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Exploring Maldives with Oumayma Elboumeshouli
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Exploring Maldives with Oumayma Elboumeshouli

Travel I had the opportunity to travel to the Maldives and stay at the beautiful Standard Resort. The resort is not just a typical Maldivian couple resort, there are plenty of activities and details that attract the younger crowd. I’m taking you with me on the journey through a photo-diary I shot. - Oumayma     Getting to the resort:   A breathtaking 35-minute sea plane ride away from Velana International Airport,The Standard, Huruvalhi is nestled between the Raa and Baa Atolls, on a naturally protected island. Guests can also take a combined 20-minute domestic flight to Dharavandhoo and 35-minute speedboat ride to the resort.     The resort:   The resort has 115 overwater and beach villas, each with its own infinity plunge pool and private lounge deck with direct access to the lagoon, ocean or beach. A glittering disco ball strategically perched above the soaking bathtub in every villa bathroom makes for a signature Standard statement piece and serves as a reminder that you really can party anywhere and at anytime of the day at The Standard. As I already mentioned, there are plenty of activities to do besides throwing your own party. The resort has 3 restaurants and 2 bars and everything is on walking distance. The part I loved the most about the resort is the beautiful sunset view at the BERU bar. Each room as water activity equipments to use.         The situation currently:   Traveling to the Maldives is currently safe. As long as you fill in an online form and show a negative PCR result you can enter the country. Unfortunately the capital is still on a lock-down, so I highly recommend to go directly to your resort.      Visit their website here: https://www.standardhotels.com/maldives/properties/huruvalhi I had the opportunity to travel to the Maldives and stay at the beautiful Standard Resort. The resort is not just a typical Maldivian couple resort, there are plenty of activities and details that attract the younger crowd. I’m taking you with me on the journey through a photo-diary I shot. - Oumayma     Getting to the resort:   A breathtaking 35-minute sea plane ride away from Velana International Airport,The Standard, Huruvalhi is nestled between the Raa and Baa Atolls, on a naturally protected island. Guests can also take a combined 20-minute domestic flight to Dharavandhoo and 35-minute speedboat ride to the resort.     The resort:   The resort has 115 overwater and beach villas, each with its own infinity plunge pool and private lounge deck with direct access to the lagoon, ocean or beach. A glittering disco ball strategically perched above the soaking bathtub in every villa bathroom makes for a signature Standard statement piece and serves as a reminder that you really can party anywhere and at anytime of the day at The Standard. As I already mentioned, there are plenty of activities to do besides throwing your own party. The resort has 3 restaurants and 2 bars and everything is on walking distance. The part I loved the most about the resort is the beautiful sunset view at the BERU bar. Each room as water activity equipments to use.         The situation currently:   Traveling to the Maldives is currently safe. As long as you fill in an online form and show a negative PCR result you can enter the country. Unfortunately the capital is still on a lock-down, so I highly recommend to go directly to your resort.      Visit their website here: https://www.standardhotels.com/maldives/properties/huruvalhi

PRADA PRESENTS LINEA ROSSA SPRING & SUMMER 2021
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PRADA PRESENTS LINEA ROSSA SPRING & SUMMER 2021

Fashion The body has always fundamentally inspired Prada Linea Rossa: metropolitan clothing engineered to enhance its form and best enable its function, to free the wearer through a fusion of innovative technicality and modern luxury.      For Spring/Summer 2021, the Prada Linea Rossa campaign reinvents the brand’s iconic ‘red line’ as the demarcations of spaces designated for sport, universal markers recognised in communities around the world.   Credits: Photographed and directed by Martine Syms  Creative Direction by Ferdinando Verderi Talents: Cai Xu Kun, Briana King, Rachelle Vinberg, Austin Augie, Le’Andre Sanders Music: ‘Cascara Prada’ by Asma Maroof The body has always fundamentally inspired Prada Linea Rossa: metropolitan clothing engineered to enhance its form and best enable its function, to free the wearer through a fusion of innovative technicality and modern luxury.      For Spring/Summer 2021, the Prada Linea Rossa campaign reinvents the brand’s iconic ‘red line’ as the demarcations of spaces designated for sport, universal markers recognised in communities around the world.   Credits: Photographed and directed by Martine Syms  Creative Direction by Ferdinando Verderi Talents: Cai Xu Kun, Briana King, Rachelle Vinberg, Austin Augie, Le’Andre Sanders Music: ‘Cascara Prada’ by Asma Maroof

Exclusive new editorial "As you are"
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Exclusive new editorial "As you are"

Fashion New digital editorial captured by Paul Scala.   Photographer : Paul Scala @paulscala Stylist : Toyo Tsuchiya @toyotsuchiya Hair : Pål Berrdahl @palberdahl Makeup : Rebecca Davenport using Deciem @davenport_mkup Model : Lillian Connor @ Premier @lillianlconner @premiermodels Model :  Sonny Round @ Models1  @sonny_round @models1 Photo Assistant : Sid Ellisdon @sidellisdon New digital editorial captured by Paul Scala.   Photographer : Paul Scala @paulscala Stylist : Toyo Tsuchiya @toyotsuchiya Hair : Pål Berrdahl @palberdahl Makeup : Rebecca Davenport using Deciem @davenport_mkup Model : Lillian Connor @ Premier @lillianlconner @premiermodels Model :  Sonny Round @ Models1  @sonny_round @models1 Photo Assistant : Sid Ellisdon @sidellisdon

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Exclusive editorial by Roza Wiktoria Tyborowska
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Exclusive editorial by Roza Wiktoria Tyborowska

Fashion Exclusive new digital editorial story captured and styled by Roza Wiktoria Tyborowska.   team credits: photo assistant: Yanika Gulina production: Studio Bajek post production: Sheriff post production model: Pivot Aurel at Kult Models London Exclusive new digital editorial story captured and styled by Roza Wiktoria Tyborowska.   team credits: photo assistant: Yanika Gulina production: Studio Bajek post production: Sheriff post production model: Pivot Aurel at Kult Models London

Columbia
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Columbia

Travel Columbia capturd by Pia Riverola. Columbia capturd by Pia Riverola.

