal ways. Streetwear is rooted in being effortless cool and not looking like you’re trying too hard. It’s a mish-mash of everything and anything. It’s nostalgia and contemporary. New and thrifted. Mixing luxury with everyday casual. Completely bold or utterly au natural. One part super thoughtout, another part super random. And it might seem like there’s no thought at all behind it. But that’s the thing. There is. Streetwear is about being unique and real, expressing yourself, whatever it takes. It’s about finding inspiration where no one else is looking. Or where everyone’s looking. It’s about combos that makes sense just because they don’t. Or out ts that don’t make sense just because they do. It’s about constantly refreshing – or not refreshing at all. About having one look today and then never again. Or the same look every day. That’s the beautiful contradiction of the streetwear attitude. Be ugly, be bold, be weird. Or don’t. Be cute, be pretty, be completely undetermined. Or don’t. Go full denim. Or don’t. Be expressive. Or don’t. It’s what you do. Or don’t.   With the streetwear campaign “It’s what you do. Or Don’t”, online fashion destination Zalando shows what it really means to express yourself through fashion. In a series of stylish urban films and ads, photographer Vitali Gelwich, director Daniel Wårdh, and stylist Corey Stokes, tell the story of a group of charismatic streetwear personalities in unexpected situations, mixing and matching Zalando streetwear and showing what liberation through fashion really means. In the campaign, we meet a motley crew of expressive streetwear in influencers: Parisian Jean-Jacques N’djoli with his irreplaceable Instagram profile and an impeccable sense of style, Berlin street fashionista and sneaker collector Dilan Kolkilic, the Swedish model Linnea Öhlund with a knack for the street savy model off duty look, and the master of over the top mixing and matching Joël Kurasinski from Valencia. They’re all curating their own eclectic mix of outfits from Zalando, as the campaign inspires people to discover and develop their own streetwear style. On the theme “It’s what you do. Or don’t”, the campaign shows our in influencers in outfits and situations that first look a certain way – but soon turn out to be something completely different. Playing with contrasts, juxtapositions and shifting perspectives. Showing how streetwear is all in the eye of the beholder, all up to you what you want to express, or not. In “Climb mountains. Or don’t”, Jean-Jacques in ski goggles is moving upwards against a blue sky giving the impression that he is hiking, only to reveal he’s actually walking up a set of outdoor stairs in an urban setting. In “Join the running team. Or don’t”, we see Dilan and Linnea tying their sneakers as a bunch of sporty joggers run by – zoom out and it’s clear that running is the last thing they’ll do, the sneakers are just a part of their ever so urban park outfit. “Be a benchwarmer. Or don’t” shows the gang dribbling a basketball on the sidelines of a court. Zoom out, and we see they’re all wearing VR goggles – fully engaged in their own world and definitely not on any bench. And on it goes in“Be fancy. Or don’t”,“Keep it minimal. Or don’t”and so on. With humor and style, the films show that streetwear has no rules, it’s not a set style or specia brands. It’s all about personal choices and maximum individual expression. This is Gen Z fashion for people who go their own way: eclectic, postmodern samplers and collaborators who get their inspiration from everywhere and everyone – and make it their own. Strong characters who mix and match their own unique way, high and low, old and new, niche and mainstream. Always de ning and re-defining themselves, always evolving, always making a statement. Or not. Produced by ACNE, the creative team has been handpicked for their unique mix of strong vision, fashion  and understanding of street culture. Photographer Vitali Gelwich is a Berlin based artist and fashion photographer, known for his raw documentary style and organic mix of high fashion and street culture. Stockholm based director Daniel Wårdh is a Vans sponsored skateboarder who combines the attitude and tempo of street culture with his passion for music and fashion. Stylist Corey Stokes is a super in influencer and art director, stylist and fashion editor at Highsnobiety. Re-imagining fashion for the good of all, the new Zalando campaign “It’s what you do. Or don’t.” is a loud, fun, and highly personal celebration of our differences – the pursuit of individual expression, to the rhythm of the street. Mixing and matching your own way, creating your own unique combinations like no one else. A unique fashion statement that’s individual, liberating and democratic. By highlighting the endless combinations and interpretations curated by the in influencers, the “It’s what you do. Or don’t.” campaign highlights how Zalando’s wide range of streetwear inspires and enables people to express their personality through fashion, combining and creating unique outfits in personal ways. Streetwear is rooted in being effortless cool and not looking like you’re trying too hard. It’s a mish-mash of everything and anything. It’s nostalgia and contemporary. New and thrifted. Mixing luxury with everyday casual. Completely bold or utterly au natural. One part super thoughtout, another part super random. And it might seem like there’s no thought at all behind it. But that’s the thing. There is. Streetwear is about being unique and real, expressing yourself, whatever it takes. It’s about finding inspiration where no one else is looking. Or where everyone’s looking. It’s about combos that makes sense just because they don’t. Or out ts that don’t make sense just because they do. It’s about constantly refreshing – or not refreshing at all. About having one look today and then never again. Or the same look every day. That’s the beautiful contradiction of the streetwear attitude. Be ugly, be bold, be weird. Or don’t. Be cute, be pretty, be completely undetermined. Or don’t. Go full denim. Or don’t. Be expressive. Or don’t. It’s what you do. Or don’t.  

