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Wrangler launches Texas Slim
36

Wrangler launches Texas Slim

Fashion Wrangler launches Texas slim, with an incredible campaign that inspired you to live with the courage to take risks and live to the fullest.  For 30 years, Wrangler’s Texas jeans have been a best-selling fit. Now the denim icon introduces the Texas Slim, a new slimmer version for men. With a regular fit through the thigh, but cut slim on the leg, it includes all the authentic and relaxed elements of the original but with a contemporary, streamlined fit, keeping the heritage alive. To mark the launch, Wrangler creates a campaign to honor the daring and freedom of the America’s last few travelling motorcycle stunt shows. It aligns with Wrangler’s new global Wear with AbandonTM campaign, which celebrates the inspiring idea that life bursts with opportunity and adventure when you live with a spirit of risk and courage. In the early 1900's, motordromes became a popular carnival sideshow at state and county fairs across the United States. Inside the wooden drome, known as the Wall of Death, spectators watch from above as riders orbit its vertical walls on antique motorcycles in a heady mix of speed, noise and adrenaline. Defying death – and gravity. In the first half of the twentieth century there were hundreds of motordromes – now there are just a handful, a travelling piece of Americana, keeping this thrilling piece of motorcycle history alive. The riders trust each other with their lives. They hare stories of the road, broken bones, and a passion for a life of risk and adventure. Going from state to state, bringing heart-stopping danger and the romance of their nomadic lives to small-town America, the team set up and take down the motordrome together – always wearing Wranglers, engineered for hard, heavy work, and with enduring authentic Western style. Wrangler is the iconic denim cowboy brand, created in 1947 to serve cowboys and ranch workers, but soon adopted by rebels and trailblazers. Wrangler recognizes this spirit in the America’s motordrome riders, the men (and sometimes women) risking their lives to thrill a crowd, who are ensuring this way of life survives into a new generation. "Cowboys on steel, always in Wranglers." Wrangler launches Texas slim, with an incredible campaign that inspired you to live with the courage to take risks and live to the fullest.  For 30 years, Wrangler’s Texas jeans have been a best-selling fit. Now the denim icon introduces the Texas Slim, a new slimmer version for men. With a regular fit through the thigh, but cut slim on the leg, it includes all the authentic and relaxed elements of the original but with a contemporary, streamlined fit, keeping the heritage alive. To mark the launch, Wrangler creates a campaign to honor the daring and freedom of the America’s last few travelling motorcycle stunt shows. It aligns with Wrangler’s new global Wear with AbandonTM campaign, which celebrates the inspiring idea that life bursts with opportunity and adventure when you live with a spirit of risk and courage. In the early 1900's, motordromes became a popular carnival sideshow at state and county fairs across the United States. Inside the wooden drome, known as the Wall of Death, spectators watch from above as riders orbit its vertical walls on antique motorcycles in a heady mix of speed, noise and adrenaline. Defying death – and gravity. In the first half of the twentieth century there were hundreds of motordromes – now there are just a handful, a travelling piece of Americana, keeping this thrilling piece of motorcycle history alive. The riders trust each other with their lives. They hare stories of the road, broken bones, and a passion for a life of risk and adventure. Going from state to state, bringing heart-stopping danger and the romance of their nomadic lives to small-town America, the team set up and take down the motordrome together – always wearing Wranglers, engineered for hard, heavy work, and with enduring authentic Western style. Wrangler is the iconic denim cowboy brand, created in 1947 to serve cowboys and ranch workers, but soon adopted by rebels and trailblazers. Wrangler recognizes this spirit in the America’s motordrome riders, the men (and sometimes women) risking their lives to thrill a crowd, who are ensuring this way of life survives into a new generation. "Cowboys on steel, always in Wranglers."

Dior in Miami
33

Dior in Miami

Fashion exclusive images by Victor Vergara from the Dior men's show in Miami. #DiorMiami exclusive images by Victor Vergara from the Dior men's show in Miami. #DiorMiami

Aayali
32

Aayali

Accessories They believe in taking a moment to show appreciation for everything we have in life. This involves focusing on the positive and appreciating the things you often take for granted: warm sunshine, clean water, healthy food, loving family and friends. They also believe gratitude creates abundance and joy. Giving thanks makes you feel happier, more present, and confident to live your best life. Their products are created to help remind you to take a moment and be thankful for your life. About the materials and ingredients: They use a 100% natural wax created by the manufacturing arm of Cire Trudon, the oldest candle maker in the world since 1643. The wax was developed with the utmost care to ensure a clean burn and an exceptional factory experience. Creating a fragrance requires patience, experience and creativity. They partnered with French nose and bespoke perfumer Anais Fournial to exclusively develop our three signature signature fragrances Confiance, Joie and Sérénité. AAYALI fragrances can be characterized as sophisticated, timeless, elevating and evoking a feeling of ultimate luxury. Their candles are poured in France in timeless reusable vessels made from pressed glass, ceramic - an exclusive design handmade for AAYALI by Belgian brand VAL POTTERY, and French Limoges porcelain Brass, an alloy of copper and zinc, is one of the most durable metals. It does not rust and when treated carefully, it can last for generations. AAYALI’s founder traveled to India in search of the best brass craftsmanship. All their accessories are made in India by skilled artisans using 100% solid brass of the highest quality.  THE FRAGRANCES: CONFIANCE Top notes: Spices Heart notes: Sandalwood Base notes: Cashmere, Cedarwood, Moss Personality: Classy / Intriguing / Seductive Reminds you of: A crackling fireplace JOIE Top notes: Floral bouquet Heart notes: Bourbon vanilla, Mimosa Base notes: Amber Personality: Delicate / Comforting / Cozy Reminds you of: Warm rays of sunshine on a crisp morning SÉRÉNITÉ Top notes: Fig Heart notes: Jasmine, Orange blossom, TuberoseBase notes: Cashmere Personality: Elegant / Sophisticated / Romantic  Reminds you of: A relaxing day at the spa More about the selection of scented candles and accessories on aayali.com They believe in taking a moment to show appreciation for everything we have in life. This involves focusing on the positive and appreciating the things you often take for granted: warm sunshine, clean water, healthy food, loving family and friends. They also believe gratitude creates abundance and joy. Giving thanks makes you feel happier, more present, and confident to live your best life. Their products are created to help remind you to take a moment and be thankful for your life. About the materials and ingredients: They use a 100% natural wax created by the manufacturing arm of Cire Trudon, the oldest candle maker in the world since 1643. The wax was developed with the utmost care to ensure a clean burn and an exceptional factory experience. Creating a fragrance requires patience, experience and creativity. They partnered with French nose and bespoke perfumer Anais Fournial to exclusively develop our three signature signature fragrances Confiance, Joie and Sérénité. AAYALI fragrances can be characterized as sophisticated, timeless, elevating and evoking a feeling of ultimate luxury. Their candles are poured in France in timeless reusable vessels made from pressed glass, ceramic - an exclusive design handmade for AAYALI by Belgian brand VAL POTTERY, and French Limoges porcelain Brass, an alloy of copper and zinc, is one of the most durable metals. It does not rust and when treated carefully, it can last for generations. AAYALI’s founder traveled to India in search of the best brass craftsmanship. All their accessories are made in India by skilled artisans using 100% solid brass of the highest quality.  THE FRAGRANCES: CONFIANCE Top notes: Spices Heart notes: Sandalwood Base notes: Cashmere, Cedarwood, Moss Personality: Classy / Intriguing / Seductive Reminds you of: A crackling fireplace JOIE Top notes: Floral bouquet Heart notes: Bourbon vanilla, Mimosa Base notes: Amber Personality: Delicate / Comforting / Cozy Reminds you of: Warm rays of sunshine on a crisp morning SÉRÉNITÉ Top notes: Fig Heart notes: Jasmine, Orange blossom, TuberoseBase notes: Cashmere Personality: Elegant / Sophisticated / Romantic  Reminds you of: A relaxing day at the spa More about the selection of scented candles and accessories on aayali.com

