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Exclusive editoral "Adam. No Eve."
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Exclusive editoral "Adam. No Eve."

Men Exclusive editoria, captured by Paul Scala.   TEAM CREDITS: Photographer @paulscala Grooming @jimmyowenjones Model @michaelyerger Set Design @ciaranlindenbeale Exclusive editoria, captured by Paul Scala.   TEAM CREDITS: Photographer @paulscala Grooming @jimmyowenjones Model @michaelyerger Set Design @ciaranlindenbeale

Exclusive editorial "Depersonalisation"
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Exclusive editorial "Depersonalisation"

Fashion Exclusive editorial, captured by Robin Berglund.     Credits:  Photographer: Robin Berglund @ https://www.instagram.com/robbinberglund/ Model: Emma Elsässer  Makeup: Josefine Vesterlund @ https://www.instagram.com/j.vesterlund/ Exclusive editorial, captured by Robin Berglund.     Credits:  Photographer: Robin Berglund @ https://www.instagram.com/robbinberglund/ Model: Emma Elsässer  Makeup: Josefine Vesterlund @ https://www.instagram.com/j.vesterlund/

A conversation between  Pauline Chalamet and Frederic Monceau
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A conversation between Pauline Chalamet and Frederic Monceau

Photography A conversation between Pauline Chalamet and Frederic Monceau.     Fred to Pauline : You live between New York and Paris. What would you borrow from these two cultures if you had to create one in-between?   This question. Ha! It’s tricky. I’ll make it short: I would take my life in Paris and sprinkle hardworking, positive, no-bulllshit New York energy in my work. And I would add a few coffee breaks.    Pauline to Fred : Your work has brought you EVERYWHERE from Los Angeles to Moscow and New York to Bangkok, where you had your latest exhibition. I assume as work starts to pick up again you will start to travel again. Where do you feel the most inspired to create your work? Has Covid-19 changed any of the ways in which you think about your work?   It is true that I have traveled a lot and I feel like a citizen of the world. Honestly, Los Angeles has a special energy that makes me want to create more. I love living in Paris, the lights are beautiful, the lifestyle is calmer. People have this artistic dimension and it is a city that is international enough to create great projects. But Paris doesn't have the energy you can find in Los Angeles or London. In Los Angeles, every street is cinematically interesting. Covid-19 and the overall world situation today hasn't really changed the way I work. I think the creative process remains the same. The conditions under which we have to create have changed because there are certain rules to be observed but the main subject of creation remains the same. I think we have to learn to live with new things that were unknown before, we must not completely change the way we do things, but just be able to adapt and evolve by protecting our creativity.   Fred to Pauline : I first met you after a play reading you did at the Studio Théâtre d’Asnières a few years ago. Are you still passionate about theater now that the cinema is more present in your life? How do you relate to these two disciplines ?   The first play I saw after quarantine was Littoral by Wajdi Mouawad at La Colline in Paris. The play starts with chairs coming down from the ceiling and then a monologue by a young woman. I cried as soon as the actress opened her mouth to speak. Really cried. In that moment I realized that I had terribly missed the power of live storytelling over the past few months. Something about the sharing and exchanging and listening that is just…unlike anything else. I am preemptively excited for the next opportunity to be on stage. In terms of how I relate to these two mediums… I don’t think much has changed. I only feel like I’m learning more with every project. In film I am awed by all of the moving pieces that come together to tell a story. I feel that the energy loop is more intimate. In theater much of the work is done in the rehearsal process and by the time you’re on stage in front of an audience you are playing, the story is yours to share in the present moment. It is a great gift.      Pauline to Fred : I’ve had the honor of experiencing first hand the comforting energy you exude behind your lens in the studio. Have you ever thought of moving from still photographs to le septième art ?   More and more, I want to make movies ! To tell a story. The cinema offers incredible possibilities that I can't wait to explore. I also have the intuition that we will work together one day! You know what I think about you Pauline and it would be an honor if you could play in something I create. The direction of photography in a film is so important. I love films that have a particular aesthetic. I love the work of Darius Khondji, Christopher Doyle or Steven Soderbergh. I would love to work on the artistic and photographic direction of a film or direct my own feature film. I still have time! Let's see where life takes me.   Fred to Pauline :  I know you are a person committed to equality and justice. The past few years, the industry has been shaken with the #MeToo movement. How do you feel today as a woman in the film industry ?   I think things are changing and more progress needs to be made. The movement is helping me be more aware of what it’s like to be a woman in this industry and in society generally. It’s helping me find courage to speak up and out and apologize less for doing so. I like to use this image: Power is a circle of men holding hands at the top of a mountain and all women (Black women, women of color, trans women, ALL womxn) need access to reach the peek. Once we get there, men have to let go of each other’s hands, give us a little room and let us find our place in the circle. Power must be shared, and the status quo will change.   I think most men want a fair and just society but don’t realize that there is work they need to do. There’s often a lack of awareness of how they, perhaps unknowingly, play into the status quo.    Pauline to Fred : I know that you have worked with Rose McGowan who has courageously spoken out about her experience(s) of abuse and about the sexism that abounds in the film industry. What do you think about the role of men in this fight for justice?   I love Rose and have been fortunate enough to work with her. I am proud that she managed to find the energy to speak and fight. She is an example and an incredible woman ! The situation of women in the film or fashion industry does not only concern women but concerns everyone! We should be all concerned by fighting for justice and making the world better. There should be no gender in the struggle for equality and justice and we should live in a world where the feminist does not need to exist. Unfortunately, things are not perfect and the fight for rights and equality is not over. Regarding men, they must take their responsibilities and get out of their comfort zones to change the situation. Men should no longer be silent. Defending the rights of women in the entertainment industry is about defending the rights of women in all industries. We have a duty to set an example. Men must dissociate themselves from inappropriate behavior, they must be a support, listen and talk.    Fred to Pauline : You always have a book with you when I see you ! What are you currently reading and what would you recommend to me?   My favorite question! Currently I’m reading two books: Ingmar Bergman’s autobiography Laterna Magica and Iris Brey’s Le Regard Féminin (but just so you don’t think I only read literature related to cinema, last week I finished Homegoing by Cynthia Voigt and Hugo’s Les Misérables which I had started this summer). A book you should read, Freddy, is James Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room. I think you’re really going to enjoy that. And then we can talk about it. Like a book club!   Pauline to Fred : Has a piece of literature ever inspired your artwork?   I think inspiration comes from a multitude of different things that surround us or that are internal to us. The literature and the various books I have read have impacted me and helped create the person I am. Literature therefore logically influenced me in my work and inspired me because it outlined my personality like many other art forms that I have encountered (cinema, painting, etc.). I don't know if some books have inspired me more than others, but I can share some of my favorite books with you (I only know the french titles versions) ! I would say, “confidences à allah” of Saphia Azzeddine, “le sumo qui ne voulait pas grossir” of Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt, “Jonathan Livingston - le Goéland” of Richard Bach, etc.    Fred to Pauline : What is your definition of art?   