Welcome to IRMA - "Reflecting Forward"
51

Welcome to IRMA - "Reflecting Forward"

Art The collaboration between Moco and Studio Irma has resulted in a new immersive digital art exhibition that - although it will first be seen at the Moco Museum - clearly has the ambition to make many a heart beat faster on an international scale. The interactive Studio Irma - “Reflecting Forward” exhibition is now open in the museum at the Museumplein in Amsterdam.   About Studio Irma - “Reflecting Forward” Brightly coloured lights, dance and music drive you through these interactive works of art. These are the ingredients that bring dreams to life: infinitely variable spaces with ever-changing dimensions and ethereal works of art that communicate with each other. You feel a sense of bliss as you wander around the digital and constantly changing spaces: Diamond infinity room, Kaleidoscope, We all live in bubbles, Connecting dotsand Universe. There is no language barrier, allowing every visitor to optimally enjoy this reflecting world in their own way. Here, life is not imitated by art or vice versa; instead, the experience is a captivating celebration of the interplay between man and art, man and man, art and art.   Irma de Vries of Studio Irma: “With 'Reflecting Forward,’ we are introducing a new art movement based on Connectivism.The exhibition emphasises how internet technologies such as web browsers, search engines and social media contribute to a new way of life. In it, the primary goal of art is to connect people in a world without borders.”   Kim Logchies, founder and curator of Moco Museum: “Usually, we reflect by looking back on the past.With this digital art experience and the infinite connections it shows us, we reveal what the future might look like and what your role in it could be.”    The influence of colour: Our early ancestors used colour to recognise ripe food. Hunger pushes one to search for food, while happiness is the reward for finding it. Over the course of millions of generations, colour has become such a reliable predictor of food that the act of eating has gradually evolved to become associated with a feeling of happiness. During the age of colonisation, bright pigments were sometimes considered closely guarded state secrets.  A new colour was developed specifically for Studio Irma's exhibition. It is a shade of pink designed to induce energy and dopamine. The exhibition takes you to a completely new dimension and offers more rooms, so a variety of truly cool experiences. Experience it yourself from today on.   Studio Irma - “Reflecting Forward” is the first of many projects coming to Moco in 2020 to celebrate female artists this year.   IRMA - “Reflecting Forward”: from Monday 10 February 2020 only in Moco. The collaboration between Moco and Studio Irma has resulted in a new immersive digital art exhibition that - although it will first be seen at the Moco Museum - clearly has the ambition to make many a heart beat faster on an international scale. The interactive Studio Irma - “Reflecting Forward” exhibition is now open in the museum at the Museumplein in Amsterdam.   About Studio Irma - “Reflecting Forward” Brightly coloured lights, dance and music drive you through these interactive works of art. These are the ingredients that bring dreams to life: infinitely variable spaces with ever-changing dimensions and ethereal works of art that communicate with each other. You feel a sense of bliss as you wander around the digital and constantly changing spaces: Diamond infinity room, Kaleidoscope, We all live in bubbles, Connecting dotsand Universe. There is no language barrier, allowing every visitor to optimally enjoy this reflecting world in their own way. Here, life is not imitated by art or vice versa; instead, the experience is a captivating celebration of the interplay between man and art, man and man, art and art.   Irma de Vries of Studio Irma: “With 'Reflecting Forward,’ we are introducing a new art movement based on Connectivism.The exhibition emphasises how internet technologies such as web browsers, search engines and social media contribute to a new way of life. In it, the primary goal of art is to connect people in a world without borders.”   Kim Logchies, founder and curator of Moco Museum: “Usually, we reflect by looking back on the past.With this digital art experience and the infinite connections it shows us, we reveal what the future might look like and what your role in it could be.”    The influence of colour: Our early ancestors used colour to recognise ripe food. Hunger pushes one to search for food, while happiness is the reward for finding it. Over the course of millions of generations, colour has become such a reliable predictor of food that the act of eating has gradually evolved to become associated with a feeling of happiness. During the age of colonisation, bright pigments were sometimes considered closely guarded state secrets.  A new colour was developed specifically for Studio Irma's exhibition. It is a shade of pink designed to induce energy and dopamine. The exhibition takes you to a completely new dimension and offers more rooms, so a variety of truly cool experiences. Experience it yourself from today on.   Studio Irma - “Reflecting Forward” is the first of many projects coming to Moco in 2020 to celebrate female artists this year.   IRMA - “Reflecting Forward”: from Monday 10 February 2020 only in Moco.