CHANEL PRESENTS ROUGE COCO BLOOM
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CHANEL PRESENTS ROUGE COCO BLOOM

Beauty In a single gesture, the richness of the lipstick and the shine of the lip shine are finally reconciled. Intensity, long-lasting hold and plumping effect combined in an exclusive patented formula developed by CHANEL Research: this is the feat of ROUGE COCO BLOOM.     An innovative action that first fixes the color, then reveals a spectacular shine when the micro-droplets of oils hatch on the surface of the lips. Moisturizing and highly concentrated in micronized pigments, this new-generation lipstick keeps its promises for eight hours. It is available in twenty bold shades developed by CHANEL Makeup Creation Studio.     In direct line with Mademoiselle Chanel's timeless maxim « add more lipstick and attack", Lily-Rose Depp embodies with freshness, joie de vivre and energy this ode to color that magnifies all smiles. Shine now! In a single gesture, the richness of the lipstick and the shine of the lip shine are finally reconciled. Intensity, long-lasting hold and plumping effect combined in an exclusive patented formula developed by CHANEL Research: this is the feat of ROUGE COCO BLOOM.     An innovative action that first fixes the color, then reveals a spectacular shine when the micro-droplets of oils hatch on the surface of the lips. Moisturizing and highly concentrated in micronized pigments, this new-generation lipstick keeps its promises for eight hours. It is available in twenty bold shades developed by CHANEL Makeup Creation Studio.     In direct line with Mademoiselle Chanel's timeless maxim « add more lipstick and attack", Lily-Rose Depp embodies with freshness, joie de vivre and energy this ode to color that magnifies all smiles. Shine now!

Summer ready with the aesthetic SS21 CK Swimwear collection
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Summer ready with the aesthetic SS21 CK Swimwear collection

Fashion We are gradually moving towards the summer days and it is high time to stock up on swimwear again. Good news, because this month Calvin Klein is launching a new Swimwear collection: Basic Beach. The collection consisting of swimwear for that, him and her is characterized by black basics, shaded with Calvin Klein's logo in white. You can never have enough bikinis and swimming trunks in your wardrobe. That is why Calvin Klein has released a swimwear collection with black basics, for every body type. The items are characterized by the minimalist, but aesthetic shapes and looks. Because the items fit together well, it is easy to combine with each other.     The Basic Beach collection contains cover-ups for those, him and her if you are going for a quick bite to eat at your favorite beach club. No waterproof shoes and sand on your feet? Calvin Klein has also thought of this with a pair of slippers in the Basic Beach collection. We are gradually moving towards the summer days and it is high time to stock up on swimwear again. Good news, because this month Calvin Klein is launching a new Swimwear collection: Basic Beach. The collection consisting of swimwear for that, him and her is characterized by black basics, shaded with Calvin Klein's logo in white. You can never have enough bikinis and swimming trunks in your wardrobe. That is why Calvin Klein has released a swimwear collection with black basics, for every body type. The items are characterized by the minimalist, but aesthetic shapes and looks. Because the items fit together well, it is easy to combine with each other.     The Basic Beach collection contains cover-ups for those, him and her if you are going for a quick bite to eat at your favorite beach club. No waterproof shoes and sand on your feet? Calvin Klein has also thought of this with a pair of slippers in the Basic Beach collection.

In conversation with Calvyn Justus
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In conversation with Calvyn Justus

