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LANVIN PRESENTS THE NEW Spring & Summer 2021 EYEWEAR CAMPAIGN STARRING PARIS HILTON
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LANVIN PRESENTS THE NEW Spring & Summer 2021 EYEWEAR CAMPAIGN STARRING PARIS HILTON

Accessories Luxurious and vintage-inspired details characterize the new Lanvin sunglass design included in the Spring/Summer 2021 advertising campaign featuring Paris Hilton, shot by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggot.      This sophisticated frame fuses modern finishes with a 1980’s inspired aesthetic. Details on the thick temples highlight the emblem of the French Maison, the mother and child gold plaque. The emblem represents the special bond between Jeanne Lanvin and her daughter, Marguerite, and is featured in jewelry, accessories and ready-to-wear items in Lanvin collections.     Part of the Yu Garden collection, the frame explores the exchange between heritage and contemporary, using the past to invent the future. The collection reexamines the legacy of the Maison, its design archives and transcends Lanvin’s ideological meaning. A Lanvin eyewear chain attaches to the hollowed tips, adding a luxe feel to the bold, oversized silhouette.  Available in Black, Tortoiseshell, Green/Havana Green and Striped Red.   Please find below the link to the YouTube video of the SS21 Show by (LA)HORDE : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKzObCvs198 Luxurious and vintage-inspired details characterize the new Lanvin sunglass design included in the Spring/Summer 2021 advertising campaign featuring Paris Hilton, shot by Mert Alas and Marcus Piggot.      This sophisticated frame fuses modern finishes with a 1980’s inspired aesthetic. Details on the thick temples highlight the emblem of the French Maison, the mother and child gold plaque. The emblem represents the special bond between Jeanne Lanvin and her daughter, Marguerite, and is featured in jewelry, accessories and ready-to-wear items in Lanvin collections.     Part of the Yu Garden collection, the frame explores the exchange between heritage and contemporary, using the past to invent the future. The collection reexamines the legacy of the Maison, its design archives and transcends Lanvin’s ideological meaning. A Lanvin eyewear chain attaches to the hollowed tips, adding a luxe feel to the bold, oversized silhouette.  Available in Black, Tortoiseshell, Green/Havana Green and Striped Red.   Please find below the link to the YouTube video of the SS21 Show by (LA)HORDE : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fKzObCvs198

Hedi Slimane presents "Sun of Sound"
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Hedi Slimane presents "Sun of Sound"