Diesel introduces its Spring & Summer campaign
50

Diesel introduces its Spring & Summer campaign

Fashion DIESEL introduces its Spring/Summer 2020 For Successful Living campaign.  But first, a little history. The famous DIESEL tagline was created in the early 90’s, when founder Renzo Rosso wanted a phrase that would remain both timeless, and true to the growing denim label’s irreverent, bold and unexpected foundation. The phrase, in just a trio of words, captured Rosso’s vision by wrapping in and connoting: irony, provocation, eccentricity and kitsch. It also solidified a mantra he had: never talk down to your customers. Treat them as equals. Involve them in your world (that was interaction 30 years before it was called so). If you wore DIESEL, you were living successfully. Simple as that. While the claim has been part of DIESEL’s communications ever since, today DIESEL returns to its nucleus by debuting a new For Successful Living story, celebrating its core product, denim; acquainting a new generation with DIESEL’s original messaging as a challenger of conventions and common places; and reminding the world that living successfully means staying true to oneself (making YOUR way the successful way) – while not taking oneself too seriously.   The centerpiece of the Spring/Summer 2020 campaign is a film by François Rousselet. It features a superhero movie actor on set, having a tough day and not quite nailing his scenes. Over with it (or rather, after having exhausted his movie director), he heads back to his trailer, changes into his DIESEL denim gear, steps out looking way more relaxed, and does the thing he couldn’t do on set but is simply a consequence of who he really is. Watch the video in the link below to see for yourself.   Accompanying photography was lensed by Kourtney Roy, and features models floating, flexing and flying.    Because, what does it all boil down to, ultimately? That For Successful Livingis fundamentally about confidence, and the power that comes from finding in oneself both strength—and irony. for more information visit shop.diesel.com DIESEL introduces its Spring/Summer 2020 For Successful Living campaign.  But first, a little history. The famous DIESEL tagline was created in the early 90’s, when founder Renzo Rosso wanted a phrase that would remain both timeless, and true to the growing denim label’s irreverent, bold and unexpected foundation. The phrase, in just a trio of words, captured Rosso’s vision by wrapping in and connoting: irony, provocation, eccentricity and kitsch. It also solidified a mantra he had: never talk down to your customers. Treat them as equals. Involve them in your world (that was interaction 30 years before it was called so). If you wore DIESEL, you were living successfully. Simple as that. While the claim has been part of DIESEL’s communications ever since, today DIESEL returns to its nucleus by debuting a new For Successful Living story, celebrating its core product, denim; acquainting a new generation with DIESEL’s original messaging as a challenger of conventions and common places; and reminding the world that living successfully means staying true to oneself (making YOUR way the successful way) – while not taking oneself too seriously.   The centerpiece of the Spring/Summer 2020 campaign is a film by François Rousselet. It features a superhero movie actor on set, having a tough day and not quite nailing his scenes. Over with it (or rather, after having exhausted his movie director), he heads back to his trailer, changes into his DIESEL denim gear, steps out looking way more relaxed, and does the thing he couldn’t do on set but is simply a consequence of who he really is. Watch the video in the link below to see for yourself.   Accompanying photography was lensed by Kourtney Roy, and features models floating, flexing and flying.    Because, what does it all boil down to, ultimately? That For Successful Livingis fundamentally about confidence, and the power that comes from finding in oneself both strength—and irony. for more information visit shop.diesel.com

Alexander Mcqueen Spring & Summer 2020
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Alexander Mcqueen Spring & Summer 2020

Fashion The Alexander Mcqueen Spirng & Summer 2020 campaign featuring Vivien Solari, Felice Noordhoff, Imaan Hammam. photographed by Jamie Hawkesworth. The Alexander Mcqueen Spirng & Summer 2020 campaign featuring Vivien Solari, Felice Noordhoff, Imaan Hammam. photographed by Jamie Hawkesworth.