I think my answer to this will always be different. Right now I’ll say that I think art is anything that calls upon the use of imagination to bring humans together.    Pauline to Fred : What is your definition of art?    Art is an extension of our soul that collides with society. Art is an essential part of a successful life. art has this exceptional and particular capacity to be able to express the indescribable. It allows the awakening of the senses and allows you to feel alive, rather than just survive.  If we take a step back and talk about art in the conceptual sense of the term, we can say that art is essential and what makes human “human”. A conversation between Pauline Chalamet and Frederic Monceau.     Fred to Pauline : You live between New York and Paris. What would you borrow from these two cultures if you had to create one in-between?   This question. Ha! It’s tricky. I’ll make it short: I would take my life in Paris and sprinkle hardworking, positive, no-bulllshit New York energy in my work. And I would add a few coffee breaks.    Pauline to Fred : Your work has brought you EVERYWHERE from Los Angeles to Moscow and New York to Bangkok, where you had your latest exhibition. I assume as work starts to pick up again you will start to travel again. Where do you feel the most inspired to create your work? Has Covid-19 changed any of the ways in which you think about your work?   It is true that I have traveled a lot and I feel like a citizen of the world. Honestly, Los Angeles has a special energy that makes me want to create more. I love living in Paris, the lights are beautiful, the lifestyle is calmer. People have this artistic dimension and it is a city that is international enough to create great projects. But Paris doesn't have the energy you can find in Los Angeles or London. In Los Angeles, every street is cinematically interesting. Covid-19 and the overall world situation today hasn't really changed the way I work. I think the creative process remains the same. The conditions under which we have to create have changed because there are certain rules to be observed but the main subject of creation remains the same. I think we have to learn to live with new things that were unknown before, we must not completely change the way we do things, but just be able to adapt and evolve by protecting our creativity.   Fred to Pauline : I first met you after a play reading you did at the Studio Théâtre d’Asnières a few years ago. Are you still passionate about theater now that the cinema is more present in your life? How do you relate to these two disciplines ?   The first play I saw after quarantine was Littoral by Wajdi Mouawad at La Colline in Paris. The play starts with chairs coming down from the ceiling and then a monologue by a young woman. I cried as soon as the actress opened her mouth to speak. Really cried. In that moment I realized that I had terribly missed the power of live storytelling over the past few months. Something about the sharing and exchanging and listening that is just…unlike anything else. I am preemptively excited for the next opportunity to be on stage. In terms of how I relate to these two mediums… I don’t think much has changed. I only feel like I’m learning more with every project. In film I am awed by all of the moving pieces that come together to tell a story. I feel that the energy loop is more intimate. In theater much of the work is done in the rehearsal process and by the time you’re on stage in front of an audience you are playing, the story is yours to share in the present moment. It is a great gift.      Pauline to Fred : I’ve had the honor of experiencing first hand the comforting energy you exude behind your lens in the studio. Have you ever thought of moving from still photographs to le septième art ?   More and more, I want to make movies ! To tell a story. The cinema offers incredible possibilities that I can't wait to explore. I also have the intuition that we will work together one day! You know what I think about you Pauline and it would be an honor if you could play in something I create. The direction of photography in a film is so important. I love films that have a particular aesthetic. I love the work of Darius Khondji, Christopher Doyle or Steven Soderbergh. I would love to work on the artistic and photographic direction of a film or direct my own feature film. I still have time! Let's see where life takes me.   Fred to Pauline :  I know you are a person committed to equality and justice. The past few years, the industry has been shaken with the #MeToo movement. How do you feel today as a woman in the film industry ?   I think things are changing and more progress needs to be made. The movement is helping me be more aware of what it’s like to be a woman in this industry and in society generally. It’s helping me find courage to speak up and out and apologize less for doing so. I like to use this image: Power is a circle of men holding hands at the top of a mountain and all women (Black women, women of color, trans women, ALL womxn) need access to reach the peek. Once we get there, men have to let go of each other’s hands, give us a little room and let us find our place in the circle. Power must be shared, and the status quo will change.   I think most men want a fair and just society but don’t realize that there is work they need to do. There’s often a lack of awareness of how they, perhaps unknowingly, play into the status quo.    Pauline to Fred : I know that you have worked with Rose McGowan who has courageously spoken out about her experience(s) of abuse and about the sexism that abounds in the film industry. What do you think about the role of men in this fight for justice?   I love Rose and have been fortunate enough to work with her. I am proud that she managed to find the energy to speak and fight. She is an example and an incredible woman ! The situation of women in the film or fashion industry does not only concern women but concerns everyone! We should be all concerned by fighting for justice and making the world better. There should be no gender in the struggle for equality and justice and we should live in a world where the feminist does not need to exist. Unfortunately, things are not perfect and the fight for rights and equality is not over. Regarding men, they must take their responsibilities and get out of their comfort zones to change the situation. Men should no longer be silent. Defending the rights of women in the entertainment industry is about defending the rights of women in all industries. We have a duty to set an example. Men must dissociate themselves from inappropriate behavior, they must be a support, listen and talk.    Fred to Pauline : You always have a book with you when I see you ! What are you currently reading and what would you recommend to me?   My favorite question! Currently I’m reading two books: Ingmar Bergman’s autobiography Laterna Magica and Iris Brey’s Le Regard Féminin (but just so you don’t think I only read literature related to cinema, last week I finished Homegoing by Cynthia Voigt and Hugo’s Les Misérables which I had started this summer). A book you should read, Freddy, is James Baldwin’s Giovanni’s Room. I think you’re really going to enjoy that. And then we can talk about it. Like a book club!   Pauline to Fred : Has a piece of literature ever inspired your artwork?   I think inspiration comes from a multitude of different things that surround us or that are internal to us. The literature and the various books I have read have impacted me and helped create the person I am. Literature therefore logically influenced me in my work and inspired me because it outlined my personality like many other art forms that I have encountered (cinema, painting, etc.). I don't know if some books have inspired me more than others, but I can share some of my favorite books with you (I only know the french titles versions) ! I would say, “confidences à allah” of Saphia Azzeddine, “le sumo qui ne voulait pas grossir” of Eric-Emmanuel Schmitt, “Jonathan Livingston - le Goéland” of Richard Bach, etc.    Fred to Pauline : What is your definition of art?   I think my answer to this will always be different. Right now I’ll say that I think art is anything that calls upon the use of imagination to bring humans together.    Pauline to Fred : What is your definition of art?    Art is an extension of our soul that collides with society. Art is an essential part of a successful life. art has this exceptional and particular capacity to be able to express the indescribable. It allows the awakening of the senses and allows you to feel alive, rather than just survive.  If we take a step back and talk about art in the conceptual sense of the term, we can say that art is essential and what makes human “human”.

