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Speaking with  Christophe Lemaire
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Speaking with Christophe Lemaire

Fashion UNIQLO U 2020 Spring & Summer collection has launched lifeWear essentials.   We had a chance to speak with Christophe Lemaire about the collection:    Can you explain what is Uniqlo U in your own words?  Elevated essentials, functionality and sense of ease. For myself and the Paris R&D team, when we started Uniqlo U we wanted to propose an elevated proposition, or something a little more experimental, a slightly more daring proposition of LifeWear. We very much wanted to be perceived or understood to be an extension of LifeWear. We made ours to be part of the values of the brand, which are clothes for every day and for everyone.  Functionality and ease are very important. Of course because we have this background of Paris and Europe, and London too, we are looking to create a European vibe in the product offering. And we are trying to be as sophisticated as possible when designing affordable, necessary items to be worn daily. For us, a “good color” is not necessarily more expensive than a “bad color,” and a “good cut” is not necessarily more expensive than a “so-so cut.” There are many ways of improving an affordable product; this is our overall philosophy.   What is the value of LifeWear to you? I come from a high-fashion background. And actually most of the team here in Paris does too. We learned a lot through this experience, through aesthetics, quality, and refinement. But I think we all share a desire to propose style and quality for everyone. We are very respectful of this democratic dimension of UNIQLO. And this is one thing we are very excited about with Uniqlo U; we wish to try to bring style, contemporariness and quality, but at a very affordable price. This is the strength of being the part of UNIQLO system, and to be able to reach that is a great achievement.   One important focus of this new collection is Denim, isn’t it? Yes it was, absolutely.We have been looking for a new straight leg, a higher rise, proposing an alternative to the curved line we did before, which was the carrot fit line that proved to be very successful. But our role in the Paris R&D Center is to continue to explore new options, so this season for both men and women, we feel there is a need for a straighter leg, a new silhouette and a higher rise, again.  In addition to the beautiful denim we worked on together with the LA team (the Jeans Innovation Center, JIC), we were also interested in cotton satin, which we proposed for the Trucker Jacket. This is a beautiful cotton satin that we can also call moleskin, but it is not brushed, available in very interesting colors. For women, we worked with cotton satin to propose a new style in the curved design, which has been very successful, and has patched pockets and details taken from a carpenter’s pants. For men we offer a four-pocket jacket in different washes of denim. And for women, we created a total look in one wash denim, with straight leg jeans and kind of a boxy men’s shirt in 6.5 ounces denim. Also, a dress in washed denim, slightly oversized; it’s a light denim, I think only 6 ounces. The idea here was to produce a full-range of denim and cotton satin products. Cotton satin is a classic material used in workwear, and so is denim. Therefore, together with the supplier we developed a superior quality cotton satin. The wonder of cotton satin is that it ages beautifully, and the more you wear it, the more it’ll achieve a specific patina or finish.   Can you talk about some of the unique details of the T-shirt collection? There’s a lot to say about the details. In general, the T-shirt is an interesting exercise, because it seems like the items is always the same. Usually a T-shirt comes in a crew neck and with short sleeves, although sometimes long sleeves. We believe in the need to be extremely precise on the weight of the cotton, the way it’s knit and other details such as the finishing, volume and colors. So this is kind of a general statement we have in mind, and I have to say I work with a great team of designers and developers, who are extremely passionate every season about making the perfect T-shirt. This season we have a lighter jersey with a cool and dry touch. It’s a double-faced jersey with Supima Cotton on the outside and AIRism inside to allow for freshness and breathability, especially in hot weather. We applied the beautiful technique of AIRism and integrated it into a Uniqlo U product with a specific cut that is slightly loose. For women, we offer a series of loose cuts which were introduced last summer, but with a lighter jersey and the interlock and mercerized rib jersey.   Did the inspiration for this come from a travel look?  Yes, it definitely came from this idea of a female reporter who travels. For example, she can run in these pants, or move comfortably, or even dance, from an idea of liberating the movement. In our design we think about movement, about breathability and having a certain freedom. There’s also this idea of a travel suit and a new setup, but in a cut and sew item. So, trying to find this balance between something stylish, timeless, and elegant, but also that is easy and has a certain fluidity and comfort. It’s something we always try to achieve, this balance.    The men’s Blocktech coat is also an iconic item. Can you comment on the overall outerwear collection? Well for us, good men’s outerwear has to first be functional. Of course, the Blocktech technique is amazing. There is also the need in the volume, in the details, and to be as authentic as possible – to be as faithful to the beauty of an original trench-coat and what makes a trench coat stylish.  We don’t always want to be literal and reproduce exactly, say a military 1940s American Army trench coat, but we look at one and try to understand what makes it classic. The weight of the lapels, the positions of the pockets, the stitching, and the way the belt is designed. All of this is considered very precisely, and our design team spends a lot of time, sometimes with the approach of a maniac. But I think especially for Menswear we have to consider every single detail of the cut, and of course the choice of the material.  I think it’s important to understand clothing history, for example, the history of military wear, workwear, and tailoring. We are passionate and obsessed in the Menswear team with the history of design, and to understand where it comes from. For this specific trench, we looked at the U.S. Army military trench, as well as the British RAF (Royal Air Force) version, etc., and we tried to make a good fusion of all this, while at the same time try to understand today’s consumer needs.  It’s also important to sometimes be faithful to tradition, because there’s a reason why those pieces are so successful. For instance, one thing we are trying to promote is the fit. Maybe today it’s more and more understood, but sometimes there is kind of habit to take a classic piece and just make it slim, and just because you made it slim, it’s now “contemporary.” We don’t think so. Sometimes the room of the sleeves, the longer volume, or the bigger volume, is actually super stylish and can be contemporary. And this is in the fashion world today, this “room” that is a little bit more oversized. get your favorite pieces at Uniqlo.com UNIQLO U 2020 Spring & Summer collection has launched lifeWear essentials.   We had a chance to speak with Christophe Lemaire about the collection:    Can you explain what is Uniqlo U in your own words?  Elevated essentials, functionality and sense of ease. For myself and the Paris R&D team, when we started Uniqlo U we wanted to propose an elevated proposition, or something a little more experimental, a slightly more daring proposition of LifeWear. We very much wanted to be perceived or understood to be an extension of LifeWear. We made ours to be part of the values of the brand, which are clothes for every day and for everyone.  Functionality and ease are very important. Of course because we have this background of Paris and Europe, and London too, we are looking to create a European vibe in the product offering. And we are trying to be as sophisticated as possible when designing affordable, necessary items to be worn daily. For us, a “good color” is not necessarily more expensive than a “bad color,” and a “good cut” is not necessarily more expensive than a “so-so cut.” There are many ways of improving an affordable product; this is our overall philosophy.   What is the value of LifeWear to you? I come from a high-fashion background. And actually most of the team here in Paris does too. We learned a lot through this experience, through aesthetics, quality, and refinement. But I think we all share a desire to propose style and quality for everyone. We are very respectful of this democratic dimension of UNIQLO. And this is one thing we are very excited about with Uniqlo U; we wish to try to bring style, contemporariness and quality, but at a very affordable price. This is the strength of being the part of UNIQLO system, and to be able to reach that is a great achievement.   One important focus of this new collection is Denim, isn’t it? Yes it was, absolutely.We have been looking for a new straight leg, a higher rise, proposing an alternative to the curved line we did before, which was the carrot fit line that proved to be very successful. But our role in the Paris R&D Center is to continue to explore new options, so this season for both men and women, we feel there is a need for a straighter leg, a new silhouette and a higher rise, again.  In addition to the beautiful denim we worked on together with the LA team (the Jeans Innovation Center, JIC), we were also interested in cotton satin, which we proposed for the Trucker Jacket. This is a beautiful cotton satin that we can also call moleskin, but it is not brushed, available in very interesting colors. For women, we worked with cotton satin to propose a new style in the curved design, which has been very successful, and has patched pockets and details taken from a carpenter’s pants. For men we offer a four-pocket jacket in different washes of denim. And for women, we created a total look in one wash denim, with straight leg jeans and kind of a boxy men’s shirt in 6.5 ounces denim. Also, a dress in washed denim, slightly oversized; it’s a light denim, I think only 6 ounces. The idea here was to produce a full-range of denim and cotton satin products. Cotton satin is a classic material used in workwear, and so is denim. Therefore, together with the supplier we developed a superior quality cotton satin. The wonder of cotton satin is that it ages beautifully, and the more you wear it, the more it’ll achieve a specific patina or finish.   Can you talk about some of the unique details of the T-shirt collection? There’s a lot to say about the details. In general, the T-shirt is an interesting exercise, because it seems like the items is always the same. Usually a T-shirt comes in a crew neck and with short sleeves, although sometimes long sleeves. We believe in the need to be extremely precise on the weight of the cotton, the way it’s knit and other details such as the finishing, volume and colors. So this is kind of a general statement we have in mind, and I have to say I work with a great team of designers and developers, who are extremely passionate every season about making the perfect T-shirt. This season we have a lighter jersey with a cool and dry touch. It’s a double-faced jersey with Supima Cotton on the outside and AIRism inside to allow for freshness and breathability, especially in hot weather. We applied the beautiful technique of AIRism and integrated it into a Uniqlo U product with a specific cut that is slightly loose. For women, we offer a series of loose cuts which were introduced last summer, but with a lighter jersey and the interlock and mercerized rib jersey.   Did the inspiration for this come from a travel look?  Yes, it definitely came from this idea of a female reporter who travels. For example, she can run in these pants, or move comfortably, or even dance, from an idea of liberating the movement. In our design we think about movement, about breathability and having a certain freedom. There’s also this idea of a travel suit and a new setup, but in a cut and sew item. So, trying to find this balance between something stylish, timeless, and elegant, but also that is easy and has a certain fluidity and comfort. It’s something we always try to achieve, this balance.    The men’s Blocktech coat is also an iconic item. Can you comment on the overall outerwear collection? Well for us, good men’s outerwear has to first be functional. Of course, the Blocktech technique is amazing. There is also the need in the volume, in the details, and to be as authentic as possible – to be as faithful to the beauty of an original trench-coat and what makes a trench coat stylish.  We don’t always want to be literal and reproduce exactly, say a military 1940s American Army trench coat, but we look at one and try to understand what makes it classic. The weight of the lapels, the positions of the pockets, the stitching, and the way the belt is designed. All of this is considered very precisely, and our design team spends a lot of time, sometimes with the approach of a maniac. But I think especially for Menswear we have to consider every single detail of the cut, and of course the choice of the material.  I think it’s important to understand clothing history, for example, the history of military wear, workwear, and tailoring. We are passionate and obsessed in the Menswear team with the history of design, and to understand where it comes from. For this specific trench, we looked at the U.S. Army military trench, as well as the British RAF (Royal Air Force) version, etc., and we tried to make a good fusion of all this, while at the same time try to understand today’s consumer needs.  It’s also important to sometimes be faithful to tradition, because there’s a reason why those pieces are so successful. For instance, one thing we are trying to promote is the fit. Maybe today it’s more and more understood, but sometimes there is kind of habit to take a classic piece and just make it slim, and just because you made it slim, it’s now “contemporary.” We don’t think so. Sometimes the room of the sleeves, the longer volume, or the bigger volume, is actually super stylish and can be contemporary. And this is in the fashion world today, this “room” that is a little bit more oversized. get your favorite pieces at Uniqlo.com