Men We had a pleasure speaking with Olympic swimmer Calvyn Justus, captured by Riley Taylor.     How would you describe your work and swimming across the past, present & future?   I think it’s been a good journey although I believe I’m still in the beginning stages, there’s so much I still want to do and achieve so hopefully there’s still a long road ahead, but I’m having the time of my life.      What has been your favourite swimming moment of your career and why?    Winning my first national title in 2016 which secured my place on the Olympic team. I wasn’t a favorite for the race, I went into the final ranked 6th.      Tell us something that is not on your resume.   Outside of swimming and modeling a huge passion is film and photography, I’ve been lucky enough to have directed and produced a few campaigns and commercials for the biggest swimming brand, Arena.      Have you learnt or explored any other new passions during this past year?   For awhile pools were closed, actually to this very day most still are, so I kept my fitness exploring another passion of mine, Surfing.      When did you start swimming and when did you know it was what you wanted to do as a career?    I began swimming competitively at 9 and that same year watched South Africa win and break the world record in the 4x100m freestyle relay at the Athens Olympics in 2004. Becoming an Olympian was all I thought about from then on.      What is your daily beauty routine like? And what beauty products you cannot go without?   I’m usually up pretty early to go for a surf, swim or run. When I get back home I’ll have a shower and use a face wash, when I’m out the shower I’ll apply a serum from ‘The Ordinary” along with a face moisturizer with sunscreen in it. Sometimes I’ll spray my face with rose water face mist. I’ll repeat that in the evening before bed using a night time serum instead. I’ve also been using a zinc sunscreen from a company called EIR NYC and it’s great for surfing.      How was it like competing at the Olympics and are you preparing for the coming Olympic Games in Japan?   Competing at the Olympics was a dream come true and an honor, I feel incredibly blessed and I’m so grateful for the experience.  Preparing for Tokyo 2020 has been incredibly challenging with Covid and the pool closures. Whether the games will be on or not is still being decided and that adds another layer to a challenging preperation. It’s something I’m just having to take day by day at the moment.    How is it different living in Los Angeles now to South Africa where you grew up?   The weather and coastal living are very similar, the culture and the way people operate in LA took a little adjusting and learning to drive on the opposite side of the road felt strange at first but ultimately I love having the option of both places, they’re so different and satisfy different parts of me. I love California and I’m really happy to be here. I wish more people could see how beautiful and unique South Africa is.      What are your other passions next to swimming? What kind of other creative things and projects have you been working on?   Touching on the video and photo passions I mentioned earlier, I definitely want to explore that world more, in-front and behind the camera. I’m trying to spend a lot more of my time writing and editing content. I’m also really enjoying the modeling and fashion world and I think there’s a few ways I could merge these two worlds together, I’m excited to keep learning and exploring.      What are some of your favourite travel spots you have been to and why? Also which are some of your bucket list places you want to visit after Covid-19?   With my swimming career I’ve spent a lot of time training and racing in Europe, I really love France and Italy, at one point I nearly took a directing job in Rome. I love Greece and the Maldives for vacation too. I would really love to spend time in Japan, I’m fascinated with the culture and food. Travel is one of the best parts of life and learning and I’m always excited to visit new places and cultures.      What does fashion mean to you?   Fashion to me is a way to express yourself and different versions of yourself visually. It’s how you’re choosing to show yourself to the world and it’s one of people’s first things they’ll learn about you on first impression. I love the idea of being different characters and experimenting with styles and colors. It’s such a big part of the world of film and photography and I can’t wait to learn more.  We had a pleasure speaking with Olympic swimmer Calvyn Justus, captured by Riley Taylor.     How would you describe your work and swimming across the past, present & future?   I think it’s been a good journey although I believe I’m still in the beginning stages, there’s so much I still want to do and achieve so hopefully there’s still a long road ahead, but I’m having the time of my life.      What has been your favourite swimming moment of your career and why?    Winning my first national title in 2016 which secured my place on the Olympic team. I wasn’t a favorite for the race, I went into the final ranked 6th.      Tell us something that is not on your resume.   Outside of swimming and modeling a huge passion is film and photography, I’ve been lucky enough to have directed and produced a few campaigns and commercials for the biggest swimming brand, Arena.      Have you learnt or explored any other new passions during this past year?   For awhile pools were closed, actually to this very day most still are, so I kept my fitness exploring another passion of mine, Surfing.      When did you start swimming and when did you know it was what you wanted to do as a career?    I began swimming competitively at 9 and that same year watched South Africa win and break the world record in the 4x100m freestyle relay at the Athens Olympics in 2004. Becoming an Olympian was all I thought about from then on.      What is your daily beauty routine like? And what beauty products you cannot go without?   I’m usually up pretty early to go for a surf, swim or run. When I get back home I’ll have a shower and use a face wash, when I’m out the shower I’ll apply a serum from ‘The Ordinary” along with a face moisturizer with sunscreen in it. Sometimes I’ll spray my face with rose water face mist. I’ll repeat that in the evening before bed using a night time serum instead. I’ve also been using a zinc sunscreen from a company called EIR NYC and it’s great for surfing.      How was it like competing at the Olympics and are you preparing for the coming Olympic Games in Japan?   Competing at the Olympics was a dream come true and an honor, I feel incredibly blessed and I’m so grateful for the experience.  Preparing for Tokyo 2020 has been incredibly challenging with Covid and the pool closures. Whether the games will be on or not is still being decided and that adds another layer to a challenging preperation. It’s something I’m just having to take day by day at the moment.    How is it different living in Los Angeles now to South Africa where you grew up?   The weather and coastal living are very similar, the culture and the way people operate in LA took a little adjusting and learning to drive on the opposite side of the road felt strange at first but ultimately I love having the option of both places, they’re so different and satisfy different parts of me. I love California and I’m really happy to be here. I wish more people could see how beautiful and unique South Africa is.      What are your other passions next to swimming? What kind of other creative things and projects have you been working on?   Touching on the video and photo passions I mentioned earlier, I definitely want to explore that world more, in-front and behind the camera. I’m trying to spend a lot more of my time writing and editing content. I’m also really enjoying the modeling and fashion world and I think there’s a few ways I could merge these two worlds together, I’m excited to keep learning and exploring.      What are some of your favourite travel spots you have been to and why? Also which are some of your bucket list places you want to visit after Covid-19?   With my swimming career I’ve spent a lot of time training and racing in Europe, I really love France and Italy, at one point I nearly took a directing job in Rome. I love Greece and the Maldives for vacation too. I would really love to spend time in Japan, I’m fascinated with the culture and food. Travel is one of the best parts of life and learning and I’m always excited to visit new places and cultures.      What does fashion mean to you?   Fashion to me is a way to express yourself and different versions of yourself visually. It’s how you’re choosing to show yourself to the world and it’s one of people’s first things they’ll learn about you on first impression. I love the idea of being different characters and experimenting with styles and colors. It’s such a big part of the world of film and photography and I can’t wait to learn more. 

LANVIN PRESENTS THE NEW Spring & Summer 2021 EYEWEAR CAMPAIGN STARRING PARIS HILTON
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LANVIN PRESENTS THE NEW Spring & Summer 2021 EYEWEAR CAMPAIGN STARRING PARIS HILTON

