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BOSS LAUNCHES SPRING/SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION AND CAMPAIGN
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BOSS LAUNCHES SPRING/SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION AND CAMPAIGN

Fashion Creativity, optimism and energy are the watchwords of Spring/Summer 2021 for BOSS. An international cast of up-and-coming talent, led by South Sudanese supermodel Adut Akech, introduces the new collection in a bold campaign directed by Fabien Baron.     Fusing elegance and ease, the looks are more relaxed than ever before. The work of artist William Farr, who combines flowers with found objects such as wire, is a rich point of reference, inspiring the use of metal eyelets throughout the collection. For men, the new season offers agenda-setting updates of classic BOSS pieces.   Graphic patterns combined with new shapes, such as in the combination of a check jacket with tracksuit-style pants. The result? A relaxed, easy-wear outfit that is every bit as elegant as a suit. The sophisticated use of stripes, camouflage and a bold logo graphic across knitwear, sweaters and outerwear underlines the contemporary mood.     Colours range from conker, a masculine red-brown first seen on the FW20 runway, to fresh blue and yellow tones. A selection of updated neutrals, including a rich camel brown and crisp off-white, round out the palette. Worn in combination, the shades infuse each look with an uplifting and dynamic feel.     For women, the collection has a sense of the playful, yet retains the precision and sharpness that defines the BOSS aesthetic. The relaxed mood is evident here too, with elegantly draped fabrics and loose fits providing a contemporary take on femininity. New combinations, such as sharp outerwear worn with track pants, or tailoring with a logo sweatshirt, are both confident and contemporary.     Colours echo those in the men’s collection, with a particular emphasis on zesty yellow and timeless black. Patterns are a key feature here too, while the use of metal elements references William Farr’s juxtaposition of the natural and industrial, and reveals the power of contrasts.   Creativity, optimism and energy are the watchwords of Spring/Summer 2021 for BOSS. An international cast of up-and-coming talent, led by South Sudanese supermodel Adut Akech, introduces the new collection in a bold campaign directed by Fabien Baron.     Fusing elegance and ease, the looks are more relaxed than ever before. The work of artist William Farr, who combines flowers with found objects such as wire, is a rich point of reference, inspiring the use of metal eyelets throughout the collection. For men, the new season offers agenda-setting updates of classic BOSS pieces.   Graphic patterns combined with new shapes, such as in the combination of a check jacket with tracksuit-style pants. The result? A relaxed, easy-wear outfit that is every bit as elegant as a suit. The sophisticated use of stripes, camouflage and a bold logo graphic across knitwear, sweaters and outerwear underlines the contemporary mood.     Colours range from conker, a masculine red-brown first seen on the FW20 runway, to fresh blue and yellow tones. A selection of updated neutrals, including a rich camel brown and crisp off-white, round out the palette. Worn in combination, the shades infuse each look with an uplifting and dynamic feel.     For women, the collection has a sense of the playful, yet retains the precision and sharpness that defines the BOSS aesthetic. The relaxed mood is evident here too, with elegantly draped fabrics and loose fits providing a contemporary take on femininity. New combinations, such as sharp outerwear worn with track pants, or tailoring with a logo sweatshirt, are both confident and contemporary.     Colours echo those in the men’s collection, with a particular emphasis on zesty yellow and timeless black. Patterns are a key feature here too, while the use of metal elements references William Farr’s juxtaposition of the natural and industrial, and reveals the power of contrasts.  

When Dancing Stars Align: A Conversation Between Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav
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When Dancing Stars Align: A Conversation Between Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav

Men Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav, two rising stars in the world of contemporary dance, were destined to meet -- both Congolese, queer, Belgium-born artists nee under the sign of Leo in 1993. While astrological, geographical and artistic forces converged to bring these two together professionally, it wasn’t until recently that their paths crossed. Coutsier, who had already collaborated with Beyoncé, reached out to Yav in 2019 to join the “Black Is King” project. Although they didn’t get to work together then, they were each featured in the visual album -- Yav in “SCAR” and Coutsier in “SPIRIT”. After cementing their artistic individuality, they came together to harness the power of Ndeko -- a word that originates from Congo’s Lingala language, which means a strong bond, either blood-related or spiritual, whereby two people are bound by care and respect. We sat down with them to talk about race, identity and the power of movement.      Christian: The first time I heard of Nick was in January 2017. I remember someone telling me that there is a beautiful black dancer that has a very interesting way of moving. At that point, I hadn’t experienced having another black body in the space of contemporary dance. The moment Instagram started to broaden connection possibilities on the platform, that's when I really started to look for people like myself. I remember one day, Nick popped up as a “Suggestion For You”, and that’s really when I saw him for the first time.    Nick: My immediate reaction when I first heard about Christian wasn’t necessarily a defensive one, but more of a question about who that person is and why the comparison is being made. I also didn’t know if the constant comparison was positive or negative, or just a warning about this other guy. In this industry, it’s kind of a privileged place to be the only black guy. So is this other person going to be an ally or is he coming for my spot? All that thinking isn’t conscious hate, it’s just so instilled in how we think and how we are trained to think -- the so-called “There can only be one“ myth. When we physically met, it was kind of like a match made in heaven. For the first time ever, I was like “Okay wow, this is how it actually feels to have another black body in the space.”   Christian: What’s interesting is the way I first started hearing about Nick. I felt this energy as though these people were preparing me for this. I often had white allies, and now I had a black ally, which allowed me to broaden my network of people of colour and black dancers. It was one of the few times where I felt that there were no strings attached.    Nick: I like to be surrounded by people who have that talent and drive. And so when I heard about Christian, I thought “If he’s that good, then let me see how good I can be.” Competition is about pushing the other up -- inspiring and challenging each other to be the best version of ourselves.    Christian: There isn’t always a lot of space to move in contemporary dance when you are the only black person. There are certain opportunities that you can’t get because it’s a project that is told from a certain narrative.    Nick: Both of us being black, queer artists, we had to move through society in a certain way because of structural racism and homophobia. Being black we had to do this, being gay we had to do this, being second-generation immigrants, we had to do this. So it all made us who we are. And I think that the way I moved in society translated into the way I move as a dancer. The body being my main instrument, it does carry its own story. And I remember when I saw Christian move, I thought ”Wow, it is so specific” and it reminded me of the singularity of how I am trying to move. It does take time and maturity to embrace singularity as being an asset.   Christian: There is a logic to movement. It’s very easy for outsiders to say, “Oh yeah, I recognise this from ballet, or this from that.” But something I’ve often noticed with people of colour and black dancers is that the moment they do their own thing, there is something about their movement that doesn’t always appear to be what people normally perceive as logical in dance. But it’s so clear that you take it for what it is. I do think that having your own logic of movement is linked to having a lonely existence. When I started doing gymnastics as a kid, I was the only boy and the only black boy. You’re constantly on an island within a group. The way Nick moves, what happens here in his chest, it’s such a minor detail for others but then I’m like “Ah, I understand this movement.” It’s important to have representation and to see yourself in someone else, but feeling the movement is even more powerful.    Nick: I now kind of understand why we weren’t put together before because we are so powerful together. The colonial system of dividing power to better conquer is still present, including in the dance industry. Now we understand the power that we have together.    Christian: Our star signs are also identical. Over the years, I’ve met a lot of people who are Leo, but rarely someone who is a double Leo, like me. When people are double Leo, it’s so strong. Even if the personalities are different, there is something that is going to work because we’re powered by the same energetical forces within the universe.    Nick: It’s an unapologetic way of being. Something that has allowed us to be so sure and assertive about who we are was to not wait for that external validation.    Christian: In dance, the movements are stronger than myself so I don’t feel the need to adapt to other dance aesthetics. As a black man in society, however, that’s where I adapt my movements. For a very long time, when I would go to the hairdresser, I would speak in a very low voice, walk in a different way, and just adapt very small things. And I still do it because in order to survive, that’s where I really need to adapt my movements. In spaces where you’re underrepresented, people don’t always have the knowledge, desire or awareness of wanting it to be an inclusive place.    Nick: As a gay person, you need to adapt all the time, and so you just become really good at it. It shouldn’t be this way but it’s unfortunately still the case, as being your true, authentic self is still not accepted everywhere. Working with movement, the body and dance in that way allows me to make lemonade out of not-so-tasty lemons, so to speak. From a cathartic point of view, my adaptability in life does translate itself in my dancing, my work and my research around movement.   Christian: Walking in the streets as a queer man with your partner is a very precious part of me and not every place is a place to share that in the way that we would like to share it. Our society is not built on that, and that’s when I started realising that adapting isn’t always a bad thing.    Nick: When I started to create my own work, my artistic spontaneity would be sparked by sonorities and movements that would go back to my African roots. When I met Christian, it was really serendipitous because it was the moment I started to deconstruct a lot of things and give value to that part of myself. You live in this constant duality, which can be a power, but for the longest time it was something that I couldn’t identify with. I questioned my legitimacy as a black man, asking “Am I really the person who can talk about structural racism?” But being a second-generation immigrant is an identity in itself and so I gave power to my Congolese roots.    Christian: It is different when as a black person, you dance with another black person. When Nick and I were dancing during this shoot, it’s as if we were an extension of each other, almost like one body. There is a sense of home that I usually have to find within myself.    Nick: And as movement is such a big part of us, both in life and in dance, it was important for us to work with a photographer who could encapsulate all of that. Julien Vallon was a perfect fit, and we decided to name this photo series “Ndeko”, as it captures the way Christian and I feel about one another -- when you recognise yourself in the other. “I see you Ndeko”.      TEAM CREDITS:   Photographer Julien Vallon Fashion by Gabriella Norberg Talents Nick Coutsier & Christian Yav Words and edit by Berenice Magistretti editor: Timotej Letonja Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav, two rising stars in the world of contemporary dance, were destined to meet -- both Congolese, queer, Belgium-born artists nee under the sign of Leo in 1993. While astrological, geographical and artistic forces converged to bring these two together professionally, it wasn’t until recently that their paths crossed. Coutsier, who had already collaborated with Beyoncé, reached out to Yav in 2019 to join the “Black Is King” project. Although they didn’t get to work together then, they were each featured in the visual album -- Yav in “SCAR” and Coutsier in “SPIRIT”. After cementing their artistic individuality, they came together to harness the power of Ndeko -- a word that originates from Congo’s Lingala language, which means a strong bond, either blood-related or spiritual, whereby two people are bound by care and respect. We sat down with them to talk about race, identity and the power of movement.      Christian: The first time I heard of Nick was in January 2017. I remember someone telling me that there is a beautiful black dancer that has a very interesting way of moving. At that point, I hadn’t experienced having another black body in the space of contemporary dance. The moment Instagram started to broaden connection possibilities on the platform, that's when I really started to look for people like myself. I remember one day, Nick popped up as a “Suggestion For You”, and that’s really when I saw him for the first time.    Nick: My immediate reaction when I first heard about Christian wasn’t necessarily a defensive one, but more of a question about who that person is and why the comparison is being made. I also didn’t know if the constant comparison was positive or negative, or just a warning about this other guy. In this industry, it’s kind of a privileged place to be the only black guy. So is this other person going to be an ally or is he coming for my spot? All that thinking isn’t conscious hate, it’s just so instilled in how we think and how we are trained to think -- the so-called “There can only be one“ myth. When we physically met, it was kind of like a match made in heaven. For the first time ever, I was like “Okay wow, this is how it actually feels to have another black body in the space.”   Christian: What’s interesting is the way I first started hearing about Nick. I felt this energy as though these people were preparing me for this. I often had white allies, and now I had a black ally, which allowed me to broaden my network of people of colour and black dancers. It was one of the few times where I felt that there were no strings attached.    Nick: I like to be surrounded by people who have that talent and drive. And so when I heard about Christian, I thought “If he’s that good, then let me see how good I can be.” Competition is about pushing the other up -- inspiring and challenging each other to be the best version of ourselves.    Christian: There isn’t always a lot of space to move in contemporary dance when you are the only black person. There are certain opportunities that you can’t get because it’s a project that is told from a certain narrative.    Nick: Both of us being black, queer artists, we had to move through society in a certain way because of structural racism and homophobia. Being black we had to do this, being gay we had to do this, being second-generation immigrants, we had to do this. So it all made us who we are. And I think that the way I moved in society translated into the way I move as a dancer. The body being my main instrument, it does carry its own story. And I remember when I saw Christian move, I thought ”Wow, it is so specific” and it reminded me of the singularity of how I am trying to move. It does take time and maturity to embrace singularity as being an asset.   Christian: There is a logic to movement. It’s very easy for outsiders to say, “Oh yeah, I recognise this from ballet, or this from that.” But something I’ve often noticed with people of colour and black dancers is that the moment they do their own thing, there is something about their movement that doesn’t always appear to be what people normally perceive as logical in dance. But it’s so clear that you take it for what it is. I do think that having your own logic of movement is linked to having a lonely existence. When I started doing gymnastics as a kid, I was the only boy and the only black boy. You’re constantly on an island within a group. The way Nick moves, what happens here in his chest, it’s such a minor detail for others but then I’m like “Ah, I understand this movement.” It’s important to have representation and to see yourself in someone else, but feeling the movement is even more powerful.    Nick: I now kind of understand why we weren’t put together before because we are so powerful together. The colonial system of dividing power to better conquer is still present, including in the dance industry. Now we understand the power that we have together.    Christian: Our star signs are also identical. Over the years, I’ve met a lot of people who are Leo, but rarely someone who is a double Leo, like me. When people are double Leo, it’s so strong. Even if the personalities are different, there is something that is going to work because we’re powered by the same energetical forces within the universe.    Nick: It’s an unapologetic way of being. Something that has allowed us to be so sure and assertive about who we are was to not wait for that external validation.    Christian: In dance, the movements are stronger than myself so I don’t feel the need to adapt to other dance aesthetics. As a black man in society, however, that’s where I adapt my movements. For a very long time, when I would go to the hairdresser, I would speak in a very low voice, walk in a different way, and just adapt very small things. And I still do it because in order to survive, that’s where I really need to adapt my movements. In spaces where you’re underrepresented, people don’t always have the knowledge, desire or awareness of wanting it to be an inclusive place.    Nick: As a gay person, you need to adapt all the time, and so you just become really good at it. It shouldn’t be this way but it’s unfortunately still the case, as being your true, authentic self is still not accepted everywhere. Working with movement, the body and dance in that way allows me to make lemonade out of not-so-tasty lemons, so to speak. From a cathartic point of view, my adaptability in life does translate itself in my dancing, my work and my research around movement.   Christian: Walking in the streets as a queer man with your partner is a very precious part of me and not every place is a place to share that in the way that we would like to share it. Our society is not built on that, and that’s when I started realising that adapting isn’t always a bad thing.    Nick: When I started to create my own work, my artistic spontaneity would be sparked by sonorities and movements that would go back to my African roots. When I met Christian, it was really serendipitous because it was the moment I started to deconstruct a lot of things and give value to that part of myself. You live in this constant duality, which can be a power, but for the longest time it was something that I couldn’t identify with. I questioned my legitimacy as a black man, asking “Am I really the person who can talk about structural racism?” But being a second-generation immigrant is an identity in itself and so I gave power to my Congolese roots.    Christian: It is different when as a black person, you dance with another black person. When Nick and I were dancing during this shoot, it’s as if we were an extension of each other, almost like one body. There is a sense of home that I usually have to find within myself.    Nick: And as movement is such a big part of us, both in life and in dance, it was important for us to work with a photographer who could encapsulate all of that. Julien Vallon was a perfect fit, and we decided to name this photo series “Ndeko”, as it captures the way Christian and I feel about one another -- when you recognise yourself in the other. “I see you Ndeko”.      TEAM CREDITS:   Photographer Julien Vallon Fashion by Gabriella Norberg Talents Nick Coutsier & Christian Yav Words and edit by Berenice Magistretti editor: Timotej Letonja

Exclusive editorial starring Maddie Ziegler
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Exclusive editorial starring Maddie Ziegler

Fashion Exclusive new digital cover story with the talented Maddie Ziegler wearing Miu Miu Fall & Winter 2020-2021.     TEAM CREDITS: Talent: Maddie Ziegler @maddieziegler Editor in Chief: Timotej Letonja @timiletonja Codirector/Photographer: Andrew Arthur @andrewarthur Codirector: Nikolai Kokanovic @foxnhound Fashion Director: Lisa Jarvis @lisajarvis_stylist Creative Producer: Chloe Brinklow @chloebrinklow Makeup: Tonya Brewer @thetonyabrewer Hair: Clayton Hawkins @claytonhawkins Stylist assistant: Damien Lloyd @thedameeffect  Choreographer: Denna Thomsen @dennathomsen  DP: Vatche Giragossian @giragossian.cine  Prop Stylist: Enoch Choi  @numero_netherlands  Exclusive new digital cover story with the talented Maddie Ziegler wearing Miu Miu Fall & Winter 2020-2021.     TEAM CREDITS: Talent: Maddie Ziegler @maddieziegler Editor in Chief: Timotej Letonja @timiletonja Codirector/Photographer: Andrew Arthur @andrewarthur Codirector: Nikolai Kokanovic @foxnhound Fashion Director: Lisa Jarvis @lisajarvis_stylist Creative Producer: Chloe Brinklow @chloebrinklow Makeup: Tonya Brewer @thetonyabrewer Hair: Clayton Hawkins @claytonhawkins Stylist assistant: Damien Lloyd @thedameeffect  Choreographer: Denna Thomsen @dennathomsen  DP: Vatche Giragossian @giragossian.cine  Prop Stylist: Enoch Choi  @numero_netherlands 

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Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Berluti
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Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Berluti

Fashion Exclusive new editorial in collaboration with Berluti.   Credits: Photographer Linus Morales at Lomo mgmt Fashion editor Gabriella Norberg Hair & Make-up Amelie Holmberg at Agency Bigoudi Model Luca Farup at Two Management Photo assistant digital Kat Stump  Photo assistant light Karl Sandock Fashion assistant Sarah Schmidt Editor Timotej Letonja Exclusive new editorial in collaboration with Berluti.   Credits: Photographer Linus Morales at Lomo mgmt Fashion editor Gabriella Norberg Hair & Make-up Amelie Holmberg at Agency Bigoudi Model Luca Farup at Two Management Photo assistant digital Kat Stump  Photo assistant light Karl Sandock Fashion assistant Sarah Schmidt Editor Timotej Letonja