Advertising
Advertising
At Givenchy, stars align for their new campaign
30

At Givenchy, stars align for their new campaign

Fashion For its Spring-Summer 2020 advertising campaign, the House of Givenchy revisits its signature “couple” theme with an iconoclastic new pairing. In a glamorous, fresh dichotomy, the House reveals two icons — Charlotte Rampling and Marc Jacobs — in a campaign lensed by the photographer Craig McDean, with guidance from Givenchy Artistic Director Clare Waight Keller. Together and individually, the Paris-based actress and the New York-based designer appear in portraits that boldly celebrate individualistic beauty and the liberated, self-assured attitude so emblematic of Givenchy. The series honors the “Givenchy sitting” style of portraiture, a celebration of strength, wit and innate elegance. It follows the campaign starring Ariana Grande, for the Fall-Winter 2019 season. Wearing directional looks and key accessories from the Spring-Summer 2020 collection, each icon appears in his or her signature style, Rampling in masculine tailoring and Jacobs in more feminine pieces. Both radiate strength of character, their natural grandeur further underscored by a neutral setting. Dual perspectives feature close-ups and three-quarter length images in color and black and white. In single portraits, they offer a personal take on Bond accessories. Dressed in graphic black and white, Rampling folds the Bond shopper under her arm while Jacobs, dressed in a shiny black overcoat, carries a men’s Bond duffle that’s filled to capacity. In a naturalistic three-quarter portrait, Rampling gazes at the viewer with her signature mysterious half-smile, the season’s star handbag, the ID93 in buttery yellow suede, slung casually over her shoulder. In another image, she appears dressed in a trench and smoky aviators with the Mystic bag in cognac leather. A dual portrait shows the stars radiating grace and confidence. Posing back-to-back, they embody a complementary take on the season’s sophisticated red floral motifs. In the campaign’s companion video, Rampling and Jacobs stars appear “as they are”. Rampling - dressed in her signature masculine/feminine style – offers Jacobs a master class in the dramatic arts. With timeless chic and natural grace, the English icon coolly plays foil to the New York-based designer’s extravagant, tongue-in-cheek take on femininity. Surreal and absurd elements show the season’s footwear playing telephone, for example. The Givenchy Spring-Summer 2020 advertising campaign will be released online today and break in the March issue of selected magazines worldwide. Creative Director: Clare Waight Keller Photographer: Craig McDean, Talents: Charlotte Rampling and Marc Jacobs Video Screenplay: Hermione Hoby  For its Spring-Summer 2020 advertising campaign, the House of Givenchy revisits its signature “couple” theme with an iconoclastic new pairing. In a glamorous, fresh dichotomy, the House reveals two icons — Charlotte Rampling and Marc Jacobs — in a campaign lensed by the photographer Craig McDean, with guidance from Givenchy Artistic Director Clare Waight Keller. Together and individually, the Paris-based actress and the New York-based designer appear in portraits that boldly celebrate individualistic beauty and the liberated, self-assured attitude so emblematic of Givenchy. The series honors the “Givenchy sitting” style of portraiture, a celebration of strength, wit and innate elegance. It follows the campaign starring Ariana Grande, for the Fall-Winter 2019 season. Wearing directional looks and key accessories from the Spring-Summer 2020 collection, each icon appears in his or her signature style, Rampling in masculine tailoring and Jacobs in more feminine pieces. Both radiate strength of character, their natural grandeur further underscored by a neutral setting. Dual perspectives feature close-ups and three-quarter length images in color and black and white. In single portraits, they offer a personal take on Bond accessories. Dressed in graphic black and white, Rampling folds the Bond shopper under her arm while Jacobs, dressed in a shiny black overcoat, carries a men’s Bond duffle that’s filled to capacity. In a naturalistic three-quarter portrait, Rampling gazes at the viewer with her signature mysterious half-smile, the season’s star handbag, the ID93 in buttery yellow suede, slung casually over her shoulder. In another image, she appears dressed in a trench and smoky aviators with the Mystic bag in cognac leather. A dual portrait shows the stars radiating grace and confidence. Posing back-to-back, they embody a complementary take on the season’s sophisticated red floral motifs. In the campaign’s companion video, Rampling and Jacobs stars appear “as they are”. Rampling - dressed in her signature masculine/feminine style – offers Jacobs a master class in the dramatic arts. With timeless chic and natural grace, the English icon coolly plays foil to the New York-based designer’s extravagant, tongue-in-cheek take on femininity. Surreal and absurd elements show the season’s footwear playing telephone, for example. The Givenchy Spring-Summer 2020 advertising campaign will be released online today and break in the March issue of selected magazines worldwide. Creative Director: Clare Waight Keller Photographer: Craig McDean, Talents: Charlotte Rampling and Marc Jacobs Video Screenplay: Hermione Hoby 

