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VERSACE SPRING-SUMMER 2021 CAMPAIGN: Welcome to Versacepolis
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VERSACE SPRING-SUMMER 2021 CAMPAIGN: Welcome to Versacepolis

Fashion Donatella Versace welcomes you to the mythical world of Versacepolis for the Spring-Summer 2021 campaign.     Dive into an underwater fantasy with fierce Versace faces Precious Lee, Hailey Bieber, Kendall Jenner, and our new La Medusa handbag. These modern muses are captured by Mert and Marcus in a setting envisioned by Donatella. Inspired by the vastness and beauty of nature, she transports us to the ocean’s previously unexplored depths to present a campaign that is fresh, fantastical and thought-provoking.     “With these images I wanted to portray the modern Medusa. Or better, to highlight how her many faces can be drastically different from one another and every woman can actually be Medusa. All of us, with our differences and unique characters, we can express ourselves also in the way we decide to dress. The same thing is true for me, of course. We live in a world in which gender differences are no longer important and we have been given a kind of freedom like never before. Let’s use it and use it well!” - Donatella Versace     Medusa is the ruler of Versacepolis and namesake of Versace’s latest handbag line, La Medusa. Each style is adorned with a Medusa-head plaque – the same plaque that’s on the doors of Via Gesù, 12: the brand’s first headquarters in Milan. The bag takes centerstage in a series of imagery and videos that portray strength, confidence, and seduction – values at the core of the brand and our Spring-Summer 2021 Collection.     Wearing designs depicting the sea themed Trésor de la Mer motif, the models are illuminated by droplets of saltwater and pictured next to vibrant neon jellyfish, which are called Medusa in Italian.     #Versacepolis #VersaceSS21 #VersaceLaMedusa     CREDITS: Chief Creative Officer: Donatella Versace Creative Director: Ferdinando Verderi Photographers: Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott Stylist: Jacob K Hair Stylist: Paul Hanlon Make-Up Artist: Lucia Pieroni Talent: Hailey Bieber, Kendall Jenner, Precious Lee, Mona Tougaard, Mica Argañaraz, Raphael Balzer, Simone Bricchi   Donatella Versace welcomes you to the mythical world of Versacepolis for the Spring-Summer 2021 campaign.     Dive into an underwater fantasy with fierce Versace faces Precious Lee, Hailey Bieber, Kendall Jenner, and our new La Medusa handbag. These modern muses are captured by Mert and Marcus in a setting envisioned by Donatella. Inspired by the vastness and beauty of nature, she transports us to the ocean’s previously unexplored depths to present a campaign that is fresh, fantastical and thought-provoking.     “With these images I wanted to portray the modern Medusa. Or better, to highlight how her many faces can be drastically different from one another and every woman can actually be Medusa. All of us, with our differences and unique characters, we can express ourselves also in the way we decide to dress. The same thing is true for me, of course. We live in a world in which gender differences are no longer important and we have been given a kind of freedom like never before. Let’s use it and use it well!” - Donatella Versace     Medusa is the ruler of Versacepolis and namesake of Versace’s latest handbag line, La Medusa. Each style is adorned with a Medusa-head plaque – the same plaque that’s on the doors of Via Gesù, 12: the brand’s first headquarters in Milan. The bag takes centerstage in a series of imagery and videos that portray strength, confidence, and seduction – values at the core of the brand and our Spring-Summer 2021 Collection.     Wearing designs depicting the sea themed Trésor de la Mer motif, the models are illuminated by droplets of saltwater and pictured next to vibrant neon jellyfish, which are called Medusa in Italian.     #Versacepolis #VersaceSS21 #VersaceLaMedusa     CREDITS: Chief Creative Officer: Donatella Versace Creative Director: Ferdinando Verderi Photographers: Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott Stylist: Jacob K Hair Stylist: Paul Hanlon Make-Up Artist: Lucia Pieroni Talent: Hailey Bieber, Kendall Jenner, Precious Lee, Mona Tougaard, Mica Argañaraz, Raphael Balzer, Simone Bricchi  

ARDUSSE FOR SPRING & SUMMER
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ARDUSSE FOR SPRING & SUMMER

Fashion ARDUSSE is revealing its first campaign, photographed by South African / London based photographer Lea Colombo.     Her exploration of color meets ARDUSSE's Spring/Summer 2021 collection, which is the founding act of a story that will unfold from here on; this first idyll reiterates and outlines the foundations of the narrative, drawing direct inspiration from the first idyll of Theocritus, the Syracusan poet who originally painted the bucolic and soothing features of Arcadia, imagining man in contact with nature. A delicate language emerges from the clash of archetypal, masculine and pragmatic shapes in enveloping volumes - the parka, the blazer, the duster coat, the anorak, the pleated trousers, the tailored bermuda shorts, the ruffled shirt, the crocheted sweaters - and delicate, feminine fabrics, either impalpable or with intense, sensual textures.      Credits:   ARDUSSE SS21 CAMPAIGN Shot by: Lea Colombo Creative direction: BRAGA + FEDERICO Stylist: Giovanni Dario Laudicina Model: Marnix Eyckmans, Dior Beye,  Prithvi Balwantsingh Hair: Fabio D'Onofrio Makeup: Luciano Chiarello Casting: Piotr Chamier Set designer: Ruggero Baisi Production: Ten Artist ARDUSSE is revealing its first campaign, photographed by South African / London based photographer Lea Colombo.     Her exploration of color meets ARDUSSE's Spring/Summer 2021 collection, which is the founding act of a story that will unfold from here on; this first idyll reiterates and outlines the foundations of the narrative, drawing direct inspiration from the first idyll of Theocritus, the Syracusan poet who originally painted the bucolic and soothing features of Arcadia, imagining man in contact with nature. A delicate language emerges from the clash of archetypal, masculine and pragmatic shapes in enveloping volumes - the parka, the blazer, the duster coat, the anorak, the pleated trousers, the tailored bermuda shorts, the ruffled shirt, the crocheted sweaters - and delicate, feminine fabrics, either impalpable or with intense, sensual textures.      Credits:   ARDUSSE SS21 CAMPAIGN Shot by: Lea Colombo Creative direction: BRAGA + FEDERICO Stylist: Giovanni Dario Laudicina Model: Marnix Eyckmans, Dior Beye,  Prithvi Balwantsingh Hair: Fabio D'Onofrio Makeup: Luciano Chiarello Casting: Piotr Chamier Set designer: Ruggero Baisi Production: Ten Artist