Exhibition Almine Rech Shanghai is thrilled to present ‘Sun of Sound’ by acclaimed French multi-disciplinary artist, photographer, and fashion designer Hedi Slimane, the fifth solo exhibition of Slimane’s work at Almine Rech since 2004, and his first exhibition in China.     ‘Sun of Sound’ also marks the artist’s rst solo exhibition since ‘Sonic’, a presentation at the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent in Paris (2014). The exhibition will be on view from Mar 19 to Apr 30, 2021.     Hedi Slimane is an artist of creative agility, whose photographic visions are nothing if not direct and intimate. The scenes he captures vibrate with intensity, but while the aura is edgy, his style envelops the elegance and drama of classic black-and-white photography. Since he began exploring photography at the age of 11, Slimane’s preference has always been for black and white and, more essentially, his interest lies in subjects that inhabit Cimmerian spaces in which the various individuals he observes are comfortable exploring themselves in the privacy of their own worlds and intimate social circles. These are worlds in which Paris-born Slimane is very much at home; his photographs emanate a sense of presence, and a process of observing that hews to intuition rather than premeditation.     For many, Slimane’s talent is most readily associated with the arena of high fashion, but his forte has always been photography. His subjects are various but core concerns draw him to the street and into the night, to youth culture, dive bars, live music, and to performers young and old, but mostly young. It’s not just any music that fascinates. Slimane has an ear, and an eye, for the raw exhilaration of the alternative scene and its nascent stars – aspiring stars who, by the very fact of being photographed by Slimane, are catapulted into the limelight. British journalist Alex Needham describes the moments Slimane captures in his photographs as showing “young fans in that golden period when the band they love is still a secret to the wider world, and a concert is a shared celebration between performers and audience.”     There is something in Slimane’s stark black-and-white style that embodies the phrase “secrets to the wider world”. It’s not that there is a conscious intent to conceal anything that you can put your nger on, but it’s there in the air of understanding that enjoins Slimane and his subjects. Far from shutting us as viewers out, this sense of presence and connection sucks us in. Staring at Slimane’s photographs, as your eye roves the dark space in which he had obviously immersed himself, the density of a crowd, and the exuberant faces of performers and fans, delivers a thrill. A sensation well described by British writer and music-maker, George the Poet, who said “Making music is like dreaming aloud.”   There are stylistic parallels in the history of photography and that can be drawn with Slimane’s oeuvre which, like numerous of his iconic images, are part of the collective unconscious of the creative milieu; instantly recognisable, the subjects immortalised through shadow and light. Slimane’s frames extend the gravitas of the best photographers of rock-and-roll – British photographer Mick Rock who captured Glam Rock in the early 1970s; Kevin Cummins who made icons of the band Joy Division and its frontman Ian Cur- tis; American/Seattle-based photographer Charles Peterson doing Grunge (birth of) who did for Kurt Cobain what Slimane did for British singer, Pete Doherty, former frontman of the Libertines, in creating portraits which immortalised the singer. The key here is that Slimane’s focus extends beyond the obvious faces of the stars to the crowds, the fans, to people igniting street culture, and beyond to a range of details, objects, and paraphernalia, more reminiscent of the 20th century giant Robert Frank. Music, the scene that surrounds it, is integral. “Music has a sense of freedom that continues to inspire me,” Slimane says. “I have never found anything else that has the same capacity to impact on popular culture.”     As mentioned, beyond the music, it’s about the things and attitudes that music, like youth culture, embraces. Slimane’s juxtaposition of intimacy and glamour, direct gazes and snatched details, of bodies special and ordinary, of proximity and distance, mirrors the way we generally look as we gaze out at the word. Our eyes seek the familiar. We pause or stumble confused and excited by what appears most unfamiliar, though ultimately settling where our natural interests and comfort zones lie. In Slimane’s case, how rich this world is. The sense that he is driven both by awe and admiration, and by naked curiosity ema- nates from the personal photographic diary posted on Slimane’s website – https://www. hedislimane.com/diary/. The collection of images shown here takes you on a journey into his life where you see what he sees. There’s lots of beauty, lots of action, and interaction, in which the overwhelming experience is the honesty of the pictures. The photographs describe what Slimane’s in to, what makes him tick, and what gets him excited; ultimately his respect for those who know how to live life freely. Beginning in 2006, the diary hops from London to Paris to LA, from skateboarders to performers to clubbers; from the “residents” of half a dozen dive bars to parties and shoots for fashion; faces, expressions natural and uninhibited. From front stage to behind the scenes, what’s remarkable is that the people Slimane photographs are so comfortably ordinary, so normal; so real. You feel right at home, even among the stars. “I like a ‘simple’ photograph,” he says, “one that does not pretend to be anything other than a captured moment in someone’s life.”   By today‘s hyper resolution digital standards, Slimane’s style is raw and gritty – there’s no retouching in the studio. His modus operandi: “I’ve always taken pictures, almost like some people take notes or write down their thoughts.” One train of thought is surely about life itself. Looking at Slimane’s photos en masse, you become aware of the gap between youth and age that he portrays. Slimane’s youth is pure and lled with possibility. The older more mature gures -- legends like Lou Reed, Joni Mitchell, Keith Richards, John Lyndon, and Jane Birkin – are the survivors. Slimane’s portraits pay unconscious homage to the fact that they made it through the treacherous extremes of their youth.   Across time and cultural discourse, we try to peg the scenes to their moment as much as to the faces and their expressions. For example, the juxtaposition of PETE, UNTITLED, the portrait of a covert Pete Doherty in 2007, with his dirty ngernails and dangerous habits, with Doherty in 2009, posed in a park like a busker on a break, with kittens in a shower of dappled sunlight, the ensemble very sur l’herbe. We look for clues, for meaning, for stories. But while it is in the nature of looking to want a simple meaning or answer, if Slimane’s photographs tell us anything at all, it is more truly what he was thinking and feeling at these profoundly sensitive moments in his life. Almine Rech Shanghai is thrilled to present ‘Sun of Sound’ by acclaimed French multi-disciplinary artist, photographer, and fashion designer Hedi Slimane, the fifth solo exhibition of Slimane’s work at Almine Rech since 2004, and his first exhibition in China.     ‘Sun of Sound’ also marks the artist’s rst solo exhibition since ‘Sonic’, a presentation at the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent in Paris (2014). The exhibition will be on view from Mar 19 to Apr 30, 2021.     Hedi Slimane is an artist of creative agility, whose photographic visions are nothing if not direct and intimate. The scenes he captures vibrate with intensity, but while the aura is edgy, his style envelops the elegance and drama of classic black-and-white photography. Since he began exploring photography at the age of 11, Slimane’s preference has always been for black and white and, more essentially, his interest lies in subjects that inhabit Cimmerian spaces in which the various individuals he observes are comfortable exploring themselves in the privacy of their own worlds and intimate social circles. These are worlds in which Paris-born Slimane is very much at home; his photographs emanate a sense of presence, and a process of observing that hews to intuition rather than premeditation.     For many, Slimane’s talent is most readily associated with the arena of high fashion, but his forte has always been photography. His subjects are various but core concerns draw him to the street and into the night, to youth culture, dive bars, live music, and to performers young and old, but mostly young. It’s not just any music that fascinates. Slimane has an ear, and an eye, for the raw exhilaration of the alternative scene and its nascent stars – aspiring stars who, by the very fact of being photographed by Slimane, are catapulted into the limelight. British journalist Alex Needham describes the moments Slimane captures in his photographs as showing “young fans in that golden period when the band they love is still a secret to the wider world, and a concert is a shared celebration between performers and audience.”     There is something in Slimane’s stark black-and-white style that embodies the phrase “secrets to the wider world”. It’s not that there is a conscious intent to conceal anything that you can put your nger on, but it’s there in the air of understanding that enjoins Slimane and his subjects. Far from shutting us as viewers out, this sense of presence and connection sucks us in. Staring at Slimane’s photographs, as your eye roves the dark space in which he had obviously immersed himself, the density of a crowd, and the exuberant faces of performers and fans, delivers a thrill. A sensation well described by British writer and music-maker, George the Poet, who said “Making music is like dreaming aloud.”   There are stylistic parallels in the history of photography and that can be drawn with Slimane’s oeuvre which, like numerous of his iconic images, are part of the collective unconscious of the creative milieu; instantly recognisable, the subjects immortalised through shadow and light. Slimane’s frames extend the gravitas of the best photographers of rock-and-roll – British photographer Mick Rock who captured Glam Rock in the early 1970s; Kevin Cummins who made icons of the band Joy Division and its frontman Ian Cur- tis; American/Seattle-based photographer Charles Peterson doing Grunge (birth of) who did for Kurt Cobain what Slimane did for British singer, Pete Doherty, former frontman of the Libertines, in creating portraits which immortalised the singer. The key here is that Slimane’s focus extends beyond the obvious faces of the stars to the crowds, the fans, to people igniting street culture, and beyond to a range of details, objects, and paraphernalia, more reminiscent of the 20th century giant Robert Frank. Music, the scene that surrounds it, is integral. “Music has a sense of freedom that continues to inspire me,” Slimane says. “I have never found anything else that has the same capacity to impact on popular culture.”     As mentioned, beyond the music, it’s about the things and attitudes that music, like youth culture, embraces. Slimane’s juxtaposition of intimacy and glamour, direct gazes and snatched details, of bodies special and ordinary, of proximity and distance, mirrors the way we generally look as we gaze out at the word. Our eyes seek the familiar. We pause or stumble confused and excited by what appears most unfamiliar, though ultimately settling where our natural interests and comfort zones lie. In Slimane’s case, how rich this world is. The sense that he is driven both by awe and admiration, and by naked curiosity ema- nates from the personal photographic diary posted on Slimane’s website – https://www. hedislimane.com/diary/. The collection of images shown here takes you on a journey into his life where you see what he sees. There’s lots of beauty, lots of action, and interaction, in which the overwhelming experience is the honesty of the pictures. The photographs describe what Slimane’s in to, what makes him tick, and what gets him excited; ultimately his respect for those who know how to live life freely. Beginning in 2006, the diary hops from London to Paris to LA, from skateboarders to performers to clubbers; from the “residents” of half a dozen dive bars to parties and shoots for fashion; faces, expressions natural and uninhibited. From front stage to behind the scenes, what’s remarkable is that the people Slimane photographs are so comfortably ordinary, so normal; so real. You feel right at home, even among the stars. “I like a ‘simple’ photograph,” he says, “one that does not pretend to be anything other than a captured moment in someone’s life.”   By today‘s hyper resolution digital standards, Slimane’s style is raw and gritty – there’s no retouching in the studio. His modus operandi: “I’ve always taken pictures, almost like some people take notes or write down their thoughts.” One train of thought is surely about life itself. Looking at Slimane’s photos en masse, you become aware of the gap between youth and age that he portrays. Slimane’s youth is pure and lled with possibility. The older more mature gures -- legends like Lou Reed, Joni Mitchell, Keith Richards, John Lyndon, and Jane Birkin – are the survivors. Slimane’s portraits pay unconscious homage to the fact that they made it through the treacherous extremes of their youth.   Across time and cultural discourse, we try to peg the scenes to their moment as much as to the faces and their expressions. For example, the juxtaposition of PETE, UNTITLED, the portrait of a covert Pete Doherty in 2007, with his dirty ngernails and dangerous habits, with Doherty in 2009, posed in a park like a busker on a break, with kittens in a shower of dappled sunlight, the ensemble very sur l’herbe. We look for clues, for meaning, for stories. But while it is in the nature of looking to want a simple meaning or answer, if Slimane’s photographs tell us anything at all, it is more truly what he was thinking and feeling at these profoundly sensitive moments in his life.