In conversation with Jorge Lopez
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In conversation with Jorge Lopez

Men Recently we had a delight speaking with actor and our cover star Jorge Lopez.       As our theme for this season is "DREAM", what are your dreams Jorge? Was acting a dream of yours or did it just happen and evolve naturally?   At this moment my dreams are not very graphic, they are reduced to the simple. The great wishes that I had before are disappearing. Having been outside of my country for almost 7 years has made me connect stronger than ever with my roots and I want that my family is well and that they do not lack anything.   Acting was always present in my life, before I began to speak my body moved to the rhythm of the music, I dressed up, sang. Later at college the same, I participated in all the activities and was the production and staging leader.   When I finished high school it was a totally visceral decision to dedicate myself to this professionally. I never questioned it because I felt that it was what I had to do, period. That, hand in hand with destiny, made everything a great path, full of great experiences and learnings.     What are some of the highlights of "ELITE" on Netflix for you? Will you be back next season?   Elite is a project that will mark my career forever. That's a fact, as an actor to be able to play such a socially controversial character. And the reception of the public fills me with satisfaction.   Exploring places that I didn’t know either as an actor or as a person, Valerio took me to the darkest and at the same time luminous limits of a human being. I learned a lot from him.   In professional terms, it was the project that brought me to Europe, a place where I always wanted to experience working and growing. For which I am very grateful to the project. I met people I admire a lot, a great team of professionals.   The personal thing that is the most important for me, it meant growing. I have been living in Spain for almost 2 years and I want it to become my base, I am completely in love with this country.   Regarding my continuity in the series, my departure is already public. However, I am already working on the pre-production of another series, also with Netflix, which has me very excited.     How doeas your normal day look like? Do you have a daily routine?   The truth is I have my rituals (which I don't always follow), that I inherited from my mother. The key is breakfast, that marks the whole day. A shot of multiple vitamins and minerals extracted from fruits and vegetables, put in the blender and that's it.   Then sports. Personally, I like to swim in the morning, then go to the gym and I'm going to do whatever I have to do for work, photos, wardrobe tests, day of shooting, etc.   With regards to eating 5 daily meals, balanced and rich mainly in proteins and carbohydrates, because when I spend a lot, I must also consume a lot.     What is it like for you personally to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic? Have you been able to stay creative during these times? Perhaps you developed new dreams, projects, or discovered new passions?   It has been a very hard blow for everyone all around the world, we were all touched differently. I personally went through it with my best friends in Madrid, it was very enriching to experience a creative and personal retreat at the same time.   I came from a very strong rhythm of 10 years of work without stopping at any time, totally devoted and absorbed by my work. And this was a very hard blow to look inside myself. It was tremendously positive. I think I had forgotten who I was, I think I had lost myself. Now that I am resuming my work, it is much more powerful to be aware of all the personal spiritual work done in the confinement.   We were confined in Madrid for 2 months and I did discover many creative places in me beyond interpretation. Now I can say that I have more than 7 hobbies.     What do you think is the most important thing about the current times? What positive aspects can we draw from this difficult period?   These are highly contradictory times. I believe that the world is constantly changing from climate change to social change, which is dehumanizing us. Situations like this are terrible, they measure us, millions of deaths in the world, it is something with a very strong impact. It is important that we stop for a second to look around us and forget about our ego and only our interests.   I believe that growing in empathy and resilience is the positive aspect, that everything we are experiencing leaves me with.     CREDITS: Talent: Jorge Lopez @jorgelopez_as Photography: Nico Bustos @nicobustos@artlistparisnewyork Casting / EIC: Timotej Letonja @timiletonja  Styling: Gabriella Norberg @gabriella.norberg Editor: Jordan Boothe @lmcworldwide  Photo assistants: Alex Orjecovschi, Federica Falcone Digital operator: Lorenzo Styling assistant: Tea Lindstrom Grooming: Alessandro Rebecchi @artlistparisnewyork Producer: Allan Vetier Production assistant: Ines Saccani  Special thanks to Hoxton Hotel Paris  Recently we had a delight speaking with actor and our cover star Jorge Lopez.       As our theme for this season is "DREAM", what are your dreams Jorge? Was acting a dream of yours or did it just happen and evolve naturally?   At this moment my dreams are not very graphic, they are reduced to the simple. The great wishes that I had before are disappearing. Having been outside of my country for almost 7 years has made me connect stronger than ever with my roots and I want that my family is well and that they do not lack anything.   Acting was always present in my life, before I began to speak my body moved to the rhythm of the music, I dressed up, sang. Later at college the same, I participated in all the activities and was the production and staging leader.   When I finished high school it was a totally visceral decision to dedicate myself to this professionally. I never questioned it because I felt that it was what I had to do, period. That, hand in hand with destiny, made everything a great path, full of great experiences and learnings.     What are some of the highlights of "ELITE" on Netflix for you? Will you be back next season?   Elite is a project that will mark my career forever. That's a fact, as an actor to be able to play such a socially controversial character. And the reception of the public fills me with satisfaction.   Exploring places that I didn’t know either as an actor or as a person, Valerio took me to the darkest and at the same time luminous limits of a human being. I learned a lot from him.   In professional terms, it was the project that brought me to Europe, a place where I always wanted to experience working and growing. For which I am very grateful to the project. I met people I admire a lot, a great team of professionals.   The personal thing that is the most important for me, it meant growing. I have been living in Spain for almost 2 years and I want it to become my base, I am completely in love with this country.   Regarding my continuity in the series, my departure is already public. However, I am already working on the pre-production of another series, also with Netflix, which has me very excited.     How doeas your normal day look like? Do you have a daily routine?   The truth is I have my rituals (which I don't always follow), that I inherited from my mother. The key is breakfast, that marks the whole day. A shot of multiple vitamins and minerals extracted from fruits and vegetables, put in the blender and that's it.   Then sports. Personally, I like to swim in the morning, then go to the gym and I'm going to do whatever I have to do for work, photos, wardrobe tests, day of shooting, etc.   With regards to eating 5 daily meals, balanced and rich mainly in proteins and carbohydrates, because when I spend a lot, I must also consume a lot.     What is it like for you personally to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic? Have you been able to stay creative during these times? Perhaps you developed new dreams, projects, or discovered new passions?   It has been a very hard blow for everyone all around the world, we were all touched differently. I personally went through it with my best friends in Madrid, it was very enriching to experience a creative and personal retreat at the same time.   I came from a very strong rhythm of 10 years of work without stopping at any time, totally devoted and absorbed by my work. And this was a very hard blow to look inside myself. It was tremendously positive. I think I had forgotten who I was, I think I had lost myself. Now that I am resuming my work, it is much more powerful to be aware of all the personal spiritual work done in the confinement.   We were confined in Madrid for 2 months and I did discover many creative places in me beyond interpretation. Now I can say that I have more than 7 hobbies.     What do you think is the most important thing about the current times? What positive aspects can we draw from this difficult period?   These are highly contradictory times. I believe that the world is constantly changing from climate change to social change, which is dehumanizing us. Situations like this are terrible, they measure us, millions of deaths in the world, it is something with a very strong impact. It is important that we stop for a second to look around us and forget about our ego and only our interests.   I believe that growing in empathy and resilience is the positive aspect, that everything we are experiencing leaves me with.     CREDITS: Talent: Jorge Lopez @jorgelopez_as Photography: Nico Bustos @nicobustos@artlistparisnewyork Casting / EIC: Timotej Letonja @timiletonja  Styling: Gabriella Norberg @gabriella.norberg Editor: Jordan Boothe @lmcworldwide  Photo assistants: Alex Orjecovschi, Federica Falcone Digital operator: Lorenzo Styling assistant: Tea Lindstrom Grooming: Alessandro Rebecchi @artlistparisnewyork Producer: Allan Vetier Production assistant: Ines Saccani  Special thanks to Hoxton Hotel Paris 

Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Jean Paul Gaultier
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Exclusive editorial in collaboration with Jean Paul Gaultier

Fashion NUMÉRO NL, spécial @jpgaultierofficial by Thibault-Théodore & Lisa Jarvis & Nicola Scarlino with Jesse Maybury     . Photographer & Director @thibault_theodore Fashion Director @lisajarvis_stylist Creative Director @nicola_scarlino Set Designer @nicola_scarlino Visual FX artist / video editor : @manuelmolla_  DOP @sictor Make up artist @aliceghendrih @calmyagent.fr Hair Stylist @hikageyumiko @saint_germain_agency Manicurist @delphineaissi_ydalagence . Casting Director @ikki_casting . Model @jessmaybury @elitemodelworld  . Fashion assistant @francescariccardi Light assistant @sosoinpariss Analog operator @maellejoigne Set Designer assistants @aminbidar @ach_d @antoinedugrandc @rosemarybrowning_ . Production @weird_fishes_studio Producer @thempresents Production assistant @adelinabichetelzey . Huge thanks to @kohlerparis NUMÉRO NL, spécial @jpgaultierofficial by Thibault-Théodore & Lisa Jarvis & Nicola Scarlino with Jesse Maybury     . Photographer & Director @thibault_theodore Fashion Director @lisajarvis_stylist Creative Director @nicola_scarlino Set Designer @nicola_scarlino Visual FX artist / video editor : @manuelmolla_  DOP @sictor Make up artist @aliceghendrih @calmyagent.fr Hair Stylist @hikageyumiko @saint_germain_agency Manicurist @delphineaissi_ydalagence . Casting Director @ikki_casting . Model @jessmaybury @elitemodelworld  . Fashion assistant @francescariccardi Light assistant @sosoinpariss Analog operator @maellejoigne Set Designer assistants @aminbidar @ach_d @antoinedugrandc @rosemarybrowning_ . Production @weird_fishes_studio Producer @thempresents Production assistant @adelinabichetelzey . Huge thanks to @kohlerparis