Exclusive editorial by Filip Koludrovic
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Exclusive editorial by Filip Koludrovic

Beauty Exclusive beauty editorial by Filip Koludrovic.     An experimental beauty story approached without a moodboard, but rather using the mix of the emotions and current mental states of everyone in the studio to create something without knowing the final outcome. That was the guide we were using when we met at the end of 2020. in a half abandoned factory on the suburbs of Belgrade, Serbia.    Filip Koludrovic: For this project we decided to form a dialog, a two way flow between the photographer and the model. It's extremely important what the model will bring on set with their energy. Knowing Jovana and her art the idea came to let me document that day with my camera, and after she was to document her experience through her drawings.   Jovana Krneta: Fashion supports art. My incide world speaks through my body the same way as throughout my drawings. How I see the world from a model's point of view is connected with the lens of the camera and photographer himself. It’s all connected, it’s all one, like the universe.     Photography: Filip Koludrovic (@filipkoludrovic) Model & illustrator: Jovana Krneta (@krneta) Beauty: Dragan Vurdelja (@drvurdelja) editor: Timotej Letonja Exclusive beauty editorial by Filip Koludrovic.     An experimental beauty story approached without a moodboard, but rather using the mix of the emotions and current mental states of everyone in the studio to create something without knowing the final outcome. That was the guide we were using when we met at the end of 2020. in a half abandoned factory on the suburbs of Belgrade, Serbia.    Filip Koludrovic: For this project we decided to form a dialog, a two way flow between the photographer and the model. It's extremely important what the model will bring on set with their energy. Knowing Jovana and her art the idea came to let me document that day with my camera, and after she was to document her experience through her drawings.   Jovana Krneta: Fashion supports art. My incide world speaks through my body the same way as throughout my drawings. How I see the world from a model's point of view is connected with the lens of the camera and photographer himself. It’s all connected, it’s all one, like the universe.     Photography: Filip Koludrovic (@filipkoludrovic) Model & illustrator: Jovana Krneta (@krneta) Beauty: Dragan Vurdelja (@drvurdelja) editor: Timotej Letonja

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BOSS LAUNCHES SPRING/SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION AND CAMPAIGN
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BOSS LAUNCHES SPRING/SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION AND CAMPAIGN

Fashion Creativity, optimism and energy are the watchwords of Spring/Summer 2021 for BOSS. An international cast of up-and-coming talent, led by South Sudanese supermodel Adut Akech, introduces the new collection in a bold campaign directed by Fabien Baron.     Fusing elegance and ease, the looks are more relaxed than ever before. The work of artist William Farr, who combines flowers with found objects such as wire, is a rich point of reference, inspiring the use of metal eyelets throughout the collection. For men, the new season offers agenda-setting updates of classic BOSS pieces.   Graphic patterns combined with new shapes, such as in the combination of a check jacket with tracksuit-style pants. The result? A relaxed, easy-wear outfit that is every bit as elegant as a suit. The sophisticated use of stripes, camouflage and a bold logo graphic across knitwear, sweaters and outerwear underlines the contemporary mood.     Colours range from conker, a masculine red-brown first seen on the FW20 runway, to fresh blue and yellow tones. A selection of updated neutrals, including a rich camel brown and crisp off-white, round out the palette. Worn in combination, the shades infuse each look with an uplifting and dynamic feel.     For women, the collection has a sense of the playful, yet retains the precision and sharpness that defines the BOSS aesthetic. The relaxed mood is evident here too, with elegantly draped fabrics and loose fits providing a contemporary take on femininity. New combinations, such as sharp outerwear worn with track pants, or tailoring with a logo sweatshirt, are both confident and contemporary.     Colours echo those in the men’s collection, with a particular emphasis on zesty yellow and timeless black. Patterns are a key feature here too, while the use of metal elements references William Farr’s juxtaposition of the natural and industrial, and reveals the power of contrasts.   Creativity, optimism and energy are the watchwords of Spring/Summer 2021 for BOSS. An international cast of up-and-coming talent, led by South Sudanese supermodel Adut Akech, introduces the new collection in a bold campaign directed by Fabien Baron.     Fusing elegance and ease, the looks are more relaxed than ever before. The work of artist William Farr, who combines flowers with found objects such as wire, is a rich point of reference, inspiring the use of metal eyelets throughout the collection. For men, the new season offers agenda-setting updates of classic BOSS pieces.   Graphic patterns combined with new shapes, such as in the combination of a check jacket with tracksuit-style pants. The result? A relaxed, easy-wear outfit that is every bit as elegant as a suit. The sophisticated use of stripes, camouflage and a bold logo graphic across knitwear, sweaters and outerwear underlines the contemporary mood.     Colours range from conker, a masculine red-brown first seen on the FW20 runway, to fresh blue and yellow tones. A selection of updated neutrals, including a rich camel brown and crisp off-white, round out the palette. Worn in combination, the shades infuse each look with an uplifting and dynamic feel.     For women, the collection has a sense of the playful, yet retains the precision and sharpness that defines the BOSS aesthetic. The relaxed mood is evident here too, with elegantly draped fabrics and loose fits providing a contemporary take on femininity. New combinations, such as sharp outerwear worn with track pants, or tailoring with a logo sweatshirt, are both confident and contemporary.     Colours echo those in the men’s collection, with a particular emphasis on zesty yellow and timeless black. Patterns are a key feature here too, while the use of metal elements references William Farr’s juxtaposition of the natural and industrial, and reveals the power of contrasts.  

When Dancing Stars Align: A Conversation Between Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav
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When Dancing Stars Align: A Conversation Between Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav

Men Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav, two rising stars in the world of contemporary dance, were destined to meet -- both Congolese, queer, Belgium-born artists nee under the sign of Leo in 1993. While astrological, geographical and artistic forces converged to bring these two together professionally, it wasn’t until recently that their paths crossed. Coutsier, who had already collaborated with Beyoncé, reached out to Yav in 2019 to join the “Black Is King” project. Although they didn’t get to work together then, they were each featured in the visual album -- Yav in “SCAR” and Coutsier in “SPIRIT”. After cementing their artistic individuality, they came together to harness the power of Ndeko -- a word that originates from Congo’s Lingala language, which means a strong bond, either blood-related or spiritual, whereby two people are bound by care and respect. We sat down with them to talk about race, identity and the power of movement.      Christian: The first time I heard of Nick was in January 2017. I remember someone telling me that there is a beautiful black dancer that has a very interesting way of moving. At that point, I hadn’t experienced having another black body in the space of contemporary dance. The moment Instagram started to broaden connection possibilities on the platform, that's when I really started to look for people like myself. I remember one day, Nick popped up as a “Suggestion For You”, and that’s really when I saw him for the first time.    Nick: My immediate reaction when I first heard about Christian wasn’t necessarily a defensive one, but more of a question about who that person is and why the comparison is being made. I also didn’t know if the constant comparison was positive or negative, or just a warning about this other guy. In this industry, it’s kind of a privileged place to be the only black guy. So is this other person going to be an ally or is he coming for my spot? All that thinking isn’t conscious hate, it’s just so instilled in how we think and how we are trained to think -- the so-called “There can only be one“ myth. When we physically met, it was kind of like a match made in heaven. For the first time ever, I was like “Okay wow, this is how it actually feels to have another black body in the space.”   Christian: What’s interesting is the way I first started hearing about Nick. I felt this energy as though these people were preparing me for this. I often had white allies, and now I had a black ally, which allowed me to broaden my network of people of colour and black dancers. It was one of the few times where I felt that there were no strings attached.    Nick: I like to be surrounded by people who have that talent and drive. And so when I heard about Christian, I thought “If he’s that good, then let me see how good I can be.” Competition is about pushing the other up -- inspiring and challenging each other to be the best version of ourselves.    Christian: There isn’t always a lot of space to move in contemporary dance when you are the only black person. There are certain opportunities that you can’t get because it’s a project that is told from a certain narrative.    Nick: Both of us being black, queer artists, we had to move through society in a certain way because of structural racism and homophobia. Being black we had to do this, being gay we had to do this, being second-generation immigrants, we had to do this. So it all made us who we are. And I think that the way I moved in society translated into the way I move as a dancer. The body being my main instrument, it does carry its own story. And I remember when I saw Christian move, I thought ”Wow, it is so specific” and it reminded me of the singularity of how I am trying to move. It does take time and maturity to embrace singularity as being an asset.   Christian: There is a logic to movement. It’s very easy for outsiders to say, “Oh yeah, I recognise this from ballet, or this from that.” But something I’ve often noticed with people of colour and black dancers is that the moment they do their own thing, there is something about their movement that doesn’t always appear to be what people normally perceive as logical in dance. But it’s so clear that you take it for what it is. I do think that having your own logic of movement is linked to having a lonely existence. When I started doing gymnastics as a kid, I was the only boy and the only black boy. You’re constantly on an island within a group. The way Nick moves, what happens here in his chest, it’s such a minor detail for others but then I’m like “Ah, I understand this movement.” It’s important to have representation and to see yourself in someone else, but feeling the movement is even more powerful.    Nick: I now kind of understand why we weren’t put together before because we are so powerful together. The colonial system of dividing power to better conquer is still present, including in the dance industry. Now we understand the power that we have together.    Christian: Our star signs are also identical. Over the years, I’ve met a lot of people who are Leo, but rarely someone who is a double Leo, like me. When people are double Leo, it’s so strong. Even if the personalities are different, there is something that is going to work because we’re powered by the same energetical forces within the universe.    Nick: It’s an unapologetic way of being. Something that has allowed us to be so sure and assertive about who we are was to not wait for that external validation.    Christian: In dance, the movements are stronger than myself so I don’t feel the need to adapt to other dance aesthetics. As a black man in society, however, that’s where I adapt my movements. For a very long time, when I would go to the hairdresser, I would speak in a very low voice, walk in a different way, and just adapt very small things. And I still do it because in order to survive, that’s where I really need to adapt my movements. In spaces where you’re underrepresented, people don’t always have the knowledge, desire or awareness of wanting it to be an inclusive place.    Nick: As a gay person, you need to adapt all the time, and so you just become really good at it. It shouldn’t be this way but it’s unfortunately still the case, as being your true, authentic self is still not accepted everywhere. Working with movement, the body and dance in that way allows me to make lemonade out of not-so-tasty lemons, so to speak. From a cathartic point of view, my adaptability in life does translate itself in my dancing, my work and my research around movement.   Christian: Walking in the streets as a queer man with your partner is a very precious part of me and not every place is a place to share that in the way that we would like to share it. Our society is not built on that, and that’s when I started realising that adapting isn’t always a bad thing.    Nick: When I started to create my own work, my artistic spontaneity would be sparked by sonorities and movements that would go back to my African roots. When I met Christian, it was really serendipitous because it was the moment I started to deconstruct a lot of things and give value to that part of myself. You live in this constant duality, which can be a power, but for the longest time it was something that I couldn’t identify with. I questioned my legitimacy as a black man, asking “Am I really the person who can talk about structural racism?” But being a second-generation immigrant is an identity in itself and so I gave power to my Congolese roots.    Christian: It is different when as a black person, you dance with another black person. When Nick and I were dancing during this shoot, it’s as if we were an extension of each other, almost like one body. There is a sense of home that I usually have to find within myself.    Nick: And as movement is such a big part of us, both in life and in dance, it was important for us to work with a photographer who could encapsulate all of that. Julien Vallon was a perfect fit, and we decided to name this photo series “Ndeko”, as it captures the way Christian and I feel about one another -- when you recognise yourself in the other. “I see you Ndeko”.      TEAM CREDITS:   Photographer Julien Vallon Fashion by Gabriella Norberg Talents Nick Coutsier & Christian Yav Words and edit by Berenice Magistretti editor: Timotej Letonja Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav, two rising stars in the world of contemporary dance, were destined to meet -- both Congolese, queer, Belgium-born artists nee under the sign of Leo in 1993. While astrological, geographical and artistic forces converged to bring these two together professionally, it wasn’t until recently that their paths crossed. Coutsier, who had already collaborated with Beyoncé, reached out to Yav in 2019 to join the “Black Is King” project. Although they didn’t get to work together then, they were each featured in the visual album -- Yav in “SCAR” and Coutsier in “SPIRIT”. After cementing their artistic individuality, they came together to harness the power of Ndeko -- a word that originates from Congo’s Lingala language, which means a strong bond, either blood-related or spiritual, whereby two people are bound by care and respect. We sat down with them to talk about race, identity and the power of movement.      Christian: The first time I heard of Nick was in January 2017. I remember someone telling me that there is a beautiful black dancer that has a very interesting way of moving. At that point, I hadn’t experienced having another black body in the space of contemporary dance. The moment Instagram started to broaden connection possibilities on the platform, that's when I really started to look for people like myself. I remember one day, Nick popped up as a “Suggestion For You”, and that’s really when I saw him for the first time.    Nick: My immediate reaction when I first heard about Christian wasn’t necessarily a defensive one, but more of a question about who that person is and why the comparison is being made. I also didn’t know if the constant comparison was positive or negative, or just a warning about this other guy. In this industry, it’s kind of a privileged place to be the only black guy. So is this other person going to be an ally or is he coming for my spot? All that thinking isn’t conscious hate, it’s just so instilled in how we think and how we are trained to think -- the so-called “There can only be one“ myth. When we physically met, it was kind of like a match made in heaven. For the first time ever, I was like “Okay wow, this is how it actually feels to have another black body in the space.”   Christian: What’s interesting is the way I first started hearing about Nick. I felt this energy as though these people were preparing me for this. I often had white allies, and now I had a black ally, which allowed me to broaden my network of people of colour and black dancers. It was one of the few times where I felt that there were no strings attached.    Nick: I like to be surrounded by people who have that talent and drive. And so when I heard about Christian, I thought “If he’s that good, then let me see how good I can be.” Competition is about pushing the other up -- inspiring and challenging each other to be the best version of ourselves.    Christian: There isn’t always a lot of space to move in contemporary dance when you are the only black person. There are certain opportunities that you can’t get because it’s a project that is told from a certain narrative.    Nick: Both of us being black, queer artists, we had to move through society in a certain way because of structural racism and homophobia. Being black we had to do this, being gay we had to do this, being second-generation immigrants, we had to do this. So it all made us who we are. And I think that the way I moved in society translated into the way I move as a dancer. The body being my main instrument, it does carry its own story. And I remember when I saw Christian move, I thought ”Wow, it is so specific” and it reminded me of the singularity of how I am trying to move. It does take time and maturity to embrace singularity as being an asset.   Christian: There is a logic to movement. It’s very easy for outsiders to say, “Oh yeah, I recognise this from ballet, or this from that.” But something I’ve often noticed with people of colour and black dancers is that the moment they do their own thing, there is something about their movement that doesn’t always appear to be what people normally perceive as logical in dance. But it’s so clear that you take it for what it is. I do think that having your own logic of movement is linked to having a lonely existence. When I started doing gymnastics as a kid, I was the only boy and the only black boy. You’re constantly on an island within a group. The way Nick moves, what happens here in his chest, it’s such a minor detail for others but then I’m like “Ah, I understand this movement.” It’s important to have representation and to see yourself in someone else, but feeling the movement is even more powerful.    Nick: I now kind of understand why we weren’t put together before because we are so powerful together. The colonial system of dividing power to better conquer is still present, including in the dance industry. Now we understand the power that we have together.    Christian: Our star signs are also identical. Over the years, I’ve met a lot of people who are Leo, but rarely someone who is a double Leo, like me. When people are double Leo, it’s so strong. Even if the personalities are different, there is something that is going to work because we’re powered by the same energetical forces within the universe.    Nick: It’s an unapologetic way of being. Something that has allowed us to be so sure and assertive about who we are was to not wait for that external validation.    Christian: In dance, the movements are stronger than myself so I don’t feel the need to adapt to other dance aesthetics. As a black man in society, however, that’s where I adapt my movements. For a very long time, when I would go to the hairdresser, I would speak in a very low voice, walk in a different way, and just adapt very small things. And I still do it because in order to survive, that’s where I really need to adapt my movements. In spaces where you’re underrepresented, people don’t always have the knowledge, desire or awareness of wanting it to be an inclusive place.    Nick: As a gay person, you need to adapt all the time, and so you just become really good at it. It shouldn’t be this way but it’s unfortunately still the case, as being your true, authentic self is still not accepted everywhere. Working with movement, the body and dance in that way allows me to make lemonade out of not-so-tasty lemons, so to speak. From a cathartic point of view, my adaptability in life does translate itself in my dancing, my work and my research around movement.   Christian: Walking in the streets as a queer man with your partner is a very precious part of me and not every place is a place to share that in the way that we would like to share it. Our society is not built on that, and that’s when I started realising that adapting isn’t always a bad thing.    Nick: When I started to create my own work, my artistic spontaneity would be sparked by sonorities and movements that would go back to my African roots. When I met Christian, it was really serendipitous because it was the moment I started to deconstruct a lot of things and give value to that part of myself. You live in this constant duality, which can be a power, but for the longest time it was something that I couldn’t identify with. I questioned my legitimacy as a black man, asking “Am I really the person who can talk about structural racism?” But being a second-generation immigrant is an identity in itself and so I gave power to my Congolese roots.    Christian: It is different when as a black person, you dance with another black person. When Nick and I were dancing during this shoot, it’s as if we were an extension of each other, almost like one body. There is a sense of home that I usually have to find within myself.    Nick: And as movement is such a big part of us, both in life and in dance, it was important for us to work with a photographer who could encapsulate all of that. Julien Vallon was a perfect fit, and we decided to name this photo series “Ndeko”, as it captures the way Christian and I feel about one another -- when you recognise yourself in the other. “I see you Ndeko”.      TEAM CREDITS:   Photographer Julien Vallon Fashion by Gabriella Norberg Talents Nick Coutsier & Christian Yav Words and edit by Berenice Magistretti editor: Timotej Letonja