Exclusive Editorial with GUCCI starring Nella Roz
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Exclusive Editorial with GUCCI starring Nella Roz

Fashion   photography: Walter Pierre Styling: Koen T. Hendriks @ House of Orange casting: Timotej Letonja Make-up: Anita Jolles Manicure: Frédérique Olthuis @ House of Orange Collage Artist: Marije Seijn Model: Nella Ngingo @ Paparazzi Model Management photography assisntant: Luka Balm Styling assistant: Nour Ezzi   All clothing & accessories:  GUCCI Fall & Winter 2019/20   photography: Walter Pierre Styling: Koen T. Hendriks @ House of Orange casting: Timotej Letonja Make-up: Anita Jolles Manicure: Frédérique Olthuis @ House of Orange Collage Artist: Marije Seijn Model: Nella Ngingo @ Paparazzi Model Management photography assisntant: Luka Balm Styling assistant: Nour Ezzi   All clothing & accessories:  GUCCI Fall & Winter 2019/20

In conversation with MJ Rodriguez
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In conversation with MJ Rodriguez

Portrait MJ Rodriguez, a young and promising star, who most people know for her role as Blanca in the hit TV series »Pose«, dreamt of being an actress since she was 7. She is a part of the largest cast of transgender stars in the world of TV. MJ knew early on in her life that she was different, not happy in her own body. Her transformation process began during her stage career, where she is also known for her various performances on Broadway.   MJ, you are one of the leading ladies in the FX's series »Pose«, a series that made history with it's cast featuring the largest number of transgender actresses. This is a series set in New York City's ballroom scene in the 80s, exploring the lives of black trans women. What were your thoughts when you were cast in one of the leading roles, as Blanca?   I was extremely apprehensive at first because I was scared as to how the audience would receive our stories. So many don't know or are not educated on our lives as women of a specific experience. When the 1st season aired and I saw the reception of the viewers, it was a complete sign of relief because there was nothing but love given and understanding. This was the best welcome for my first television role as a leading actress. I felt like I did the women, who were here before me, justice and their stories were seen and heard.   For your role in »Pose« you were described as a breakout star and your performance didn't go unnoticed by critics, who praised you. What would you describe as the thing that connects you the most to this character? And which is the most special thing about your character?   The thing that connects me with this character the most is her will to keep going and her drive to stay focused on laying a foundation and securing a legacy for her children.  She's very secure in herself and knows exactly who she is and we definitely have those things in common. The most special thing about her is her heart, I truly believe she is pure in her actions and what she positively wants to accomplish.   You were studying at Berklee College of Music in Boston and were in your freshman year when you landed your first professional role, as Angel, in an off Broadway production »Rent«. Tell us more about the development of your career.   When I was going to Berklee, I was completely in my element as an artist. I was in a  place of comfort and a place where I could truly explore myself artistically. I took all types of fundamental classes, but the most fulfilling ones were my music business class and songwriting class. These two classes gave me glimpses into how I should take complete control of who I wanna be as an artist as well as storytelling. By the time I was nearing the end of my first semester, I felt like I was inches closer to where I wanted to be. During summer break I took part in a small community production of Rent, that was held at New Jersey’s Performing Arts Center. There I met a woman named Freddie Walker Brown. We created such a Wonderful Rapport by the end of the run. After the run, I went back to school to try and finish off my first semester, but by the time finals had come, I found myself in the middle of going back and forth from Boston to NYC, auditioning for »Rent«, the off-Broadway revival. In these moments I felt like Berklee prepared me for not only Rent, but also for what was to come.    Who is the most special and important person in your life, and why?   My mother is the most special and important person in my life, simply because she keeps me grounded. She's never failed me and now I expect that kind of security from others. I know it's a high expectation, but that's what I feel I deserve when it comes to partnerships and people who I really want to consider lifelong friends.    What would be your advice to young trans people who are still trying to figure out their true identity?   My advice to younger individuals would be to never second guess who you are. If you're ever in doubt, look into the mirror and see the beauty that is starring right back at you. Also know that you are enough!   You're an advocate for your community. Why do you believe being an advocate is such an important role in trans world?   The reason why it is so important, is because people need a voice that uplifts in a positive and factual way and I feel like I, as well as many others are trying our best to be that. We need to be pillars and totem poles for the generations behind us to climb, so that they can be at the top.    What can we expect from you in the future, on your personal level and career wise from »Pose«?   I feel like there's so many things that one can expect from me in the future. The biggest one of them all is being incorporated in more mainstream TV and Film, specifically drama, comedy, romantic and action. As far as on personal level, the most important thing you should expect from me is growth. I'm a person who loves to learn and I'm a person who loves to change things for the better.   To people, who don't know and watch »Pose« yet, why would you suggest it to them? I would suggest »POSE« simply because it is a groundbreaking show that beautifully journeys through lives of individuals who are simply just trying to make a way for themselves and the people that are part of their community, and I think everyone in the world has done that. It's a show that does nothing but raise the bar for awareness, especially when it comes to HIV and AIDS. It's also a show that really digs deep into the true definition of what the human condition is. That's why people should tune into this show.   photographed by Philippe Vogelenzang casting by Timotej Letonja styling by Ronnie Hart make-up by Grace Ahn hair by Ursula Stephen MJ Rodriguez, a young and promising star, who most people know for her role as Blanca in the hit TV series »Pose«, dreamt of being an actress since she was 7. She is a part of the largest cast of transgender stars in the world of TV. MJ knew early on in her life that she was different, not happy in her own body. Her transformation process began during her stage career, where she is also known for her various performances on Broadway.   MJ, you are one of the leading ladies in the FX's series »Pose«, a series that made history with it's cast featuring the largest number of transgender actresses. This is a series set in New York City's ballroom scene in the 80s, exploring the lives of black trans women. What were your thoughts when you were cast in one of the leading roles, as Blanca?   I was extremely apprehensive at first because I was scared as to how the audience would receive our stories. So many don't know or are not educated on our lives as women of a specific experience. When the 1st season aired and I saw the reception of the viewers, it was a complete sign of relief because there was nothing but love given and understanding. This was the best welcome for my first television role as a leading actress. I felt like I did the women, who were here before me, justice and their stories were seen and heard.   For your role in »Pose« you were described as a breakout star and your performance didn't go unnoticed by critics, who praised you. What would you describe as the thing that connects you the most to this character? And which is the most special thing about your character?   The thing that connects me with this character the most is her will to keep going and her drive to stay focused on laying a foundation and securing a legacy for her children.  She's very secure in herself and knows exactly who she is and we definitely have those things in common. The most special thing about her is her heart, I truly believe she is pure in her actions and what she positively wants to accomplish.   You were studying at Berklee College of Music in Boston and were in your freshman year when you landed your first professional role, as Angel, in an off Broadway production »Rent«. Tell us more about the development of your career.   When I was going to Berklee, I was completely in my element as an artist. I was in a  place of comfort and a place where I could truly explore myself artistically. I took all types of fundamental classes, but the most fulfilling ones were my music business class and songwriting class. These two classes gave me glimpses into how I should take complete control of who I wanna be as an artist as well as storytelling. By the time I was nearing the end of my first semester, I felt like I was inches closer to where I wanted to be. During summer break I took part in a small community production of Rent, that was held at New Jersey’s Performing Arts Center. There I met a woman named Freddie Walker Brown. We created such a Wonderful Rapport by the end of the run. After the run, I went back to school to try and finish off my first semester, but by the time finals had come, I found myself in the middle of going back and forth from Boston to NYC, auditioning for »Rent«, the off-Broadway revival. In these moments I felt like Berklee prepared me for not only Rent, but also for what was to come.    Who is the most special and important person in your life, and why?   My mother is the most special and important person in my life, simply because she keeps me grounded. She's never failed me and now I expect that kind of security from others. I know it's a high expectation, but that's what I feel I deserve when it comes to partnerships and people who I really want to consider lifelong friends.    What would be your advice to young trans people who are still trying to figure out their true identity?   My advice to younger individuals would be to never second guess who you are. If you're ever in doubt, look into the mirror and see the beauty that is starring right back at you. Also know that you are enough!   You're an advocate for your community. Why do you believe being an advocate is such an important role in trans world?   The reason why it is so important, is because people need a voice that uplifts in a positive and factual way and I feel like I, as well as many others are trying our best to be that. We need to be pillars and totem poles for the generations behind us to climb, so that they can be at the top.    What can we expect from you in the future, on your personal level and career wise from »Pose«?   I feel like there's so many things that one can expect from me in the future. The biggest one of them all is being incorporated in more mainstream TV and Film, specifically drama, comedy, romantic and action. As far as on personal level, the most important thing you should expect from me is growth. I'm a person who loves to learn and I'm a person who loves to change things for the better.   To people, who don't know and watch »Pose« yet, why would you suggest it to them? I would suggest »POSE« simply because it is a groundbreaking show that beautifully journeys through lives of individuals who are simply just trying to make a way for themselves and the people that are part of their community, and I think everyone in the world has done that. It's a show that does nothing but raise the bar for awareness, especially when it comes to HIV and AIDS. It's also a show that really digs deep into the true definition of what the human condition is. That's why people should tune into this show.   photographed by Philippe Vogelenzang casting by Timotej Letonja styling by Ronnie Hart make-up by Grace Ahn hair by Ursula Stephen