Accessories Luxurious and vintage-inspired details characterize the new Lanvin sunglass design included in the Spring/Summer 2021 advertising campaign featuring Paris Hilton, shot by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggot.      This sophisticated frame fuses modern finishes with a 1980’s inspired aesthetic. Details on the thick temples highlight the emblem of the French Maison, the mother and child gold plaque. The emblem represents the special bond between Jeanne Lanvin and her daughter, Marguerite, and is featured in jewelry, accessories and ready-to-wear items in Lanvin collections.     Part of the Yu Garden collection, the frame explores the exchange between heritage and contemporary, using the past to invent the future. The collection reexamines the legacy of the Maison, its design archives and transcends Lanvin’s ideological meaning. A Lanvin eyewear chain attaches to the hollowed tips, adding a luxe feel to the bold, oversized silhouette.  Available in Black, Tortoiseshell, Green/Havana Green and Striped Red.   Please find below the link to the YouTube video of the SS21 Show by (LA)HORDE : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKzObCvs198 Luxurious and vintage-inspired details characterize the new Lanvin sunglass design included in the Spring/Summer 2021 advertising campaign featuring Paris Hilton, shot by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggot.      This sophisticated frame fuses modern finishes with a 1980’s inspired aesthetic. Details on the thick temples highlight the emblem of the French Maison, the mother and child gold plaque. The emblem represents the special bond between Jeanne Lanvin and her daughter, Marguerite, and is featured in jewelry, accessories and ready-to-wear items in Lanvin collections.     Part of the Yu Garden collection, the frame explores the exchange between heritage and contemporary, using the past to invent the future. The collection reexamines the legacy of the Maison, its design archives and transcends Lanvin’s ideological meaning. A Lanvin eyewear chain attaches to the hollowed tips, adding a luxe feel to the bold, oversized silhouette.  Available in Black, Tortoiseshell, Green/Havana Green and Striped Red.   Please find below the link to the YouTube video of the SS21 Show by (LA)HORDE : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKzObCvs198

Hedi Slimane presents "Sun of Sound"
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Hedi Slimane presents "Sun of Sound"