Exclusive editorial starring Maddie Ziegler
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Exclusive editorial starring Maddie Ziegler

Fashion Exclusive new digital cover story with the talented Maddie Ziegler wearing Miu Miu Fall & Winter 2020-2021.     TEAM CREDITS: Talent: Maddie Ziegler @maddieziegler Editor in Chief: Timotej Letonja @timiletonja Codirector/Photographer: Andrew Arthur @andrewarthur Codirector: Nikolai Kokanovic @foxnhound Fashion Director: Lisa Jarvis @lisajarvis_stylist Creative Producer: Chloe Brinklow @chloebrinklow Makeup: Tonya Brewer @thetonyabrewer Hair: Clayton Hawkins @claytonhawkins Stylist assistant: Damien Lloyd @thedameeffect  Choreographer: Denna Thomsen @dennathomsen  DP: Vatche Giragossian @giragossian.cine  Prop Stylist: Enoch Choi  @numero_netherlands  Exclusive new digital cover story with the talented Maddie Ziegler wearing Miu Miu Fall & Winter 2020-2021.     TEAM CREDITS: Talent: Maddie Ziegler @maddieziegler Editor in Chief: Timotej Letonja @timiletonja Codirector/Photographer: Andrew Arthur @andrewarthur Codirector: Nikolai Kokanovic @foxnhound Fashion Director: Lisa Jarvis @lisajarvis_stylist Creative Producer: Chloe Brinklow @chloebrinklow Makeup: Tonya Brewer @thetonyabrewer Hair: Clayton Hawkins @claytonhawkins Stylist assistant: Damien Lloyd @thedameeffect  Choreographer: Denna Thomsen @dennathomsen  DP: Vatche Giragossian @giragossian.cine  Prop Stylist: Enoch Choi  @numero_netherlands 

Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Berluti
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Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Berluti

Fashion Exclusive new editorial in collaboration with Berluti.   Credits: Photographer Linus Morales at Lomo mgmt Fashion editor Gabriella Norberg Hair & Make-up Amelie Holmberg at Agency Bigoudi Model Luca Farup at Two Management Photo assistant digital Kat Stump  Photo assistant light Karl Sandock Fashion assistant Sarah Schmidt Editor Timotej Letonja Exclusive new editorial in collaboration with Berluti.   Credits: Photographer Linus Morales at Lomo mgmt Fashion editor Gabriella Norberg Hair & Make-up Amelie Holmberg at Agency Bigoudi Model Luca Farup at Two Management Photo assistant digital Kat Stump  Photo assistant light Karl Sandock Fashion assistant Sarah Schmidt Editor Timotej Letonja

In conversation with Jorge Lopez
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In conversation with Jorge Lopez

Men Recently we had a delight speaking with actor and our cover star Jorge Lopez.       As our theme for this season is "DREAM", what are your dreams Jorge? Was acting a dream of yours or did it just happen and evolve naturally?   At this moment my dreams are not very graphic, they are reduced to the simple. The great wishes that I had before are disappearing. Having been outside of my country for almost 7 years has made me connect stronger than ever with my roots and I want that my family is well and that they do not lack anything.   Acting was always present in my life, before I began to speak my body moved to the rhythm of the music, I dressed up, sang. Later at college the same, I participated in all the activities and was the production and staging leader.   When I finished high school it was a totally visceral decision to dedicate myself to this professionally. I never questioned it because I felt that it was what I had to do, period. That, hand in hand with destiny, made everything a great path, full of great experiences and learnings.     What are some of the highlights of "ELITE" on Netflix for you? Will you be back next season?   Elite is a project that will mark my career forever. That's a fact, as an actor to be able to play such a socially controversial character. And the reception of the public fills me with satisfaction.   Exploring places that I didn’t know either as an actor or as a person, Valerio took me to the darkest and at the same time luminous limits of a human being. I learned a lot from him.   In professional terms, it was the project that brought me to Europe, a place where I always wanted to experience working and growing. For which I am very grateful to the project. I met people I admire a lot, a great team of professionals.   The personal thing that is the most important for me, it meant growing. I have been living in Spain for almost 2 years and I want it to become my base, I am completely in love with this country.   Regarding my continuity in the series, my departure is already public. However, I am already working on the pre-production of another series, also with Netflix, which has me very excited.     How doeas your normal day look like? Do you have a daily routine?   The truth is I have my rituals (which I don't always follow), that I inherited from my mother. The key is breakfast, that marks the whole day. A shot of multiple vitamins and minerals extracted from fruits and vegetables, put in the blender and that's it.   Then sports. Personally, I like to swim in the morning, then go to the gym and I'm going to do whatever I have to do for work, photos, wardrobe tests, day of shooting, etc.   With regards to eating 5 daily meals, balanced and rich mainly in proteins and carbohydrates, because when I spend a lot, I must also consume a lot.     What is it like for you personally to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic? Have you been able to stay creative during these times? Perhaps you developed new dreams, projects, or discovered new passions?   It has been a very hard blow for everyone all around the world, we were all touched differently. I personally went through it with my best friends in Madrid, it was very enriching to experience a creative and personal retreat at the same time.   I came from a very strong rhythm of 10 years of work without stopping at any time, totally devoted and absorbed by my work. And this was a very hard blow to look inside myself. It was tremendously positive. I think I had forgotten who I was, I think I had lost myself. Now that I am resuming my work, it is much more powerful to be aware of all the personal spiritual work done in the confinement.   We were confined in Madrid for 2 months and I did discover many creative places in me beyond interpretation. Now I can say that I have more than 7 hobbies.     What do you think is the most important thing about the current times? What positive aspects can we draw from this difficult period?   These are highly contradictory times. I believe that the world is constantly changing from climate change to social change, which is dehumanizing us. Situations like this are terrible, they measure us, millions of deaths in the world, it is something with a very strong impact. It is important that we stop for a second to look around us and forget about our ego and only our interests.   I believe that growing in empathy and resilience is the positive aspect, that everything we are experiencing leaves me with.     CREDITS: Talent: Jorge Lopez @jorgelopez_as Photography: Nico Bustos @nicobustos@artlistparisnewyork Casting / EIC: Timotej Letonja @timiletonja  Styling: Gabriella Norberg @gabriella.norberg Editor: Jordan Boothe @lmcworldwide  Photo assistants: Alex Orjecovschi, Federica Falcone Digital operator: Lorenzo Styling assistant: Tea Lindstrom Grooming: Alessandro Rebecchi @artlistparisnewyork Producer: Allan Vetier Production assistant: Ines Saccani  Special thanks to Hoxton Hotel Paris  Recently we had a delight speaking with actor and our cover star Jorge Lopez.       As our theme for this season is "DREAM", what are your dreams Jorge? Was acting a dream of yours or did it just happen and evolve naturally?   At this moment my dreams are not very graphic, they are reduced to the simple. The great wishes that I had before are disappearing. Having been outside of my country for almost 7 years has made me connect stronger than ever with my roots and I want that my family is well and that they do not lack anything.   Acting was always present in my life, before I began to speak my body moved to the rhythm of the music, I dressed up, sang. Later at college the same, I participated in all the activities and was the production and staging leader.   When I finished high school it was a totally visceral decision to dedicate myself to this professionally. I never questioned it because I felt that it was what I had to do, period. That, hand in hand with destiny, made everything a great path, full of great experiences and learnings.     What are some of the highlights of "ELITE" on Netflix for you? Will you be back next season?   Elite is a project that will mark my career forever. That's a fact, as an actor to be able to play such a socially controversial character. And the reception of the public fills me with satisfaction.   Exploring places that I didn’t know either as an actor or as a person, Valerio took me to the darkest and at the same time luminous limits of a human being. I learned a lot from him.   In professional terms, it was the project that brought me to Europe, a place where I always wanted to experience working and growing. For which I am very grateful to the project. I met people I admire a lot, a great team of professionals.   The personal thing that is the most important for me, it meant growing. I have been living in Spain for almost 2 years and I want it to become my base, I am completely in love with this country.   Regarding my continuity in the series, my departure is already public. However, I am already working on the pre-production of another series, also with Netflix, which has me very excited.     How doeas your normal day look like? Do you have a daily routine?   The truth is I have my rituals (which I don't always follow), that I inherited from my mother. The key is breakfast, that marks the whole day. A shot of multiple vitamins and minerals extracted from fruits and vegetables, put in the blender and that's it.   Then sports. Personally, I like to swim in the morning, then go to the gym and I'm going to do whatever I have to do for work, photos, wardrobe tests, day of shooting, etc.   With regards to eating 5 daily meals, balanced and rich mainly in proteins and carbohydrates, because when I spend a lot, I must also consume a lot.     What is it like for you personally to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic? Have you been able to stay creative during these times? Perhaps you developed new dreams, projects, or discovered new passions?   It has been a very hard blow for everyone all around the world, we were all touched differently. I personally went through it with my best friends in Madrid, it was very enriching to experience a creative and personal retreat at the same time.   I came from a very strong rhythm of 10 years of work without stopping at any time, totally devoted and absorbed by my work. And this was a very hard blow to look inside myself. It was tremendously positive. I think I had forgotten who I was, I think I had lost myself. Now that I am resuming my work, it is much more powerful to be aware of all the personal spiritual work done in the confinement.   We were confined in Madrid for 2 months and I did discover many creative places in me beyond interpretation. Now I can say that I have more than 7 hobbies.     What do you think is the most important thing about the current times? What positive aspects can we draw from this difficult period?   These are highly contradictory times. I believe that the world is constantly changing from climate change to social change, which is dehumanizing us. Situations like this are terrible, they measure us, millions of deaths in the world, it is something with a very strong impact. It is important that we stop for a second to look around us and forget about our ego and only our interests.   I believe that growing in empathy and resilience is the positive aspect, that everything we are experiencing leaves me with.     CREDITS: Talent: Jorge Lopez @jorgelopez_as Photography: Nico Bustos @nicobustos@artlistparisnewyork Casting / EIC: Timotej Letonja @timiletonja  Styling: Gabriella Norberg @gabriella.norberg Editor: Jordan Boothe @lmcworldwide  Photo assistants: Alex Orjecovschi, Federica Falcone Digital operator: Lorenzo Styling assistant: Tea Lindstrom Grooming: Alessandro Rebecchi @artlistparisnewyork Producer: Allan Vetier Production assistant: Ines Saccani  Special thanks to Hoxton Hotel Paris 

Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Jean Paul Gaultier
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Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Jean Paul Gaultier

Fashion NUMÉRO NL, spécial @jpgaultierofficial by Thibault-Théodore & Lisa Jarvis & Nicola Scarlino with Jesse Maybury     . Photographer & Director @thibault_theodore Fashion Director @lisajarvis_stylist Creative Director @nicola_scarlino Set Designer @nicola_scarlino Visual FX artist / video editor : @manuelmolla_  DOP @sictor Make up artist @aliceghendrih @calmyagent.fr Hair Stylist @hikageyumiko @saint_germain_agency Manicurist @delphineaissi_ydalagence . Casting Director @ikki_casting . Model @jessmaybury @elitemodelworld  . Fashion assistant @francescariccardi Light assistant @sosoinpariss Analog operator @maellejoigne Set Designer assistants @aminbidar @ach_d @antoinedugrandc @rosemarybrowning_ . Production @weird_fishes_studio Producer @thempresents Production assistant @adelinabichetelzey . Huge thanks to @kohlerparis NUMÉRO NL, spécial @jpgaultierofficial by Thibault-Théodore & Lisa Jarvis & Nicola Scarlino with Jesse Maybury     . Photographer & Director @thibault_theodore Fashion Director @lisajarvis_stylist Creative Director @nicola_scarlino Set Designer @nicola_scarlino Visual FX artist / video editor : @manuelmolla_  DOP @sictor Make up artist @aliceghendrih @calmyagent.fr Hair Stylist @hikageyumiko @saint_germain_agency Manicurist @delphineaissi_ydalagence . Casting Director @ikki_casting . Model @jessmaybury @elitemodelworld  . Fashion assistant @francescariccardi Light assistant @sosoinpariss Analog operator @maellejoigne Set Designer assistants @aminbidar @ach_d @antoinedugrandc @rosemarybrowning_ . Production @weird_fishes_studio Producer @thempresents Production assistant @adelinabichetelzey . Huge thanks to @kohlerparis

Dr. Martens Talking Tough podcast: In conversation with the role models of our time
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Dr. Martens Talking Tough podcast: In conversation with the role models of our time