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Eclectic Nomad
120

Eclectic Nomad

Fashion The Eclectic Nomad Collection by EDITED gets us in the mood for summer with a super-trendy mix of sunshine styles. From boho and batik to sporty, the new looks effortlessly combine a wide variety of fashion references to celebrate summer and the 80s.   The 1980s are a key theme in the collection: power shoulders, accentuated sleeve designs and high waists with wide belts set the tone. Details from this unforgettable fashion decade are teamed up with new inspiration; a deliberate play on contrasts flows through the collection. Typical 80s shapes meet romantic boho patterns and flounces. Pastel shades and batik fabrics are mixed with bright-colored sportswear. Mesh knits and light denim styles are also part of the collection. Basics in white or nude shades bring everything together.   Brand Director Franziska Nellessen and the EDITED production team shot the collection lookbook with model Ilya Vermeulen in Cape Town.   The collection was designed by Design Director Clarissa Labin and her team in Berlin.   The Eclectic Nomad Collection is available from April 2, 2020 at EDITED.nl and in all EDITED stores. The Eclectic Nomad Collection by EDITED gets us in the mood for summer with a super-trendy mix of sunshine styles. From boho and batik to sporty, the new looks effortlessly combine a wide variety of fashion references to celebrate summer and the 80s.   The 1980s are a key theme in the collection: power shoulders, accentuated sleeve designs and high waists with wide belts set the tone. Details from this unforgettable fashion decade are teamed up with new inspiration; a deliberate play on contrasts flows through the collection. Typical 80s shapes meet romantic boho patterns and flounces. Pastel shades and batik fabrics are mixed with bright-colored sportswear. Mesh knits and light denim styles are also part of the collection. Basics in white or nude shades bring everything together.   Brand Director Franziska Nellessen and the EDITED production team shot the collection lookbook with model Ilya Vermeulen in Cape Town.   The collection was designed by Design Director Clarissa Labin and her team in Berlin.   The Eclectic Nomad Collection is available from April 2, 2020 at EDITED.nl and in all EDITED stores.

Moose Knuckles release the new Spring & Summer campaign
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Moose Knuckles release the new Spring & Summer campaign