Thinking of Summer
28

Thinking of Summer

Fashion Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Lois Jeans.   photographed by: Fabrizzio Del Rincon styled by: Victor Vergara casting by: Timotej Letonja grooming by: Wout Philippo models: Mees & Dani at Republic Models  Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Lois Jeans.   photographed by: Fabrizzio Del Rincon styled by: Victor Vergara casting by: Timotej Letonja grooming by: Wout Philippo models: Mees & Dani at Republic Models 

Fosbury & Sons opens in Amsterdam
25

Fosbury & Sons opens in Amsterdam

Design Fosbury & Sons has moved into the former Prinsengrachtziekenhuis (Prinsengracht Hospital) in Amsterdam. The final redevelopment phase has been completed - the building, listed as national monument, has been entirely transformed into stylishly appointed offices and work places, inspiring meeting rooms, event spaces, and a restaurant where entrepreneurs and companies can meet and mingle. Fosbury & Sons Prinsengracht, the first international location of the eponymous Belgian co-working concept, occupies 6,000 sqm. (64,583 sq.ft.) of an imposing monumental building. The iconic premises offer room for more than 250 companies and entrepreneurs. The founders of companies such as Blendle, Van Moof, TicketSwap, Ace & Tate, Top Notch, Tony Chocolonely, The Media Nanny and Temper are among the first members of Fosbury & Sons Prinsengracht. ‘It’s our first location outside Belgium’, says Stijn Geeraets, co-founder of Fosbury & Sons. ‘It speaks for itself to launch in a leading business hub such as Amsterdam. While researching suitable locations we came across the building’s owners, Millten (Foppe Eshuis and Lennard Rottier) and Million Monkeys (Maarten Beucker Andreae). As partners we opted for a joint venture to operate the former Prinsengrachtziekenhuis. It’s almost unreal that we’ve been able to occupy this beautiful canalside building with so much history. Obviously, we treated it with utmost respect, and we set out to make it a special place for locals. Also, we believe the Netherlands are ready for our vision of beautifully appointed work places with a professional yet welcoming atmosphere’. Art & Design The interior design of Fosbury & Sons Prinsengracht has been created by design duo Going East. The aim to restore the structure’s former glory and grandeur has been used as a starting point. ‘We decided to reinstall parquet flooring in the suites, just like we had seen in old photographs’, says Going East designer Anaïs Torfs. We intended to recreate an authentic Italian palazzo atmosphere alongside the canals. We emphasized the beautiful arches and some of the dilapidated ceilings have intentionally been retained. This has resulted in an interior where contrasts take centre stage: old vs. new and classic vs. modern, along with detailing in colourful marble, rich wool fabrics and vintage design. Beside design, art plays a pivotal role in the interior design. In collaboration with Grimm Gallery and The Ravestijn Gallery the communal spaces are adorned by modern art and photo works. On display are eye-catching sculptures by American artist Nick van Woert, all curated by Grimm Gallery. Additionally, works by lensman Koen Hauser (The Ravestijn Gallery) are presented which feature a bold and contemporary take on still life. Last but not least, a series of custom artworks by artist Sarah Yu Zeebroek add a Belgian touch. Fosbury & Sons Café Next to the stylish offices and meeting rooms, members are able to meet at the Fosbury & Sons Café. Occupying 230 sqm. (2,476 sq.ft.), it is situated alongside an idyllic and sheltered inner garden. Members can indulge in special dishes and international classics, all freshly prepared on a daily basis by its very own chef. The venue can also be accessed through a half-day membership (breakfast or afternoon treat included) or a full-day membership (lunch included). The building which Fosbury & Sons occupies a 19th century building which was known as Prinsengrachtziekenhuis (Prinsengracht Hospital) until 2014. Since 1994 it served as a branch of Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis (OLVG Hospital) and gained the status of outpatient clinic. The last beds disappeared two years later. In 2014 the building was sold to Millten and Million Monkeys. Commissioned by real estate developer Millten, and in collaboration with architect Roberto Meyer of MVSA Architects, the monumental building has been thoroughly renovated over the course of five years. About Fosbury & Sons Fosbury & Sons Prinsengracht is the first branch outside Belgium of Fosbury & Sons. The company was founded in 2016 by Serge Hannecart, Stijn Geeraets and Maarten Van Gool who set out to radically change the office world with the motto ‘Not Your Ordinary Office’. Following the first location at the WATT Tower in Antwerp, a 7,000 sqm. (75,347 sq.ft.) was launched on the premises of a modernist landmark building in Brussels by Polish-Belgian architect Constantin Brodzki. Additionally, Fosbury & Sons opened two other venues in Brussels in 2019. Fosbury & Sons Prinsengracht is the first Dutch location of the Antwerp-based company. A second Dutch location in the Amsterdam Westerdok area is currently being developed and is expected to open by the end of this year. Additional branches are to open shortly in Antwerp, Valencia, Ghent, and The Hague. Fosbury & Sons is the answer to bland office space and monotonous work by offering its members not only a pleasant environment, but also full autonomy, flexibility, connectivity with other entrepreneurs and companies, and a necessary dose of fun. Fosbury & Sons adheres to the importance of a balance between work and private life and offers members a professional work place, including useful services which help raise the quality of the aforementioned balance. As a member, you are able to enjoy a professional office with living room-inspired comfort, the services and atmosphere of a hotel, and the fun level that equals having a day off. Mind you, your friends and family are equally welcome to enjoy lunch together or to attend one of the many events held on the premises. Needless to say, it is a perfect example of how private life and work are intertwined hassle- free. for prices visit https://fosburyandsons.com Fosbury & Sons has moved into the former Prinsengrachtziekenhuis (Prinsengracht Hospital) in Amsterdam. The final redevelopment phase has been completed - the building, listed as national monument, has been entirely transformed into stylishly appointed offices and work places, inspiring meeting rooms, event spaces, and a restaurant where entrepreneurs and companies can meet and mingle. Fosbury & Sons Prinsengracht, the first international location of the eponymous Belgian co-working concept, occupies 6,000 sqm. (64,583 sq.ft.) of an imposing monumental building. The iconic premises offer room for more than 250 companies and entrepreneurs. The founders of companies such as Blendle, Van Moof, TicketSwap, Ace & Tate, Top Notch, Tony Chocolonely, The Media Nanny and Temper are among the first members of Fosbury & Sons Prinsengracht. ‘It’s our first location outside Belgium’, says Stijn Geeraets, co-founder of Fosbury & Sons. ‘It speaks for itself to launch in a leading business hub such as Amsterdam. While researching suitable locations we came across the building’s owners, Millten (Foppe Eshuis and Lennard Rottier) and Million Monkeys (Maarten Beucker Andreae). As partners we opted for a joint venture to operate the former Prinsengrachtziekenhuis. It’s almost unreal that we’ve been able to occupy this beautiful canalside building with so much history. Obviously, we treated it with utmost respect, and we set out to make it a special place for locals. Also, we believe the Netherlands are ready for our vision of beautifully appointed work places with a professional yet welcoming atmosphere’. Art & Design The interior design of Fosbury & Sons Prinsengracht has been created by design duo Going East. The aim to restore the structure’s former glory and grandeur has been used as a starting point. ‘We decided to reinstall parquet flooring in the suites, just like we had seen in old photographs’, says Going East designer Anaïs Torfs. We intended to recreate an authentic Italian palazzo atmosphere alongside the canals. We emphasized the beautiful arches and some of the dilapidated ceilings have intentionally been retained. This has resulted in an interior where contrasts take centre stage: old vs. new and classic vs. modern, along with detailing in colourful marble, rich wool fabrics and vintage design. Beside design, art plays a pivotal role in the interior design. In collaboration with Grimm Gallery and The Ravestijn Gallery the communal spaces are adorned by modern art and photo works. On display are eye-catching sculptures by American artist Nick van Woert, all curated by Grimm Gallery. Additionally, works by lensman Koen Hauser (The Ravestijn Gallery) are presented which feature a bold and contemporary take on still life. Last but not least, a series of custom artworks by artist Sarah Yu Zeebroek add a Belgian touch. Fosbury & Sons Café Next to the stylish offices and meeting rooms, members are able to meet at the Fosbury & Sons Café. Occupying 230 sqm. (2,476 sq.ft.), it is situated alongside an idyllic and sheltered inner garden. Members can indulge in special dishes and international classics, all freshly prepared on a daily basis by its very own chef. The venue can also be accessed through a half-day membership (breakfast or afternoon treat included) or a full-day membership (lunch included). The building which Fosbury & Sons occupies a 19th century building which was known as Prinsengrachtziekenhuis (Prinsengracht Hospital) until 2014. Since 1994 it served as a branch of Onze Lieve Vrouwe Gasthuis (OLVG Hospital) and gained the status of outpatient clinic. The last beds disappeared two years later. In 2014 the building was sold to Millten and Million Monkeys. Commissioned by real estate developer Millten, and in collaboration with architect Roberto Meyer of MVSA Architects, the monumental building has been thoroughly renovated over the course of five years. About Fosbury & Sons Fosbury & Sons Prinsengracht is the first branch outside Belgium of Fosbury & Sons. The company was founded in 2016 by Serge Hannecart, Stijn Geeraets and Maarten Van Gool who set out to radically change the office world with the motto ‘Not Your Ordinary Office’. Following the first location at the WATT Tower in Antwerp, a 7,000 sqm. (75,347 sq.ft.) was launched on the premises of a modernist landmark building in Brussels by Polish-Belgian architect Constantin Brodzki. Additionally, Fosbury & Sons opened two other venues in Brussels in 2019. Fosbury & Sons Prinsengracht is the first Dutch location of the Antwerp-based company. A second Dutch location in the Amsterdam Westerdok area is currently being developed and is expected to open by the end of this year. Additional branches are to open shortly in Antwerp, Valencia, Ghent, and The Hague. Fosbury & Sons is the answer to bland office space and monotonous work by offering its members not only a pleasant environment, but also full autonomy, flexibility, connectivity with other entrepreneurs and companies, and a necessary dose of fun. Fosbury & Sons adheres to the importance of a balance between work and private life and offers members a professional work place, including useful services which help raise the quality of the aforementioned balance. As a member, you are able to enjoy a professional office with living room-inspired comfort, the services and atmosphere of a hotel, and the fun level that equals having a day off. Mind you, your friends and family are equally welcome to enjoy lunch together or to attend one of the many events held on the premises. Needless to say, it is a perfect example of how private life and work are intertwined hassle- free. for prices visit https://fosburyandsons.com