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Exclusive editorial starring Mike Gioia
538

Exclusive editorial starring Mike Gioia

Men Exclusive editorial, captured by Diane Zhao.     TEAM CREDITS: model: Mike Gioia - Ford Models grooming by: Agata Helena Exclusive editorial, captured by Diane Zhao.     TEAM CREDITS: model: Mike Gioia - Ford Models grooming by: Agata Helena

Dries Van Noten The collections for Women & Men S/S 2021
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Dries Van Noten The collections for Women & Men S/S 2021

Fashion Week Bold, optimistic, colourful, light, pure, fun, sculpted, easy, kinetic, frank, joyous, vivid, warm and stark, jubilant, powerful. A minimum od artifice. The visionary films of New Zealand artist Len Lye. He pioneered harnessing motion in art. Filmed in the 1920s–1940s, with colour painted and motives scratched on the celluloid, they were precursors of the psychedelia that would follow only forty years later. A fashion shoot by Viviane Sassen. An homage to the powerful role fashion editorial and imagery has played in fashion. The uplifting joy of a perfect moment. A bright windy, sunny day on the beach. Billowing pure white clouds race across a clear blue sky. Energy is high. The narrative of folklore is evoked with traditional embroidery techniques. A point of view shared for our collections for Women and Men.     FORM: The challenge was to capture movement and optimism in dress. Pure lines that span many attitudes of dress from the sublimation of couture to utility in workwear. From constructed balloon sleeves to a simple patch pocket chino. Many looks for women and men have shorts as a foundation. The lines between traditions of garment structure for men and women are blurred. High waisted skirts and pants. Exaggerated wide scooped necklines on constructed garments are mirrored in shirting. Vivid one-piece bathing suits for women for the first-ever time. Light caftans for the beach. Ties draw scalloped forms on backs.     FABRICS: The crisp and comforting simplicity of cottons. The airy light movement of organza. Contrasts in opacity and hand. Summer suiting and shirting, Large mesh, Silk organza bonded to linen, Casual sweats, chinos, silk cloque.   PRINT & EMBELLISHMENT: All printed motifs are derived from frames captured from the films of Len Lye. A new take on print and embroidery. A graphic play with light and shadow. The reality and illusion of dancing in a projection. Motifs from one printed garment invade another – prints from a skirt move onto the lapel of a jacket. What appear as simple stripes are shards of light cast through a louver shutter captured and printed. Stripes undulating across garments almost bring optical interference. The word ‘You’ is printed orembroidered on tops to encourage an end to the era of ‘Me’. The largecircle of a spotlight in vivid colours seems projected on the wearer. The romance of verdant green palm trees. The traditional craft of needlework in optic white. Laser cuts in leather seem as ‘Broderie Anglaise’ or lace. The exuberance of ruffles. Len Lye’s essay on movement in art is printed in its entirety on garments that will ‘drop’ later in the season.   ACCESSORIES:  Clutches seem caught in a vivid projection of colour and stripes. Shoes and open-toe sandals in Nappa leather mounted on our signature banana heel. Eyewear is colour coordinated with earrings and necklaces in micro beads.   PHOTOGRAPHY: Viviane Sassen   Bold, optimistic, colourful, light, pure, fun, sculpted, easy, kinetic, frank, joyous, vivid, warm and stark, jubilant, powerful. A minimum od artifice. The visionary films of New Zealand artist Len Lye. He pioneered harnessing motion in art. Filmed in the 1920s–1940s, with colour painted and motives scratched on the celluloid, they were precursors of the psychedelia that would follow only forty years later. A fashion shoot by Viviane Sassen. An homage to the powerful role fashion editorial and imagery has played in fashion. The uplifting joy of a perfect moment. A bright windy, sunny day on the beach. Billowing pure white clouds race across a clear blue sky. Energy is high. The narrative of folklore is evoked with traditional embroidery techniques. A point of view shared for our collections for Women and Men.     FORM: The challenge was to capture movement and optimism in dress. Pure lines that span many attitudes of dress from the sublimation of couture to utility in workwear. From constructed balloon sleeves to a simple patch pocket chino. Many looks for women and men have shorts as a foundation. The lines between traditions of garment structure for men and women are blurred. High waisted skirts and pants. Exaggerated wide scooped necklines on constructed garments are mirrored in shirting. Vivid one-piece bathing suits for women for the first-ever time. Light caftans for the beach. Ties draw scalloped forms on backs.     FABRICS: The crisp and comforting simplicity of cottons. The airy light movement of organza. Contrasts in opacity and hand. Summer suiting and shirting, Large mesh, Silk organza bonded to linen, Casual sweats, chinos, silk cloque.   PRINT & EMBELLISHMENT: All printed motifs are derived from frames captured from the films of Len Lye. A new take on print and embroidery. A graphic play with light and shadow. The reality and illusion of dancing in a projection. Motifs from one printed garment invade another – prints from a skirt move onto the lapel of a jacket. What appear as simple stripes are shards of light cast through a louver shutter captured and printed. Stripes undulating across garments almost bring optical interference. The word ‘You’ is printed orembroidered on tops to encourage an end to the era of ‘Me’. The largecircle of a spotlight in vivid colours seems projected on the wearer. The romance of verdant green palm trees. The traditional craft of needlework in optic white. Laser cuts in leather seem as ‘Broderie Anglaise’ or lace. The exuberance of ruffles. Len Lye’s essay on movement in art is printed in its entirety on garments that will ‘drop’ later in the season.   ACCESSORIES:  Clutches seem caught in a vivid projection of colour and stripes. Shoes and open-toe sandals in Nappa leather mounted on our signature banana heel. Eyewear is colour coordinated with earrings and necklaces in micro beads.   PHOTOGRAPHY: Viviane Sassen  