Fashion Canada’s notoriously intrepid and much acclaimed outwearbrand, Moose Knuckles, debuts its Spring/Summer 2020 campaign ‘Surf Rodeo’, featuring skateboarder and surfer, Evan Mock, his brother, Alika Mock, Canadian model, Melrose Boyer, and Hawaiian surfer and model, Malia Murphy. The campaign, shot on the North Shore of Hawaii, infuses cowboy aesthetics and metropolitan sensibilities for the Spring/Summer 2020 Collection. Styled and co-creative directed by Hawaiian creative, Taylor Okata,and shot by photographer Alana Spencer, sister to Evan and Alika Mock, the Spring/Summer 2020 campaign ties in the feeling of family, Ohana, and celebrates the history and shared culture between Canada and Hawaii. Predating the Wild West, Captain George Vancouver, British Naval officer and explorer, gifted cattle to King Kamehameha I, founder and first ruler of the Kingdom of Hawaii. The King then requested that Mexican vaqueros travel from California to Hawaii to teach their cowboy lifestyle throughout the Islands, what Hawaiians then labeled as “paniolo’ – Hawaiian cowboys. The storyline of the campaign further embodies the Hawaiian way of life; It portrays a group of friends on a Hawaiian adventure that leads them from a beautiful horse ranch to a beach bonfire with the cast ending the day in a sunset surf session. “Moose Knuckles takes a trip to Cowtown, an affectionate nickname for Calgary, the Alberta city steeped in Western culture,” Tu Ly, Moose Knuckles’ VP of Design, explains. Inspired by the Calgary Stampede, one of the world’s largest rodeos, we reinterpreted the stampede’s rich heritage as the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth to perpetuate the greatest outerwear brand in the nation.” The Spring/Summer 2020 Collection features a variety of lightweight quilted jackets, rainwear, seam-sealed parkas, fitted down jackets, and elevated country-influenced pieces – all in a color palette inspired by the grasslands of the Canadian Prairies, provoking a feeling of nostalgia. The standout piece of the season is a bleached denim jacket with suede fringe in a dramatized 80’s silhouette. This season’s collection includes graphic treatments, ranging from thematic horseshoes to humble “Eat Your Greens Broccoli.” The hardworking looks for the collection are designed with Moose Knuckles’ logo-patterned bandanas. Rounding out the Spring/Summer 2020 Collection, Moose Knuckles introduces custom, hand-made, python and kangaroo cowboy boots with inlay designs made by the Alberta Boot Company.  #MKSurfRodeo https://www.mooseknucklescanada.com/ Canada’s notoriously intrepid and much acclaimed outwearbrand, Moose Knuckles, debuts its Spring/Summer 2020 campaign ‘Surf Rodeo’, featuring skateboarder and surfer, Evan Mock, his brother, Alika Mock, Canadian model, Melrose Boyer, and Hawaiian surfer and model, Malia Murphy. The campaign, shot on the North Shore of Hawaii, infuses cowboy aesthetics and metropolitan sensibilities for the Spring/Summer 2020 Collection. Styled and co-creative directed by Hawaiian creative, Taylor Okata,and shot by photographer Alana Spencer, sister to Evan and Alika Mock, the Spring/Summer 2020 campaign ties in the feeling of family, Ohana, and celebrates the history and shared culture between Canada and Hawaii. Predating the Wild West, Captain George Vancouver, British Naval officer and explorer, gifted cattle to King Kamehameha I, founder and first ruler of the Kingdom of Hawaii. The King then requested that Mexican vaqueros travel from California to Hawaii to teach their cowboy lifestyle throughout the Islands, what Hawaiians then labeled as “paniolo’ – Hawaiian cowboys. The storyline of the campaign further embodies the Hawaiian way of life; It portrays a group of friends on a Hawaiian adventure that leads them from a beautiful horse ranch to a beach bonfire with the cast ending the day in a sunset surf session. “Moose Knuckles takes a trip to Cowtown, an affectionate nickname for Calgary, the Alberta city steeped in Western culture,” Tu Ly, Moose Knuckles’ VP of Design, explains. Inspired by the Calgary Stampede, one of the world’s largest rodeos, we reinterpreted the stampede’s rich heritage as the Greatest Outdoor Show on Earth to perpetuate the greatest outerwear brand in the nation.” The Spring/Summer 2020 Collection features a variety of lightweight quilted jackets, rainwear, seam-sealed parkas, fitted down jackets, and elevated country-influenced pieces – all in a color palette inspired by the grasslands of the Canadian Prairies, provoking a feeling of nostalgia. The standout piece of the season is a bleached denim jacket with suede fringe in a dramatized 80’s silhouette. This season’s collection includes graphic treatments, ranging from thematic horseshoes to humble “Eat Your Greens Broccoli.” The hardworking looks for the collection are designed with Moose Knuckles’ logo-patterned bandanas. Rounding out the Spring/Summer 2020 Collection, Moose Knuckles introduces custom, hand-made, python and kangaroo cowboy boots with inlay designs made by the Alberta Boot Company.  #MKSurfRodeo https://www.mooseknucklescanada.com/

GUCCI releases Eyewear campaign for Spring & Summer
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GUCCI releases Eyewear campaign for Spring & Summer

Accessories For its new Spring Summer eyewear advertising campaign, Gucci moved to the Amoeba Music Hollywood store in Los Angeles to pay homage to that staple of American ‘80s teen movies, the record and VHS rental store.Creative Director Alessandro Michele mines the colourful neon-lit setting of this archetypal hangout for youth culture to showcase the spirit of individuality. In this new campaign, the browsing customers suggest many narratives, and in their attitude of proud freedom speak of Gucci’s desire to encourage self-expression.   Chinese actress and brand ambassador Ni Ni stars once again in theHouse eyewear advertisingcampaign, and is joined for the second time by Kai, the South Korean singer, actor and dancer, member of the EXO boy band, and global male ambassador for Gucci eyewear.Models Delphi McNicol, Azu Nwogu and Jana Jonckheere also appear in the campaign. Shot by cult filmmaker and photographer Harmony Korine, the campaign presents candid portraits – in still and moving images – of individuals or couples within the rich setting of the record store with its stacks and shelves of vinyl, tapes, CDs and videos. The emphasis is on close-up crops that bring the eyewear to the fore – both Gucci optical glasses and sunglasses – while the busy and vibrant background, alive with pop-culture graphics, suggests the energy and excitement of the retro music scene. The film also pays homage to those days when the local record shop or video exchange would be a social nexus, with the narrative plot showing customers meeting up in the store and trying on the glasses, while browsing the tapes and CDs. more on gucci.com             Creative Director: Alessandro Michele Art Director: Christopher SimmondsPhotographer/Director: Harmony Korine Styling: Jonathan Kaye Hair Stylist: Alex BrownsellMake Up: Thomas de Kluyver and Gao Jian For its new Spring Summer eyewear advertising campaign, Gucci moved to the Amoeba Music Hollywood store in Los Angeles to pay homage to that staple of American ‘80s teen movies, the record and VHS rental store.Creative Director Alessandro Michele mines the colourful neon-lit setting of this archetypal hangout for youth culture to showcase the spirit of individuality. In this new campaign, the browsing customers suggest many narratives, and in their attitude of proud freedom speak of Gucci’s desire to encourage self-expression.   Chinese actress and brand ambassador Ni Ni stars once again in theHouse eyewear advertisingcampaign, and is joined for the second time by Kai, the South Korean singer, actor and dancer, member of the EXO boy band, and global male ambassador for Gucci eyewear.Models Delphi McNicol, Azu Nwogu and Jana Jonckheere also appear in the campaign. Shot by cult filmmaker and photographer Harmony Korine, the campaign presents candid portraits – in still and moving images – of individuals or couples within the rich setting of the record store with its stacks and shelves of vinyl, tapes, CDs and videos. The emphasis is on close-up crops that bring the eyewear to the fore – both Gucci optical glasses and sunglasses – while the busy and vibrant background, alive with pop-culture graphics, suggests the energy and excitement of the retro music scene. The film also pays homage to those days when the local record shop or video exchange would be a social nexus, with the narrative plot showing customers meeting up in the store and trying on the glasses, while browsing the tapes and CDs. more on gucci.com             Creative Director: Alessandro Michele Art Director: Christopher SimmondsPhotographer/Director: Harmony Korine Styling: Jonathan Kaye Hair Stylist: Alex BrownsellMake Up: Thomas de Kluyver and Gao Jian

O'neill is ready for an endless Summer fuelled by nostalgia
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O'neill is ready for an endless Summer fuelled by nostalgia

Fashion With their signature Californian surf attitude and a fresh take on the fusion between sports and fashion, O’Neill is ready for an endless summer fuelled by nostalgia for SS20. Inspired by the Californian sun, the collection’s campaign and brand’s core message for the season promotes a joyful exploration of summer style, friendship, being young and of shared experiences. This continues O’Neill’s message that summer is more than just a season. It’s a feeling. The pursuit of life and good vibes in all forms is supported by O’Neill’s path of innovation with the O’Neill Blue line. An initiative to create a more sustainable approach to apparel. The result sees recycled plastic from around the beaches & shorelines be turned into high performance eco threads and yarns that are then used to create the line of board shorts, bikinis, t-shirts, dresses and sweatshirts. The continued collaboration with BIONIC YARN, REPREVE and ECONYL is one of O’Neill’s many sustainability efforts. As a result, 100% of the SS20 bikini collection is produced with sustainable fabrics. O’Neill manages to resignify the context in which we see ocean protection – showcasing a commitment to making a difference in the industry, whilst giving sustainable clothing personality and fun through a connection to modern art, bold colour use and abstract shapes. Throughout, O’Neill combines its innovative technology from their core water sports, such as the O’Neill Hyperdry with smart t and intersects it with fashion. Seen not only in the new line of swimwear that is inspired by athletic wear, but across the entire collection. O’Neill manages to take the modern surfer from board to beach effortlessly, putting them in vintage inspired resort looks that have been interpreted for the streets. Comprised of ve themes: Modern Retro, Athleisure, California Surf Lifestyle, Water & Sun, and O’Neill Blue – the collection of menswear, womenswear and childrenswear features wearable pieces that easily adapt for a life at the beach, or the city. Collection highlights see the 70’s mixed with a modern surf attitude. With a vintage colour palette & casual silhouette, the use of soft fabrics and prints in saturated tones is juxtaposed with the 90’s obsession that shines through elsewhere. O’Neill’s new collection is then set to appeal to a wide range of customers. O’Neill, where It’s Always Summer on the Inside. With their signature Californian surf attitude and a fresh take on the fusion between sports and fashion, O’Neill is ready for an endless summer fuelled by nostalgia for SS20. Inspired by the Californian sun, the collection’s campaign and brand’s core message for the season promotes a joyful exploration of summer style, friendship, being young and of shared experiences. This continues O’Neill’s message that summer is more than just a season. It’s a feeling. The pursuit of life and good vibes in all forms is supported by O’Neill’s path of innovation with the O’Neill Blue line. An initiative to create a more sustainable approach to apparel. The result sees recycled plastic from around the beaches & shorelines be turned into high performance eco threads and yarns that are then used to create the line of board shorts, bikinis, t-shirts, dresses and sweatshirts. The continued collaboration with BIONIC YARN, REPREVE and ECONYL is one of O’Neill’s many sustainability efforts. As a result, 100% of the SS20 bikini collection is produced with sustainable fabrics. O’Neill manages to resignify the context in which we see ocean protection – showcasing a commitment to making a difference in the industry, whilst giving sustainable clothing personality and fun through a connection to modern art, bold colour use and abstract shapes. Throughout, O’Neill combines its innovative technology from their core water sports, such as the O’Neill Hyperdry with smart t and intersects it with fashion. Seen not only in the new line of swimwear that is inspired by athletic wear, but across the entire collection. O’Neill manages to take the modern surfer from board to beach effortlessly, putting them in vintage inspired resort looks that have been interpreted for the streets. Comprised of ve themes: Modern Retro, Athleisure, California Surf Lifestyle, Water & Sun, and O’Neill Blue – the collection of menswear, womenswear and childrenswear features wearable pieces that easily adapt for a life at the beach, or the city. Collection highlights see the 70’s mixed with a modern surf attitude. With a vintage colour palette & casual silhouette, the use of soft fabrics and prints in saturated tones is juxtaposed with the 90’s obsession that shines through elsewhere. O’Neill’s new collection is then set to appeal to a wide range of customers. O’Neill, where It’s Always Summer on the Inside.