Exhibition Almine Rech Shanghai is thrilled to present ‘Sun of Sound’ by acclaimed French multi-disciplinary artist, photographer, and fashion designer Hedi Slimane, the fifth solo exhibition of Slimane’s work at Almine Rech since 2004, and his first exhibition in China.     ‘Sun of Sound’ also marks the artist’s rst solo exhibition since ‘Sonic’, a presentation at the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent in Paris (2014). The exhibition will be on view from Mar 19 to Apr 30, 2021.     Hedi Slimane is an artist of creative agility, whose photographic visions are nothing if not direct and intimate. The scenes he captures vibrate with intensity, but while the aura is edgy, his style envelops the elegance and drama of classic black-and-white photography. Since he began exploring photography at the age of 11, Slimane’s preference has always been for black and white and, more essentially, his interest lies in subjects that inhabit Cimmerian spaces in which the various individuals he observes are comfortable exploring themselves in the privacy of their own worlds and intimate social circles. These are worlds in which Paris-born Slimane is very much at home; his photographs emanate a sense of presence, and a process of observing that hews to intuition rather than premeditation.     For many, Slimane’s talent is most readily associated with the arena of high fashion, but his forte has always been photography. His subjects are various but core concerns draw him to the street and into the night, to youth culture, dive bars, live music, and to performers young and old, but mostly young. It’s not just any music that fascinates. Slimane has an ear, and an eye, for the raw exhilaration of the alternative scene and its nascent stars – aspiring stars who, by the very fact of being photographed by Slimane, are catapulted into the limelight. British journalist Alex Needham describes the moments Slimane captures in his photographs as showing “young fans in that golden period when the band they love is still a secret to the wider world, and a concert is a shared celebration between performers and audience.”     There is something in Slimane’s stark black-and-white style that embodies the phrase “secrets to the wider world”. It’s not that there is a conscious intent to conceal anything that you can put your nger on, but it’s there in the air of understanding that enjoins Slimane and his subjects. Far from shutting us as viewers out, this sense of presence and connection sucks us in. Staring at Slimane’s photographs, as your eye roves the dark space in which he had obviously immersed himself, the density of a crowd, and the exuberant faces of performers and fans, delivers a thrill. A sensation well described by British writer and music-maker, George the Poet, who said “Making music is like dreaming aloud.”   There are stylistic parallels in the history of photography and that can be drawn with Slimane’s oeuvre which, like numerous of his iconic images, are part of the collective unconscious of the creative milieu; instantly recognisable, the subjects immortalised through shadow and light. Slimane’s frames extend the gravitas of the best photographers of rock-and-roll – British photographer Mick Rock who captured Glam Rock in the early 1970s; Kevin Cummins who made icons of the band Joy Division and its frontman Ian Cur- tis; American/Seattle-based photographer Charles Peterson doing Grunge (birth of) who did for Kurt Cobain what Slimane did for British singer, Pete Doherty, former frontman of the Libertines, in creating portraits which immortalised the singer. The key here is that Slimane’s focus extends beyond the obvious faces of the stars to the crowds, the fans, to people igniting street culture, and beyond to a range of details, objects, and paraphernalia, more reminiscent of the 20th century giant Robert Frank. Music, the scene that surrounds it, is integral. “Music has a sense of freedom that continues to inspire me,” Slimane says. “I have never found anything else that has the same capacity to impact on popular culture.”     As mentioned, beyond the music, it’s about the things and attitudes that music, like youth culture, embraces. Slimane’s juxtaposition of intimacy and glamour, direct gazes and snatched details, of bodies special and ordinary, of proximity and distance, mirrors the way we generally look as we gaze out at the word. Our eyes seek the familiar. We pause or stumble confused and excited by what appears most unfamiliar, though ultimately settling where our natural interests and comfort zones lie. In Slimane’s case, how rich this world is. The sense that he is driven both by awe and admiration, and by naked curiosity ema- nates from the personal photographic diary posted on Slimane’s website – https://www. hedislimane.com/diary/. The collection of images shown here takes you on a journey into his life where you see what he sees. There’s lots of beauty, lots of action, and interaction, in which the overwhelming experience is the honesty of the pictures. The photographs describe what Slimane’s in to, what makes him tick, and what gets him excited; ultimately his respect for those who know how to live life freely. Beginning in 2006, the diary hops from London to Paris to LA, from skateboarders to performers to clubbers; from the “residents” of half a dozen dive bars to parties and shoots for fashion; faces, expressions natural and uninhibited. From front stage to behind the scenes, what’s remarkable is that the people Slimane photographs are so comfortably ordinary, so normal; so real. You feel right at home, even among the stars. “I like a ‘simple’ photograph,” he says, “one that does not pretend to be anything other than a captured moment in someone’s life.”   By today‘s hyper resolution digital standards, Slimane’s style is raw and gritty – there’s no retouching in the studio. His modus operandi: “I’ve always taken pictures, almost like some people take notes or write down their thoughts.” One train of thought is surely about life itself. Looking at Slimane’s photos en masse, you become aware of the gap between youth and age that he portrays. Slimane’s youth is pure and lled with possibility. The older more mature gures -- legends like Lou Reed, Joni Mitchell, Keith Richards, John Lyndon, and Jane Birkin – are the survivors. Slimane’s portraits pay unconscious homage to the fact that they made it through the treacherous extremes of their youth.   Across time and cultural discourse, we try to peg the scenes to their moment as much as to the faces and their expressions. For example, the juxtaposition of PETE, UNTITLED, the portrait of a covert Pete Doherty in 2007, with his dirty ngernails and dangerous habits, with Doherty in 2009, posed in a park like a busker on a break, with kittens in a shower of dappled sunlight, the ensemble very sur l’herbe. We look for clues, for meaning, for stories. But while it is in the nature of looking to want a simple meaning or answer, if Slimane’s photographs tell us anything at all, it is more truly what he was thinking and feeling at these profoundly sensitive moments in his life. Almine Rech Shanghai is thrilled to present ‘Sun of Sound’ by acclaimed French multi-disciplinary artist, photographer, and fashion designer Hedi Slimane, the fifth solo exhibition of Slimane’s work at Almine Rech since 2004, and his first exhibition in China.     ‘Sun of Sound’ also marks the artist’s rst solo exhibition since ‘Sonic’, a presentation at the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent in Paris (2014). The exhibition will be on view from Mar 19 to Apr 30, 2021.     Hedi Slimane is an artist of creative agility, whose photographic visions are nothing if not direct and intimate. The scenes he captures vibrate with intensity, but while the aura is edgy, his style envelops the elegance and drama of classic black-and-white photography. Since he began exploring photography at the age of 11, Slimane’s preference has always been for black and white and, more essentially, his interest lies in subjects that inhabit Cimmerian spaces in which the various individuals he observes are comfortable exploring themselves in the privacy of their own worlds and intimate social circles. These are worlds in which Paris-born Slimane is very much at home; his photographs emanate a sense of presence, and a process of observing that hews to intuition rather than premeditation.     For many, Slimane’s talent is most readily associated with the arena of high fashion, but his forte has always been photography. His subjects are various but core concerns draw him to the street and into the night, to youth culture, dive bars, live music, and to performers young and old, but mostly young. It’s not just any music that fascinates. Slimane has an ear, and an eye, for the raw exhilaration of the alternative scene and its nascent stars – aspiring stars who, by the very fact of being photographed by Slimane, are catapulted into the limelight. British journalist Alex Needham describes the moments Slimane captures in his photographs as showing “young fans in that golden period when the band they love is still a secret to the wider world, and a concert is a shared celebration between performers and audience.”     There is something in Slimane’s stark black-and-white style that embodies the phrase “secrets to the wider world”. It’s not that there is a conscious intent to conceal anything that you can put your nger on, but it’s there in the air of understanding that enjoins Slimane and his subjects. Far from shutting us as viewers out, this sense of presence and connection sucks us in. Staring at Slimane’s photographs, as your eye roves the dark space in which he had obviously immersed himself, the density of a crowd, and the exuberant faces of performers and fans, delivers a thrill. A sensation well described by British writer and music-maker, George the Poet, who said “Making music is like dreaming aloud.”   There are stylistic parallels in the history of photography and that can be drawn with Slimane’s oeuvre which, like numerous of his iconic images, are part of the collective unconscious of the creative milieu; instantly recognisable, the subjects immortalised through shadow and light. Slimane’s frames extend the gravitas of the best photographers of rock-and-roll – British photographer Mick Rock who captured Glam Rock in the early 1970s; Kevin Cummins who made icons of the band Joy Division and its frontman Ian Cur- tis; American/Seattle-based photographer Charles Peterson doing Grunge (birth of) who did for Kurt Cobain what Slimane did for British singer, Pete Doherty, former frontman of the Libertines, in creating portraits which immortalised the singer. The key here is that Slimane’s focus extends beyond the obvious faces of the stars to the crowds, the fans, to people igniting street culture, and beyond to a range of details, objects, and paraphernalia, more reminiscent of the 20th century giant Robert Frank. Music, the scene that surrounds it, is integral. “Music has a sense of freedom that continues to inspire me,” Slimane says. “I have never found anything else that has the same capacity to impact on popular culture.”     As mentioned, beyond the music, it’s about the things and attitudes that music, like youth culture, embraces. Slimane’s juxtaposition of intimacy and glamour, direct gazes and snatched details, of bodies special and ordinary, of proximity and distance, mirrors the way we generally look as we gaze out at the word. Our eyes seek the familiar. We pause or stumble confused and excited by what appears most unfamiliar, though ultimately settling where our natural interests and comfort zones lie. In Slimane’s case, how rich this world is. The sense that he is driven both by awe and admiration, and by naked curiosity ema- nates from the personal photographic diary posted on Slimane’s website – https://www. hedislimane.com/diary/. The collection of images shown here takes you on a journey into his life where you see what he sees. There’s lots of beauty, lots of action, and interaction, in which the overwhelming experience is the honesty of the pictures. The photographs describe what Slimane’s in to, what makes him tick, and what gets him excited; ultimately his respect for those who know how to live life freely. Beginning in 2006, the diary hops from London to Paris to LA, from skateboarders to performers to clubbers; from the “residents” of half a dozen dive bars to parties and shoots for fashion; faces, expressions natural and uninhibited. From front stage to behind the scenes, what’s remarkable is that the people Slimane photographs are so comfortably ordinary, so normal; so real. You feel right at home, even among the stars. “I like a ‘simple’ photograph,” he says, “one that does not pretend to be anything other than a captured moment in someone’s life.”   By today‘s hyper resolution digital standards, Slimane’s style is raw and gritty – there’s no retouching in the studio. His modus operandi: “I’ve always taken pictures, almost like some people take notes or write down their thoughts.” One train of thought is surely about life itself. Looking at Slimane’s photos en masse, you become aware of the gap between youth and age that he portrays. Slimane’s youth is pure and lled with possibility. The older more mature gures -- legends like Lou Reed, Joni Mitchell, Keith Richards, John Lyndon, and Jane Birkin – are the survivors. Slimane’s portraits pay unconscious homage to the fact that they made it through the treacherous extremes of their youth.   Across time and cultural discourse, we try to peg the scenes to their moment as much as to the faces and their expressions. For example, the juxtaposition of PETE, UNTITLED, the portrait of a covert Pete Doherty in 2007, with his dirty ngernails and dangerous habits, with Doherty in 2009, posed in a park like a busker on a break, with kittens in a shower of dappled sunlight, the ensemble very sur l’herbe. We look for clues, for meaning, for stories. But while it is in the nature of looking to want a simple meaning or answer, if Slimane’s photographs tell us anything at all, it is more truly what he was thinking and feeling at these profoundly sensitive moments in his life.