EXHIBITION VOICES OF FASHION: BLACK COUTURE, BEAUTY & STYLES IN CENTRAAL MUSEUM UTRECHT
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EXHIBITION VOICES OF FASHION: BLACK COUTURE, BEAUTY & STYLES IN CENTRAAL MUSEUM UTRECHT

Exhibition Centraal Museum Utrecht presents the major fashion exhibition Voices of Fashion: Black Couture, Beauty & Styles, in which iconic designs, models and sources of inspiration promote a more inclusive fashion legacy. In this multi-disciplinary exhibition, fashion curator Ninke Bloemberg teams up with fashion activist, co-curator and founder of Diversity Rules, Janice Deul, to examine how Black designers have influenced the world of fashion, what stereotypes continue to exist, and how beauty is perceived. Voices of Fashion was created in close collaboration with designers, photographers and models from the Netherlands and abroad. The visually striking exhibition design is by AFARAI’s Afaina de Jong, and the exhibition is structured according to several themes.     COUTURE   The exhibition opens with a dazzling display of couture by domestic and international Black designers. To name just a few highlights: first is a highly personal installation by South African designer Thebe Magugu, who also presented this collection during the Paris Fashion Week. Magugu won the prestigious LVHM prize for young designers in 2019. Also, from South Africa, filmmaker and photographer Kristin-Lee Moolman worked with the stylist Ib Kamar to produce photographs and a film featuring Magugu’s work.   Of course the exhibition also features work by Virgil Abloh, creative director of men’s fashion at Louis Vuitton and founder of the label Off-White. Several of his ensembles are on display, including the black- and-white men’s suit consisting of woollen pants and a coat decorated with what seems to be a classic pied-de-poule pattern. On closer inspection, however, the motif turns out to be based on the shape of the African continent.   Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are represented in the exhibition with two ensembles: one which they created for Nina Ricci, consisting of silk pants and blouse and their signature ‘bucket hat’, and a second iconic design by their own Botter label. Maria Grazia Chiuri, the first-ever female creative director at fashion house Dior, worked with the African designer Pathé Ouédraogo – better known as Pathé’O – to pay tribute to the African continent, as part of Dior’s Resort 2020 collection. On display is an indigo-coloured skirt and jacket. This collaboration embodied the identity of the entire collection.   We are also proud to show an iconic evening gown made of down, from Moncler. It is the result of a collaboration between Valentino’s creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli with the Ethiopian label Lemlem, founded by model and designer Liya Kebede. The Surinamese-Dutch designer Marga Weimans launched her own label in 2006 and has presented several successful collections, investigating themes such as identity, technology and beauty. The exhibition shows an outfit from the Power of my Dreams collection, in which she infused traditional African wax prints with new meaning. We furthermore show an impressive black evening gown from her Debut collection, about which Weimans says: “It is my first collection, in which I tell a story about the sublime and seductive beauty of the Parisian couture landscape, using the archetypical ballgown as basis. I combine this with the horrors of slavery, from which the fashion industry arose. The blood, sweat and tears of ambition are mixed with the blood, sweat and tears of my enslaved ancestors.”   Stereotypes still abound: consider the Surinamese-Dutch designer Giorgio Toppin of the Xhosa label, who is regularly asked whether he makes streetwear while in fact, he specialises in men’s couture.     THE INFLUENCE OF STEETWEAR AND MUSIC   Hip-hop music has had a strong impact on everyday fashion and even couture. Cross Colours, famous for dressing ‘the Fresh Prince of Bel Air’, among others, was founded in 1989 by TJ Walker and Carl Jones. Their goal was to design clothing that is blind to prejudice. With their creations, full of symbolism and statements, the designers aim to give Black youths a voice. This goal is echoed by Dutch Black- owned brands like Patta, Daily Paper, Filling Pieces, The New Originals and HOSSELAER. These brands staked out their spot in the fashion industry by selling sneakers or T-shirts, soon followed by complete collections and sales points across the world. Such labels have become a permanent fixture of the fashion landscape. They owe their success in part to their collaborations with domestic and international labels like Nike and Adidas, but the real strength of these entrepreneurs is their sense of shared responsibility towards young people who feel unheard or misunderstood.   Political and social messages are also found in the colourful streetwear collections by Priya Ahluwalia. Her designs are always geared to sustainability, for instance by creating a series of new designs using Adidas deadstock. The creations by Farida Sedoc, artist, entrepreneur and founder of HOSSELAER are likewise suffused by statements. Especially for Voices of Fashion she made an installation using a selection of T-shirts from her private archive.     BEAUTY   Black women often were and continue to be marginalised. Their skills, beauties and body shapes are rarely celebrated and their natural Black hair is viewed as ‘unprofessional’. The cosmetics industry, with its limited colour palette, has likewise seemed to ignore them. Black women have been fighting to change this for decades. A selection of Dutch and international fashion magazine covers from the 1960s until today celebrates the diversity of Black models. This part of the exhibition includes photographs made by Kwame Brathwaite in the 1960s of the people and street images that inspired the Black is Beautiful movement in New York. The Black Panthers and icons such as Angela Davis, instantly recognisable for her large afro, contributed to the international reputation of this movement. More than 50 years on, the goal of highlighting the beauty of Black women remains relevant, although change does seem to be underway.     A BOOK, A MULTI-MEDIA TOUR, AND FRINGE PROGRAMME   The exhibition is accompanied by a lavishly illustrated book containing unique interviews and several long-reads, designed by Serana Angelista and Glamcult.Studio. The book will be published in mid- February and can be purchased in (among other outlets) the Museum Shop and from Waanders publishers.   Discover much more through the Voices of Fashion multi-media tour featuring the voices of Guillaume Schmidt (Patta), Giovanca Ostiana (singer, model, presenter) and Denise Jannah (singer).   There is also an extensive fringe programme, with the collaboration of The Black Archives, the African Fashion Research Institute, The New Originals, and others. More details of this programme will be announced online. The exhibition is sponsored by the City of Utrecht, BankGiro Loterij, Fonds 21, the   Creative Industries Fund NL, VSBfonds, Prins Bernhard Culture Fund, Mondriaan Fund and Prins Claus Fund.   Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race)Voices of fashion is part of Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race), a partnership between twelve museums in the Netherlands that are all working to embed the practices underpinning true inclusion and diversity in the DNA of the museum industry. The Centraal Museum’s partners in this venture are the Amsterdam Museum, the Bonnefanten, the Dordrechts Museum, the Frans Hals Museum, Museum Arnhem, the Rembrandt House Museum, the Rijksmuseum, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, the Van Abbemuseum, the Van Gogh Museum and the Zeeuws Museum. We hope to welcome other museums aboard in the future. The museums in this partnership will this year hold exhibitions and stage events highlighting themes of cultural diversity and slavery/the legacy of colonialism. Centraal Museum Utrecht presents the major fashion exhibition Voices of Fashion: Black Couture, Beauty & Styles, in which iconic designs, models and sources of inspiration promote a more inclusive fashion legacy. In this multi-disciplinary exhibition, fashion curator Ninke Bloemberg teams up with fashion activist, co-curator and founder of Diversity Rules, Janice Deul, to examine how Black designers have influenced the world of fashion, what stereotypes continue to exist, and how beauty is perceived. Voices of Fashion was created in close collaboration with designers, photographers and models from the Netherlands and abroad. The visually striking exhibition design is by AFARAI’s Afaina de Jong, and the exhibition is structured according to several themes.     COUTURE   The exhibition opens with a dazzling display of couture by domestic and international Black designers. To name just a few highlights: first is a highly personal installation by South African designer Thebe Magugu, who also presented this collection during the Paris Fashion Week. Magugu won the prestigious LVHM prize for young designers in 2019. Also, from South Africa, filmmaker and photographer Kristin-Lee Moolman worked with the stylist Ib Kamar to produce photographs and a film featuring Magugu’s work.   Of course the exhibition also features work by Virgil Abloh, creative director of men’s fashion at Louis Vuitton and founder of the label Off-White. Several of his ensembles are on display, including the black- and-white men’s suit consisting of woollen pants and a coat decorated with what seems to be a classic pied-de-poule pattern. On closer inspection, however, the motif turns out to be based on the shape of the African continent.   Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are represented in the exhibition with two ensembles: one which they created for Nina Ricci, consisting of silk pants and blouse and their signature ‘bucket hat’, and a second iconic design by their own Botter label. Maria Grazia Chiuri, the first-ever female creative director at fashion house Dior, worked with the African designer Pathé Ouédraogo – better known as Pathé’O – to pay tribute to the African continent, as part of Dior’s Resort 2020 collection. On display is an indigo-coloured skirt and jacket. This collaboration embodied the identity of the entire collection.   We are also proud to show an iconic evening gown made of down, from Moncler. It is the result of a collaboration between Valentino’s creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli with the Ethiopian label Lemlem, founded by model and designer Liya Kebede. The Surinamese-Dutch designer Marga Weimans launched her own label in 2006 and has presented several successful collections, investigating themes such as identity, technology and beauty. The exhibition shows an outfit from the Power of my Dreams collection, in which she infused traditional African wax prints with new meaning. We furthermore show an impressive black evening gown from her Debut collection, about which Weimans says: “It is my first collection, in which I tell a story about the sublime and seductive beauty of the Parisian couture landscape, using the archetypical ballgown as basis. I combine this with the horrors of slavery, from which the fashion industry arose. The blood, sweat and tears of ambition are mixed with the blood, sweat and tears of my enslaved ancestors.”   Stereotypes still abound: consider the Surinamese-Dutch designer Giorgio Toppin of the Xhosa label, who is regularly asked whether he makes streetwear while in fact, he specialises in men’s couture.     THE INFLUENCE OF STEETWEAR AND MUSIC   Hip-hop music has had a strong impact on everyday fashion and even couture. Cross Colours, famous for dressing ‘the Fresh Prince of Bel Air’, among others, was founded in 1989 by TJ Walker and Carl Jones. Their goal was to design clothing that is blind to prejudice. With their creations, full of symbolism and statements, the designers aim to give Black youths a voice. This goal is echoed by Dutch Black- owned brands like Patta, Daily Paper, Filling Pieces, The New Originals and HOSSELAER. These brands staked out their spot in the fashion industry by selling sneakers or T-shirts, soon followed by complete collections and sales points across the world. Such labels have become a permanent fixture of the fashion landscape. They owe their success in part to their collaborations with domestic and international labels like Nike and Adidas, but the real strength of these entrepreneurs is their sense of shared responsibility towards young people who feel unheard or misunderstood.   Political and social messages are also found in the colourful streetwear collections by Priya Ahluwalia. Her designs are always geared to sustainability, for instance by creating a series of new designs using Adidas deadstock. The creations by Farida Sedoc, artist, entrepreneur and founder of HOSSELAER are likewise suffused by statements. Especially for Voices of Fashion she made an installation using a selection of T-shirts from her private archive.     BEAUTY   Black women often were and continue to be marginalised. Their skills, beauties and body shapes are rarely celebrated and their natural Black hair is viewed as ‘unprofessional’. The cosmetics industry, with its limited colour palette, has likewise seemed to ignore them. Black women have been fighting to change this for decades. A selection of Dutch and international fashion magazine covers from the 1960s until today celebrates the diversity of Black models. This part of the exhibition includes photographs made by Kwame Brathwaite in the 1960s of the people and street images that inspired the Black is Beautiful movement in New York. The Black Panthers and icons such as Angela Davis, instantly recognisable for her large afro, contributed to the international reputation of this movement. More than 50 years on, the goal of highlighting the beauty of Black women remains relevant, although change does seem to be underway.     A BOOK, A MULTI-MEDIA TOUR, AND FRINGE PROGRAMME   The exhibition is accompanied by a lavishly illustrated book containing unique interviews and several long-reads, designed by Serana Angelista and Glamcult.Studio. The book will be published in mid- February and can be purchased in (among other outlets) the Museum Shop and from Waanders publishers.   Discover much more through the Voices of Fashion multi-media tour featuring the voices of Guillaume Schmidt (Patta), Giovanca Ostiana (singer, model, presenter) and Denise Jannah (singer).   There is also an extensive fringe programme, with the collaboration of The Black Archives, the African Fashion Research Institute, The New Originals, and others. More details of this programme will be announced online. The exhibition is sponsored by the City of Utrecht, BankGiro Loterij, Fonds 21, the   Creative Industries Fund NL, VSBfonds, Prins Bernhard Culture Fund, Mondriaan Fund and Prins Claus Fund.   Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race)Voices of fashion is part of Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race), a partnership between twelve museums in the Netherlands that are all working to embed the practices underpinning true inclusion and diversity in the DNA of the museum industry. The Centraal Museum’s partners in this venture are the Amsterdam Museum, the Bonnefanten, the Dordrechts Museum, the Frans Hals Museum, Museum Arnhem, the Rembrandt House Museum, the Rijksmuseum, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, the Van Abbemuseum, the Van Gogh Museum and the Zeeuws Museum. We hope to welcome other museums aboard in the future. The museums in this partnership will this year hold exhibitions and stage events highlighting themes of cultural diversity and slavery/the legacy of colonialism.