DIESEL Presents “Unforgettable Denim”
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DIESEL Presents “Unforgettable Denim”

Fashion DIESEL announces the launch of its Fall 2020 campaign, which is rooted into one of denim’s key, longstanding elements: memory. Denim gets better with experience and becomes a sort of wearable record of the times you’ve had. The pen marks on the pocket? Doodles during a long flight to a faraway location. The scrape at the hem? From a night spent partying in Berlin. Denim collects these moments no matter what; not even 2020 can cancel a great pair of jeans.    In what has been a generation-defining year, DIESEL invites people—the world over—to celebrate the beautiful memories made in lieu of the plans that had to be put on hold, and wear these unexpected highlights with pride. For all the trips, events, parties, plans, ceremonies and more that could not take place in 2020, we are finding the opportunity to tell the surprise stories the connections that were made, the fun that was had, and the positive silver linings.    At the center of the Fall 2020 campaign is DIESEL’s new customizable denim collection. Through a special portal on www.diesel.com—and in select stores worldwide—clients will be able to personalize the leather tags on denim with something they could not participate this year. The intention is to commemorate what they did notdo, and the memory-making moments that ensued in the absence of those plans. A birthday party called off? Celebrate it by remembering it. A surf trip postponed? Create a keepsake for what might have been and use it as inspiration to plan for a later date – always with your favorite, unforgettable denim.   The platform is multi-subject: dozens of video clips, with real life anecdotes, directed by Pantera of the group Anonymous Content, will live online and on social media. Key visuals have been created by JP Bonino and will feature DIESEL watches and eyewear in addition to ready-to-wear.    The 2-month platform will follow the stories of various talents, influential figures including Evan Mock, the skateboarder and model. Normally a resident of New York City, he chose to enter isolation in Mallorca, Spain, reconnecting with nature. Julia Fox, an Italian-American actress, found unexpectedly restored love during lockdown. Donte Colley looked inward and became more active in fighting for what’s right. These individuals were photographed by RAYSCORRUPTEDMIND.   And it doesn't stop here: DIESEL is also partnering with different canceled events, like UNTOLD Festival, one of the most renowned music festivals in the world, to create a series of limited-edition denim trousers called the 2020 Fallen Edition. UNTOLD has won the award for Best Major Festival in Europe from its inception. In a “normal” year, it is visited by more than 350,000 fans from across the globe. Those fans will hold 2020’s edition in their imagination – and in a pair of customized Diesel jeans. DIESEL announces the launch of its Fall 2020 campaign, which is rooted into one of denim’s key, longstanding elements: memory. Denim gets better with experience and becomes a sort of wearable record of the times you’ve had. The pen marks on the pocket? Doodles during a long flight to a faraway location. The scrape at the hem? From a night spent partying in Berlin. Denim collects these moments no matter what; not even 2020 can cancel a great pair of jeans.    In what has been a generation-defining year, DIESEL invites people—the world over—to celebrate the beautiful memories made in lieu of the plans that had to be put on hold, and wear these unexpected highlights with pride. For all the trips, events, parties, plans, ceremonies and more that could not take place in 2020, we are finding the opportunity to tell the surprise stories the connections that were made, the fun that was had, and the positive silver linings.    At the center of the Fall 2020 campaign is DIESEL’s new customizable denim collection. Through a special portal on www.diesel.com—and in select stores worldwide—clients will be able to personalize the leather tags on denim with something they could not participate this year. The intention is to commemorate what they did notdo, and the memory-making moments that ensued in the absence of those plans. A birthday party called off? Celebrate it by remembering it. A surf trip postponed? Create a keepsake for what might have been and use it as inspiration to plan for a later date – always with your favorite, unforgettable denim.   The platform is multi-subject: dozens of video clips, with real life anecdotes, directed by Pantera of the group Anonymous Content, will live online and on social media. Key visuals have been created by JP Bonino and will feature DIESEL watches and eyewear in addition to ready-to-wear.    The 2-month platform will follow the stories of various talents, influential figures including Evan Mock, the skateboarder and model. Normally a resident of New York City, he chose to enter isolation in Mallorca, Spain, reconnecting with nature. Julia Fox, an Italian-American actress, found unexpectedly restored love during lockdown. Donte Colley looked inward and became more active in fighting for what’s right. These individuals were photographed by RAYSCORRUPTEDMIND.   And it doesn't stop here: DIESEL is also partnering with different canceled events, like UNTOLD Festival, one of the most renowned music festivals in the world, to create a series of limited-edition denim trousers called the 2020 Fallen Edition. UNTOLD has won the award for Best Major Festival in Europe from its inception. In a “normal” year, it is visited by more than 350,000 fans from across the globe. Those fans will hold 2020’s edition in their imagination – and in a pair of customized Diesel jeans.