Wrangler launches Texas Slim
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Wrangler launches Texas Slim

Fashion Wrangler launches Texas slim, with an incredible campaign that inspired you to live with the courage to take risks and live to the fullest.  For 30 years, Wrangler’s Texas jeans have been a best-selling fit. Now the denim icon introduces the Texas Slim, a new slimmer version for men. With a regular fit through the thigh, but cut slim on the leg, it includes all the authentic and relaxed elements of the original but with a contemporary, streamlined fit, keeping the heritage alive. To mark the launch, Wrangler creates a campaign to honor the daring and freedom of the America’s last few travelling motorcycle stunt shows. It aligns with Wrangler’s new global Wear with AbandonTM campaign, which celebrates the inspiring idea that life bursts with opportunity and adventure when you live with a spirit of risk and courage. In the early 1900's, motordromes became a popular carnival sideshow at state and county fairs across the United States. Inside the wooden drome, known as the Wall of Death, spectators watch from above as riders orbit its vertical walls on antique motorcycles in a heady mix of speed, noise and adrenaline. Defying death – and gravity. In the first half of the twentieth century there were hundreds of motordromes – now there are just a handful, a travelling piece of Americana, keeping this thrilling piece of motorcycle history alive. The riders trust each other with their lives. They hare stories of the road, broken bones, and a passion for a life of risk and adventure. Going from state to state, bringing heart-stopping danger and the romance of their nomadic lives to small-town America, the team set up and take down the motordrome together – always wearing Wranglers, engineered for hard, heavy work, and with enduring authentic Western style. Wrangler is the iconic denim cowboy brand, created in 1947 to serve cowboys and ranch workers, but soon adopted by rebels and trailblazers. Wrangler recognizes this spirit in the America’s motordrome riders, the men (and sometimes women) risking their lives to thrill a crowd, who are ensuring this way of life survives into a new generation. "Cowboys on steel, always in Wranglers." Wrangler launches Texas slim, with an incredible campaign that inspired you to live with the courage to take risks and live to the fullest.  For 30 years, Wrangler’s Texas jeans have been a best-selling fit. Now the denim icon introduces the Texas Slim, a new slimmer version for men. With a regular fit through the thigh, but cut slim on the leg, it includes all the authentic and relaxed elements of the original but with a contemporary, streamlined fit, keeping the heritage alive. To mark the launch, Wrangler creates a campaign to honor the daring and freedom of the America’s last few travelling motorcycle stunt shows. It aligns with Wrangler’s new global Wear with AbandonTM campaign, which celebrates the inspiring idea that life bursts with opportunity and adventure when you live with a spirit of risk and courage. In the early 1900's, motordromes became a popular carnival sideshow at state and county fairs across the United States. Inside the wooden drome, known as the Wall of Death, spectators watch from above as riders orbit its vertical walls on antique motorcycles in a heady mix of speed, noise and adrenaline. Defying death – and gravity. In the first half of the twentieth century there were hundreds of motordromes – now there are just a handful, a travelling piece of Americana, keeping this thrilling piece of motorcycle history alive. The riders trust each other with their lives. They hare stories of the road, broken bones, and a passion for a life of risk and adventure. Going from state to state, bringing heart-stopping danger and the romance of their nomadic lives to small-town America, the team set up and take down the motordrome together – always wearing Wranglers, engineered for hard, heavy work, and with enduring authentic Western style. Wrangler is the iconic denim cowboy brand, created in 1947 to serve cowboys and ranch workers, but soon adopted by rebels and trailblazers. Wrangler recognizes this spirit in the America’s motordrome riders, the men (and sometimes women) risking their lives to thrill a crowd, who are ensuring this way of life survives into a new generation. "Cowboys on steel, always in Wranglers."