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Daily Paper Explores Family Structures in Their Latest Spring & Summer  editorial
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Daily Paper Explores Family Structures in Their Latest Spring & Summer editorial

Fashion Following last year’s editorial in collaboration with the all-round creative Chakhani, this feature is centring the concepts of community and togetherness within a diverse family setting.    The editorial builds on Daily Paper's four brand pillars; inclusion, unity, creativity and heritage. Uplifting each individual culture rather than excluding any, Chakhani uses the traditional family portrait as a vehicle to convey his message.    Aligned with the brand’s values and vision, family is visualised as something not exclusively bound to a shared bloodline, but rather as something that can be chosen and celebrated in a multitude of ways.     EDITORIAL CREDITS: Creative direction and photography: @chakhani.pngStyling: @hallafarhatAssistant: @so.ambrosiaSet design: @marcusviniciusdqAssistant: @kpj____Casting: @tsellot @blackhead_conceptsHair: @nappychildMUA: @jenna.Ima.makeup @bymailinhProducer: @bbysu_chiAssistant: @anhnlv Talent: @zaidcharkaoui7 @gayundertheinfluence @iliaswalchshofer@whitneykiala @exoceexiste @can_soysal @sade.nadia @malsoo__27  @tisskeen @yvannovak @khadijasound @jesuisass Following last year’s editorial in collaboration with the all-round creative Chakhani, this feature is centring the concepts of community and togetherness within a diverse family setting.    The editorial builds on Daily Paper's four brand pillars; inclusion, unity, creativity and heritage. Uplifting each individual culture rather than excluding any, Chakhani uses the traditional family portrait as a vehicle to convey his message.    Aligned with the brand’s values and vision, family is visualised as something not exclusively bound to a shared bloodline, but rather as something that can be chosen and celebrated in a multitude of ways.     EDITORIAL CREDITS: Creative direction and photography: @chakhani.pngStyling: @hallafarhatAssistant: @so.ambrosiaSet design: @marcusviniciusdqAssistant: @kpj____Casting: @tsellot @blackhead_conceptsHair: @nappychildMUA: @jenna.Ima.makeup @bymailinhProducer: @bbysu_chiAssistant: @anhnlv Talent: @zaidcharkaoui7 @gayundertheinfluence @iliaswalchshofer@whitneykiala @exoceexiste @can_soysal @sade.nadia @malsoo__27  @tisskeen @yvannovak @khadijasound @jesuisass