Digital cover story with actress KAT GRAHAM
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Digital cover story with actress KAT GRAHAM

Fashion Kat Graham, whose breakout role was staring as Bonnie Bennett in the hit tv show ”The Vampire Diaries”, is a Swiss-born American actress, singer, dancer, producer and humanitarian. She started her career at the early age of five, released her own music working with music titans Babyface and Prince, been involved in fashion and is an advocate for human rights, focusing on the refugee crisis with the UNHCR. Since becoming a teen idol on the show, Graham has gone on to films like ”How It Ends” alongside Forest Whitaker, ”Cut Throat City” alongside Ethan Hawke and Wesley Snipes, and making history as the worlds first African-American April O'Neil in the ”Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” series.      Exclusive digital cover story was captured by photographer Filip Koludrovic in Italy.   We had a delight speaking with Kat:   Kat, fans mostly know you through your work on ”The Vampire Diaries”. How has this role changed your career?    The role really gave me a platform internationally. It felt like Boot Camp honestly. We were doing 22 episodes a year for eight years. It was the hardest I have ever had to work on anything at that age. Right before booking the show I was touring with Will.i.am and The Black Eyed Peas. I definitely didn't think that my break was necessarily going to come from acting even though I had been acting longer than anything at that point. From that show, I was able to reach so many fans internationally, that I might not have had otherwise. I'm truly grateful for that experience. I learned so much about my craft, and also about my space in that show and the world as the only African-American in the cast.      You've been working with Dior as one of the faces of their campaign for their new series ”What's Ladylike” of their signature Lady Dior Bag. The series explores the diverse definitions and manifestations of a lady. How would you sum up this partnership?   Dior has always been a brand to me that represents strong women. Maria constantly pushes the boundaries on what is lady like? What is feminine? Who are we in our true essence? From pairing boots with skirts, to embracing African culture from hair to fabrics, Dior is truly a house of diversity and acceptance. I'm lucky and fiercely loyal to those women and that brand, because of who they are and what they represent for all women.      You've worked on PSA short film ”At Risk Youth” for Black Lives Matter 2 years ago, which landed you an Emmy nomination. The Black Lives matter movement is now more relevant and important than ever. What's your view on all that's been going on regarding this in 2020?   The murder of so many African-Americans by police forces in America is not only heartbreaking but a symptom of a deeply rooted system of injustice and discrimination in our society.  First, as an African-American actress in Hollywood, it is incredibly unfortunate and wildly oppressive that many black actors and actresses, such as myself, still to this day experience tokenism, marginalization, and are written without three-dimensional development that is so freely given to their white co-stars. It's infuriating and unacceptable. I deeply understand how important the black narrative is on film and television, as well as in music, which is why I have made the decisions that I have made in the past few years that support those narratives and have consciously chosen to not engage in projects and or with people that don't fit within that agenda.  More importantly, I want to focus on the issue at hand - end police brutality – and work through the many layers of racism that plague our society. Black lives are on the line. Right now, I want to use my voice to raise awareness for Breonna, George, Ahmaud and the many men and women who desperately need their stories told. We cannot take our focus off of this until meaningful change comes. I also want to focus my efforts on promoting solutions, such as investing in new approaches to community safety and holding officials accountable.      You're a strong advocate for human rights. You're a supporter of the United Nations High Commissioner of Refugees. What does supporting the UNHCR mean to you?   My father is eight generations Liberian. During the Liberian Civil War, my grandfather was lined up on the beach to be shot by the Charles Taylor regime. My mother is Russo-Polish, whose family fled Europe and the Holocaust. I'm half African, and half Ashkenazi, with my family living in Israel.  People who've had to find refuge in other countries in order to live a better life are prevalent in my family's history. As a result, I've made it my life mission to help raise awareness about the plight of refugees across the world. Worldwide, almost 80 million people have been forced to flee their homes because of war, conflict, persecution and human rights violations. Of those, 26 million are refugees. This is why in 2013, I joined the UNHCR - The UN refugee agency - as a High-Profile Supporter.  In the last few years, I met with Syrian refugees at the Za'atari camp in Jordan. I travelled along the Guatemala-Mexico border where I met women, children and families forced to flee their own countries to escape extreme gang violence. I visited with Somali refugees at the Melkadida camp in southern Ethiopia and travelled to Nakivale in Uganda. In all the time I was there, I met incredibly resolute, resourceful, graceful and smart people. All they wanted was the chance to stand on their own feet and show the world they had the strength to survive and to thrive. I want to give these people a voice and a chance to fulfill their potential.      In August, your action heist thriller ”Cut Throat City”, starring also Terrence Howard, Eiza Gonzalez and Wesley Snipes, finally premiered. Tell us more about this film.   ”Cut Throat City” isa film directed by RZA. I played Demyra in the film, the wife of Blink who is a struggling artist that sets out to carry out a heist with his friends, after the government neglects the 9th ward community post Hurricane Katrina. I really loved working on this film and it is probably the coolest project that I've done up-to-date.      What's next for you in film and TV?   My next film is Netflix‘s ”Operation Christmas Drop” out in November. I play a congressional aid that gets sent to the Anderson Air Force Base to shut down their mission. Fun fact, this is actually a real mission that the base does every year and is the longest running humanitarian airlift in the world to this day. This is my fourth Netflix project in the three years that I've done since wrapping TVD. I really love being a part of that family. Netflix does an incredible job of fighting for inclusion and uplifting and elevating Black talent across the board.      What do you hope to see come from the work you are doing?   I hope that through my work, whether taking photos, being in film and TV and what I've been focusing on in 2020 (which has me producing and co-founding of the Modern Nirvana wellness group), I'm able to bring empowerment and healing to the world. I hope that I'm able to give a voice to the voiceless and do it in a really creative and enlightening way, that brings more compassion and understanding to the world.      