EXHIBITION VOICES OF FASHION: BLACK COUTURE, BEAUTY & STYLES IN CENTRAAL MUSEUM UTRECHT
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EXHIBITION VOICES OF FASHION: BLACK COUTURE, BEAUTY & STYLES IN CENTRAAL MUSEUM UTRECHT

Exhibition Centraal Museum Utrecht presents the major fashion exhibition Voices of Fashion: Black Couture, Beauty & Styles, in which iconic designs, models and sources of inspiration promote a more inclusive fashion legacy. In this multi-disciplinary exhibition, fashion curator Ninke Bloemberg teams up with fashion activist, co-curator and founder of Diversity Rules, Janice Deul, to examine how Black designers have influenced the world of fashion, what stereotypes continue to exist, and how beauty is perceived. Voices of Fashion was created in close collaboration with designers, photographers and models from the Netherlands and abroad. The visually striking exhibition design is by AFARAI’s Afaina de Jong, and the exhibition is structured according to several themes.     COUTURE   The exhibition opens with a dazzling display of couture by domestic and international Black designers. To name just a few highlights: first is a highly personal installation by South African designer Thebe Magugu, who also presented this collection during the Paris Fashion Week. Magugu won the prestigious LVHM prize for young designers in 2019. Also, from South Africa, filmmaker and photographer Kristin-Lee Moolman worked with the stylist Ib Kamar to produce photographs and a film featuring Magugu’s work.   Of course the exhibition also features work by Virgil Abloh, creative director of men’s fashion at Louis Vuitton and founder of the label Off-White. Several of his ensembles are on display, including the black- and-white men’s suit consisting of woollen pants and a coat decorated with what seems to be a classic pied-de-poule pattern. On closer inspection, however, the motif turns out to be based on the shape of the African continent.   Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are represented in the exhibition with two ensembles: one which they created for Nina Ricci, consisting of silk pants and blouse and their signature ‘bucket hat’, and a second iconic design by their own Botter label. Maria Grazia Chiuri, the first-ever female creative director at fashion house Dior, worked with the African designer Pathé Ouédraogo – better known as Pathé’O – to pay tribute to the African continent, as part of Dior’s Resort 2020 collection. On display is an indigo-coloured skirt and jacket. This collaboration embodied the identity of the entire collection.   We are also proud to show an iconic evening gown made of down, from Moncler. It is the result of a collaboration between Valentino’s creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli with the Ethiopian label Lemlem, founded by model and designer Liya Kebede. The Surinamese-Dutch designer Marga Weimans launched her own label in 2006 and has presented several successful collections, investigating themes such as identity, technology and beauty. The exhibition shows an outfit from the Power of my Dreams collection, in which she infused traditional African wax prints with new meaning. We furthermore show an impressive black evening gown from her Debut collection, about which Weimans says: “It is my first collection, in which I tell a story about the sublime and seductive beauty of the Parisian couture landscape, using the archetypical ballgown as basis. I combine this with the horrors of slavery, from which the fashion industry arose. The blood, sweat and tears of ambition are mixed with the blood, sweat and tears of my enslaved ancestors.”   Stereotypes still abound: consider the Surinamese-Dutch designer Giorgio Toppin of the Xhosa label, who is regularly asked whether he makes streetwear while in fact, he specialises in men’s couture.     THE INFLUENCE OF STEETWEAR AND MUSIC   Hip-hop music has had a strong impact on everyday fashion and even couture. Cross Colours, famous for dressing ‘the Fresh Prince of Bel Air’, among others, was founded in 1989 by TJ Walker and Carl Jones. Their goal was to design clothing that is blind to prejudice. With their creations, full of symbolism and statements, the designers aim to give Black youths a voice. This goal is echoed by Dutch Black- owned brands like Patta, Daily Paper, Filling Pieces, The New Originals and HOSSELAER. These brands staked out their spot in the fashion industry by selling sneakers or T-shirts, soon followed by complete collections and sales points across the world. Such labels have become a permanent fixture of the fashion landscape. They owe their success in part to their collaborations with domestic and international labels like Nike and Adidas, but the real strength of these entrepreneurs is their sense of shared responsibility towards young people who feel unheard or misunderstood.   Political and social messages are also found in the colourful streetwear collections by Priya Ahluwalia. Her designs are always geared to sustainability, for instance by creating a series of new designs using Adidas deadstock. The creations by Farida Sedoc, artist, entrepreneur and founder of HOSSELAER are likewise suffused by statements. Especially for Voices of Fashion she made an installation using a selection of T-shirts from her private archive.     BEAUTY   Black women often were and continue to be marginalised. Their skills, beauties and body shapes are rarely celebrated and their natural Black hair is viewed as ‘unprofessional’. The cosmetics industry, with its limited colour palette, has likewise seemed to ignore them. Black women have been fighting to change this for decades. A selection of Dutch and international fashion magazine covers from the 1960s until today celebrates the diversity of Black models. This part of the exhibition includes photographs made by Kwame Brathwaite in the 1960s of the people and street images that inspired the Black is Beautiful movement in New York. The Black Panthers and icons such as Angela Davis, instantly recognisable for her large afro, contributed to the international reputation of this movement. More than 50 years on, the goal of highlighting the beauty of Black women remains relevant, although change does seem to be underway.     A BOOK, A MULTI-MEDIA TOUR, AND FRINGE PROGRAMME   The exhibition is accompanied by a lavishly illustrated book containing unique interviews and several long-reads, designed by Serana Angelista and Glamcult.Studio. The book will be published in mid- February and can be purchased in (among other outlets) the Museum Shop and from Waanders publishers.   Discover much more through the Voices of Fashion multi-media tour featuring the voices of Guillaume Schmidt (Patta), Giovanca Ostiana (singer, model, presenter) and Denise Jannah (singer).   There is also an extensive fringe programme, with the collaboration of The Black Archives, the African Fashion Research Institute, The New Originals, and others. More details of this programme will be announced online. The exhibition is sponsored by the City of Utrecht, BankGiro Loterij, Fonds 21, the   Creative Industries Fund NL, VSBfonds, Prins Bernhard Culture Fund, Mondriaan Fund and Prins Claus Fund.   Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race)Voices of fashion is part of Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race), a partnership between twelve museums in the Netherlands that are all working to embed the practices underpinning true inclusion and diversity in the DNA of the museum industry. The Centraal Museum’s partners in this venture are the Amsterdam Museum, the Bonnefanten, the Dordrechts Museum, the Frans Hals Museum, Museum Arnhem, the Rembrandt House Museum, the Rijksmuseum, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, the Van Abbemuseum, the Van Gogh Museum and the Zeeuws Museum. We hope to welcome other museums aboard in the future. The museums in this partnership will this year hold exhibitions and stage events highlighting themes of cultural diversity and slavery/the legacy of colonialism. Centraal Museum Utrecht presents the major fashion exhibition Voices of Fashion: Black Couture, Beauty & Styles, in which iconic designs, models and sources of inspiration promote a more inclusive fashion legacy. In this multi-disciplinary exhibition, fashion curator Ninke Bloemberg teams up with fashion activist, co-curator and founder of Diversity Rules, Janice Deul, to examine how Black designers have influenced the world of fashion, what stereotypes continue to exist, and how beauty is perceived. Voices of Fashion was created in close collaboration with designers, photographers and models from the Netherlands and abroad. The visually striking exhibition design is by AFARAI’s Afaina de Jong, and the exhibition is structured according to several themes.     COUTURE   The exhibition opens with a dazzling display of couture by domestic and international Black designers. To name just a few highlights: first is a highly personal installation by South African designer Thebe Magugu, who also presented this collection during the Paris Fashion Week. Magugu won the prestigious LVHM prize for young designers in 2019. Also, from South Africa, filmmaker and photographer Kristin-Lee Moolman worked with the stylist Ib Kamar to produce photographs and a film featuring Magugu’s work.   Of course the exhibition also features work by Virgil Abloh, creative director of men’s fashion at Louis Vuitton and founder of the label Off-White. Several of his ensembles are on display, including the black- and-white men’s suit consisting of woollen pants and a coat decorated with what seems to be a classic pied-de-poule pattern. On closer inspection, however, the motif turns out to be based on the shape of the African continent.   Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are represented in the exhibition with two ensembles: one which they created for Nina Ricci, consisting of silk pants and blouse and their signature ‘bucket hat’, and a second iconic design by their own Botter label. Maria Grazia Chiuri, the first-ever female creative director at fashion house Dior, worked with the African designer Pathé Ouédraogo – better known as Pathé’O – to pay tribute to the African continent, as part of Dior’s Resort 2020 collection. On display is an indigo-coloured skirt and jacket. This collaboration embodied the identity of the entire collection.   We are also proud to show an iconic evening gown made of down, from Moncler. It is the result of a collaboration between Valentino’s creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli with the Ethiopian label Lemlem, founded by model and designer Liya Kebede. The Surinamese-Dutch designer Marga Weimans launched her own label in 2006 and has presented several successful collections, investigating themes such as identity, technology and beauty. The exhibition shows an outfit from the Power of my Dreams collection, in which she infused traditional African wax prints with new meaning. We furthermore show an impressive black evening gown from her Debut collection, about which Weimans says: “It is my first collection, in which I tell a story about the sublime and seductive beauty of the Parisian couture landscape, using the archetypical ballgown as basis. I combine this with the horrors of slavery, from which the fashion industry arose. The blood, sweat and tears of ambition are mixed with the blood, sweat and tears of my enslaved ancestors.”   Stereotypes still abound: consider the Surinamese-Dutch designer Giorgio Toppin of the Xhosa label, who is regularly asked whether he makes streetwear while in fact, he specialises in men’s couture.     THE INFLUENCE OF STEETWEAR AND MUSIC   Hip-hop music has had a strong impact on everyday fashion and even couture. Cross Colours, famous for dressing ‘the Fresh Prince of Bel Air’, among others, was founded in 1989 by TJ Walker and Carl Jones. Their goal was to design clothing that is blind to prejudice. With their creations, full of symbolism and statements, the designers aim to give Black youths a voice. This goal is echoed by Dutch Black- owned brands like Patta, Daily Paper, Filling Pieces, The New Originals and HOSSELAER. These brands staked out their spot in the fashion industry by selling sneakers or T-shirts, soon followed by complete collections and sales points across the world. Such labels have become a permanent fixture of the fashion landscape. They owe their success in part to their collaborations with domestic and international labels like Nike and Adidas, but the real strength of these entrepreneurs is their sense of shared responsibility towards young people who feel unheard or misunderstood.   Political and social messages are also found in the colourful streetwear collections by Priya Ahluwalia. Her designs are always geared to sustainability, for instance by creating a series of new designs using Adidas deadstock. The creations by Farida Sedoc, artist, entrepreneur and founder of HOSSELAER are likewise suffused by statements. Especially for Voices of Fashion she made an installation using a selection of T-shirts from her private archive.     BEAUTY   Black women often were and continue to be marginalised. Their skills, beauties and body shapes are rarely celebrated and their natural Black hair is viewed as ‘unprofessional’. The cosmetics industry, with its limited colour palette, has likewise seemed to ignore them. Black women have been fighting to change this for decades. A selection of Dutch and international fashion magazine covers from the 1960s until today celebrates the diversity of Black models. This part of the exhibition includes photographs made by Kwame Brathwaite in the 1960s of the people and street images that inspired the Black is Beautiful movement in New York. The Black Panthers and icons such as Angela Davis, instantly recognisable for her large afro, contributed to the international reputation of this movement. More than 50 years on, the goal of highlighting the beauty of Black women remains relevant, although change does seem to be underway.     A BOOK, A MULTI-MEDIA TOUR, AND FRINGE PROGRAMME   The exhibition is accompanied by a lavishly illustrated book containing unique interviews and several long-reads, designed by Serana Angelista and Glamcult.Studio. The book will be published in mid- February and can be purchased in (among other outlets) the Museum Shop and from Waanders publishers.   Discover much more through the Voices of Fashion multi-media tour featuring the voices of Guillaume Schmidt (Patta), Giovanca Ostiana (singer, model, presenter) and Denise Jannah (singer).   There is also an extensive fringe programme, with the collaboration of The Black Archives, the African Fashion Research Institute, The New Originals, and others. More details of this programme will be announced online. The exhibition is sponsored by the City of Utrecht, BankGiro Loterij, Fonds 21, the   Creative Industries Fund NL, VSBfonds, Prins Bernhard Culture Fund, Mondriaan Fund and Prins Claus Fund.   Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race)Voices of fashion is part of Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race), a partnership between twelve museums in the Netherlands that are all working to embed the practices underpinning true inclusion and diversity in the DNA of the museum industry. The Centraal Museum’s partners in this venture are the Amsterdam Museum, the Bonnefanten, the Dordrechts Museum, the Frans Hals Museum, Museum Arnhem, the Rembrandt House Museum, the Rijksmuseum, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, the Van Abbemuseum, the Van Gogh Museum and the Zeeuws Museum. We hope to welcome other museums aboard in the future. The museums in this partnership will this year hold exhibitions and stage events highlighting themes of cultural diversity and slavery/the legacy of colonialism.