Dior in Miami
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Dior in Miami

Fashion exclusive images by Victor Vergara from the Dior men's show in Miami. #DiorMiami exclusive images by Victor Vergara from the Dior men's show in Miami. #DiorMiami

Aayali
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Aayali

Accessories They believe in taking a moment to show appreciation for everything we have in life. This involves focusing on the positive and appreciating the things you often take for granted: warm sunshine, clean water, healthy food, loving family and friends. They also believe gratitude creates abundance and joy. Giving thanks makes you feel happier, more present, and confident to live your best life. Their products are created to help remind you to take a moment and be thankful for your life. About the materials and ingredients: They use a 100% natural wax created by the manufacturing arm of Cire Trudon, the oldest candle maker in the world since 1643. The wax was developed with the utmost care to ensure a clean burn and an exceptional factory experience. Creating a fragrance requires patience, experience and creativity. They partnered with French nose and bespoke perfumer Anais Fournial to exclusively develop our three signature signature fragrances Confiance, Joie and Sérénité. AAYALI fragrances can be characterized as sophisticated, timeless, elevating and evoking a feeling of ultimate luxury. Their candles are poured in France in timeless reusable vessels made from pressed glass, ceramic - an exclusive design handmade for AAYALI by Belgian brand VAL POTTERY, and French Limoges porcelain Brass, an alloy of copper and zinc, is one of the most durable metals. It does not rust and when treated carefully, it can last for generations. AAYALI’s founder traveled to India in search of the best brass craftsmanship. All their accessories are made in India by skilled artisans using 100% solid brass of the highest quality.  THE FRAGRANCES: CONFIANCE Top notes: Spices Heart notes: Sandalwood Base notes: Cashmere, Cedarwood, Moss Personality: Classy / Intriguing / Seductive Reminds you of: A crackling fireplace JOIE Top notes: Floral bouquet Heart notes: Bourbon vanilla, Mimosa Base notes: Amber Personality: Delicate / Comforting / Cozy Reminds you of: Warm rays of sunshine on a crisp morning SÉRÉNITÉ Top notes: Fig Heart notes: Jasmine, Orange blossom, TuberoseBase notes: Cashmere Personality: Elegant / Sophisticated / Romantic  Reminds you of: A relaxing day at the spa More about the selection of scented candles and accessories on aayali.com They believe in taking a moment to show appreciation for everything we have in life. This involves focusing on the positive and appreciating the things you often take for granted: warm sunshine, clean water, healthy food, loving family and friends. They also believe gratitude creates abundance and joy. Giving thanks makes you feel happier, more present, and confident to live your best life. Their products are created to help remind you to take a moment and be thankful for your life. About the materials and ingredients: They use a 100% natural wax created by the manufacturing arm of Cire Trudon, the oldest candle maker in the world since 1643. The wax was developed with the utmost care to ensure a clean burn and an exceptional factory experience. Creating a fragrance requires patience, experience and creativity. They partnered with French nose and bespoke perfumer Anais Fournial to exclusively develop our three signature signature fragrances Confiance, Joie and Sérénité. AAYALI fragrances can be characterized as sophisticated, timeless, elevating and evoking a feeling of ultimate luxury. Their candles are poured in France in timeless reusable vessels made from pressed glass, ceramic - an exclusive design handmade for AAYALI by Belgian brand VAL POTTERY, and French Limoges porcelain Brass, an alloy of copper and zinc, is one of the most durable metals. It does not rust and when treated carefully, it can last for generations. AAYALI’s founder traveled to India in search of the best brass craftsmanship. All their accessories are made in India by skilled artisans using 100% solid brass of the highest quality.  THE FRAGRANCES: CONFIANCE Top notes: Spices Heart notes: Sandalwood Base notes: Cashmere, Cedarwood, Moss Personality: Classy / Intriguing / Seductive Reminds you of: A crackling fireplace JOIE Top notes: Floral bouquet Heart notes: Bourbon vanilla, Mimosa Base notes: Amber Personality: Delicate / Comforting / Cozy Reminds you of: Warm rays of sunshine on a crisp morning SÉRÉNITÉ Top notes: Fig Heart notes: Jasmine, Orange blossom, TuberoseBase notes: Cashmere Personality: Elegant / Sophisticated / Romantic  Reminds you of: A relaxing day at the spa More about the selection of scented candles and accessories on aayali.com

At Givenchy, stars align for their new campaign
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At Givenchy, stars align for their new campaign