TEAM CREDITS: PHOTO AND ART DIRECTION: FILIP KOLUDROVIC STYLING : MARCO DE LUCIA @ LUISAVIAROMA HAIR AND MAKE UP: ELISA RAMPI PRODUCTION: FEDERICA FRAGNOLI @LUISAVIAROMA ALL FASHION: @LUISAVIAROMA SPECIAL THANKS TO CRISTIANA CANOSA @ COMUNE DI ORTONA A MARE (CH) FOR THE LOCATIONS EDITOR: TIMOTEJ LETONJA Kat Graham, whose breakout role was staring as Bonnie Bennett in the hit tv show ”The Vampire Diaries”, is a Swiss-born American actress, singer, dancer, producer and humanitarian. She started her career at the early age of five, released her own music working with music titans Babyface and Prince, been involved in fashion and is an advocate for human rights, focusing on the refugee crisis with the UNHCR. Since becoming a teen idol on the show, Graham has gone on to films like ”How It Ends” alongside Forest Whitaker, ”Cut Throat City” alongside Ethan Hawke and Wesley Snipes, and making history as the worlds first African-American April O'Neil in the ”Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles” series.      Exclusive digital cover story was captured by photographer Filip Koludrovic in Italy.   We had a delight speaking with Kat:   Kat, fans mostly know you through your work on ”The Vampire Diaries”. How has this role changed your career?    The role really gave me a platform internationally. It felt like Boot Camp honestly. We were doing 22 episodes a year for eight years. It was the hardest I have ever had to work on anything at that age. Right before booking the show I was touring with Will.i.am and The Black Eyed Peas. I definitely didn't think that my break was necessarily going to come from acting even though I had been acting longer than anything at that point. From that show, I was able to reach so many fans internationally, that I might not have had otherwise. I'm truly grateful for that experience. I learned so much about my craft, and also about my space in that show and the world as the only African-American in the cast.      You've been working with Dior as one of the faces of their campaign for their new series ”What's Ladylike” of their signature Lady Dior Bag. The series explores the diverse definitions and manifestations of a lady. How would you sum up this partnership?   Dior has always been a brand to me that represents strong women. Maria constantly pushes the boundaries on what is lady like? What is feminine? Who are we in our true essence? From pairing boots with skirts, to embracing African culture from hair to fabrics, Dior is truly a house of diversity and acceptance. I'm lucky and fiercely loyal to those women and that brand, because of who they are and what they represent for all women.      You've worked on PSA short film ”At Risk Youth” for Black Lives Matter 2 years ago, which landed you an Emmy nomination. The Black Lives matter movement is now more relevant and important than ever. What's your view on all that's been going on regarding this in 2020?   The murder of so many African-Americans by police forces in America is not only heartbreaking but a symptom of a deeply rooted system of injustice and discrimination in our society.  First, as an African-American actress in Hollywood, it is incredibly unfortunate and wildly oppressive that many black actors and actresses, such as myself, still to this day experience tokenism, marginalization, and are written without three-dimensional development that is so freely given to their white co-stars. It's infuriating and unacceptable. I deeply understand how important the black narrative is on film and television, as well as in music, which is why I have made the decisions that I have made in the past few years that support those narratives and have consciously chosen to not engage in projects and or with people that don't fit within that agenda.  More importantly, I want to focus on the issue at hand - end police brutality – and work through the many layers of racism that plague our society. Black lives are on the line. Right now, I want to use my voice to raise awareness for Breonna, George, Ahmaud and the many men and women who desperately need their stories told. We cannot take our focus off of this until meaningful change comes. I also want to focus my efforts on promoting solutions, such as investing in new approaches to community safety and holding officials accountable.      You're a strong advocate for human rights. You're a supporter of the United Nations High Commissioner of Refugees. What does supporting the UNHCR mean to you?   My father is eight generations Liberian. During the Liberian Civil War, my grandfather was lined up on the beach to be shot by the Charles Taylor regime. My mother is Russo-Polish, whose family fled Europe and the Holocaust. I'm half African, and half Ashkenazi, with my family living in Israel.  People who've had to find refuge in other countries in order to live a better life are prevalent in my family's history. As a result, I've made it my life mission to help raise awareness about the plight of refugees across the world. Worldwide, almost 80 million people have been forced to flee their homes because of war, conflict, persecution and human rights violations. Of those, 26 million are refugees. This is why in 2013, I joined the UNHCR - The UN refugee agency - as a High-Profile Supporter.  In the last few years, I met with Syrian refugees at the Za'atari camp in Jordan. I travelled along the Guatemala-Mexico border where I met women, children and families forced to flee their own countries to escape extreme gang violence. I visited with Somali refugees at the Melkadida camp in southern Ethiopia and travelled to Nakivale in Uganda. In all the time I was there, I met incredibly resolute, resourceful, graceful and smart people. All they wanted was the chance to stand on their own feet and show the world they had the strength to survive and to thrive. I want to give these people a voice and a chance to fulfill their potential.      In August, your action heist thriller ”Cut Throat City”, starring also Terrence Howard, Eiza Gonzalez and Wesley Snipes, finally premiered. Tell us more about this film.   ”Cut Throat City” isa film directed by RZA. I played Demyra in the film, the wife of Blink who is a struggling artist that sets out to carry out a heist with his friends, after the government neglects the 9th ward community post Hurricane Katrina. I really loved working on this film and it is probably the coolest project that I've done up-to-date.      What's next for you in film and TV?   My next film is Netflix‘s ”Operation Christmas Drop” out in November. I play a congressional aid that gets sent to the Anderson Air Force Base to shut down their mission. Fun fact, this is actually a real mission that the base does every year and is the longest running humanitarian airlift in the world to this day. This is my fourth Netflix project in the three years that I've done since wrapping TVD. I really love being a part of that family. Netflix does an incredible job of fighting for inclusion and uplifting and elevating Black talent across the board.      What do you hope to see come from the work you are doing?   I hope that through my work, whether taking photos, being in film and TV and what I've been focusing on in 2020 (which has me producing and co-founding of the Modern Nirvana wellness group), I'm able to bring empowerment and healing to the world. I hope that I'm able to give a voice to the voiceless and do it in a really creative and enlightening way, that brings more compassion and understanding to the world.      TEAM CREDITS: PHOTO AND ART DIRECTION: FILIP KOLUDROVIC STYLING : MARCO DE LUCIA @ LUISAVIAROMA HAIR AND MAKE UP: ELISA RAMPI PRODUCTION: FEDERICA FRAGNOLI @LUISAVIAROMA ALL FASHION: @LUISAVIAROMA SPECIAL THANKS TO CRISTIANA CANOSA @ COMUNE DI ORTONA A MARE (CH) FOR THE LOCATIONS EDITOR: TIMOTEJ LETONJA