Louis Vuitton presents Pre-Fall 2020
24

Louis Vuitton presents Pre-Fall 2020

Fashion Fashion is a novel. And the Louis Vuitton Pre-Fall 2020 collection embarks on a narrative journey where the garments tell their own tales. These characters from their wardrobe set the scene for our days, our moods, our lives. Thismeeting of periods, stylistic movements and anachronistic combinations brings to life a rich cast of costumes. In such a ‘wearable library’, each outwrites its own chapter made up of romantic monologues. Peculiar dialogues between stylistic rebellion and ne crafts-manship. An account of sportswear’s encounter withtailoring. Taking the cultural references even further, Louis Vuitton has adorned one of the collection’s t-shirts with the original cover from William Peter Blatty’s 1971 cult science-fiction novel The Exorcist. To illustrate this collection – a term that works just as well with fashion as it does with literature or on the big screen – the House’s muses proudly take to book covers or posters as protagonists, fitting perfectly into Louis Vuitton’s history and brilliantly embracing therole of adventurer. for more go on louisvuitton.com Photographer Collier Schorr   Fashion is a novel. And the Louis Vuitton Pre-Fall 2020 collection embarks on a narrative journey where the garments tell their own tales. These characters from their wardrobe set the scene for our days, our moods, our lives. Thismeeting of periods, stylistic movements and anachronistic combinations brings to life a rich cast of costumes. In such a ‘wearable library’, each outwrites its own chapter made up of romantic monologues. Peculiar dialogues between stylistic rebellion and ne crafts-manship. An account of sportswear’s encounter withtailoring. Taking the cultural references even further, Louis Vuitton has adorned one of the collection’s t-shirts with the original cover from William Peter Blatty’s 1971 cult science-fiction novel The Exorcist. To illustrate this collection – a term that works just as well with fashion as it does with literature or on the big screen – the House’s muses proudly take to book covers or posters as protagonists, fitting perfectly into Louis Vuitton’s history and brilliantly embracing therole of adventurer. for more go on louisvuitton.com Photographer Collier Schorr  

Winter wonderland
21

Winter wonderland

Fashion photographed by: Fabrizzio del Rincon styled by: Victor Vergara model: Linde at Paparazzi Model Management hair and make-up by: Carlos Saidel casting by: Timotej Letonja   photographed by: Fabrizzio del Rincon styled by: Victor Vergara model: Linde at Paparazzi Model Management hair and make-up by: Carlos Saidel casting by: Timotej Letonja  

Saint Laurent men's Spring & Summer 2020 campaign with Rami Malek
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Saint Laurent men's Spring & Summer 2020 campaign with Rami Malek

Fashion Art Direction: Anthony Vaccarello Director: David Sims Talent: Rami Malek ysl.com #YSL #SaintLaurent #YvesSaintLaurent @anthonyvaccarello Art Direction: Anthony Vaccarello Director: David Sims Talent: Rami Malek ysl.com #YSL #SaintLaurent #YvesSaintLaurent @anthonyvaccarello

The future is ______?
10

The future is ______?