Dr. Martens Talking Tough podcast: In conversation with the role models of our time
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Dr. Martens Talking Tough podcast: In conversation with the role models of our time

Culture Dr.Martens is back with new episodes of the Talking Tough (UK) podcast.This time we present a special mini-series, recorded live from Rotterdam in the Netherlands.Hosted by writer Jill Mathon, journalist Bo Hanna and former night mayor of Amsterdam Shamiro van der Geld, each episode sheds light on topics ranging from community building, activism and self-expression in the form of art.They talk to the role models of our time: Massih Hutak, Tim Wes and Naomie Pieter.Talking Tough is a podcast about game changers that deserves to be heard more.In this mini-series, the hosts go into depth with our guests per episode.From gentrification to art as a form of resistance, and from Black queer love to spirituality.Today the first episode was launched with artist and writer Massih Hutak, which can be heard on Spotify and watched on YouTube.You can expect these episodes:     15/12 Episode 1: THIS LAND IS FOR EVERYONE | Massih Hutak   In the first episode of this Talking Tough miniseries, Jill, Bo and Shamiro talk to Massih Hutak about community building, creative initiatives and preserving authentic cultures.Massih is a rapper, father writer and columnist.Originally from Afghanistan, but raised in Amsterdam Noord, he talks about integration as a two-way street and the worldwide threat of gentrification.He recently published his first book about this: 'You have not discovered us.We have always been here. 'On behalf of Massih, Dr.Martens paid a sum of money to the Food Bank.They support people and fight against poverty by putting together and issuing food packages.Want to know more about the organization?Look here: amsterdam.voedselbank.org The episode with Massih can already be heard via Spotify from today: click here to listen immediately!   LISTEN TO THE PODCAST HERE: https://open.spotify.com/episode/5E0x09xBLPNfUADwcr4n7k?si=brWKp3GxTAuli7Tm_NrF7Q#login     22/12 Episode 2: MUSIC MEANS IDENTITY | Tim Wes   In this episode we take a look at the soul of Tim Wes.As an independent musician and multi-disciplinary artist, he often ran into stuck systems and boxes in his career.Looking at the intersection with identity and individualism, in the second episode of this Talking Tough miniseries, the jazz and R&B artist tells Jill, Bo and Shamiro about pressure in the music industry, art as an act of defiance and the struggle for new forms.of creativity.On behalf of Tim, Dr.Martens paid a sum of money to the MAEH Foundation.This organization offers development opportunities in the form of music lessons, art and language for young people in Rotterdam.Want to know more about the organization?Look here: https://maeh.eu/This episode will be released on Tuesday December 22, 2020 on Spotify & YouTube.     29/12 Episode 3: BEHIND THE MEGAPHONE | Naomie Pieter   Naomie Pieter has always made her voice heard.She is a choreographer, founder of Black Pride Nederland and Pon Di Pride.Naomie is also one of the driving forces behind Kick Out Zwarte Piet, Black Queer Trans Resistance and Black Lives Matter NL.And yes, she also has 24 hours in her day.In this episode of Talking Tough, Jill, Bo and Shamiro learn more about the woman behind the megaphone.And they talk to her about healing, self-care for activists and the importance of love in the broadest sense of the word.On behalf of Naomie, Dr.Martens paid a sum of money to the FOKO Curacao Foundation.They are committed to the LGBTQI + community on Curacao.Want to know more about the organization?Look here: instagram.com/fundashonorguyokorsouThe last episode of this miniseries with Naomie Pieter will be released on Tuesday December 29, 2020. You can also listen to it on Spotify, and watch it on YouTube.Stay tuned! Dr.Martens is back with new episodes of the Talking Tough (UK) podcast.This time we present a special mini-series, recorded live from Rotterdam in the Netherlands.Hosted by writer Jill Mathon, journalist Bo Hanna and former night mayor of Amsterdam Shamiro van der Geld, each episode sheds light on topics ranging from community building, activism and self-expression in the form of art.They talk to the role models of our time: Massih Hutak, Tim Wes and Naomie Pieter.Talking Tough is a podcast about game changers that deserves to be heard more.In this mini-series, the hosts go into depth with our guests per episode.From gentrification to art as a form of resistance, and from Black queer love to spirituality.Today the first episode was launched with artist and writer Massih Hutak, which can be heard on Spotify and watched on YouTube.You can expect these episodes:     15/12 Episode 1: THIS LAND IS FOR EVERYONE | Massih Hutak   In the first episode of this Talking Tough miniseries, Jill, Bo and Shamiro talk to Massih Hutak about community building, creative initiatives and preserving authentic cultures.Massih is a rapper, father writer and columnist.Originally from Afghanistan, but raised in Amsterdam Noord, he talks about integration as a two-way street and the worldwide threat of gentrification.He recently published his first book about this: 'You have not discovered us.We have always been here. 'On behalf of Massih, Dr.Martens paid a sum of money to the Food Bank.They support people and fight against poverty by putting together and issuing food packages.Want to know more about the organization?Look here: amsterdam.voedselbank.org The episode with Massih can already be heard via Spotify from today: click here to listen immediately!   LISTEN TO THE PODCAST HERE: https://open.spotify.com/episode/5E0x09xBLPNfUADwcr4n7k?si=brWKp3GxTAuli7Tm_NrF7Q#login     22/12 Episode 2: MUSIC MEANS IDENTITY | Tim Wes   In this episode we take a look at the soul of Tim Wes.As an independent musician and multi-disciplinary artist, he often ran into stuck systems and boxes in his career.Looking at the intersection with identity and individualism, in the second episode of this Talking Tough miniseries, the jazz and R&B artist tells Jill, Bo and Shamiro about pressure in the music industry, art as an act of defiance and the struggle for new forms.of creativity.On behalf of Tim, Dr.Martens paid a sum of money to the MAEH Foundation.This organization offers development opportunities in the form of music lessons, art and language for young people in Rotterdam.Want to know more about the organization?Look here: https://maeh.eu/This episode will be released on Tuesday December 22, 2020 on Spotify & YouTube.     29/12 Episode 3: BEHIND THE MEGAPHONE | Naomie Pieter   Naomie Pieter has always made her voice heard.She is a choreographer, founder of Black Pride Nederland and Pon Di Pride.Naomie is also one of the driving forces behind Kick Out Zwarte Piet, Black Queer Trans Resistance and Black Lives Matter NL.And yes, she also has 24 hours in her day.In this episode of Talking Tough, Jill, Bo and Shamiro learn more about the woman behind the megaphone.And they talk to her about healing, self-care for activists and the importance of love in the broadest sense of the word.On behalf of Naomie, Dr.Martens paid a sum of money to the FOKO Curacao Foundation.They are committed to the LGBTQI + community on Curacao.Want to know more about the organization?Look here: instagram.com/fundashonorguyokorsouThe last episode of this miniseries with Naomie Pieter will be released on Tuesday December 29, 2020. You can also listen to it on Spotify, and watch it on YouTube.Stay tuned!

GIVENCHY presents the pre-collection for Fall 2021
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GIVENCHY presents the pre-collection for Fall 2021