Fashion For its Spring-Summer 2020 advertising campaign, the House of Givenchy revisits its signature “couple” theme with an iconoclastic new pairing. In a glamorous, fresh dichotomy, the House reveals two icons — Charlotte Rampling and Marc Jacobs — in a campaign lensed by the photographer Craig McDean, with guidance from Givenchy Artistic Director Clare Waight Keller. Together and individually, the Paris-based actress and the New York-based designer appear in portraits that boldly celebrate individualistic beauty and the liberated, self-assured attitude so emblematic of Givenchy. The series honors the “Givenchy sitting” style of portraiture, a celebration of strength, wit and innate elegance. It follows the campaign starring Ariana Grande, for the Fall-Winter 2019 season. Wearing directional looks and key accessories from the Spring-Summer 2020 collection, each icon appears in his or her signature style, Rampling in masculine tailoring and Jacobs in more feminine pieces. Both radiate strength of character, their natural grandeur further underscored by a neutral setting. Dual perspectives feature close-ups and three-quarter length images in color and black and white. In single portraits, they offer a personal take on Bond accessories. Dressed in graphic black and white, Rampling folds the Bond shopper under her arm while Jacobs, dressed in a shiny black overcoat, carries a men’s Bond duffle that’s filled to capacity. In a naturalistic three-quarter portrait, Rampling gazes at the viewer with her signature mysterious half-smile, the season’s star handbag, the ID93 in buttery yellow suede, slung casually over her shoulder. In another image, she appears dressed in a trench and smoky aviators with the Mystic bag in cognac leather. A dual portrait shows the stars radiating grace and confidence. Posing back-to-back, they embody a complementary take on the season’s sophisticated red floral motifs. In the campaign’s companion video, Rampling and Jacobs stars appear “as they are”. Rampling - dressed in her signature masculine/feminine style – offers Jacobs a master class in the dramatic arts. With timeless chic and natural grace, the English icon coolly plays foil to the New York-based designer’s extravagant, tongue-in-cheek take on femininity. Surreal and absurd elements show the season’s footwear playing telephone, for example. The Givenchy Spring-Summer 2020 advertising campaign will be released online today and break in the March issue of selected magazines worldwide. Creative Director: Clare Waight Keller Photographer: Craig McDean, Talents: Charlotte Rampling and Marc Jacobs Video Screenplay: Hermione Hoby  For its Spring-Summer 2020 advertising campaign, the House of Givenchy revisits its signature “couple” theme with an iconoclastic new pairing. In a glamorous, fresh dichotomy, the House reveals two icons — Charlotte Rampling and Marc Jacobs — in a campaign lensed by the photographer Craig McDean, with guidance from Givenchy Artistic Director Clare Waight Keller. Together and individually, the Paris-based actress and the New York-based designer appear in portraits that boldly celebrate individualistic beauty and the liberated, self-assured attitude so emblematic of Givenchy. The series honors the “Givenchy sitting” style of portraiture, a celebration of strength, wit and innate elegance. It follows the campaign starring Ariana Grande, for the Fall-Winter 2019 season. Wearing directional looks and key accessories from the Spring-Summer 2020 collection, each icon appears in his or her signature style, Rampling in masculine tailoring and Jacobs in more feminine pieces. Both radiate strength of character, their natural grandeur further underscored by a neutral setting. Dual perspectives feature close-ups and three-quarter length images in color and black and white. In single portraits, they offer a personal take on Bond accessories. Dressed in graphic black and white, Rampling folds the Bond shopper under her arm while Jacobs, dressed in a shiny black overcoat, carries a men’s Bond duffle that’s filled to capacity. In a naturalistic three-quarter portrait, Rampling gazes at the viewer with her signature mysterious half-smile, the season’s star handbag, the ID93 in buttery yellow suede, slung casually over her shoulder. In another image, she appears dressed in a trench and smoky aviators with the Mystic bag in cognac leather. A dual portrait shows the stars radiating grace and confidence. Posing back-to-back, they embody a complementary take on the season’s sophisticated red floral motifs. In the campaign’s companion video, Rampling and Jacobs stars appear “as they are”. Rampling - dressed in her signature masculine/feminine style – offers Jacobs a master class in the dramatic arts. With timeless chic and natural grace, the English icon coolly plays foil to the New York-based designer’s extravagant, tongue-in-cheek take on femininity. Surreal and absurd elements show the season’s footwear playing telephone, for example. The Givenchy Spring-Summer 2020 advertising campaign will be released online today and break in the March issue of selected magazines worldwide. Creative Director: Clare Waight Keller Photographer: Craig McDean, Talents: Charlotte Rampling and Marc Jacobs Video Screenplay: Hermione Hoby 

Thinking of Summer
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Thinking of Summer

Fashion Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Lois Jeans.   photographed by: Fabrizzio Del Rincon styled by: Victor Vergara casting by: Timotej Letonja grooming by: Wout Philippo models: Mees & Dani at Republic Models  Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Lois Jeans.   photographed by: Fabrizzio Del Rincon styled by: Victor Vergara casting by: Timotej Letonja grooming by: Wout Philippo models: Mees & Dani at Republic Models 

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