Fashion Exclusive fashion editorial Team: Production: Simone Bronzi & Timotej Letonja @Haze Media Photographer: Marcello Arena Stylist: Giulia Meterangelis Model: Kaspar Rosander @Next Models Grooming: Augusto Picerni @W-M Management Set designer: Francesco Petrillo Director: White Paper Camera: Leonardo Russo Stylist assistant: Joele Iapadre Exclusive fashion editorial Team: Production: Simone Bronzi & Timotej Letonja @Haze Media Photographer: Marcello Arena Stylist: Giulia Meterangelis Model: Kaspar Rosander @Next Models Grooming: Augusto Picerni @W-M Management Set designer: Francesco Petrillo Director: White Paper Camera: Leonardo Russo Stylist assistant: Joele Iapadre

When music and fashion collide
6

When music and fashion collide

Fashion When two worlds collide, when fashion intertwines with a whole new world, it connects its DNA with music. HUGO BOSS, a German men's leading fashion brand has chosen Liam Payne as their new HUGO global brand ambassador. And we had a chance to speak to Liam about the collaboration   You said fashion started as a hobby for you. Now here we are, with you collaborating on an exclusive new capsule and being the first global brand ambassador for HUGO. What went through your head when you got this news?   I mean, it just even seems weird looking at my name, seeing my name on the label of some clothing, which is nice, but just weird at the same time. When I first heard that we were going to be doing it, I was just thinking about how many amazing people HUGO BOSS has had over the years, so many great names and different people that I look up to and watch on the big screen, like Ryan Reynolds or Chris Hemsworth. Being the first one for HUGO is just amazing. When I found out more into the way everything was working, that we were making clothes, not just trying them on, this was really cool. When I was on the way to the first design meeting, I was in the car and I didn't really know what to expect. But as soon as we sat down and started looking at different drawings and different designs and things that were possible, it all became really fun and it drew me in.    You collaborated with HUGO on an exclusive "HUGO x Liam Payne capsule". What was the most exciting part of being involved in the desig process of this collection?   I think just coming up with new ideas, it's quite fun. There's loads of different printing techniques that they've not actually done before. And there's actually a pocket now on the joggers that they've nicknamed »the Liam Pocket«, because I always used to drop my phone and smashed it. So we not only have a zip pocket inside the jogger pocket, but they started putting it across a bunch of different pieces even in their collection now as well. This is actually the most exciting thing for me, when you figure something out that hasn't really been figured out very much before.    The capsule was just revealed at this year's Berlin Fashion Week, accompanied with your performance. How do you look at people's reaction to your collection with HUGO?    This is completely new territory for me. I think I'm most happy with the fact that when we designed everything, it's quite subtle and that my name is not anywhere in these pieces, except on the label inside. Not that I'm trying to hide myself or anything, but I just think that people who shop HUGO, should be able to walk into HUGO and still shop HUGO, whether or not I made it. I think that as someone who's designing the clothes, it's not your job to make sure that your name is everywhere. It's your job to make sure that the the blend between what is you and what is the brand fits so well, that people will mistakenly buy it, not even knowing that it was a piece of my collection.   You were also named as the new face of HUGO Bodywear campaign. How does it feel to be the a part of a first partnership of this kind for HUGO, linking the fashion world with music?   It was really good, it was fun. It was a lot of hours in the gym to get that shoot done, which now I'm back on my training schedule again. It was nice to go to the gym with the goal of what you're gonna be doing, because I know everybody wants to look at the people on the boxes.  The shoot was really amazing. Get to shoot all of this with Mert & Marcus was just the best thing ever. When they took the first picture, I was so stressed because of being in underwear in front of loads of people, but working with them, they took the pressure off. And I don't know what it is about them, but just the slightest move they make you do and the way they place you within the shot, the way they actually direct you within the scene, it's super easy to work with them. All of the poses that I've been doing over the years, I've just been doing it so wrong.   How would you describe the style of "HUGO x Liam Payne capsule"?   It's definitely smart casual and a bit more loose. I think it's quite nice as well. When we were designing the capsule, obviously it was so heavily designed around me and stuff that I wear and the way that I wear things. In the way we designed the joggers or the way that the hoodie fits or whatever else, I think is definitely my fit on a lot of the things. Some of it's has a bit of streetwear in there, but most of it's kind of smart casual.   How do you manage to keep your own style, through working with a lot of different styles and being dressed by many different people?   Honestly, I think this is all because I've covered so many different ranges of fashion over the years, kind of because we started as young as we did in the band. You grow through your fashion at one stage or another, there were different elements of stuff that I've dressed along the way. So there's always something I can draw back to. The time I got it the most right was when it was the most simple and it was towards the end of the band. And then I kind of went off on trying different, new things. When I started off being a solo artist, being so nervous about presenting just myself to a fanbase and the world, I think I was kind of hiding behind as many things as possible. It was all the gold chains and sunglasses and everyting else, which was kind of me trying to create my own character, but it wasn't really me. But now I really have grown with fashion and I'm really happy that I made all those different mistakes.    What does HUGO mean to you?   I'd worn a few of different HUGO suits, different things on catwalks. I think in one element, it was just really perfect for me. And when we kind of made this brand partnership together, it just made complete sense to me. A lot of the pieces just cater to everything that I wear actually, which is really good. And it is exactly how I want to dress.   What can we expect from you in the future, are there any other collaborations with HUGO already on the horizon?    Yeah, there's a few things that we've already shot which are very fun and quite exciting. There's another collection that we're gonna make as well. Another one of the two, I think, at the moment. So lots of different things. And I can't help it, the more I go on HUGO's website and look at what's been made, where they're going next with things, I just start print screening and trying to design things. I mean, I'm really enjoying doing this at the moment, so I hope I get to do it for quite a long time.   Was there anything specifically, any idea, that you wanted to do that didn't come to life and you were hoping it would?    The problem that we had at this point was the timing, because we wanted to get it done for this specific period. It's great that the team worked as hard as they did because we got everything finished, but it was hard to do. There were so many different things that we had ideas for. And my problem is, I have like a million ideas. So if an idea gets left behind, it might get left way behind, because I'll think of something else that I like more. There was a lot of different pieces, especially more streetwear jackets. But I think I'm bringing that more into the second collection.   How different is it to design then to write a song?   