Fashion “Ultimately, what I am trying to do in the Givenchy collections is reflect today’s world. I appreciate a certain material experimentation and an intense contrast in clothing that could only be achieved and exist now. At the same time, we embrace tradition, the techniques of the salon and timelessness; these distinct elements are not mutually exclusive. The clothing is not disposable or dictatorial, instead we want it to become central to a person’s sense of their own style, and build each season. It’s an idea of a more personal luxury, of simultaneous formality and informality, construction and comfort; it’s the luxury of people wearing clothes, not clothes wearing people.” Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     Honing in on elements begun in his debut offering for Givenchy, Matthew M. Williams presents a collection of contrasts, both strident and subtle, for Fall ’21. Here, both classicism and subversion play a part; focusing on the traditional areas of tailoring, knitwear and leather there is an experimentation with the codes and techniques related to each, together with an ease applied equally for both men and women. Working with a precise, monochromatic palette in looks, the classicism of black, white and silver grey is contrasted with olive drab, vivid red and pink, becoming almost provocative in their connotations.     It is the discreet opulence of materials and methods that matter, found in an array of clothing choices both formal and informal, classical and more radical.     Clothing archetypes are once again experimented with alongside proportion in the silhouettes, bringing together ideas of both the salon and the city street. This is particularly visible in the recurring ‘cropped’motif, where jackets echo MA1 bombers, varsity and evening boleros. Signature, sculptural jersey is once again applied to realise pure yet easeful forms, at times literally punctuated with studs. Here, hardware made embellishment – a key Williams’ theme for each gender – mainly finds form in the stud this season. The new 4G Emblem bag also carries with it a tough yet decorative approach to hardware for both women and men. A constructed attitude to the Givenchy monogram is realised in guipure lace, a motif reinforcing a sense of underlying, traditional, rigorous craft as well as ascendant surface style in the collection.     An idea of a ‘second skin’ is utilised extensively, predominantly in the use of silk for women and men; both constructed and comfortable, a sinuous sensuousness travels through the collection, particularly in tailoring, This is also found in the leather pieces, where ease, structure and casual non-conformity all come into play. In turn, leather footwear becomes more fully integrated into the actual silhouettes, principally in the use of long, patent leather boots. Comfort is not forgotten in the footwear, with soles formulated using new TPU (Thermoplastic Polyurethane, a bridge between rubber and plastic) techniques. There is also a continuation of the Marshmallow Slide – with its extremely comfortable recovery-style sole – mixed with new, natural and more formal materials.     Collaborating on the imagery once more with the photographer Heji Shin, Williams presents a democratic and encompassing view of Givenchy. Here, the focus is on the people wearing the clothes as opposed to the clothes wearing the people – there is not just one Givenchy woman or one Givenchy man, but many. Each brings their own inimitable character and sense of style to the House. “Ultimately, what I am trying to do in the Givenchy collections is reflect today’s world. I appreciate a certain material experimentation and an intense contrast in clothing that could only be achieved and exist now. At the same time, we embrace tradition, the techniques of the salon and timelessness; these distinct elements are not mutually exclusive. The clothing is not disposable or dictatorial, instead we want it to become central to a person’s sense of their own style, and build each season. It’s an idea of a more personal luxury, of simultaneous formality and informality, construction and comfort; it’s the luxury of people wearing clothes, not clothes wearing people.” Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     Honing in on elements begun in his debut offering for Givenchy, Matthew M. Williams presents a collection of contrasts, both strident and subtle, for Fall ’21. Here, both classicism and subversion play a part; focusing on the traditional areas of tailoring, knitwear and leather there is an experimentation with the codes and techniques related to each, together with an ease applied equally for both men and women. Working with a precise, monochromatic palette in looks, the classicism of black, white and silver grey is contrasted with olive drab, vivid red and pink, becoming almost provocative in their connotations.     It is the discreet opulence of materials and methods that matter, found in an array of clothing choices both formal and informal, classical and more radical.     Clothing archetypes are once again experimented with alongside proportion in the silhouettes, bringing together ideas of both the salon and the city street. This is particularly visible in the recurring ‘cropped’motif, where jackets echo MA1 bombers, varsity and evening boleros. Signature, sculptural jersey is once again applied to realise pure yet easeful forms, at times literally punctuated with studs. Here, hardware made embellishment – a key Williams’ theme for each gender – mainly finds form in the stud this season. The new 4G Emblem bag also carries with it a tough yet decorative approach to hardware for both women and men. A constructed attitude to the Givenchy monogram is realised in guipure lace, a motif reinforcing a sense of underlying, traditional, rigorous craft as well as ascendant surface style in the collection.     An idea of a ‘second skin’ is utilised extensively, predominantly in the use of silk for women and men; both constructed and comfortable, a sinuous sensuousness travels through the collection, particularly in tailoring, This is also found in the leather pieces, where ease, structure and casual non-conformity all come into play. In turn, leather footwear becomes more fully integrated into the actual silhouettes, principally in the use of long, patent leather boots. Comfort is not forgotten in the footwear, with soles formulated using new TPU (Thermoplastic Polyurethane, a bridge between rubber and plastic) techniques. There is also a continuation of the Marshmallow Slide – with its extremely comfortable recovery-style sole – mixed with new, natural and more formal materials.     Collaborating on the imagery once more with the photographer Heji Shin, Williams presents a democratic and encompassing view of Givenchy. Here, the focus is on the people wearing the clothes as opposed to the clothes wearing the people – there is not just one Givenchy woman or one Givenchy man, but many. Each brings their own inimitable character and sense of style to the House.

DIOR presents the Fall 2021 collection
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DIOR presents the Fall 2021 collection

Fashion For Maria Grazia Chiuri, creating a collection is above all about exploring the bonds she weaves with her time. The Fall 2021 line thus is infused with a double movement between innovation and heritage, ultramodernity and the savoir-faire in the Dior ateliers. Hyper-colorful, transparent, shiny, embroidered or silvered, each piece outlines a new Pop attitude with a sportswear spirit, evoking the aesthetic power of designer Elio Fiorucci, as well as the way Andy Warhol revisited and reinterpreted Renaissance paintings by Paolo Uccello. Mizza Bricard, the muse of muses for Christian Dior, loved leopard print – which became an emblematic code of the House – and today it punctuates many looks, reflecting a radiant, vibrant optimism alongside the vitality of raspberry and chartreuse hues. Fashion becomes an experience to be explored, symbolized by a series of white T-shirts designed like an inspiring diary, a space of infinite freedom for the imagination. Dior icons, including the Bar jacket, are reinterpreted with audacity and refinement. An ode to energy and joie de vivre, exalted by the richness of exceptional craftsmanship. For Maria Grazia Chiuri, creating a collection is above all about exploring the bonds she weaves with her time. The Fall 2021 line thus is infused with a double movement between innovation and heritage, ultramodernity and the savoir-faire in the Dior ateliers. Hyper-colorful, transparent, shiny, embroidered or silvered, each piece outlines a new Pop attitude with a sportswear spirit, evoking the aesthetic power of designer Elio Fiorucci, as well as the way Andy Warhol revisited and reinterpreted Renaissance paintings by Paolo Uccello. Mizza Bricard, the muse of muses for Christian Dior, loved leopard print – which became an emblematic code of the House – and today it punctuates many looks, reflecting a radiant, vibrant optimism alongside the vitality of raspberry and chartreuse hues. Fashion becomes an experience to be explored, symbolized by a series of white T-shirts designed like an inspiring diary, a space of infinite freedom for the imagination. Dior icons, including the Bar jacket, are reinterpreted with audacity and refinement. An ode to energy and joie de vivre, exalted by the richness of exceptional craftsmanship.

ZALANDO PARTNERS WITH FASHION INDUSTRY NAMES TO RELEASE NEVER BEFORE SEEN IMAGES ON THE THEME OF HUMAN CONNECTION
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ZALANDO PARTNERS WITH FASHION INDUSTRY NAMES TO RELEASE NEVER BEFORE SEEN IMAGES ON THE THEME OF HUMAN CONNECTION