Moose Knuckles Introduces FW21 Collection Release: PRISM
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Moose Knuckles Introduces FW21 Collection Release: PRISM

Fashion Moose Knuckles FW21 collection, PRISM, marks the emergence of a limitless horizon with endless possibilities bringing together luxury, performance, and style to keep you warm, dry, and wild.     Taking the purity and serenity of the Canadian tundra anchored in our foundational roots and the brand’s dedication to making the world’s warmest parkas, Moose Knuckles is in its optimal position for elevation and evolution delivering a collection representative of polished utility with edge.  For direction, Moose Knuckles focused on their Iconic Collection, the pillar of the brand for a guiding light. From there, light was directed through a prism of creativity to produce a full spectrum of new ideas, expressions, and territories.     For FW21, the four outerwear collections include:   Collection Blue:   Dedicated to maintaining a blue-sky attitude despite dropping temps and grey skies fall might bring with it, this collection focuses on freedom and mobility acting as an “all-weather” expansion of SS21. Key looks include: Feather Lite- Using an Ultra-Light Micro ripstop for the outer shell and lining with a high fill power of down which takes these styles to the next level of Weightless Outerwear. Rainwear– Engineered for fashion, function, and utility, with heat sealed seams to keep the wearer dry and warm.      Collection White   Returning to the brand’s Canadian Tundra roots, Moose Knuckles looks at a utilitarian past to inform an equally functional yet more aesthetically pleasing present. Check patterns, wool, shearlings, and leatherset the standard for city-oriented functionality. Key looks include: Wool – Sophisticated urban styles bringing polished utility with edge offering wearers unlimited opportunities for protection and expression. Leather + Shearling –The Moose Moto Jacket, introduced here in a classic style and playful iterations offers the perfect mix of fit and function.      Collection Red   Using the brand’s trademark premium down, 4-layer construction, and durable hardware alongside Nyluxe–a beautiful new fabric with a luxurious hand and radiant sheen that doesn't sacrifice durability or function. Key looks include: Nyluxe- A performance knit in a nylon blend ensures outdoor performance stays true to itself as being modern, polished, and offering a sense of utility with edge. Designed with stretch as a key technical feature, these pieces offer both ultimate protection and ultimate liberation. Power Puff – Re-fitted, re-energized, revamped, and lighter offering perfected silhouettes with updated trims, prints and details.     Collection Gold   Key styles seen throughout the collection are elevated here through the lens of Moose Knuckles’ iconic Gold series including refined fits, non-fur options, velvet/velour and patch detailing, and shearling trims.   Credits: Photo: Hugo Comte Styling: Alex Harrington Moose Knuckles FW21 collection, PRISM, marks the emergence of a limitless horizon with endless possibilities bringing together luxury, performance, and style to keep you warm, dry, and wild.     Taking the purity and serenity of the Canadian tundra anchored in our foundational roots and the brand’s dedication to making the world’s warmest parkas, Moose Knuckles is in its optimal position for elevation and evolution delivering a collection representative of polished utility with edge.  For direction, Moose Knuckles focused on their Iconic Collection, the pillar of the brand for a guiding light. From there, light was directed through a prism of creativity to produce a full spectrum of new ideas, expressions, and territories.     For FW21, the four outerwear collections include:   Collection Blue:   Dedicated to maintaining a blue-sky attitude despite dropping temps and grey skies fall might bring with it, this collection focuses on freedom and mobility acting as an “all-weather” expansion of SS21. Key looks include: Feather Lite- Using an Ultra-Light Micro ripstop for the outer shell and lining with a high fill power of down which takes these styles to the next level of Weightless Outerwear. Rainwear– Engineered for fashion, function, and utility, with heat sealed seams to keep the wearer dry and warm.      Collection White   Returning to the brand’s Canadian Tundra roots, Moose Knuckles looks at a utilitarian past to inform an equally functional yet more aesthetically pleasing present. Check patterns, wool, shearlings, and leatherset the standard for city-oriented functionality. Key looks include: Wool – Sophisticated urban styles bringing polished utility with edge offering wearers unlimited opportunities for protection and expression. Leather + Shearling –The Moose Moto Jacket, introduced here in a classic style and playful iterations offers the perfect mix of fit and function.      Collection Red   Using the brand’s trademark premium down, 4-layer construction, and durable hardware alongside Nyluxe–a beautiful new fabric with a luxurious hand and radiant sheen that doesn't sacrifice durability or function. Key looks include: Nyluxe- A performance knit in a nylon blend ensures outdoor performance stays true to itself as being modern, polished, and offering a sense of utility with edge. Designed with stretch as a key technical feature, these pieces offer both ultimate protection and ultimate liberation. Power Puff – Re-fitted, re-energized, revamped, and lighter offering perfected silhouettes with updated trims, prints and details.     Collection Gold   Key styles seen throughout the collection are elevated here through the lens of Moose Knuckles’ iconic Gold series including refined fits, non-fur options, velvet/velour and patch detailing, and shearling trims.   Credits: Photo: Hugo Comte Styling: Alex Harrington

Boo Johnson captured by Ricardo Gomes
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Boo Johnson captured by Ricardo Gomes

Men We are excited to share our next digital cover star Boo Johnson     TEAM CREDITS: Talent: Boo Johnson @imgmodels  Photographer: @ricardogomesinst  Stylist: @saint_____rita  Editor: @timiletonja  Special thanks to @nettafrankel We are excited to share our next digital cover star Boo Johnson     TEAM CREDITS: Talent: Boo Johnson @imgmodels  Photographer: @ricardogomesinst  Stylist: @saint_____rita  Editor: @timiletonja  Special thanks to @nettafrankel

LOUIS VUITTON PRESENTS THE NEW SUMMER 2021 CAMPAIGN BY STEVEN MEISEL
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LOUIS VUITTON PRESENTS THE NEW SUMMER 2021 CAMPAIGN BY STEVEN MEISEL

Fashion A splash of colour, a wave of iridescent light, a breath of fresh air, the joy of sunrays caressing one’s skin. From bright to pastel, a portfolio of Malibu sunrise yellows make up the Sunbathing collection, while Riviera blues embody the Morning Swim pieces.     A place in the sun. Beachwear prints, gradient Monogram, Damier motifs - Louis Vuitton icons play with colour. Going from day to night, sorbets to cocktails, the collection draws inspiration from fizzy red and parasol stripes, features raffia and embossed leather.     Silk twill pyjamas, bobs, bag charms, small leather goods, a beach towel and sarong, sandals and sneakers – a burst of colour under the summer sun. Available in all Louis Vuitton stores from March 19th.     A sporty parka in gradient nylon, the brilliance of a sequined dress, a Capucines, NéoNoé and the multi- pocketed Papillon - twists on House classics brush the skin and awaken desires. Shine, dance, dream of an endless summer, feeling relaxed, fresh in carefree attire for summer 2021. A splash of colour, a wave of iridescent light, a breath of fresh air, the joy of sunrays caressing one’s skin. From bright to pastel, a portfolio of Malibu sunrise yellows make up the Sunbathing collection, while Riviera blues embody the Morning Swim pieces.     A place in the sun. Beachwear prints, gradient Monogram, Damier motifs - Louis Vuitton icons play with colour. Going from day to night, sorbets to cocktails, the collection draws inspiration from fizzy red and parasol stripes, features raffia and embossed leather.     Silk twill pyjamas, bobs, bag charms, small leather goods, a beach towel and sarong, sandals and sneakers – a burst of colour under the summer sun. Available in all Louis Vuitton stores from March 19th.     A sporty parka in gradient nylon, the brilliance of a sequined dress, a Capucines, NéoNoé and the multi- pocketed Papillon - twists on House classics brush the skin and awaken desires. Shine, dance, dream of an endless summer, feeling relaxed, fresh in carefree attire for summer 2021.