I've always liked drawing and as soon as we've made the first collection, I went home and started drawing bunch of logos, different colors and things and seeing what went together, because when drawing, you can make as many mistakes as you want. I think that's kind of similar in songwriting, you can re-record it and re-record it  until you go »I like that a little bit more«, which is quite nice. It is a different sector. When drawing, your eyes just know when something goes together. Whereas the music is more of a feeling, like how does that song make you feel in a certain way or when you sing this line. I think that's the difference.  We sat down also with HUGO's creative director, Bart De Backer, a Belgian designer, who's in charge of designing BOSS younger brother brand's menswear.  HUGO is a brand with fashion forward approach, aiming for younger customers. From  the signature tailored suits to incorporating today's streetwear philosophy, HUGO is mixing together different styles and creating something new. 10 years in the future, what changes would you like to see in the world? What I would like to see is free health care, free education, more equality and less plastic. For people to be more considerate of what we use the plastic for.   What makes HUGO unique in your words? For me that's a brand that always challenged the status quo in a bit classic mindset in a way. When we started the brand started to wear sneakers under suits, we had tailored jackets with denims. Then we started to mix tailoring with sportswear and now we actually go completely into the whole mix master idea. An example for this is creating a platform for self expression, that makes people who buy HUGO wanna wear HUGO just how they want to wear it, we're not gonna tell them how they should wear it.  Recently, we started blurring the boundaries between the menswear and womenswear, in the last 3 – 4 collections we created unisex styles, so we actually invite our customers to not only check one side of the shop, but also the other side. This is a new thing we are working on and esentially something we always did with HUGO. Something that was seen as established, we question and we start challenging. This is something that is current, but also we are gonna try to introduce it more into the mainstream. What you have now is still a niche of people and our reach as a brand is quite big.    What are your next projects and which one you're most excited about? That's a thing I can not really talk about, it's still »under construction«. But the thing is, in general with every collection we try to collaborate with a lot of people. The collections that I'm working on and are coming out now, we're always searching for talent and when we see a really good graphic designer or people who sketch quite nicely or a different way of making designs, then we try to collaborate with them. This is also in the spirit of HUGO as a platform for self expression, we are actually searching for talents that have their voice or their point of view on things.   Could you tell us a bit about the inspirations behind the next collection coming out for spring and summer 2020? I discovered that Bowie was living in Berlin in the 70s, from 1976 to 1979, where he recorded what I find one of his most innovative albums, Low, Lodger and Heroes. About that time he also strated to reinvent himself. What I liked about that whole inspiration is that he always tried to push something new, tried new things, mixing different styles together and this is what he did in Berlin, experimented and created kind of new ways of music. For me he is the ultimate mix master.  This was the inspiration of the collection. We mixed the Bowie heritage and the Bowie street style of the 70s with the Berlin of today, where the street style is still very influenced by 90s, but is also very US heritage. The Bowie tailoring was very important and what we did in this collection is actually looking at the suit itself, kind of in a different way. What I wanted to do and did in this collection is looking at the very basic philosophy and use that as a starting point, where the suit has the top and bottom in the same fabric, with placing this in the time of today, where leisure wear is dominant. Everybody dresses down at the moment. I took a track suit as a starting point and gave it to my pattern designer of tailoring and I asked him »Please take the heritage techniques from tailoring and make a track suit«. What we developed was a tailored version of a track suit. What I think is in the future of suits, what is our heritage, what I believe is our future direction is the new idea of the suit, that is more leisure, more fitted to the lifestyle of all, also the young kids today. People wanna look cool, they still wanna look very valuable and they don't wanna feel forced into wearing a suit.  We started to work together with the Estate of Bowie and we have a little capsule where we actually use the pictures of Bowie on our clothing. The cover of Heroes album, together with Bowie's quote is a very nice piece from the collection. We also worked a lot around the silhouettes of David Bowie, we focused a lot on the fabric, but always with a little twist, because Bowie always wore suits in brighter colors, which were a bit loud, but he could wear it one way or another, he made it work.   What trends do you see shape the future of menswear? Dressing up becomes more important, but I don't think it will translate automatically in more tailoring. Tailoring will take a different place in mens wardrobe. We try to have new silhouettes, the way of dressing will have a very leisure shape. The tailored jacket  is an element you can use even in a very street inspired look. I think the formal and leisure styles will blend more.   How does HUGO differentiate itself from BOSS? It's a very different brand. In the past we were more like brothers, but now we are really a different brand. We talk differently to our consumer, the way we build our collections is completely different. For me, BOSS is a more established approach, where we question everything that is established. Brand HUGO by istself is also a brand that is based on self-expression, that means people who buy HUGO can actually wear it how they want to and they can experiment with it and try new things. For me this is a completely different philosophy.    How much do you think sustainability gives importance to fashion, now in 2019? I think it will gain more and more importance. We're also working on it in very different projects, so when we design, we think differently about things. I'm also reducing my collections, like the sizing of things becomes smaller, we get much more focused on our products and of course we are working into a different way of design, more long term design.  Also, a very interesting thing about young designers. Some time ago I talked to a teacher at Royal College in London and there they already see that young generations , the future designers are already thinking in the long term, what will happen when they design, what will be the effects on the environment. In HUGO we also started going into that mindset. Shot by photographers Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott inside an apartment in Berlin, the new campaign features Liam in signature styles from the brand’s underwear line. The musician and his model counterpart, interpret a young couple who have escaped to Berlin with the paparazzi hot on their tails.   “I feel lucky that as the face of HUGO, I get to front iconic campaigns such as this. It’s been an amazing experience to work with such an incredibly talented group of people,” says Liam.   In one hyper-saturated image, Liam is seen standing on a bed, wearing boxer briefs woven with the HUGO logo across the waistband. In a black and white shot, he poses for Maxwell as she captures his likeness on film. Perhaps the most intimate of all the images, shows the pair intertwined on the bed, while she wears his underwear and he wears nothing at all.   The bodywear range, comprised of trunks, boxer briefs, and tank tops borrows from the motif-heavy aesthetic of the core collection. Underwear styles are topped with waistbands in signature HUGO red with statement contrast logos, and sporty tank tops have vertical logos stitched onto their hemlines. When two worlds collide, when fashion intertwines with a whole new world, it connects its DNA with music. HUGO BOSS, a German men's leading fashion brand has chosen Liam Payne as their new HUGO global brand ambassador. And we had a chance to speak to Liam about the collaboration   You said fashion started as a hobby for you. Now here we are, with you collaborating on an exclusive new capsule and being the first global brand ambassador for HUGO. What went through your head when you got this news?   