Fashion This holiday season, Zalando, Europe’s leading online platform for fashion and lifestyle, is partnering with some of fashion’s biggest names to bring the feeling of amillion virtual hugs across Europe. The campaign features Brooklyn Beckham, Jeremy Scott and Munroe Bergdorf sharing candid images showing the ultimate expression of human connection and solidarity: the hug. Against the backdrop of a challenging year of uncertainty and separation, positive future and a reminder of the importance of personal connection this festive period. the collection comes with the inspirational rallying cry - ‘We Will Hug Again’ - an optimistic message of a more   The campaign also features friend of Zalando, model and activist Rain Dove as well as creativecollective Muslim Sisterhood, who’s work centres around Muslim women and non-binary people. The image collection is an extension of Zalando’s Holiday Campaign, ‘We Will Hug Again’, which launched in November with the heart-warming film, ‘100 Years of Hugs’ and a series of images - Hug Portraits - of real people embracing.     As part of the efforts to celebrate the power of human connection, Zalando is also supporting the Red Cross to help those who may be isolated and lacking that connection at this time. While many of us cannot hug at this moment in time, together they are looking forward to a time when we can. They are calling on consumers to pick a favourite picture of a hug memory from their camera roll and share it on social media. For each post tagging @Zalando and using #WeWillHugAgain,Zalando will donate €5 to the Red Cross.     Photographer Brooklyn Beckham, whose emotive imagery made him the perfect fit for the “Human connection and physical embraces are soimportant in life. At a time when many of us are apart from loved ones, it felt right to partner with Zalando to spread a message of optimism that we will hug again. These images are deeplypersonal to me and show moments I don’t often share, but now is the time to be thankful for the great moments we’ve had and look forward to creating many more sometime soon.”   Model and activist Munroe Bergdorf, who shared an image of a tender hug between herself and friend and model Billy, added: “My camera roll is full of so many gorgeous cuddles and hugswith family and friends that I was spoilt for choice. It's lovely to look back on past moments and know that, even while things can be challenging right now, we will create many more memories like these in the future. Our loved ones are our support systems, they allow us to feel seen, heard and understood. I'm going to miss seeing so many of them over the festive season but I know we have so many amazing times to come. I'm glad to be part of spreading a bit of positivity and part of a campaign that is helping support those that need human connection themost.”     Natalie Wills, Global Director Social Media & Consumer PR remarked: “We’re delighted that so many of the industry’s most well-known faces have lent their voices to share this positivemessage. The images they’ve shared celebrate the beauty of human connection, and we wantto inspire the feeling of hope and optimism in these challenging times. It was also important to us to use this campaign as another opportunity to give back to the community and the support Red Cross on their mission to bring connection and support to those that need it most duringthis period.”     #wewillhugagain @Zalando This holiday season, Zalando, Europe’s leading online platform for fashion and lifestyle, is partnering with some of fashion’s biggest names to bring the feeling of amillion virtual hugs across Europe. The campaign features Brooklyn Beckham, Jeremy Scott and Munroe Bergdorf sharing candid images showing the ultimate expression of human connection and solidarity: the hug. Against the backdrop of a challenging year of uncertainty and separation, positive future and a reminder of the importance of personal connection this festive period. the collection comes with the inspirational rallying cry - ‘We Will Hug Again’ - an optimistic message of a more   The campaign also features friend of Zalando, model and activist Rain Dove as well as creativecollective Muslim Sisterhood, who’s work centres around Muslim women and non-binary people. The image collection is an extension of Zalando’s Holiday Campaign, ‘We Will Hug Again’, which launched in November with the heart-warming film, ‘100 Years of Hugs’ and a series of images - Hug Portraits - of real people embracing.     As part of the efforts to celebrate the power of human connection, Zalando is also supporting the Red Cross to help those who may be isolated and lacking that connection at this time. While many of us cannot hug at this moment in time, together they are looking forward to a time when we can. They are calling on consumers to pick a favourite picture of a hug memory from their camera roll and share it on social media. For each post tagging @Zalando and using #WeWillHugAgain,Zalando will donate €5 to the Red Cross.     Photographer Brooklyn Beckham, whose emotive imagery made him the perfect fit for the “Human connection and physical embraces are soimportant in life. At a time when many of us are apart from loved ones, it felt right to partner with Zalando to spread a message of optimism that we will hug again. These images are deeplypersonal to me and show moments I don’t often share, but now is the time to be thankful for the great moments we’ve had and look forward to creating many more sometime soon.”   Model and activist Munroe Bergdorf, who shared an image of a tender hug between herself and friend and model Billy, added: “My camera roll is full of so many gorgeous cuddles and hugswith family and friends that I was spoilt for choice. It's lovely to look back on past moments and know that, even while things can be challenging right now, we will create many more memories like these in the future. Our loved ones are our support systems, they allow us to feel seen, heard and understood. I'm going to miss seeing so many of them over the festive season but I know we have so many amazing times to come. I'm glad to be part of spreading a bit of positivity and part of a campaign that is helping support those that need human connection themost.”     Natalie Wills, Global Director Social Media & Consumer PR remarked: “We’re delighted that so many of the industry’s most well-known faces have lent their voices to share this positivemessage. The images they’ve shared celebrate the beauty of human connection, and we wantto inspire the feeling of hope and optimism in these challenging times. It was also important to us to use this campaign as another opportunity to give back to the community and the support Red Cross on their mission to bring connection and support to those that need it most duringthis period.”     #wewillhugagain @Zalando

GUESS ANNOUNCES MICHELE MORRONE AS THE NEW WORLDWIDE FACE OF GUESS MEN’S
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GUESS ANNOUNCES MICHELE MORRONE AS THE NEW WORLDWIDE FACE OF GUESS MEN’S

Fashion In celebration of the Fall/Winter 2020 collection, GUESS is excited to introduce Michele Morrone as the new worldwide face of GUESS Men’s. Morrone is an international actor and singer who is best known for his lead role in the successful Netflix film 365 Days,one of the most popular movies in Netflix history that is currently streaming in over 200 countries.       Morrone gained international recognition for his performance and soundtrack in the film, proving to be a multi-faceted superstar who has gained traction on social media rapidly, with approximately 10 million followers on Instagram alone – a stunning increase from 1.7 million followers three weeks before the campaign was shot.     Staged under the creative guidance of GUESS Chief Creative Officer Paul Marciano, the holiday advertising campaign was shot by fashion photographer Nima Benati in her first campaign with GUESS, at the breathtaking Villa Erba in Lake Como, Italy.  Once the home of internationally renowned movie director Luchino Visconti, this historic villa was the perfect setting for an iconic campaign and a fundamental inspiration for Paul Marciano’s love of Italian movie history.      “I had a brief meeting with Michele at my hotel in Lugano last June and we immediately had a strong connection,” says Paul Marciano.  “Michele is an extremely hard worker, and a very ambitious and decisive man and these are all qualities I deeply appreciate.  In a matter of minutes, we knew we were going to work together and a few weeks after that very first meeting we met again in Lake Como to shoot these spectacular images.”     “The moment I met Paul, I knew I found a new mentor and friend,” says Michele Morrone. “We share the same values and goals.  It’s an incredible feeling being able to have fun on set doing what I love, while having a sense of comfort that I’m now part of such an amazing family. Family and loyalty are important to me, and I want to take this brand and treat it as my own.”      “This campaign marks the launch of our new GUESS men’s collection, reflecting our new focus on elevated, classic, and high-quality styles which is perfectly in-line with Michele Morrone’s personality” says Paul Marciano.       These GUESS images will be featured in upcoming issues of top international fashion and lifestyle magazines and in GUESS retail stores.       In celebration of the Fall/Winter 2020 collection, GUESS is excited to introduce Michele Morrone as the new worldwide face of GUESS Men’s. Morrone is an international actor and singer who is best known for his lead role in the successful Netflix film 365 Days,one of the most popular movies in Netflix history that is currently streaming in over 200 countries.       Morrone gained international recognition for his performance and soundtrack in the film, proving to be a multi-faceted superstar who has gained traction on social media rapidly, with approximately 10 million followers on Instagram alone – a stunning increase from 1.7 million followers three weeks before the campaign was shot.     Staged under the creative guidance of GUESS Chief Creative Officer Paul Marciano, the holiday advertising campaign was shot by fashion photographer Nima Benati in her first campaign with GUESS, at the breathtaking Villa Erba in Lake Como, Italy.  Once the home of internationally renowned movie director Luchino Visconti, this historic villa was the perfect setting for an iconic campaign and a fundamental inspiration for Paul Marciano’s love of Italian movie history.      “I had a brief meeting with Michele at my hotel in Lugano last June and we immediately had a strong connection,” says Paul Marciano.  “Michele is an extremely hard worker, and a very ambitious and decisive man and these are all qualities I deeply appreciate.  In a matter of minutes, we knew we were going to work together and a few weeks after that very first meeting we met again in Lake Como to shoot these spectacular images.”     “The moment I met Paul, I knew I found a new mentor and friend,” says Michele Morrone. “We share the same values and goals.  It’s an incredible feeling being able to have fun on set doing what I love, while having a sense of comfort that I’m now part of such an amazing family. Family and loyalty are important to me, and I want to take this brand and treat it as my own.”      “This campaign marks the launch of our new GUESS men’s collection, reflecting our new focus on elevated, classic, and high-quality styles which is perfectly in-line with Michele Morrone’s personality” says Paul Marciano.       These GUESS images will be featured in upcoming issues of top international fashion and lifestyle magazines and in GUESS retail stores.      

In conversation with Michaela DePrince
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In conversation with Michaela DePrince