Daily Paper Explores Family Structures in Their Latest Spring & Summer  editorial
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Daily Paper Explores Family Structures in Their Latest Spring & Summer editorial

Fashion Following last year’s editorial in collaboration with the all-round creative Chakhani, this feature is centring the concepts of community and togetherness within a diverse family setting.    The editorial builds on Daily Paper's four brand pillars; inclusion, unity, creativity and heritage. Uplifting each individual culture rather than excluding any, Chakhani uses the traditional family portrait as a vehicle to convey his message.    Aligned with the brand’s values and vision, family is visualised as something not exclusively bound to a shared bloodline, but rather as something that can be chosen and celebrated in a multitude of ways.     EDITORIAL CREDITS: Creative direction and photography: @chakhani.pngStyling: @hallafarhatAssistant: @so.ambrosiaSet design: @marcusviniciusdqAssistant: @kpj____Casting: @tsellot @blackhead_conceptsHair: @nappychildMUA: @jenna.Ima.makeup @bymailinhProducer: @bbysu_chiAssistant: @anhnlv Talent: @zaidcharkaoui7 @gayundertheinfluence @iliaswalchshofer@whitneykiala @exoceexiste @can_soysal @sade.nadia @malsoo__27  @tisskeen @yvannovak @khadijasound @jesuisass Following last year’s editorial in collaboration with the all-round creative Chakhani, this feature is centring the concepts of community and togetherness within a diverse family setting.    The editorial builds on Daily Paper's four brand pillars; inclusion, unity, creativity and heritage. Uplifting each individual culture rather than excluding any, Chakhani uses the traditional family portrait as a vehicle to convey his message.    Aligned with the brand’s values and vision, family is visualised as something not exclusively bound to a shared bloodline, but rather as something that can be chosen and celebrated in a multitude of ways.     EDITORIAL CREDITS: Creative direction and photography: @chakhani.pngStyling: @hallafarhatAssistant: @so.ambrosiaSet design: @marcusviniciusdqAssistant: @kpj____Casting: @tsellot @blackhead_conceptsHair: @nappychildMUA: @jenna.Ima.makeup @bymailinhProducer: @bbysu_chiAssistant: @anhnlv Talent: @zaidcharkaoui7 @gayundertheinfluence @iliaswalchshofer@whitneykiala @exoceexiste @can_soysal @sade.nadia @malsoo__27  @tisskeen @yvannovak @khadijasound @jesuisass

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