I mean, it just even seems weird looking at my name, seeing my name on the label of some clothing, which is nice, but just weird at the same time. When I first heard that we were going to be doing it, I was just thinking about how many amazing people HUGO BOSS has had over the years, so many great names and different people that I look up to and watch on the big screen, like Ryan Reynolds or Chris Hemsworth. Being the first one for HUGO is just amazing. When I found out more into the way everything was working, that we were making clothes, not just trying them on, this was really cool. When I was on the way to the first design meeting, I was in the car and I didn't really know what to expect. But as soon as we sat down and started looking at different drawings and different designs and things that were possible, it all became really fun and it drew me in.    You collaborated with HUGO on an exclusive "HUGO x Liam Payne capsule". What was the most exciting part of being involved in the desig process of this collection?   I think just coming up with new ideas, it's quite fun. There's loads of different printing techniques that they've not actually done before. And there's actually a pocket now on the joggers that they've nicknamed »the Liam Pocket«, because I always used to drop my phone and smashed it. So we not only have a zip pocket inside the jogger pocket, but they started putting it across a bunch of different pieces even in their collection now as well. This is actually the most exciting thing for me, when you figure something out that hasn't really been figured out very much before.    The capsule was just revealed at this year's Berlin Fashion Week, accompanied with your performance. How do you look at people's reaction to your collection with HUGO?    This is completely new territory for me. I think I'm most happy with the fact that when we designed everything, it's quite subtle and that my name is not anywhere in these pieces, except on the label inside. Not that I'm trying to hide myself or anything, but I just think that people who shop HUGO, should be able to walk into HUGO and still shop HUGO, whether or not I made it. I think that as someone who's designing the clothes, it's not your job to make sure that your name is everywhere. It's your job to make sure that the the blend between what is you and what is the brand fits so well, that people will mistakenly buy it, not even knowing that it was a piece of my collection.   You were also named as the new face of HUGO Bodywear campaign. How does it feel to be the a part of a first partnership of this kind for HUGO, linking the fashion world with music?   It was really good, it was fun. It was a lot of hours in the gym to get that shoot done, which now I'm back on my training schedule again. It was nice to go to the gym with the goal of what you're gonna be doing, because I know everybody wants to look at the people on the boxes.  The shoot was really amazing. Get to shoot all of this with Mert & Marcus was just the best thing ever. When they took the first picture, I was so stressed because of being in underwear in front of loads of people, but working with them, they took the pressure off. And I don't know what it is about them, but just the slightest move they make you do and the way they place you within the shot, the way they actually direct you within the scene, it's super easy to work with them. All of the poses that I've been doing over the years, I've just been doing it so wrong.   How would you describe the style of "HUGO x Liam Payne capsule"?   It's definitely smart casual and a bit more loose. I think it's quite nice as well. When we were designing the capsule, obviously it was so heavily designed around me and stuff that I wear and the way that I wear things. In the way we designed the joggers or the way that the hoodie fits or whatever else, I think is definitely my fit on a lot of the things. Some of it's has a bit of streetwear in there, but most of it's kind of smart casual.   How do you manage to keep your own style, through working with a lot of different styles and being dressed by many different people?   Honestly, I think this is all because I've covered so many different ranges of fashion over the years, kind of because we started as young as we did in the band. You grow through your fashion at one stage or another, there were different elements of stuff that I've dressed along the way. So there's always something I can draw back to. The time I got it the most right was when it was the most simple and it was towards the end of the band. And then I kind of went off on trying different, new things. When I started off being a solo artist, being so nervous about presenting just myself to a fanbase and the world, I think I was kind of hiding behind as many things as possible. It was all the gold chains and sunglasses and everyting else, which was kind of me trying to create my own character, but it wasn't really me. But now I really have grown with fashion and I'm really happy that I made all those different mistakes.    What does HUGO mean to you?   I'd worn a few of different HUGO suits, different things on catwalks. I think in one element, it was just really perfect for me. And when we kind of made this brand partnership together, it just made complete sense to me. A lot of the pieces just cater to everything that I wear actually, which is really good. And it is exactly how I want to dress.   What can we expect from you in the future, are there any other collaborations with HUGO already on the horizon?    Yeah, there's a few things that we've already shot which are very fun and quite exciting. There's another collection that we're gonna make as well. Another one of the two, I think, at the moment. So lots of different things. And I can't help it, the more I go on HUGO's website and look at what's been made, where they're going next with things, I just start print screening and trying to design things. I mean, I'm really enjoying doing this at the moment, so I hope I get to do it for quite a long time.   Was there anything specifically, any idea, that you wanted to do that didn't come to life and you were hoping it would?    The problem that we had at this point was the timing, because we wanted to get it done for this specific period. It's great that the team worked as hard as they did because we got everything finished, but it was hard to do. There were so many different things that we had ideas for. And my problem is, I have like a million ideas. So if an idea gets left behind, it might get left way behind, because I'll think of something else that I like more. There was a lot of different pieces, especially more streetwear jackets. But I think I'm bringing that more into the second collection.   How different is it to design then to write a song?   I've always liked drawing and as soon as we've made the first collection, I went home and started drawing bunch of logos, different colors and things and seeing what went together, because when drawing, you can make as many mistakes as you want. I think that's kind of similar in songwriting, you can re-record it and re-record it  until you go »I like that a little bit more«, which is quite nice. It is a different sector. When drawing, your eyes just know when something goes together. Whereas the music is more of a feeling, like how does that song make you feel in a certain way or when you sing this line. I think that's the difference.  We sat down also with HUGO's creative director, Bart De Backer, a Belgian designer, who's in charge of designing BOSS younger brother brand's menswear.  HUGO is a brand with fashion forward approach, aiming for younger customers. From  the signature tailored suits to incorporating today's streetwear philosophy, HUGO is mixing together different styles and creating something new. 10 years in the future, what changes would you like to see in the world? What I would like to see is free health care, free education, more equality and less plastic. For people to be more considerate of what we use the plastic for.   