Portrait Michaela DePrince, a Sierra Leonean-American ballet dancer, rose to fame in 2011 with starring in the documentary ”First Position”, which was following her and other young ballet dancers as they were preparing to compete at the Youth America Grand Prix, at which her performance gained her a scholarship at the American Ballet Theatre's Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School of Ballet. As the youngest dancer in the history of the company, she danced with the Dance Theatre of Harlem and currently she is a solo ballet dancer for the Dutch National Ballet, which she joined in 2013.       What inspired you to become a ballerina?   What I would say inspired me was when I found this magazine in Sierra Leone and there was this beautiful ballerina. And it wasn't just the fact that she was something I've never seen before, the position was absolutely beautiful, the costumes were absolutely beautiful in all the pages of the magazine. But the cover struck me so much because she looked so happy and I decided then that I would become this ballerina and to become super happy and that's when my dream to become a ballerina started, in Sierra Leone.     From competing at the Youth America Grand Prix, studying at the American Ballet Theatre's Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School of Ballet to becoming a professional ballerina. In US, you danced with the Dance Theatre of Harlem, where you were their youngest dancer in the history. Then you came to Europe, where you are now a solo ballet dancer for the Dutch National Ballet. Tell us more about your journey from the US to the Netherlands.    I remember that when I got adopted I felt like the biggest thing that I ever have to worry about was people not like me for my white spots, cause in Sierra Leone I was considered the devil's child because of my vitiligo, I was different. But then I got to the US and I realized there's a fact that I was born brown and I fell in love with the art that has always discriminated against brown and black dancers and somehow I was drawn to it and I didn't want to be affected by it. But I was affected by it, I didn't have a lot of friends as well, I never saw a lot of black dancers in my classes growing up.    Then I joined Dance Theatre Harlem, I was the youngest member to join and it was an amazing experience, cause the founder that started it, Arthur Mitchell, he was originally the first black, African-American dancer in New York City Ballet. Obviously everybody knows New York City Ballet is one of the best and he was able to give space for brown and black dancers of different races and built this opportunity to do what you love, to do ballet and know that it's ok to accept your skin color. He would give us the opportunity to wear brown tights, whatever skin tone matched our bodies, but then at the same time I felt like I needed to bring that into bigger companies and change that in Europe or in the US and so I joined Dutch National Ballet, the junior company.    Of course, in the beginning you're a beginner and you don't want to speak out as much, so I was holding my tounge as much as possible and waiting for me to get the opportunity to be at the highest point as possible. When I got to the highest point, that's when I realized it was my opportunity to really try to change it, so I started wearing brown tights at Dutch National Ballet. But even last year, I had to fight for it. They wanted me not to make a big deal about it, but that's just me going back to who I was. Them not letting me wear them, that's not who I was, so they made me feel like I didn't belong again and all those old feelings. Luckily, I was able to make a fuss about it and I was able to wear my brown tights in the end.    I don't want other dancers in the next generation to have to deal with that, to have to constantly feel like you're not fully yourself on stage. You're trying to tell a story, but it's also coming from your point of view and you want to feel like you're most authentic that you possibly can be.     Your road hasn't been the easiest, you faced a lot of racial discrimination, which is a global problem that escalated to its highest levels ever in 2020. What is your view on that, how do you feel about all that?   The Black Lives Matter movement, it's a big movement. It was sad seeing people, who look exactly like me, getting killed for absolutely no reason. I always think we're all human, we all have preferences, we all love, we can all care about each other and support each other. I just don't understand why people are killing people without even getting to know them. You just see them as an animal or whatever and it's really upsetting, cause I've experienced that growing up in New York, that discrimination. Also here in Amsterdam, I've been told to go back to my own country and it's a lot and it's constantly making you feel like you never belong. So that's what I'm trying to do, to change that. It doesn't matter if you're brown, black, spotted, white ... you have an option to conquer your dreams through a lot of hard work and your support system.     What do you love most about ballet, what is the most special thing about this passion of yours?   For me, it's not that I saw ballet and I was living a great childhood. It was what gave me hope as a young orphan who thought nobody ever wanted her and gave me an outlet to just being in a little bubble when other things in my life, even after I got adopted, were not going the way I wanted them to go.    Ballet, it made me feel special. Acknowledgement from the audience always makes you want to do it more and more, but it's just this opportunity to have your own bubble and to be able to express yourself as much as possible. That's why in general art is such a saviour for a lot of people and it's upsetting when they're constantly defunding arts. The art helped me, it helped my sisters and brothers and other people that I know and it's an outlet to express yourself without even having to use words and I think that's the best way for me to express myself. When I'm sad, I can dance. When I'm upset, I can dance.    It's really like a second half of my heart. It sounds cheesy, but it really means a lot to me.      Together with your mom, Elaine, you wrote the book ”Taking Flight: From War Orphan to Star Ballerina”. What inspired you to write your story as an autobiography?    I was getting a lot of good feedback from telling my story and other people hearing it and saying ”You need to talk about it”. I remember one of the biggest moments was when I was living in Vermont and I told my story and the next day two little black girls came in to the studio. They never started ballet because they never thought that they could see somebody who looked exactly like them and as well because of where they came from. Coming to the studio and starting ballet showed them that they could accomplish their dreams and so I decided I wanted to find a way to reach out to more people.    ”Taking Flight” is in 12 different languages around the world. ”Ballerina Dreams” is also in around 5 different languages around the world, it'a a children's book. It's inspiring people and that's what I always wanted to do, just to give people hope. I had that opportunity with a magazine, to have hope. And if I can find a way to help people, I'll do it, which is also why I work with War Child Holland.      You've been a goodwill ambassador for the Dutch organisation War Child since 2016.  What is the most important thing about this ambassadorship?   I was a refugee at one point and I had no hope. Going on the field with War Child, telling my story and having these children see somebody who came exactly from the same circumstances, accomplishing her dreams and just beating the odds, I'm hoping I can inspire them they don't need to be defined by where they came from. They can become a doctor, they can become a singer, they can become a pediatrician, they can become whatever they want to be, because where you're born does not mean you can't overcome those circumstances.         Tommy Hilfiger partnered with you on their Tommy Icons Campaign for Fall 2020, which is a celebration for the brand 's 35th anniversary. How was it for you to be a part of such a meaningful campaign?   Being part of Tommy Hilfiger's Icons Campaign for Fall 2020, I mean this is just an incredible honor. When I was in LA shooting with such a diverse group of people, it felt like oh wow, I didn't feel like the odd one out. These people come from different stories, they're doing amazing things, accomplishing things that people probably don't even know about. We've really got to know each other and it just made me even more proud to be a part of this campaign of diversity, being together, moving forward together and it's just absolutely incredible to be a part of it. I love what Tommy believes in, I love the vision, I love the concept of everything. I'm just so proud to be around so many incredible people.     The theme of Tommy Icons Fall 2020 collection is 'Moving Forward Together' and represents inclusivity and diversity. The campaign itself celebrates and proudly portrays models from a variety of backgrounds, sizes, ages, gender expressions and ethnicities. What does the message of this campaign mean to you?   What moving forward together means to me is creating opportunities to spread a message of hope, power and love. The hope we need to believe in a better world, the power we need to make a change and the love for each other, no matter who you are or what you look like. That will be a basis, on which a new world will be built.     Tommy Hilfiger is not just a fashion brand, it is also one of the world's most recognized lifestyle brands, that shares its inclusive and youthful spirit. How do you identify with the brand's style and philosophy?   I've been in the Tommy family for a little bit of time. From my experience personally, I think everything that they're doing is very authentic. I believe their philosophy is authentic, I see it in their clothes, I see it with the people that they have representing the clothes, I see it with the fact that they support Black Lives Matter. They really believe in what they're saying and they're thinking about it and making sure it's gonna be equal for everybody and everbody is gonna have that opportunity to feel like this fashion brand ”Makes me feel like I belong”.        What are your hopes for ballet post-pandemic? What's in the future for you?   To be honest, I don't know what my future's gonna be like. Right now I'm focusing on myself and maybe some people might think that's selfish, but it takes a lot of courage to say I need a break.I lost my father this summer during Covid and I wasn't able to see him, so I've decided to take some time off to just focus on the next step of me becoming the best artist I possibly can. With grief, you really have to experience it, you can't just go and supress it. In the dance world it's like, even when you're injured, you continue and it's not about your mental health. But it is important to take some time off. It's scary, but I can not be the best artist I can possibly be when I'm dealing with such grief and loss and Covid, which is a mental thing as well for a lot of people.   At the moment it's just a lot of uncertinty, not really knowing when I can go and see my family in the US. But I do have the certainty right now that I have this amazing support system. They're helping me through everything and I know that's just gonna make me have a better future and I'm just gonna have to be patient. I'm always gonna be an artist. I'll either be a teacher or when I open up my school in Sierra Leone, I'm still gonna be an artist teaching children who deserve an opportunity to see what I've experienced in life and I wanna give back to them. You know, that's a goal that I have after my career.    We'll just have to see. I'm hoping as well that with the Black Lives Matter movement, it's gonna change also the dance world. I mean, it's 2020, let's change this. Dancers just wanna do what they love to do, they should not be defined by their skin color. If you give us an opportunity, if you open those doors to us, we will fight. If you can just do that for us in the ballet world, give us an opportunity that our skin color doesn't define us, I think you will find some amazing, beautiful brown and black ballerinas around the world.   It was a crazy year and I'm hoping things get better. Now it's really time for me to take care of myself and find out who and what kind of artist I will be after all this healing.      Michaela DePrince is one of our cover stars of our Third issue: Dream which you can now pre-order on @boutiquemags   TEAM CREDITS: Talent: Michaela DePrince @michaeladeprince Photography: Woody Bos @woodybos  Casting / EIC: Timotej Letonja @timiletonja Styling: Gino Gurrieri @ginogurrieri  Art director: Victor Vergara @victor___vergara  Make-up: Anita Jolles using Deciem: The Ordinary & MAC Cosmetics @anitajolles  Hair: Sanne Schoofs using Label M Styling assistant: Emma Hersbach Photo assistant: Nikki Hock @nikki_hock  Special thanks to Omyra Samadi @omyrasamadi & @miloukakisina  Location: Parq Studios Amsterdam Interview by: Jana Letonja @janaletonja Michaela is wearing Tommy Hilfiger @tommyhilfiger    Michaela DePrince, a Sierra Leonean-American ballet dancer, rose to fame in 2011 with starring in the documentary ”First Position”, which was following her and other young ballet dancers as they were preparing to compete at the Youth America Grand Prix, at which her performance gained her a scholarship at the American Ballet Theatre's Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School of Ballet. As the youngest dancer in the history of the company, she danced with the Dance Theatre of Harlem and currently she is a solo ballet dancer for the Dutch National Ballet, which she joined in 2013.       