DGTL Amsterdam creates blueprint for a circular festival
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DGTL Amsterdam creates blueprint for a circular festival

Music After making great strides in the field of circularity for years, electronic music festival DGTL is taking a crucial next step during its upcoming eighth edition. As a pioneer in the field of innovation and sustainability, DGTL has created a circular blueprint that can be applied to both a festival and a city. DGTL Amsterdam, which kicks off the festival season on April 11th and 12th at the NDSM Docklands, is therefore the world's first electronic music festival that pursues full circularity.   The DGTL sustainability program has been running since 2013 and has been aimed from the outset to close cycles in the areas of energy, water & sanitation, food, commodities (waste) and mobility. As the aim this year is to close the entire DGTL circle, organisers have deemed the term ‘CYCLE’ their overarching theme for the 2020 edition. DGTL will close the cycles for a number of on-site systems, including energy, commodities, water and sanitation.    Of course, DGTL remains first and foremost a music festival, and for years have been working with a sustainable way of programming, combining international headliners with local talent. With over 65 artists spread out over seven stages, DGTL focuses on deepening and broadening the music line-up. For the broader audience, the Modular and AMP stages create a real festival vibe. Connoisseurs and purists can find their way to the techno stage Generator or the more underground-focused Filter. An increasingly prominent part of the program is set up for live performances on the large LIVE stage. View the full line-up at https://dgtl.nl/artists/line-up.   Collaboration with the city of Amsterdam It’s entirely feasible toview a festival as a temporary miniature version of a community. People work and consume, move, eat and sleep. Much like in a community there are all kinds of different flows such as money, energy, food, exchange of knowledge, water and creativity. For this reason, DGTL sees its festival terrain as a living lab for circular innovation in neighbourhoods and cities. By entering into partnerships with, among others, the City of Amsterdam and the Central Government, the festival takes on urban challenges on themes such as the energy transition and a new more sustainable form of sanitation.   Energy neutral With regard to energy, the objective this year is simple: during show days, energy consumption must come entirely from renewable sources. This means from sun, wind or other inexhaustible sources. The City of Amsterdam has invested in the event facilities at the NDSM Docklands; for example, the construction of additional power boxes has increased access to the main power grid. This means that all energy-demanding parts of the festival - such as bars, lighting and the food court - can simply use the sockets on the NDSM Docklands for their power supply. DGTL's energy system will be completely energy-neutral and emission-free during show days and the festival is parting ways with traditional diesel generators.   From urine to water, from poo to compost DGTL has also started a pilot together with the City of Amsterdam, researchers, toilet suppliers and processors to realize a circular sanitary system at the event. Urine is converted into (gray) water and faeces are processed into compost. DGTL hopes that this pilot offers a blueprint which neighbourhoods, cities and the music and events industry can learn from.   Plant-based menu After the introduction of a meat-free food court in 2016, in recent years DGTL has moved towards a menu consisting of rescued food and imperfect products. This year DGTL is taking astep further by offering a fully plant-based (vegan) menu put together by a select group of chefs.   Mobility Another important spearhead is the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions as a result of mobility movements. By far the largest part of DGTL's greenhouse gas emissions is caused by the travels of visitors. Artists’ flights, transport of suppliers and the use of machines during the festival build and dismantling process also produce emissions through burning fossil fuels. DGTL is closely looking at ways to make mobility (visitors, suppliers, artists) as efficient and sustainable as possible.   Regarding the fuel used for the machinery used during the set-up and breakdown of the event, DGTL will switch completely from diesel to biodiesel this year. With this, the festival reduces the CO2 emissions in that area by 89 percent. This year, DGTL also focuses on making traveling by train attractive for both national and international visitors. The festival offers special ticket deals, promoting national and international train transport when purchasing a ticket for DGTL Amsterdam. DGTL aims to direct as many visitors as possible towards travel by train instead of flight travel.   About DGTL: DGTL is a global electronic music festival with editions in Amsterdam, Santiago (Chile), São Paulo (Brazil), Barcelona & Madrid (Spain), Tel Aviv (Israel), Bangalore (India) and during the Amsterdam Dance Event. Besides the focus on music, the organisation brings a mix of unique art installations and revolutionary sustainability projects. Their sustainability program distinguishes them within the festival landscape. For the full line-up and more information please visit www.dgtl.nl   DGTL 11 & 12 April 2020, NDSM Docklands, Amsterdam TICKETS: https://dgtl.nl/mydgtl/tickets FULL LINE-UP: https://dgtl.nl/artists/line-up FACEBOOK EVENT: https://www.facebook.com/events/421732865305915/ After making great strides in the field of circularity for years, electronic music festival DGTL is taking a crucial next step during its upcoming eighth edition. As a pioneer in the field of innovation and sustainability, DGTL has created a circular blueprint that can be applied to both a festival and a city. DGTL Amsterdam, which kicks off the festival season on April 11th and 12th at the NDSM Docklands, is therefore the world's first electronic music festival that pursues full circularity.   The DGTL sustainability program has been running since 2013 and has been aimed from the outset to close cycles in the areas of energy, water & sanitation, food, commodities (waste) and mobility. As the aim this year is to close the entire DGTL circle, organisers have deemed the term ‘CYCLE’ their overarching theme for the 2020 edition. DGTL will close the cycles for a number of on-site systems, including energy, commodities, water and sanitation.    Of course, DGTL remains first and foremost a music festival, and for years have been working with a sustainable way of programming, combining international headliners with local talent. With over 65 artists spread out over seven stages, DGTL focuses on deepening and broadening the music line-up. For the broader audience, the Modular and AMP stages create a real festival vibe. Connoisseurs and purists can find their way to the techno stage Generator or the more underground-focused Filter. An increasingly prominent part of the program is set up for live performances on the large LIVE stage. View the full line-up at https://dgtl.nl/artists/line-up.   Collaboration with the city of Amsterdam It’s entirely feasible toview a festival as a temporary miniature version of a community. People work and consume, move, eat and sleep. Much like in a community there are all kinds of different flows such as money, energy, food, exchange of knowledge, water and creativity. For this reason, DGTL sees its festival terrain as a living lab for circular innovation in neighbourhoods and cities. By entering into partnerships with, among others, the City of Amsterdam and the Central Government, the festival takes on urban challenges on themes such as the energy transition and a new more sustainable form of sanitation.   Energy neutral With regard to energy, the objective this year is simple: during show days, energy consumption must come entirely from renewable sources. This means from sun, wind or other inexhaustible sources. The City of Amsterdam has invested in the event facilities at the NDSM Docklands; for example, the construction of additional power boxes has increased access to the main power grid. This means that all energy-demanding parts of the festival - such as bars, lighting and the food court - can simply use the sockets on the NDSM Docklands for their power supply. DGTL's energy system will be completely energy-neutral and emission-free during show days and the festival is parting ways with traditional diesel generators.   From urine to water, from poo to compost DGTL has also started a pilot together with the City of Amsterdam, researchers, toilet suppliers and processors to realize a circular sanitary system at the event. Urine is converted into (gray) water and faeces are processed into compost. DGTL hopes that this pilot offers a blueprint which neighbourhoods, cities and the music and events industry can learn from.   Plant-based menu After the introduction of a meat-free food court in 2016, in recent years DGTL has moved towards a menu consisting of rescued food and imperfect products. This year DGTL is taking astep further by offering a fully plant-based (vegan) menu put together by a select group of chefs.   Mobility Another important spearhead is the reduction of greenhouse gas emissions as a result of mobility movements. By far the largest part of DGTL's greenhouse gas emissions is caused by the travels of visitors. Artists’ flights, transport of suppliers and the use of machines during the festival build and dismantling process also produce emissions through burning fossil fuels. DGTL is closely looking at ways to make mobility (visitors, suppliers, artists) as efficient and sustainable as possible.   Regarding the fuel used for the machinery used during the set-up and breakdown of the event, DGTL will switch completely from diesel to biodiesel this year. With this, the festival reduces the CO2 emissions in that area by 89 percent. This year, DGTL also focuses on making traveling by train attractive for both national and international visitors. The festival offers special ticket deals, promoting national and international train transport when purchasing a ticket for DGTL Amsterdam. DGTL aims to direct as many visitors as possible towards travel by train instead of flight travel.   About DGTL: DGTL is a global electronic music festival with editions in Amsterdam, Santiago (Chile), São Paulo (Brazil), Barcelona & Madrid (Spain), Tel Aviv (Israel), Bangalore (India) and during the Amsterdam Dance Event. Besides the focus on music, the organisation brings a mix of unique art installations and revolutionary sustainability projects. Their sustainability program distinguishes them within the festival landscape. For the full line-up and more information please visit www.dgtl.nl   DGTL 11 & 12 April 2020, NDSM Docklands, Amsterdam TICKETS: https://dgtl.nl/mydgtl/tickets FULL LINE-UP: https://dgtl.nl/artists/line-up FACEBOOK EVENT: https://www.facebook.com/events/421732865305915/