Culture Dr.Martens is back with new episodes of the Talking Tough (UK) podcast.This time we present a special mini-series, recorded live from Rotterdam in the Netherlands.Hosted by writer Jill Mathon, journalist Bo Hanna and former night mayor of Amsterdam Shamiro van der Geld, each episode sheds light on topics ranging from community building, activism and self-expression in the form of art.They talk to the role models of our time: Massih Hutak, Tim Wes and Naomie Pieter.Talking Tough is a podcast about game changers that deserves to be heard more.In this mini-series, the hosts go into depth with our guests per episode.From gentrification to art as a form of resistance, and from Black queer love to spirituality.Today the first episode was launched with artist and writer Massih Hutak, which can be heard on Spotify and watched on YouTube.You can expect these episodes:     15/12 Episode 1: THIS LAND IS FOR EVERYONE | Massih Hutak   In the first episode of this Talking Tough miniseries, Jill, Bo and Shamiro talk to Massih Hutak about community building, creative initiatives and preserving authentic cultures.Massih is a rapper, father writer and columnist.Originally from Afghanistan, but raised in Amsterdam Noord, he talks about integration as a two-way street and the worldwide threat of gentrification.He recently published his first book about this: 'You have not discovered us.We have always been here. 'On behalf of Massih, Dr.Martens paid a sum of money to the Food Bank.They support people and fight against poverty by putting together and issuing food packages.Want to know more about the organization?Look here: amsterdam.voedselbank.org The episode with Massih can already be heard via Spotify from today: click here to listen immediately!   LISTEN TO THE PODCAST HERE: https://open.spotify.com/episode/5E0x09xBLPNfUADwcr4n7k?si=brWKp3GxTAuli7Tm_NrF7Q#login     22/12 Episode 2: MUSIC MEANS IDENTITY | Tim Wes   In this episode we take a look at the soul of Tim Wes.As an independent musician and multi-disciplinary artist, he often ran into stuck systems and boxes in his career.Looking at the intersection with identity and individualism, in the second episode of this Talking Tough miniseries, the jazz and R&B artist tells Jill, Bo and Shamiro about pressure in the music industry, art as an act of defiance and the struggle for new forms.of creativity.On behalf of Tim, Dr.Martens paid a sum of money to the MAEH Foundation.This organization offers development opportunities in the form of music lessons, art and language for young people in Rotterdam.Want to know more about the organization?Look here: https://maeh.eu/This episode will be released on Tuesday December 22, 2020 on Spotify & YouTube.     29/12 Episode 3: BEHIND THE MEGAPHONE | Naomie Pieter   Naomie Pieter has always made her voice heard.She is a choreographer, founder of Black Pride Nederland and Pon Di Pride.Naomie is also one of the driving forces behind Kick Out Zwarte Piet, Black Queer Trans Resistance and Black Lives Matter NL.And yes, she also has 24 hours in her day.In this episode of Talking Tough, Jill, Bo and Shamiro learn more about the woman behind the megaphone.And they talk to her about healing, self-care for activists and the importance of love in the broadest sense of the word.On behalf of Naomie, Dr.Martens paid a sum of money to the FOKO Curacao Foundation.They are committed to the LGBTQI + community on Curacao.Want to know more about the organization?Look here: instagram.com/fundashonorguyokorsouThe last episode of this miniseries with Naomie Pieter will be released on Tuesday December 29, 2020. You can also listen to it on Spotify, and watch it on YouTube.Stay tuned! Dr.Martens is back with new episodes of the Talking Tough (UK) podcast.This time we present a special mini-series, recorded live from Rotterdam in the Netherlands.Hosted by writer Jill Mathon, journalist Bo Hanna and former night mayor of Amsterdam Shamiro van der Geld, each episode sheds light on topics ranging from community building, activism and self-expression in the form of art.They talk to the role models of our time: Massih Hutak, Tim Wes and Naomie Pieter.Talking Tough is a podcast about game changers that deserves to be heard more.In this mini-series, the hosts go into depth with our guests per episode.From gentrification to art as a form of resistance, and from Black queer love to spirituality.Today the first episode was launched with artist and writer Massih Hutak, which can be heard on Spotify and watched on YouTube.You can expect these episodes:     15/12 Episode 1: THIS LAND IS FOR EVERYONE | Massih Hutak   In the first episode of this Talking Tough miniseries, Jill, Bo and Shamiro talk to Massih Hutak about community building, creative initiatives and preserving authentic cultures.Massih is a rapper, father writer and columnist.Originally from Afghanistan, but raised in Amsterdam Noord, he talks about integration as a two-way street and the worldwide threat of gentrification.He recently published his first book about this: 'You have not discovered us.We have always been here. 'On behalf of Massih, Dr.Martens paid a sum of money to the Food Bank.They support people and fight against poverty by putting together and issuing food packages.Want to know more about the organization?Look here: amsterdam.voedselbank.org The episode with Massih can already be heard via Spotify from today: click here to listen immediately!   LISTEN TO THE PODCAST HERE: https://open.spotify.com/episode/5E0x09xBLPNfUADwcr4n7k?si=brWKp3GxTAuli7Tm_NrF7Q#login     22/12 Episode 2: MUSIC MEANS IDENTITY | Tim Wes   In this episode we take a look at the soul of Tim Wes.As an independent musician and multi-disciplinary artist, he often ran into stuck systems and boxes in his career.Looking at the intersection with identity and individualism, in the second episode of this Talking Tough miniseries, the jazz and R&B artist tells Jill, Bo and Shamiro about pressure in the music industry, art as an act of defiance and the struggle for new forms.of creativity.On behalf of Tim, Dr.Martens paid a sum of money to the MAEH Foundation.This organization offers development opportunities in the form of music lessons, art and language for young people in Rotterdam.Want to know more about the organization?Look here: https://maeh.eu/This episode will be released on Tuesday December 22, 2020 on Spotify & YouTube.     29/12 Episode 3: BEHIND THE MEGAPHONE | Naomie Pieter   Naomie Pieter has always made her voice heard.She is a choreographer, founder of Black Pride Nederland and Pon Di Pride.Naomie is also one of the driving forces behind Kick Out Zwarte Piet, Black Queer Trans Resistance and Black Lives Matter NL.And yes, she also has 24 hours in her day.In this episode of Talking Tough, Jill, Bo and Shamiro learn more about the woman behind the megaphone.And they talk to her about healing, self-care for activists and the importance of love in the broadest sense of the word.On behalf of Naomie, Dr.Martens paid a sum of money to the FOKO Curacao Foundation.They are committed to the LGBTQI + community on Curacao.Want to know more about the organization?Look here: instagram.com/fundashonorguyokorsouThe last episode of this miniseries with Naomie Pieter will be released on Tuesday December 29, 2020. You can also listen to it on Spotify, and watch it on YouTube.Stay tuned!

GIVENCHY presents the pre-collection for Fall 2021
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GIVENCHY presents the pre-collection for Fall 2021