What inspired you to become a ballerina?   What I would say inspired me was when I found this magazine in Sierra Leone and there was this beautiful ballerina. And it wasn't just the fact that she was something I've never seen before, the position was absolutely beautiful, the costumes were absolutely beautiful in all the pages of the magazine. But the cover struck me so much because she looked so happy and I decided then that I would become this ballerina and to become super happy and that's when my dream to become a ballerina started, in Sierra Leone.     From competing at the Youth America Grand Prix, studying at the American Ballet Theatre's Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School of Ballet to becoming a professional ballerina. In US, you danced with the Dance Theatre of Harlem, where you were their youngest dancer in the history. Then you came to Europe, where you are now a solo ballet dancer for the Dutch National Ballet. Tell us more about your journey from the US to the Netherlands.    I remember that when I got adopted I felt like the biggest thing that I ever have to worry about was people not like me for my white spots, cause in Sierra Leone I was considered the devil's child because of my vitiligo, I was different. But then I got to the US and I realized there's a fact that I was born brown and I fell in love with the art that has always discriminated against brown and black dancers and somehow I was drawn to it and I didn't want to be affected by it. But I was affected by it, I didn't have a lot of friends as well, I never saw a lot of black dancers in my classes growing up.    Then I joined Dance Theatre Harlem, I was the youngest member to join and it was an amazing experience, cause the founder that started it, Arthur Mitchell, he was originally the first black, African-American dancer in New York City Ballet. Obviously everybody knows New York City Ballet is one of the best and he was able to give space for brown and black dancers of different races and built this opportunity to do what you love, to do ballet and know that it's ok to accept your skin color. He would give us the opportunity to wear brown tights, whatever skin tone matched our bodies, but then at the same time I felt like I needed to bring that into bigger companies and change that in Europe or in the US and so I joined Dutch National Ballet, the junior company.    Of course, in the beginning you're a beginner and you don't want to speak out as much, so I was holding my tounge as much as possible and waiting for me to get the opportunity to be at the highest point as possible. When I got to the highest point, that's when I realized it was my opportunity to really try to change it, so I started wearing brown tights at Dutch National Ballet. But even last year, I had to fight for it. They wanted me not to make a big deal about it, but that's just me going back to who I was. Them not letting me wear them, that's not who I was, so they made me feel like I didn't belong again and all those old feelings. Luckily, I was able to make a fuss about it and I was able to wear my brown tights in the end.    I don't want other dancers in the next generation to have to deal with that, to have to constantly feel like you're not fully yourself on stage. You're trying to tell a story, but it's also coming from your point of view and you want to feel like you're most authentic that you possibly can be.     Your road hasn't been the easiest, you faced a lot of racial discrimination, which is a global problem that escalated to its highest levels ever in 2020. What is your view on that, how do you feel about all that?   The Black Lives Matter movement, it's a big movement. It was sad seeing people, who look exactly like me, getting killed for absolutely no reason. I always think we're all human, we all have preferences, we all love, we can all care about each other and support each other. I just don't understand why people are killing people without even getting to know them. You just see them as an animal or whatever and it's really upsetting, cause I've experienced that growing up in New York, that discrimination. Also here in Amsterdam, I've been told to go back to my own country and it's a lot and it's constantly making you feel like you never belong. So that's what I'm trying to do, to change that. It doesn't matter if you're brown, black, spotted, white ... you have an option to conquer your dreams through a lot of hard work and your support system.     What do you love most about ballet, what is the most special thing about this passion of yours?   For me, it's not that I saw ballet and I was living a great childhood. It was what gave me hope as a young orphan who thought nobody ever wanted her and gave me an outlet to just being in a little bubble when other things in my life, even after I got adopted, were not going the way I wanted them to go.    Ballet, it made me feel special. Acknowledgement from the audience always makes you want to do it more and more, but it's just this opportunity to have your own bubble and to be able to express yourself as much as possible. That's why in general art is such a saviour for a lot of people and it's upsetting when they're constantly defunding arts. The art helped me, it helped my sisters and brothers and other people that I know and it's an outlet to express yourself without even having to use words and I think that's the best way for me to express myself. When I'm sad, I can dance. When I'm upset, I can dance.    It's really like a second half of my heart. It sounds cheesy, but it really means a lot to me.      Together with your mom, Elaine, you wrote the book ”Taking Flight: From War Orphan to Star Ballerina”. What inspired you to write your story as an autobiography?    I was getting a lot of good feedback from telling my story and other people hearing it and saying ”You need to talk about it”. I remember one of the biggest moments was when I was living in Vermont and I told my story and the next day two little black girls came in to the studio. They never started ballet because they never thought that they could see somebody who looked exactly like them and as well because of where they came from. Coming to the studio and starting ballet showed them that they could accomplish their dreams and so I decided I wanted to find a way to reach out to more people.    ”Taking Flight” is in 12 different languages around the world. ”Ballerina Dreams” is also in around 5 different languages around the world, it'a a children's book. It's inspiring people and that's what I always wanted to do, just to give people hope. I had that opportunity with a magazine, to have hope. And if I can find a way to help people, I'll do it, which is also why I work with War Child Holland.      You've been a goodwill ambassador for the Dutch organisation War Child since 2016.  What is the most important thing about this ambassadorship?   I was a refugee at one point and I had no hope. Going on the field with War Child, telling my story and having these children see somebody who came exactly from the same circumstances, accomplishing her dreams and just beating the odds, I'm hoping I can inspire them they don't need to be defined by where they came from. They can become a doctor, they can become a singer, they can become a pediatrician, they can become whatever they want to be, because where you're born does not mean you can't overcome those circumstances.         Tommy Hilfiger partnered with you on their Tommy Icons Campaign for Fall 2020, which is a celebration for the brand 's 35th anniversary. How was it for you to be a part of such a meaningful campaign?   Being part of Tommy Hilfiger's Icons Campaign for Fall 2020, I mean this is just an incredible honor. When I was in LA shooting with such a diverse group of people, it felt like oh wow, I didn't feel like the odd one out. These people come from different stories, they're doing amazing things, accomplishing things that people probably don't even know about. We've really got to know each other and it just made me even more proud to be a part of this campaign of diversity, being together, moving forward together and it's just absolutely incredible to be a part of it. I love what Tommy believes in, I love the vision, I love the concept of everything. I'm just so proud to be around so many incredible people.     The theme of Tommy Icons Fall 2020 collection is 'Moving Forward Together' and represents inclusivity and diversity. The campaign itself celebrates and proudly portrays models from a variety of backgrounds, sizes, ages, gender expressions and ethnicities. What does the message of this campaign mean to you?   What moving forward together means to me is creating opportunities to spread a message of hope, power and love. The hope we need to believe in a better world, the power we need to make a change and the love for each other, no matter who you are or what you look like. That will be a basis, on which a new world will be built.     Tommy Hilfiger is not just a fashion brand, it is also one of the world's most recognized lifestyle brands, that shares its inclusive and youthful spirit. How do you identify with the brand's style and philosophy?   I've been in the Tommy family for a little bit of time. From my experience personally, I think everything that they're doing is very authentic. I believe their philosophy is authentic, I see it in their clothes, I see it with the people that they have representing the clothes, I see it with the fact that they support Black Lives Matter. They really believe in what they're saying and they're thinking about it and making sure it's gonna be equal for everybody and everbody is gonna have that opportunity to feel like this fashion brand ”Makes me feel like I belong”.        What are your hopes for ballet post-pandemic? What's in the future for you?   To be honest, I don't know what my future's gonna be like. Right now I'm focusing on myself and maybe some people might think that's selfish, but it takes a lot of courage to say I need a break.I lost my father this summer during Covid and I wasn't able to see him, so I've decided to take some time off to just focus on the next step of me becoming the best artist I possibly can. With grief, you really have to experience it, you can't just go and supress it. In the dance world it's like, even when you're injured, you continue and it's not about your mental health. But it is important to take some time off. It's scary, but I can not be the best artist I can possibly be when I'm dealing with such grief and loss and Covid, which is a mental thing as well for a lot of people.   At the moment it's just a lot of uncertinty, not really knowing when I can go and see my family in the US. But I do have the certainty right now that I have this amazing support system. They're helping me through everything and I know that's just gonna make me have a better future and I'm just gonna have to be patient. I'm always gonna be an artist. I'll either be a teacher or when I open up my school in Sierra Leone, I'm still gonna be an artist teaching children who deserve an opportunity to see what I've experienced in life and I wanna give back to them. You know, that's a goal that I have after my career.    We'll just have to see. I'm hoping as well that with the Black Lives Matter movement, it's gonna change also the dance world. I mean, it's 2020, let's change this. Dancers just wanna do what they love to do, they should not be defined by their skin color. If you give us an opportunity, if you open those doors to us, we will fight. If you can just do that for us in the ballet world, give us an opportunity that our skin color doesn't define us, I think you will find some amazing, beautiful brown and black ballerinas around the world.   It was a crazy year and I'm hoping things get better. Now it's really time for me to take care of myself and find out who and what kind of artist I will be after all this healing.      Michaela DePrince is one of our cover stars of our Third issue: Dream which you can now pre-order on @boutiquemags   TEAM CREDITS: Talent: Michaela DePrince @michaeladeprince Photography: Woody Bos @woodybos  Casting / EIC: Timotej Letonja @timiletonja Styling: Gino Gurrieri @ginogurrieri  Art director: Victor Vergara @victor___vergara  Make-up: Anita Jolles using Deciem: The Ordinary & MAC Cosmetics @anitajolles  Hair: Sanne Schoofs using Label M Styling assistant: Emma Hersbach Photo assistant: Nikki Hock @nikki_hock  Special thanks to Omyra Samadi @omyrasamadi & @miloukakisina  Location: Parq Studios Amsterdam Interview by: Jana Letonja @janaletonja Michaela is wearing Tommy Hilfiger @tommyhilfiger   

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