Digital Cover story with actor Nolan Funk
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Digital Cover story with actor Nolan Funk

Men Exclusive editorial and digital cover of actor Nolan Funk, photographed by Kat Irlin.     TEAM CREDITS: photog - kat irlin (@kat_in_nyc) talent - nolan funk (@nolanfunk) talent - rachel connor (@rachelnconnor) styling - seppe tirabassi (@seppetirabassi) makeup - jodie boland (@jodieboland), hair - riad azar (@riadazar9), assistant - ros hayes (@roshaknie), shot at - splashlight studios (@splashlightstudios) editor: Timotej Letonja Exclusive editorial and digital cover of actor Nolan Funk, photographed by Kat Irlin.     TEAM CREDITS: photog - kat irlin (@kat_in_nyc) talent - nolan funk (@nolanfunk) talent - rachel connor (@rachelnconnor) styling - seppe tirabassi (@seppetirabassi) makeup - jodie boland (@jodieboland), hair - riad azar (@riadazar9), assistant - ros hayes (@roshaknie), shot at - splashlight studios (@splashlightstudios) editor: Timotej Letonja

"INTERLUDE" exclusive digital editorial
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"INTERLUDE" exclusive digital editorial

Fashion Exclusive editorial by Giuseppe Triscari.     TEAM CREDITS: Photography: Giuseppe Triscari Styling: Fabio Pittalis Casting: Giuseppe Triscari Hair: Giuseppe Lorusso @ Closeup Milano Make-up: Lorenzo Zavatta 1st Ph. Assistant: Marella Bessone 2nd Ph. Assistant: Bhagya Gaikwad St. Assistant: Gianluca Troncatti Models: Nikita@Ilovemodels and Kristo er@95mgmt Special thanks to Lidia Bianchi Exclusive editorial by Giuseppe Triscari.     TEAM CREDITS: Photography: Giuseppe Triscari Styling: Fabio Pittalis Casting: Giuseppe Triscari Hair: Giuseppe Lorusso @ Closeup Milano Make-up: Lorenzo Zavatta 1st Ph. Assistant: Marella Bessone 2nd Ph. Assistant: Bhagya Gaikwad St. Assistant: Gianluca Troncatti Models: Nikita@Ilovemodels and Kristo er@95mgmt Special thanks to Lidia Bianchi

In conversation with Damon Baker
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In conversation with Damon Baker