Fashion “Ultimately, what I am trying to do in the Givenchy collections is reflect today’s world. I appreciate a certain material experimentation and an intense contrast in clothing that could only be achieved and exist now. At the same time, we embrace tradition, the techniques of the salon and timelessness; these distinct elements are not mutually exclusive. The clothing is not disposable or dictatorial, instead we want it to become central to a person’s sense of their own style, and build each season. It’s an idea of a more personal luxury, of simultaneous formality and informality, construction and comfort; it’s the luxury of people wearing clothes, not clothes wearing people.” Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     Honing in on elements begun in his debut offering for Givenchy, Matthew M. Williams presents a collection of contrasts, both strident and subtle, for Fall ’21. Here, both classicism and subversion play a part; focusing on the traditional areas of tailoring, knitwear and leather there is an experimentation with the codes and techniques related to each, together with an ease applied equally for both men and women. Working with a precise, monochromatic palette in looks, the classicism of black, white and silver grey is contrasted with olive drab, vivid red and pink, becoming almost provocative in their connotations.     It is the discreet opulence of materials and methods that matter, found in an array of clothing choices both formal and informal, classical and more radical.     Clothing archetypes are once again experimented with alongside proportion in the silhouettes, bringing together ideas of both the salon and the city street. This is particularly visible in the recurring ‘cropped’motif, where jackets echo MA1 bombers, varsity and evening boleros. Signature, sculptural jersey is once again applied to realise pure yet easeful forms, at times literally punctuated with studs. Here, hardware made embellishment – a key Williams’ theme for each gender – mainly finds form in the stud this season. The new 4G Emblem bag also carries with it a tough yet decorative approach to hardware for both women and men. A constructed attitude to the Givenchy monogram is realised in guipure lace, a motif reinforcing a sense of underlying, traditional, rigorous craft as well as ascendant surface style in the collection.     An idea of a ‘second skin’ is utilised extensively, predominantly in the use of silk for women and men; both constructed and comfortable, a sinuous sensuousness travels through the collection, particularly in tailoring, This is also found in the leather pieces, where ease, structure and casual non-conformity all come into play. In turn, leather footwear becomes more fully integrated into the actual silhouettes, principally in the use of long, patent leather boots. Comfort is not forgotten in the footwear, with soles formulated using new TPU (Thermoplastic Polyurethane, a bridge between rubber and plastic) techniques. There is also a continuation of the Marshmallow Slide – with its extremely comfortable recovery-style sole – mixed with new, natural and more formal materials.     Collaborating on the imagery once more with the photographer Heji Shin, Williams presents a democratic and encompassing view of Givenchy. Here, the focus is on the people wearing the clothes as opposed to the clothes wearing the people – there is not just one Givenchy woman or one Givenchy man, but many. Each brings their own inimitable character and sense of style to the House. “Ultimately, what I am trying to do in the Givenchy collections is reflect today’s world. I appreciate a certain material experimentation and an intense contrast in clothing that could only be achieved and exist now. At the same time, we embrace tradition, the techniques of the salon and timelessness; these distinct elements are not mutually exclusive. The clothing is not disposable or dictatorial, instead we want it to become central to a person’s sense of their own style, and build each season. It’s an idea of a more personal luxury, of simultaneous formality and informality, construction and comfort; it’s the luxury of people wearing clothes, not clothes wearing people.” Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     Honing in on elements begun in his debut offering for Givenchy, Matthew M. Williams presents a collection of contrasts, both strident and subtle, for Fall ’21. Here, both classicism and subversion play a part; focusing on the traditional areas of tailoring, knitwear and leather there is an experimentation with the codes and techniques related to each, together with an ease applied equally for both men and women. Working with a precise, monochromatic palette in looks, the classicism of black, white and silver grey is contrasted with olive drab, vivid red and pink, becoming almost provocative in their connotations.     It is the discreet opulence of materials and methods that matter, found in an array of clothing choices both formal and informal, classical and more radical.     Clothing archetypes are once again experimented with alongside proportion in the silhouettes, bringing together ideas of both the salon and the city street. This is particularly visible in the recurring ‘cropped’motif, where jackets echo MA1 bombers, varsity and evening boleros. Signature, sculptural jersey is once again applied to realise pure yet easeful forms, at times literally punctuated with studs. Here, hardware made embellishment – a key Williams’ theme for each gender – mainly finds form in the stud this season. The new 4G Emblem bag also carries with it a tough yet decorative approach to hardware for both women and men. A constructed attitude to the Givenchy monogram is realised in guipure lace, a motif reinforcing a sense of underlying, traditional, rigorous craft as well as ascendant surface style in the collection.     An idea of a ‘second skin’ is utilised extensively, predominantly in the use of silk for women and men; both constructed and comfortable, a sinuous sensuousness travels through the collection, particularly in tailoring, This is also found in the leather pieces, where ease, structure and casual non-conformity all come into play. In turn, leather footwear becomes more fully integrated into the actual silhouettes, principally in the use of long, patent leather boots. Comfort is not forgotten in the footwear, with soles formulated using new TPU (Thermoplastic Polyurethane, a bridge between rubber and plastic) techniques. There is also a continuation of the Marshmallow Slide – with its extremely comfortable recovery-style sole – mixed with new, natural and more formal materials.     Collaborating on the imagery once more with the photographer Heji Shin, Williams presents a democratic and encompassing view of Givenchy. Here, the focus is on the people wearing the clothes as opposed to the clothes wearing the people – there is not just one Givenchy woman or one Givenchy man, but many. Each brings their own inimitable character and sense of style to the House.

DIOR presents the Fall 2021 collection
810

DIOR presents the Fall 2021 collection

Fashion For Maria Grazia Chiuri, creating a collection is above all about exploring the bonds she weaves with her time. The Fall 2021 line thus is infused with a double movement between innovation and heritage, ultramodernity and the savoir-faire in the Dior ateliers. Hyper-colorful, transparent, shiny, embroidered or silvered, each piece outlines a new Pop attitude with a sportswear spirit, evoking the aesthetic power of designer Elio Fiorucci, as well as the way Andy Warhol revisited and reinterpreted Renaissance paintings by Paolo Uccello. Mizza Bricard, the muse of muses for Christian Dior, loved leopard print – which became an emblematic code of the House – and today it punctuates many looks, reflecting a radiant, vibrant optimism alongside the vitality of raspberry and chartreuse hues. Fashion becomes an experience to be explored, symbolized by a series of white T-shirts designed like an inspiring diary, a space of infinite freedom for the imagination. Dior icons, including the Bar jacket, are reinterpreted with audacity and refinement. An ode to energy and joie de vivre, exalted by the richness of exceptional craftsmanship. For Maria Grazia Chiuri, creating a collection is above all about exploring the bonds she weaves with her time. The Fall 2021 line thus is infused with a double movement between innovation and heritage, ultramodernity and the savoir-faire in the Dior ateliers. Hyper-colorful, transparent, shiny, embroidered or silvered, each piece outlines a new Pop attitude with a sportswear spirit, evoking the aesthetic power of designer Elio Fiorucci, as well as the way Andy Warhol revisited and reinterpreted Renaissance paintings by Paolo Uccello. Mizza Bricard, the muse of muses for Christian Dior, loved leopard print – which became an emblematic code of the House – and today it punctuates many looks, reflecting a radiant, vibrant optimism alongside the vitality of raspberry and chartreuse hues. Fashion becomes an experience to be explored, symbolized by a series of white T-shirts designed like an inspiring diary, a space of infinite freedom for the imagination. Dior icons, including the Bar jacket, are reinterpreted with audacity and refinement. An ode to energy and joie de vivre, exalted by the richness of exceptional craftsmanship.

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