In conversation with Lost Frequencies
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In conversation with Lost Frequencies

Music Felix De Laet, better known by his moniker Lost Frequencies, has soared to success in the international music industry on many levels. Releasing his global smash hit ‘Are You With Me’ back in 2014 and quickly cementing himself as a name to watch, the track rapidly ascended by hitting multi-platinum status and taking the #1 spot in 18 countries.  Lost Frequencies was the first Belgian artist to secure his first 5 hit singles charting at the #1 spot on the Ultra top official Belgian charts, as well as the first Belgian artist to hit #1 in the UK, he went on to release his long-awaited debut album ‘Less Is More’ in 2016 via Armin Van Buuren’s iconic Armada imprint that dazzled globally, certifying a future star for the next generation. Lost Frequencies also firmly established himself as one of the strongest, fastest rising talents with his debut entry into the 2017 DJ Mag poll at #26, the highest new entry of any artist that year. You touch people's hearts with your music, which's great. I would like to ask you about the show, since this was your first live tour. What could you tell us about it?  Yeah, it's different from what you're used to, because all three of us were going to be on stage; the drummer, a guitarist and I. Everything was more electronic sounding and I had two guest singers coming up and down from the stage. So in total five and it's a completely different approach. I was playing 100 % Lost Frequencies music, including also some remixes that I did for some artists.   How did you mix that the way you did? Like where did it come from as a new show?  It was hard to put everything in session.When I was in Miami with my manager we were going from A to B during Miami music week and then suddenly a track comes up and he goes like »this is a good track to remix«. So I started talking with some guys in London, where they will record everything, like the vocals, the trunk beds, the guitars, everything. And so I get all the stems and I can really work out an umbilical remix.    You released your second album »Alive and Feeling Fine« in October 2019. Could you tell us more about this album and your new projects?  So under the new album I wanted to put two CDs. There is one CD, which is more straightforward, more of the typical Lost Frequencies sound. Like maybe you are expecting it with a little bit more electronic sounding strikes. And then on the second CD it's more the Lost Frequencies sound in the clubs and festivals, in any of the live shows, which is really more electronic music, but still with the end vocals. Now for the last two, three years I've been playing more electro in my sets than on my first album. And I think people got used to it now.   You have also released your own label under Armada, »Found Frequencies«. How do you source talent yourself for finding new DJs and new talents?  I tried to work also with bigger acts to release tracks on the label. But I have a demo address, where I get a lot of demos from everywhere in the world. But it's funny, because most of the artists I sign, they don't come through demos, they come through connections from people like »Hey, maybe you should listen to this« or »Oh, this guy on SoundCloud's putting up some tracks and it sounds nice«. So we signed him and we released some music, but it's mostly if I like the music then I'm going to release it. It can be very indie dance and it can be more deep house. It stays very melodic and for me it's important that I have to be able to play the message.    What is your integral role with Tomorrowland and how does it make you feel performing at such a big festival?  My manager works with Tomorrowland, so he has a good connection with the guys and thanks to that I've been able to perform for the last four or five years at Tomorrowland. For me, of course, it's an amazing experience because it's only 40 minutes away from my home, in my homecountry. It's one of the biggest festivals, atrium music in the world. It's an amazing festival and the vibe is really great. I've never been as a festival goer, so the first time I went as an artist and I played. I was so scared, I was just looking at the texts for the most of the set. Now, I know the guys from the organization, so I go there and it's super relaxed and I have such a great time. It's bigger and bigger every year, it's crazy.    Based on your social media and everything you are very fashion involved as well. Could you perhaps say, where do you source your inspiration for fashion from?  I have the chance to travel a lot and every time I travel maybe someone promotes a store, like which is the store I need to go to. Then if I find something I like, it is it. There's one really good one called Four, it's one of the best I think and would highly recommend it.    What else can we expect from you after your new album and your tour? Is there anything else exciting coming up? I want to challenge myself and I've been in contact with more underground people in the last few months. It's funny because I feel like all the boundaries between genres are kind of blurring and going away, because the techno scene before was really like you have to be a techno DJ to be able to be in that scene. But now I have some techno guys or melodic upcoming underground guys that talk to me and they say »Oh, we like your music« even though it's not completely their genre. I'm going to try to work with them and try to do something out of the box for me and most of them and try to do a little EP, like four tracks, which will be more clubby.   Lost Frequencies is such a cool name. I know a little bit about the story behind it, but can you tell me yourself?  In the very beginning, I had a few different projects and then at some point I really wanted to work with vocals, but I was only a bedroom producer. So the only way for me to get vocals, it was to do remixes. So I started to do releases of all tracks that I used to love and take them back and do like a clubby version of those tracks. And those old tracks would be the Lost Frequencies.   At what age did you realize you were passionate about music and when did you start to produce by yourself?  In Belgium and also in Ireland illustrate music is really big. So since I was very young, when I was 11 or 12 years old, I was the only one in my class listening to electronic music. It was when Fedde Le Grand came out with Put your hands up for Detroit. I was like »this kind of music is pretty nice« and so I really started to get into it. Then I went to boarding school and when I was at the boarding school, there were only boys. Everybody was really into electronic music, I had five DJs in my room. It was a thing to go back home for the weekend, then you came back and everybody had new tracks, we shared a lot of this music and that was when Avicii and all those guys were coming up and it was really an exciting moment, you know. And then when I came back from boarding school, I got my first laptop and on there was GarageBand, so I started working on GarageBand, finding out how everything worked. My piano teacher was also a sound engineer and since I'm a keyboard player, that really helped me.   If you weren't a DJ, what else would you do in life?  Now with the live show, I discovered something that I really like is a front house sound engineer, mixing the show. Like when we mix the live show, I go in front of house, I listen to the mix and I do the mixed show. You can do a kick louder, you put the vocal rebuttal, you compress little things and I really love to play with the sounds. Long story short; I think I would still be in the music industry. For tour schedule please visit - https://www.facebook.com/LostFrequenciesMusic/app/123966167614127/ Felix De Laet, better known by his moniker Lost Frequencies, has soared to success in the international music industry on many levels. Releasing his global smash hit ‘Are You With Me’ back in 2014 and quickly cementing himself as a name to watch, the track rapidly ascended by hitting multi-platinum status and taking the #1 spot in 18 countries.  Lost Frequencies was the first Belgian artist to secure his first 5 hit singles charting at the #1 spot on the Ultra top official Belgian charts, as well as the first Belgian artist to hit #1 in the UK, he went on to release his long-awaited debut album ‘Less Is More’ in 2016 via Armin Van Buuren’s iconic Armada imprint that dazzled globally, certifying a future star for the next generation. Lost Frequencies also firmly established himself as one of the strongest, fastest rising talents with his debut entry into the 2017 DJ Mag poll at #26, the highest new entry of any artist that year. You touch people's hearts with your music, which's great. I would like to ask you about the show, since this was your first live tour. What could you tell us about it?  Yeah, it's different from what you're used to, because all three of us were going to be on stage; the drummer, a guitarist and I. Everything was more electronic sounding and I had two guest singers coming up and down from the stage. So in total five and it's a completely different approach. I was playing 100 % Lost Frequencies music, including also some remixes that I did for some artists.   How did you mix that the way you did? Like where did it come from as a new show?  It was hard to put everything in session.When I was in Miami with my manager we were going from A to B during Miami music week and then suddenly a track comes up and he goes like »this is a good track to remix«. So I started talking with some guys in London, where they will record everything, like the vocals, the trunk beds, the guitars, everything. And so I get all the stems and I can really work out an umbilical remix.    You released your second album »Alive and Feeling Fine« in October 2019. Could you tell us more about this album and your new projects?  So under the new album I wanted to put two CDs. There is one CD, which is more straightforward, more of the typical Lost Frequencies sound. Like maybe you are expecting it with a little bit more electronic sounding strikes. And then on the second CD it's more the Lost Frequencies sound in the clubs and festivals, in any of the live shows, which is really more electronic music, but still with the end vocals. Now for the last two, three years I've been playing more electro in my sets than on my first album. And I think people got used to it now.   You have also released your own label under Armada, »Found Frequencies«. How do you source talent yourself for finding new DJs and new talents?  I tried to work also with bigger acts to release tracks on the label. But I have a demo address, where I get a lot of demos from everywhere in the world. But it's funny, because most of the artists I sign, they don't come through demos, they come through connections from people like »Hey, maybe you should listen to this« or »Oh, this guy on SoundCloud's putting up some tracks and it sounds nice«. So we signed him and we released some music, but it's mostly if I like the music then I'm going to release it. It can be very indie dance and it can be more deep house. It stays very melodic and for me it's important that I have to be able to play the message.    What is your integral role with Tomorrowland and how does it make you feel performing at such a big festival?  My manager works with Tomorrowland, so he has a good connection with the guys and thanks to that I've been able to perform for the last four or five years at Tomorrowland. For me, of course, it's an amazing experience because it's only 40 minutes away from my home, in my homecountry. It's one of the biggest festivals, atrium music in the world. It's an amazing festival and the vibe is really great. I've never been as a festival goer, so the first time I went as an artist and I played. I was so scared, I was just looking at the texts for the most of the set. Now, I know the guys from the organization, so I go there and it's super relaxed and I have such a great time. It's bigger and bigger every year, it's crazy.    Based on your social media and everything you are very fashion involved as well. Could you perhaps say, where do you source your inspiration for fashion from?  I have the chance to travel a lot and every time I travel maybe someone promotes a store, like which is the store I need to go to. Then if I find something I like, it is it. There's one really good one called Four, it's one of the best I think and would highly recommend it.    What else can we expect from you after your new album and your tour? Is there anything else exciting coming up? I want to challenge myself and I've been in contact with more underground people in the last few months. It's funny because I feel like all the boundaries between genres are kind of blurring and going away, because the techno scene before was really like you have to be a techno DJ to be able to be in that scene. But now I have some techno guys or melodic upcoming underground guys that talk to me and they say »Oh, we like your music« even though it's not completely their genre. I'm going to try to work with them and try to do something out of the box for me and most of them and try to do a little EP, like four tracks, which will be more clubby.   Lost Frequencies is such a cool name. I know a little bit about the story behind it, but can you tell me yourself?  In the very beginning, I had a few different projects and then at some point I really wanted to work with vocals, but I was only a bedroom producer. So the only way for me to get vocals, it was to do remixes. So I started to do releases of all tracks that I used to love and take them back and do like a clubby version of those tracks. And those old tracks would be the Lost Frequencies.   At what age did you realize you were passionate about music and when did you start to produce by yourself?  In Belgium and also in Ireland illustrate music is really big. So since I was very young, when I was 11 or 12 years old, I was the only one in my class listening to electronic music. It was when Fedde Le Grand came out with Put your hands up for Detroit. I was like »this kind of music is pretty nice« and so I really started to get into it. Then I went to boarding school and when I was at the boarding school, there were only boys. Everybody was really into electronic music, I had five DJs in my room. It was a thing to go back home for the weekend, then you came back and everybody had new tracks, we shared a lot of this music and that was when Avicii and all those guys were coming up and it was really an exciting moment, you know. And then when I came back from boarding school, I got my first laptop and on there was GarageBand, so I started working on GarageBand, finding out how everything worked. My piano teacher was also a sound engineer and since I'm a keyboard player, that really helped me.   If you weren't a DJ, what else would you do in life?  Now with the live show, I discovered something that I really like is a front house sound engineer, mixing the show. Like when we mix the live show, I go in front of house, I listen to the mix and I do the mixed show. You can do a kick louder, you put the vocal rebuttal, you compress little things and I really love to play with the sounds. Long story short; I think I would still be in the music industry. For tour schedule please visit - https://www.facebook.com/LostFrequenciesMusic/app/123966167614127/