Photography Photographer Damon Baker known for signing with industry powerhouse  by the time he turned 18 years old. He has worked with the likes of Taylor Swift, Nicole Kidman, Jared Leto to name just a few. We had a pleasure speaking to him about his career, passion and life.      Damon, please tell us what does photography mean to you? Photography to me means freedom. It allows me to go deep within my emotions and draw from that place to translate my pain and darkness into something beautiful. Without that, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to understand myself.     Your work is mostly in black and white. What is behind your love of black & white photography? I’ve simply just always felt a deep connection to black and white photography. I think it relates to my emotions also, and that I don’t feel happy all the time nor do I feel sad all the time. I live in a state of inbetween, so color doesn’t feel honest to me, grayness does.     Your photography is really edgy and unique, but you also started experiencing with color. The timeless shots you did of Hailey Bieber show your different side. Tell us more about that other side of tour work. I feel that I usually experiment with color when I am in love with somebody in my life. The colors still have a desaturation to them because like love, it is a temporarily feeling of happiness, there is still a slight darkness there.     Which was your favourite project you’ve worked on so far and why? You’ve worked with many artists and celebrities in your career. If you had to choose your favorite one you’ve photographed, who would it be and why?  Every picture that I have worked on is a favorite, honestly. Because with each picture comes a connection and a self expression and that truly is the most beautiful feeling in the world And, every person I have created with is unique and holds it’s own special story. I couldn’t choose because even if the experience wasn’t the best, it still is a story that I’ve experienced and created with.       You started your career very young and have done an impressive amount of work for your age. Was photography always something you wanted to do in life and what are your plans for the future?    I started working professionally at seventeen so I’ve learnt a lot in life but with that I had to also grow up very quickly and handle myself in the world, in different countries, with different people. I am thankful for all of this knowledge but it hasn’t been easy and it has consumed my entire life and everything that I know. I’m not sure I could do anything else at this point, it’s almost as if I was born to do this. I’d like to experience more in the future and expand on my art, hopefully growing with it.        You’re an advocate for Suicide prevention. Can you tell us more about your involvement.    I just truly want people to not feel alone in their emotions or to be ashamed of their emotions. I have learnt that without so much of my pain, I wouldn’t be half the artist I am. I want to inspire others to accept this about themselves also and to use creativity as a tool to self express freely and truly.   I think it’s important for people to know that everything I say is how I feel and I can only truly speak for myself in the hopes that it will connect with how others are feeling too. I feel we are almost made to believe that our vulnerabilities are a weakness. I disagree completely with that, I enjoy to feel, I respect my pain, without it I don’t think I’d be half the artist that I am. I channel my emotions and my vulnerabilities into my creativity and into my connecting with other people. I believe that is strength. Weakness, in my opinion, is denying yourself to feel. I speak out about my journey with my own mental health simply because I am part of the crisis. I have been, for a very long time, through sexuality, identity, anxiety, depression, not knowing what to do next. Every little part of life that feels hard, I’m part of, we all are. I found my therapy through my art and my creativity so it is not my job as an artist to sugar coat my reality, it is my job to share my voice and inspire.     Can you tell us more about your recently released project  First Impressions with Netflix? First Impressions is my directorial debut. I wanted to create an extension from my still pictures. I feel my still imagery holds so much emotion and I wanted to explore that in moving image. First Impressions is an exploration through my eye that challenges the ideology of how himself and the humans in his world are viewed. Are we perfect? Not at all. Society has manipulated the idea that gaining noticeable success suggests that all your problems are solved. Honestly, they are mostly amplified. I created this series to give a platform for my subjects to express their true selves, without judgement, in a safe space, through art.  (@Netflix @Kristine_Froseth) To be continued…     You can follow his work on instagram @Damon_Baker Photographer Damon Baker known for signing with industry powerhouse  by the time he turned 18 years old. He has worked with the likes of Taylor Swift, Nicole Kidman, Jared Leto to name just a few. We had a pleasure speaking to him about his career, passion and life.      Damon, please tell us what does photography mean to you? Photography to me means freedom. It allows me to go deep within my emotions and draw from that place to translate my pain and darkness into something beautiful. Without that, I’m not sure I’d ever be able to understand myself.     Your work is mostly in black and white. What is behind your love of black & white photography? I’ve simply just always felt a deep connection to black and white photography. I think it relates to my emotions also, and that I don’t feel happy all the time nor do I feel sad all the time. I live in a state of inbetween, so color doesn’t feel honest to me, grayness does.     Your photography is really edgy and unique, but you also started experiencing with color. The timeless shots you did of Hailey Bieber show your different side. Tell us more about that other side of tour work. I feel that I usually experiment with color when I am in love with somebody in my life. The colors still have a desaturation to them because like love, it is a temporarily feeling of happiness, there is still a slight darkness there.     Which was your favourite project you’ve worked on so far and why? You’ve worked with many artists and celebrities in your career. If you had to choose your favorite one you’ve photographed, who would it be and why?  Every picture that I have worked on is a favorite, honestly. Because with each picture comes a connection and a self expression and that truly is the most beautiful feeling in the world And, every person I have created with is unique and holds it’s own special story. I couldn’t choose because even if the experience wasn’t the best, it still is a story that I’ve experienced and created with.       You started your career very young and have done an impressive amount of work for your age. Was photography always something you wanted to do in life and what are your plans for the future?    I started working professionally at seventeen so I’ve learnt a lot in life but with that I had to also grow up very quickly and handle myself in the world, in different countries, with different people. I am thankful for all of this knowledge but it hasn’t been easy and it has consumed my entire life and everything that I know. I’m not sure I could do anything else at this point, it’s almost as if I was born to do this. I’d like to experience more in the future and expand on my art, hopefully growing with it.        You’re an advocate for Suicide prevention. Can you tell us more about your involvement.    I just truly want people to not feel alone in their emotions or to be ashamed of their emotions. I have learnt that without so much of my pain, I wouldn’t be half the artist I am. I want to inspire others to accept this about themselves also and to use creativity as a tool to self express freely and truly.   I think it’s important for people to know that everything I say is how I feel and I can only truly speak for myself in the hopes that it will connect with how others are feeling too. I feel we are almost made to believe that our vulnerabilities are a weakness. I disagree completely with that, I enjoy to feel, I respect my pain, without it I don’t think I’d be half the artist that I am. I channel my emotions and my vulnerabilities into my creativity and into my connecting with other people. I believe that is strength. Weakness, in my opinion, is denying yourself to feel. I speak out about my journey with my own mental health simply because I am part of the crisis. I have been, for a very long time, through sexuality, identity, anxiety, depression, not knowing what to do next. Every little part of life that feels hard, I’m part of, we all are. I found my therapy through my art and my creativity so it is not my job as an artist to sugar coat my reality, it is my job to share my voice and inspire.     Can you tell us more about your recently released project  First Impressions with Netflix? First Impressions is my directorial debut. I wanted to create an extension from my still pictures. I feel my still imagery holds so much emotion and I wanted to explore that in moving image. First Impressions is an exploration through my eye that challenges the ideology of how himself and the humans in his world are viewed. Are we perfect? Not at all. Society has manipulated the idea that gaining noticeable success suggests that all your problems are solved. Honestly, they are mostly amplified. I created this series to give a platform for my subjects to express their true selves, without judgement, in a safe space, through art.  (@Netflix @Kristine_Froseth) To be continued…     You can follow his work on instagram @Damon_Baker

Bastiaan Woudt
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Bastiaan Woudt

Photography Bastiaan Woudt (1987) has seen meteoric rises and is considered to be one of the biggest names within the world of contemporary photography.     After starting his own photography studio from scratch a mere five years ago, with no experience or formal training, he has developed into a photographer with his own distinct signature style – abstract yet sharp, with a strong focus on detail.   While he has done a number of documentary projects, including the series Karawan in Morocco in 2016 and Mukono in Uganda in 2017, he is first and foremost a studio photographer. The Mukono-project was in collaboration with the Marie-Stella-Maris Foundation.   For his latest project ‘Peak’ photographer Bastiaan Woudt travels through the mountains of Nepal for a month. An expedition of 26 days takes him to the often uninhabited areas around Mount Annapurna, where he climbs up to almost 6000 meters. It results in a coffee table book (€75) that shows not only the landscapes and still lifes but also the proud Nepalese people he encounters along the way.    Woudt does not let himself be hindered by any traditional conventions of the art world. His curiosity has allowed him to create a singular photographic oeuvre.     more information: https://www.bastiaanwoudt.com/shop/peak Bastiaan Woudt (1987) has seen meteoric rises and is considered to be one of the biggest names within the world of contemporary photography.     After starting his own photography studio from scratch a mere five years ago, with no experience or formal training, he has developed into a photographer with his own distinct signature style – abstract yet sharp, with a strong focus on detail.   While he has done a number of documentary projects, including the series Karawan in Morocco in 2016 and Mukono in Uganda in 2017, he is first and foremost a studio photographer. The Mukono-project was in collaboration with the Marie-Stella-Maris Foundation.   For his latest project ‘Peak’ photographer Bastiaan Woudt travels through the mountains of Nepal for a month. An expedition of 26 days takes him to the often uninhabited areas around Mount Annapurna, where he climbs up to almost 6000 meters. It results in a coffee table book (€75) that shows not only the landscapes and still lifes but also the proud Nepalese people he encounters along the way.    Woudt does not let himself be hindered by any traditional conventions of the art world. His curiosity has allowed him to create a singular photographic oeuvre.     more information: https://www.bastiaanwoudt.com/shop/peak

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