In conversation with Sergiño Dest
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In conversation with Sergiño Dest

Men Barcelona FC player Sergiño Dest reveals new Nike Spring’21 underwear campaign, showcasing that it’s the perfect first move to help define your day ahead.   The Nike Underwear collection for Spring’21 has been designed to keep you comfortable, confident and ready for wherever the day takes you. The new men’s collection uses innovative Nike Dri-FIT technology, to provide maximum comfort for all for aspects of your day, whether that’s relaxing at home or training for the next big game.    Nike Underwear uses athlete insights at the forefront of its design, along with Nike innovation to provide superior comfort at all times. Speaking of his involvement in the new Nike Underwear campaign, Sergiño Dest said; “I’m super grateful to be a part of the new Nike Underwear campaign this season, taking my career both on and off the field to the next level.”    The collection includes the Nike Essential Micro, made from smooth, stretch microfiber for ease of movement, perfect for everyday wear.    Nike Underwear RRP starts from €20.00 Stockist - https://www.footlocker.nl/nl/search?query=nike%20underwear We had a great time speaking to him about the campaign.   Congratulations on becoming the face of Nike’s new underwear. It must be quite exciting, especially following in the footsteps of Marcus Rashford.   It is nice. I think you have to take advantage of the things you can do with your career. So for me I know that on the field I can do a lot of things. But also, off the field, I can do a lot of special things too. This is my first campaign with Nike Underwear and it was a good opportunity for me to get this one done.     Talk us through the Nike Underwear photoshoot. How was that for you?   It was really good. At first, they talked me through a video of how they wanted it to be and I really liked it. They came out to Barcelona and we managed to shoot the campaign in around three or four hours. I think it went really well and so, for me, it was a nice start to doing something new.      Your first footballing move was to Ajax, aged 11. Tell us a bit more about that and how exciting it was for you.   I lived about 20km away from Ajax. It was really nice when they wanted me. I was at school and around the age of 10 or something. I just remember my mother telling me the news. She told me I could go to Ajax. But when I had my first trial in the first year, they didn’t pick me. After that year, I got one more trial. That went well and they did pick me. So from the age of 11 until last year I played there. It was such a good experience at Ajax. It will always be a part of my heart because I played there for such a long time, for half of my life so far. And I’m thankful for that. I’m still looking out for their results. They’re doing great right now. They are first in the league and they just beat Lille twice in the Europa League. They’re doing good.      Moving to Barcelona last year was your first big transfer move in your football career. To leave Ajax, where you had spent your entire career before now, must have been a massive decision to make - especially, during the Lockdown era.    Yes. It was not easy, of course. I miss Holland sometimes. But Barcelona is also a great city. So, I feel good over here. There are still a lot of things for me to see here in Barcelona, of course, because of the whole Covid situation. But even then I still really like it here. I’ve heard from people that once this whole situation is over, or begins to return to normal again, then Barcelona is a completely different city. So, for me right now, I’m just focusing on training. Then maybe for the rest of the day, I may go to the supermarket or go to eat something. So, it hasn’t been too difficult to adjust here in Barcelona because it is just part of the same lifestyle.     This Nike Underwear campaign is about ‘Your First Move’. So, what is Your First Move to kickstart the day - and how does the rest of it typically go down?   Well, I just wake up and get out of bed! On my average day, I’ll get up. Then, I brush my teeth, have a shower and go to the Club (FC Barcelona). I eat my breakfast at the Club and then do some preparation before the training. Then, I’ll train and after that it is lunch. You can take the food back to your house. Sometimes I’ll do that but most times I will eat there. After that, basically I have the whole day off. And that feels good! We have a lot of games and mentally, as well as physically, you do need to have a rest because nobody can focus 24/7. That’s really hard. So when we are done with training, for the rest of the day I like to be able to chill in my house, watching movies. But I also have to do a lot of things too. Sometimes I cook by myself, plus I have to do the washing and everything else. So it’s not always chilled. But I always have a little bit of time for myself during the day to do what I want to do, like watching a movie or playing on the PlayStation for a bit. And that is basically my day.      That 'rest and recovery' element must be so important as a footballer, particularly this season where the calendar has been so congested with back-to-back games. Has that been difficult to adjust to?   Everybody wants to play a lot of games. You can develop really well by doing that, so that is good. But right now, the focus level has to be really high because you have to play a game, recover and then prepare for the next game. It can be hard. But, ultimately, we are all glad that we can play Soccer again. And that is great for the supporters too. Unfortunately, they can’t come to the stadium right now. But they do have a lot of games on TV to watch.     The new Nike Underwear promises to be groundbreaking in the fashion arena. So, tell us more about your dress style and what you like to wear?   It depends really. Right now, I’m not going out and I’m not going out for dinner. So, I’m just at home or going to the supermarket or training. Basically that means I’m just wearing Nike clothes most! Like hoodies, Nike Tech fleece etc. If I’m really going, then I like to wear stuff like jeans or things like that. Right now, it’s all relative to sport - and it is more comfortable.     What makes you happy?    It makes me happy when other people are happy, especially those who are close to me - like if they are doing well with their jobs and stuff. For me, that always makes me happy. I don’t need a lot to be happy, you know.      What was the last film you watched on Netflix?   The last film I watched? Ah, that was yesterday. It’s called, ‘Get Out’. You know that one? It’s on Netflix [starring Daniel Kaluuya and Allison Williams]. It’s a bit of a horror, thriller, kind of film. It’s a little bit scary, to be honest!     Barcelona FC player Sergiño Dest reveals new Nike Spring’21 underwear campaign, showcasing that it’s the perfect first move to help define your day ahead.   The Nike Underwear collection for Spring’21 has been designed to keep you comfortable, confident and ready for wherever the day takes you. The new men’s collection uses innovative Nike Dri-FIT technology, to provide maximum comfort for all for aspects of your day, whether that’s relaxing at home or training for the next big game.    Nike Underwear uses athlete insights at the forefront of its design, along with Nike innovation to provide superior comfort at all times. Speaking of his involvement in the new Nike Underwear campaign, Sergiño Dest said; “I’m super grateful to be a part of the new Nike Underwear campaign this season, taking my career both on and off the field to the next level.”    The collection includes the Nike Essential Micro, made from smooth, stretch microfiber for ease of movement, perfect for everyday wear.    Nike Underwear RRP starts from €20.00 Stockist - https://www.footlocker.nl/nl/search?query=nike%20underwear We had a great time speaking to him about the campaign.   Congratulations on becoming the face of Nike’s new underwear. It must be quite exciting, especially following in the footsteps of Marcus Rashford.   It is nice. I think you have to take advantage of the things you can do with your career. So for me I know that on the field I can do a lot of things. But also, off the field, I can do a lot of special things too. This is my first campaign with Nike Underwear and it was a good opportunity for me to get this one done.     Talk us through the Nike Underwear photoshoot. How was that for you?   It was really good. At first, they talked me through a video of how they wanted it to be and I really liked it. They came out to Barcelona and we managed to shoot the campaign in around three or four hours. I think it went really well and so, for me, it was a nice start to doing something new.      Your first footballing move was to Ajax, aged 11. Tell us a bit more about that and how exciting it was for you.   I lived about 20km away from Ajax. It was really nice when they wanted me. I was at school and around the age of 10 or something. I just remember my mother telling me the news. She told me I could go to Ajax. But when I had my first trial in the first year, they didn’t pick me. After that year, I got one more trial. That went well and they did pick me. So from the age of 11 until last year I played there. It was such a good experience at Ajax. It will always be a part of my heart because I played there for such a long time, for half of my life so far. And I’m thankful for that. I’m still looking out for their results. They’re doing great right now. They are first in the league and they just beat Lille twice in the Europa League. They’re doing good.      Moving to Barcelona last year was your first big transfer move in your football career. To leave Ajax, where you had spent your entire career before now, must have been a massive decision to make - especially, during the Lockdown era.    Yes. It was not easy, of course. I miss Holland sometimes. But Barcelona is also a great city. So, I feel good over here. There are still a lot of things for me to see here in Barcelona, of course, because of the whole Covid situation. But even then I still really like it here. I’ve heard from people that once this whole situation is over, or begins to return to normal again, then Barcelona is a completely different city. So, for me right now, I’m just focusing on training. Then maybe for the rest of the day, I may go to the supermarket or go to eat something. So, it hasn’t been too difficult to adjust here in Barcelona because it is just part of the same lifestyle.     This Nike Underwear campaign is about ‘Your First Move’. So, what is Your First Move to kickstart the day - and how does the rest of it typically go down?   Well, I just wake up and get out of bed! On my average day, I’ll get up. Then, I brush my teeth, have a shower and go to the Club (FC Barcelona). I eat my breakfast at the Club and then do some preparation before the training. Then, I’ll train and after that it is lunch. You can take the food back to your house. Sometimes I’ll do that but most times I will eat there. After that, basically I have the whole day off. And that feels good! We have a lot of games and mentally, as well as physically, you do need to have a rest because nobody can focus 24/7. That’s really hard. So when we are done with training, for the rest of the day I like to be able to chill in my house, watching movies. But I also have to do a lot of things too. Sometimes I cook by myself, plus I have to do the washing and everything else. So it’s not always chilled. But I always have a little bit of time for myself during the day to do what I want to do, like watching a movie or playing on the PlayStation for a bit. And that is basically my day.      That 'rest and recovery' element must be so important as a footballer, particularly this season where the calendar has been so congested with back-to-back games. Has that been difficult to adjust to?   Everybody wants to play a lot of games. You can develop really well by doing that, so that is good. But right now, the focus level has to be really high because you have to play a game, recover and then prepare for the next game. It can be hard. But, ultimately, we are all glad that we can play Soccer again. And that is great for the supporters too. Unfortunately, they can’t come to the stadium right now. But they do have a lot of games on TV to watch.     The new Nike Underwear promises to be groundbreaking in the fashion arena. So, tell us more about your dress style and what you like to wear?   It depends really. Right now, I’m not going out and I’m not going out for dinner. So, I’m just at home or going to the supermarket or training. Basically that means I’m just wearing Nike clothes most! Like hoodies, Nike Tech fleece etc. If I’m really going, then I like to wear stuff like jeans or things like that. Right now, it’s all relative to sport - and it is more comfortable.     What makes you happy?    It makes me happy when other people are happy, especially those who are close to me - like if they are doing well with their jobs and stuff. For me, that always makes me happy. I don’t need a lot to be happy, you know.      What was the last film you watched on Netflix?   The last film I watched? Ah, that was yesterday. It’s called, ‘Get Out’. You know that one? It’s on Netflix [starring Daniel Kaluuya and Allison Williams]. It’s a bit of a horror, thriller, kind of film. It’s a little bit scary, to be honest!    