Taiwan
65

Taiwan

Travel Exclusive travel story photographed by Ashley Soong. Exclusive travel story photographed by Ashley Soong.

A.P.C. & Persol announce collaboration
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A.P.C. & Persol announce collaboration

Accessories For their first collaboration in half a century, Persol worked with A.P.C. on three color variants for their iconic 649 model. It was originally designed in 1957 for tram-drivers in Torino, Italy, but became legendary when Marcello Mastroianni wore them in the movie Divorce, Italian Style in 1961. With A.P.C., Persol worked on three new acetate colors: transparent green with gradient brown lens, transparent brown with gradient green lens and matte white with grey gradient lens. The sunglasses come in canvas and brown leather cases. A special campaign was shot by Sam Rock at the A.P.C. headquarters with A.P.C. founder Jean Touitou, Metronomy singer Joseph Mount and Sky Ferreira. The campaign is also accompanied by a set of four videos. “I really enjoy wearing sunglasses when it is sunny outside. These ones can be used to simply bare with every day light, just like Kurt Cobain had to. He has become the inspiration for those white frames the venerable Maison Persol agreed to do with us.” — Jean Touitou, A.P.C. “Both the story and philosophy of A.P.C. have much in common with those of Persol. We are two brands granting as much importance to beauty and craft as to simple functionality.” – Niels van Geet, Persol.   In stores from February 7th. For their first collaboration in half a century, Persol worked with A.P.C. on three color variants for their iconic 649 model. It was originally designed in 1957 for tram-drivers in Torino, Italy, but became legendary when Marcello Mastroianni wore them in the movie Divorce, Italian Style in 1961. With A.P.C., Persol worked on three new acetate colors: transparent green with gradient brown lens, transparent brown with gradient green lens and matte white with grey gradient lens. The sunglasses come in canvas and brown leather cases. A special campaign was shot by Sam Rock at the A.P.C. headquarters with A.P.C. founder Jean Touitou, Metronomy singer Joseph Mount and Sky Ferreira. The campaign is also accompanied by a set of four videos. “I really enjoy wearing sunglasses when it is sunny outside. These ones can be used to simply bare with every day light, just like Kurt Cobain had to. He has become the inspiration for those white frames the venerable Maison Persol agreed to do with us.” — Jean Touitou, A.P.C. “Both the story and philosophy of A.P.C. have much in common with those of Persol. We are two brands granting as much importance to beauty and craft as to simple functionality.” – Niels van Geet, Persol.   In stores from February 7th.

"It's what you do. Or don't."
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"It's what you do. Or don't."