What makes HUGO unique in your words? For me that's a brand that always challenged the status quo in a bit classic mindset in a way. When we started the brand started to wear sneakers under suits, we had tailored jackets with denims. Then we started to mix tailoring with sportswear and now we actually go completely into the whole mix master idea. An example for this is creating a platform for self expression, that makes people who buy HUGO wanna wear HUGO just how they want to wear it, we're not gonna tell them how they should wear it.  Recently, we started blurring the boundaries between the menswear and womenswear, in the last 3 – 4 collections we created unisex styles, so we actually invite our customers to not only check one side of the shop, but also the other side. This is a new thing we are working on and esentially something we always did with HUGO. Something that was seen as established, we question and we start challenging. This is something that is current, but also we are gonna try to introduce it more into the mainstream. What you have now is still a niche of people and our reach as a brand is quite big.    What are your next projects and which one you're most excited about? That's a thing I can not really talk about, it's still »under construction«. But the thing is, in general with every collection we try to collaborate with a lot of people. The collections that I'm working on and are coming out now, we're always searching for talent and when we see a really good graphic designer or people who sketch quite nicely or a different way of making designs, then we try to collaborate with them. This is also in the spirit of HUGO as a platform for self expression, we are actually searching for talents that have their voice or their point of view on things.   Could you tell us a bit about the inspirations behind the next collection coming out for spring and summer 2020? I discovered that Bowie was living in Berlin in the 70s, from 1976 to 1979, where he recorded what I find one of his most innovative albums, Low, Lodger and Heroes. About that time he also strated to reinvent himself. What I liked about that whole inspiration is that he always tried to push something new, tried new things, mixing different styles together and this is what he did in Berlin, experimented and created kind of new ways of music. For me he is the ultimate mix master.  This was the inspiration of the collection. We mixed the Bowie heritage and the Bowie street style of the 70s with the Berlin of today, where the street style is still very influenced by 90s, but is also very US heritage. The Bowie tailoring was very important and what we did in this collection is actually looking at the suit itself, kind of in a different way. What I wanted to do and did in this collection is looking at the very basic philosophy and use that as a starting point, where the suit has the top and bottom in the same fabric, with placing this in the time of today, where leisure wear is dominant. Everybody dresses down at the moment. I took a track suit as a starting point and gave it to my pattern designer of tailoring and I asked him »Please take the heritage techniques from tailoring and make a track suit«. What we developed was a tailored version of a track suit. What I think is in the future of suits, what is our heritage, what I believe is our future direction is the new idea of the suit, that is more leisure, more fitted to the lifestyle of all, also the young kids today. People wanna look cool, they still wanna look very valuable and they don't wanna feel forced into wearing a suit.  We started to work together with the Estate of Bowie and we have a little capsule where we actually use the pictures of Bowie on our clothing. The cover of Heroes album, together with Bowie's quote is a very nice piece from the collection. We also worked a lot around the silhouettes of David Bowie, we focused a lot on the fabric, but always with a little twist, because Bowie always wore suits in brighter colors, which were a bit loud, but he could wear it one way or another, he made it work.   What trends do you see shape the future of menswear? Dressing up becomes more important, but I don't think it will translate automatically in more tailoring. Tailoring will take a different place in mens wardrobe. We try to have new silhouettes, the way of dressing will have a very leisure shape. The tailored jacket  is an element you can use even in a very street inspired look. I think the formal and leisure styles will blend more.   How does HUGO differentiate itself from BOSS? It's a very different brand. In the past we were more like brothers, but now we are really a different brand. We talk differently to our consumer, the way we build our collections is completely different. For me, BOSS is a more established approach, where we question everything that is established. Brand HUGO by istself is also a brand that is based on self-expression, that means people who buy HUGO can actually wear it how they want to and they can experiment with it and try new things. For me this is a completely different philosophy.    How much do you think sustainability gives importance to fashion, now in 2019? I think it will gain more and more importance. We're also working on it in very different projects, so when we design, we think differently about things. I'm also reducing my collections, like the sizing of things becomes smaller, we get much more focused on our products and of course we are working into a different way of design, more long term design.  Also, a very interesting thing about young designers. Some time ago I talked to a teacher at Royal College in London and there they already see that young generations , the future designers are already thinking in the long term, what will happen when they design, what will be the effects on the environment. In HUGO we also started going into that mindset. Shot by photographers Mert Alas and Marcus Piggott inside an apartment in Berlin, the new campaign features Liam in signature styles from the brand’s underwear line. The musician and his model counterpart, interpret a young couple who have escaped to Berlin with the paparazzi hot on their tails.   “I feel lucky that as the face of HUGO, I get to front iconic campaigns such as this. It’s been an amazing experience to work with such an incredibly talented group of people,” says Liam.   In one hyper-saturated image, Liam is seen standing on a bed, wearing boxer briefs woven with the HUGO logo across the waistband. In a black and white shot, he poses for Maxwell as she captures his likeness on film. Perhaps the most intimate of all the images, shows the pair intertwined on the bed, while she wears his underwear and he wears nothing at all.   The bodywear range, comprised of trunks, boxer briefs, and tank tops borrows from the motif-heavy aesthetic of the core collection. Underwear styles are topped with waistbands in signature HUGO red with statement contrast logos, and sporty tank tops have vertical logos stitched onto their hemlines.

Jean-Baptiste Mondino : “I don’t use my camera as an extension of my penis”
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Jean-Baptiste Mondino : “I don’t use my camera as an extension of my penis”

Photography Johnny Depp, Lou Doillon, Karl Lagerfeld, Robert Pattinson, Björk – they’ve all posed for French photographer and director Jean-Baptiste Mondino, who recently exibited 20 years’ of his outstanding work for Numéro. Insatiably curious, he takes inspiration from the energy and beauty of the exceptional designers, artists, musicians and models who define our times, subliming their singularity into unforgettably iconic images of contemporary pop culture. Johnny Depp, Lou Doillon, Karl Lagerfeld, Robert Pattinson, Björk – they’ve all posed for French photographer and director Jean-Baptiste Mondino, who recently exibited 20 years’ of his outstanding work for Numéro. Insatiably curious, he takes inspiration from the energy and beauty of the exceptional designers, artists, musicians and models who define our times, subliming their singularity into unforgettably iconic images of contemporary pop culture.

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