Our digital cover star for March is Herizen
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Our digital cover star for March is Herizen

Photography We had a delight speaking and working with Herizen, captured by Jack Waterlot.     Tell our readers who you are in your own words.   Creative creature looking for the next adventure :P.   What is your first memory of acting and music?   My first memory of acting was when I was about 8 playing ‘Mustardseed’ in Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” As far as music, I’ve been singing since I could talk, and fell more in love with it watching my dad perform on stage.      Among all the roles you have played so far, which one embodies your personality the most?   Playing ‘Oshun’ in AMERICAN GODS was such a special moment for me, I felt a connection to my childhood/womanhood I’ve never felt before. It was a beautiful spiritual experience.     What gives you confidence?    Knowing where I come from, who I am, and that feeling of pride when I close my eyes and think about the hard work it took for me to get to where I am, without sacrificing my integrity.      Who is the one voice that has inspired you the most in your personal life and your career?   My mother. She’s always been there pushing me to stay true and keep my eye on my goal/vision.      What is the most daring thing you did recently and tell us something that is not on your resume?   Last year when I visited my father in Costa Rica, I sat in the same spot every day on that beach staring at this island that was a little over a mile out in the water. Every day I told myself “I’m not leaving Costa Rica without swimming to that island” and every day for those 3 weeks it was like chanting an obsession. Finally, on the last day I did it! It was scary as hell and I freaked out in the middle there for a bit, but finally surrendered to the ocean and I completed my journey. When I got back to the shore, I felt a wave of courage and strength wash over me, and since then whenever I feel fear or weakness I think about that island, and it helps me move forward.      What is your personal motto?   I’ve noticed it changes, but right now it’s “time is on your side.” I think it’s really important to have this relationship with time, because for women especially, it can feel like it’s our enemy when it’s not, it’s just our mentality.    What are your upcoming projects for this year?   AMERICAN GODS is currently streaming on Starz, and I’m working on my next music project that I’m very excited to share. I also have jewelry that I will be releasing alongside my music project :).     Why acting and why music? What inspired you to embark on a career in this industry?   Music has always been my reason for being alive, and acting was a happy accident... a very happy accident.    What is your work of art about and what does it mean to you?   It’s about expression of one’s true self and not being afraid to feel/share pain. It means everything to me and I’m very grateful to be able to do this as a career and maybe, with my deepest hope, it can help someone else with their pain too.      With work you have traveled a lot. What are some of the favourite places you have seen and been to so far and why?   I filmed an indie film called THE LOST HUSBAND about two years ago in Texas. We were filming on location in this cute little town called Roundtop, it was absolutely beautiful. I very much enjoyed listening to the crickets and the song that the wind sings at night. Being able to look up to the sky and seeing stars go on for eternity was magical.      What is your biggest outtake from last year?   You can’t take this life for granted, it’s imperative that you soak up the moments you share with your loved ones, hold them in a special place in your heart, and tell them you love them as often as you can because you never know what tomorrow brings.    As the theme of our Spring & Summer season is ELEMENTS and it is about sustainability, nature. Tell us about your perspective on sustainability and environment.   I think keeping a garden is something that everyone should learn. We had one last Spring and have started planting for this upcoming one :) It’s a meditation and an honor to put back into the earth that we take so much from and show it the love it deserves. Keeping an environmentally aware home is something that no one should get away with not doing. We all have to do our jobs to keep our planet alive. After all, it’s our home and the only one we have.      Tell us about your recently released debut EP.   Demon, my most recent EP, is very special to me. It’s about heartbreak, anger, and redemption. I’m grateful to the person who hurt me because without them, I wouldn’t have been able to share this project with the world. We all have our “hellboy” and we should be grateful to them for their lessons.      PHOTO CREDITS: Photo: Jack Waterlot talent: Herizen Styling : Jean Chung Make up : Frankie Boyd Hair : Rita Marmor Nails : Dohee Bahn  Casting: Timi Letonja   We had a delight speaking and working with Herizen, captured by Jack Waterlot.     Tell our readers who you are in your own words.   Creative creature looking for the next adventure :P.   What is your first memory of acting and music?   My first memory of acting was when I was about 8 playing ‘Mustardseed’ in Shakespeare’s “A Midsummer Night’s Dream.” As far as music, I’ve been singing since I could talk, and fell more in love with it watching my dad perform on stage.      Among all the roles you have played so far, which one embodies your personality the most?   Playing ‘Oshun’ in AMERICAN GODS was such a special moment for me, I felt a connection to my childhood/womanhood I’ve never felt before. It was a beautiful spiritual experience.     What gives you confidence?    Knowing where I come from, who I am, and that feeling of pride when I close my eyes and think about the hard work it took for me to get to where I am, without sacrificing my integrity.      Who is the one voice that has inspired you the most in your personal life and your career?   My mother. She’s always been there pushing me to stay true and keep my eye on my goal/vision.      What is the most daring thing you did recently and tell us something that is not on your resume?   Last year when I visited my father in Costa Rica, I sat in the same spot every day on that beach staring at this island that was a little over a mile out in the water. Every day I told myself “I’m not leaving Costa Rica without swimming to that island” and every day for those 3 weeks it was like chanting an obsession. Finally, on the last day I did it! It was scary as hell and I freaked out in the middle there for a bit, but finally surrendered to the ocean and I completed my journey. When I got back to the shore, I felt a wave of courage and strength wash over me, and since then whenever I feel fear or weakness I think about that island, and it helps me move forward.      What is your personal motto?   I’ve noticed it changes, but right now it’s “time is on your side.” I think it’s really important to have this relationship with time, because for women especially, it can feel like it’s our enemy when it’s not, it’s just our mentality.    What are your upcoming projects for this year?   AMERICAN GODS is currently streaming on Starz, and I’m working on my next music project that I’m very excited to share. I also have jewelry that I will be releasing alongside my music project :).     Why acting and why music? What inspired you to embark on a career in this industry?   Music has always been my reason for being alive, and acting was a happy accident... a very happy accident.    What is your work of art about and what does it mean to you?   It’s about expression of one’s true self and not being afraid to feel/share pain. It means everything to me and I’m very grateful to be able to do this as a career and maybe, with my deepest hope, it can help someone else with their pain too.      With work you have traveled a lot. What are some of the favourite places you have seen and been to so far and why?   I filmed an indie film called THE LOST HUSBAND about two years ago in Texas. We were filming on location in this cute little town called Roundtop, it was absolutely beautiful. I very much enjoyed listening to the crickets and the song that the wind sings at night. Being able to look up to the sky and seeing stars go on for eternity was magical.      What is your biggest outtake from last year?   You can’t take this life for granted, it’s imperative that you soak up the moments you share with your loved ones, hold them in a special place in your heart, and tell them you love them as often as you can because you never know what tomorrow brings.    As the theme of our Spring & Summer season is ELEMENTS and it is about sustainability, nature. Tell us about your perspective on sustainability and environment.   I think keeping a garden is something that everyone should learn. We had one last Spring and have started planting for this upcoming one :) It’s a meditation and an honor to put back into the earth that we take so much from and show it the love it deserves. Keeping an environmentally aware home is something that no one should get away with not doing. We all have to do our jobs to keep our planet alive. After all, it’s our home and the only one we have.      Tell us about your recently released debut EP.   Demon, my most recent EP, is very special to me. It’s about heartbreak, anger, and redemption. I’m grateful to the person who hurt me because without them, I wouldn’t have been able to share this project with the world. We all have our “hellboy” and we should be grateful to them for their lessons.      PHOTO CREDITS: Photo: Jack Waterlot talent: Herizen Styling : Jean Chung Make up : Frankie Boyd Hair : Rita Marmor Nails : Dohee Bahn  Casting: Timi Letonja  

Exclusive editorial by Koers von Cremer
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Exclusive editorial by Koers von Cremer

Fashion New digital editorial, captured by Koers von Cremer in Zandvoort.     TEAM CREDITS: Photography: Koers von Cremer @koersvoncremer Fashion: Gino Gurrieri @ginogurrieri Muah: Wout Philippo @woutphilippobeauty using Redken @redken  Model: Fee Kienhuis @feekienhuis at Paparazzi Model Management @paparazzimodels Casting: Timi Letonja @timiletonja     New digital editorial, captured by Koers von Cremer in Zandvoort.     TEAM CREDITS: Photography: Koers von Cremer @koersvoncremer Fashion: Gino Gurrieri @ginogurrieri Muah: Wout Philippo @woutphilippobeauty using Redken @redken  Model: Fee Kienhuis @feekienhuis at Paparazzi Model Management @paparazzimodels Casting: Timi Letonja @timiletonja    

A surrealist dreamscape by Carlfried Verwaayen
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A surrealist dreamscape by Carlfried Verwaayen

Accessories   A surrealist dreamscape composed with strange shapes created from and with everyday objects with elements of surprise and unexpected juxtapositions. The scenographic light plays another fundamental role in this story.     Team credits: Photography: Carlfried Verwaayen  Concept, Art Direction and Styling: Analik Brouwer   A surrealist dreamscape composed with strange shapes created from and with everyday objects with elements of surprise and unexpected juxtapositions. The scenographic light plays another fundamental role in this story.     Team credits: Photography: Carlfried Verwaayen  Concept, Art Direction and Styling: Analik Brouwer

Exclusive editorial by Jeremie Monnier
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Exclusive editorial by Jeremie Monnier

Fashion Brand new digital editorial captured by Jeremie Monnier.       TEAM CREDITS: Photographer Jeremie Monnier @jeremiemonnier Stylist Victor Vergara @victor___vergara Hair Kevin Roux @kevinrouxhair Make up Marie Guillon @marieguillon_ Casting Daniel Estévez @vxeast Photographer assistant Louis-Co Andrieu @louiscoandrieu EIC Timotej Letonja @timiletonja Model Justina Ageitos @ OUI Management Brand new digital editorial captured by Jeremie Monnier.       TEAM CREDITS: Photographer Jeremie Monnier @jeremiemonnier Stylist Victor Vergara @victor___vergara Hair Kevin Roux @kevinrouxhair Make up Marie Guillon @marieguillon_ Casting Daniel Estévez @vxeast Photographer assistant Louis-Co Andrieu @louiscoandrieu EIC Timotej Letonja @timiletonja Model Justina Ageitos @ OUI Management

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