Fashion With the streetwear campaign “It’s what you do. Or Don’t”, online fashion destination Zalando shows what it really means to express yourself through fashion. In a series of stylish urban films and ads, photographer Vitali Gelwich, director Daniel Wårdh, and stylist Corey Stokes, tell the story of a group of charismatic streetwear personalities in unexpected situations, mixing and matching Zalando streetwear and showing what liberation through fashion really means. In the campaign, we meet a motley crew of expressive streetwear in influencers: Parisian Jean-Jacques N’djoli with his irreplaceable Instagram profile and an impeccable sense of style, Berlin street fashionista and sneaker collector Dilan Kolkilic, the Swedish model Linnea Öhlund with a knack for the street savy model off duty look, and the master of over the top mixing and matching Joël Kurasinski from Valencia. They’re all curating their own eclectic mix of outfits from Zalando, as the campaign inspires people to discover and develop their own streetwear style. On the theme “It’s what you do. Or don’t”, the campaign shows our in influencers in outfits and situations that first look a certain way – but soon turn out to be something completely different. Playing with contrasts, juxtapositions and shifting perspectives. Showing how streetwear is all in the eye of the beholder, all up to you what you want to express, or not. In “Climb mountains. Or don’t”, Jean-Jacques in ski goggles is moving upwards against a blue sky giving the impression that he is hiking, only to reveal he’s actually walking up a set of outdoor stairs in an urban setting. In “Join the running team. Or don’t”, we see Dilan and Linnea tying their sneakers as a bunch of sporty joggers run by – zoom out and it’s clear that running is the last thing they’ll do, the sneakers are just a part of their ever so urban park outfit. “Be a benchwarmer. Or don’t” shows the gang dribbling a basketball on the sidelines of a court. Zoom out, and we see they’re all wearing VR goggles – fully engaged in their own world and definitely not on any bench. And on it goes in“Be fancy. Or don’t”,“Keep it minimal. Or don’t”and so on. With humor and style, the films show that streetwear has no rules, it’s not a set style or specia brands. It’s all about personal choices and maximum individual expression. This is Gen Z fashion for people who go their own way: eclectic, postmodern samplers and collaborators who get their inspiration from everywhere and everyone – and make it their own. Strong characters who mix and match their own unique way, high and low, old and new, niche and mainstream. Always de ning and re-defining themselves, always evolving, always making a statement. Or not. Produced by ACNE, the creative team has been handpicked for their unique mix of strong vision, fashion  and understanding of street culture. Photographer Vitali Gelwich is a Berlin based artist and fashion photographer, known for his raw documentary style and organic mix of high fashion and street culture. Stockholm based director Daniel Wårdh is a Vans sponsored skateboarder who combines the attitude and tempo of street culture with his passion for music and fashion. Stylist Corey Stokes is a super in influencer and art director, stylist and fashion editor at Highsnobiety. Re-imagining fashion for the good of all, the new Zalando campaign “It’s what you do. Or don’t.” is a loud, fun, and highly personal celebration of our differences – the pursuit of individual expression, to the rhythm of the street. Mixing and matching your own way, creating your own unique combinations like no one else. A unique fashion statement that’s individual, liberating and democratic. By highlighting the endless combinations and interpretations curated by the in influencers, the “It’s what you do. Or don’t.” campaign highlights how Zalando’s wide range of streetwear inspires and enables people to express their personality through fashion, combining and creating unique outfits in personal ways. Streetwear is rooted in being effortless cool and not looking like you’re trying too hard. It’s a mish-mash of everything and anything. It’s nostalgia and contemporary. New and thrifted. Mixing luxury with everyday casual. Completely bold or utterly au natural. One part super thoughtout, another part super random. And it might seem like there’s no thought at all behind it. But that’s the thing. There is. Streetwear is about being unique and real, expressing yourself, whatever it takes. It’s about finding inspiration where no one else is looking. Or where everyone’s looking. It’s about combos that makes sense just because they don’t. Or out ts that don’t make sense just because they do. It’s about constantly refreshing – or not refreshing at all. About having one look today and then never again. Or the same look every day. That’s the beautiful contradiction of the streetwear attitude. Be ugly, be bold, be weird. Or don’t. Be cute, be pretty, be completely undetermined. Or don’t. Go full denim. Or don’t. Be expressive. Or don’t. It’s what you do. Or don’t.   With the streetwear campaign “It’s what you do. Or Don’t”, online fashion destination Zalando shows what it really means to express yourself through fashion. In a series of stylish urban films and ads, photographer Vitali Gelwich, director Daniel Wårdh, and stylist Corey Stokes, tell the story of a group of charismatic streetwear personalities in unexpected situations, mixing and matching Zalando streetwear and showing what liberation through fashion really means. In the campaign, we meet a motley crew of expressive streetwear in influencers: Parisian Jean-Jacques N’djoli with his irreplaceable Instagram profile and an impeccable sense of style, Berlin street fashionista and sneaker collector Dilan Kolkilic, the Swedish model Linnea Öhlund with a knack for the street savy model off duty look, and the master of over the top mixing and matching Joël Kurasinski from Valencia. They’re all curating their own eclectic mix of outfits from Zalando, as the campaign inspires people to discover and develop their own streetwear style. On the theme “It’s what you do. Or don’t”, the campaign shows our in influencers in outfits and situations that first look a certain way – but soon turn out to be something completely different. Playing with contrasts, juxtapositions and shifting perspectives. Showing how streetwear is all in the eye of the beholder, all up to you what you want to express, or not. In “Climb mountains. Or don’t”, Jean-Jacques in ski goggles is moving upwards against a blue sky giving the impression that he is hiking, only to reveal he’s actually walking up a set of outdoor stairs in an urban setting. In “Join the running team. Or don’t”, we see Dilan and Linnea tying their sneakers as a bunch of sporty joggers run by – zoom out and it’s clear that running is the last thing they’ll do, the sneakers are just a part of their ever so urban park outfit. “Be a benchwarmer. Or don’t” shows the gang dribbling a basketball on the sidelines of a court. Zoom out, and we see they’re all wearing VR goggles – fully engaged in their own world and definitely not on any bench. And on it goes in“Be fancy. Or don’t”,“Keep it minimal. Or don’t”and so on. With humor and style, the films show that streetwear has no rules, it’s not a set style or specia brands. It’s all about personal choices and maximum individual expression. This is Gen Z fashion for people who go their own way: eclectic, postmodern samplers and collaborators who get their inspiration from everywhere and everyone – and make it their own. Strong characters who mix and match their own unique way, high and low, old and new, niche and mainstream. Always de ning and re-defining themselves, always evolving, always making a statement. Or not. Produced by ACNE, the creative team has been handpicked for their unique mix of strong vision, fashion  and understanding of street culture. Photographer Vitali Gelwich is a Berlin based artist and fashion photographer, known for his raw documentary style and organic mix of high fashion and street culture. Stockholm based director Daniel Wårdh is a Vans sponsored skateboarder who combines the attitude and tempo of street culture with his passion for music and fashion. Stylist Corey Stokes is a super in influencer and art director, stylist and fashion editor at Highsnobiety. Re-imagining fashion for the good of all, the new Zalando campaign “It’s what you do. Or don’t.” is a loud, fun, and highly personal celebration of our differences – the pursuit of individual expression, to the rhythm of the street. Mixing and matching your own way, creating your own unique combinations like no one else. A unique fashion statement that’s individual, liberating and democratic. By highlighting the endless combinations and interpretations curated by the in influencers, the “It’s what you do. Or don’t.” campaign highlights how Zalando’s wide range of streetwear inspires and enables people to express their personality through fashion, combining and creating unique outfits in personal ways. Streetwear is rooted in being effortless cool and not looking like you’re trying too hard. It’s a mish-mash of everything and anything. It’s nostalgia and contemporary. New and thrifted. Mixing luxury with everyday casual. Completely bold or utterly au natural. One part super thoughtout, another part super random. And it might seem like there’s no thought at all behind it. But that’s the thing. There is. Streetwear is about being unique and real, expressing yourself, whatever it takes. It’s about finding inspiration where no one else is looking. Or where everyone’s looking. It’s about combos that makes sense just because they don’t. Or out ts that don’t make sense just because they do. It’s about constantly refreshing – or not refreshing at all. About having one look today and then never again. Or the same look every day. That’s the beautiful contradiction of the streetwear attitude. Be ugly, be bold, be weird. Or don’t. Be cute, be pretty, be completely undetermined. Or don’t. Go full denim. Or don’t. Be expressive. Or don’t. It’s what you do. Or don’t.  

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