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Watch the lyric video for Nina Kraviz's new single  "This Time"
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Watch the lyric video for Nina Kraviz's new single "This Time"

Music “This Time” is the second single of Nina Kraviz’s upcoming album. For “This Time” the renowned producer, singer and DJ takes inspiration from Cindy Lauper, Laura Branigan and early Madonna records yet the song has kept that signature Nina Kraviz feel.   “I put my main focus on the arrangement and on the vocals to create a warm yet sultry atmosphere that my favourite pop music is known for.” - Nina Kraviz   Whilst “This Time” and “Skyscrapers” see Nina further explore her abilities as a singer, song writer and producer in a pop-leaning music field, they are also a natural evolution and continuation of Nina’s debut album.   The lyric video for "This Time" was shot by Yonathan Baraki in Miami during Nina's most recent US tour using a super 8 film camera.    Watch the video here. “This Time” is the second single of Nina Kraviz’s upcoming album. For “This Time” the renowned producer, singer and DJ takes inspiration from Cindy Lauper, Laura Branigan and early Madonna records yet the song has kept that signature Nina Kraviz feel.   “I put my main focus on the arrangement and on the vocals to create a warm yet sultry atmosphere that my favourite pop music is known for.” - Nina Kraviz   Whilst “This Time” and “Skyscrapers” see Nina further explore her abilities as a singer, song writer and producer in a pop-leaning music field, they are also a natural evolution and continuation of Nina’s debut album.   The lyric video for "This Time" was shot by Yonathan Baraki in Miami during Nina's most recent US tour using a super 8 film camera.    Watch the video here.

In conversation with WIWEK
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In conversation with WIWEK

Music We had a pleasure interviewing an incredibly talented artist WIWEK.     Born in Utrecht, Indian parents, son of a musician. What was it like, growing up in The Netherlands and when did your musical journey start? Most importantly, who or what inspired you to make music?   I loved growing up here, I grew up with 2 brothers and 2 sisters so it’s been a wild ride haha. My musical journey started around the age of 11. My father bought a playstation game for my brothers for Christmas called ‘music 2000’. I ended up playing it the most at a certain point.    My inspiration came from hearing electronic music for the first time on the radio. Trance became really big early 2000 and I remember hearing a DJ set from Tiesto and it was as u can say a very magical revelation to me. From that day I knew what I was going to be when I grew up.      You are known as the godfather of jungle terror. Can you explain what it is and its origins?   It started as a way to explain to my friends what I was making, because there was no other way how I could explain it, I felt. I then inserted it as a genre on soundcloud for the music I uploaded. I think when I released the Jungle Terror EP’s it really catched on and it became a definition.       How do you approach music production? What type of musical gear do you use?    For me the bass is very important. When the bass is right where I want it everything else kind of flows with it. I mostly use software and samples. My favorites at the moment are the ones where they sample a certain percussion in all the hits possible and you can create your own percussion pattern like it’s played live.      Where do you usually get your music samples?   Basically on all the major sample website platforms like Splice and Loopmasters. Occasionally I record own stuff as well.      You have collaborated with artists like Skrillex, Yellow Claw and Marshmello. How would you describe working with them?   I would say one thing they all had in common is that they worked very fast and instinctively. When something is cool it is cool and you do not change it 200x times. Something I can learn from them because I tend to do that on solo productions.      Your latest EP Time Machine Drums embodies many different percussive and melodic elements, what was the creative process like?   It all started with rhythms I heard in my head. From those rhythms I created an environment that seemed fitting for this. I spend a lot of time trying to find the right percussive sounds for what I wanted to express.       Your most recent debut album Cycles was released on March 8 2019in your label Maha Vana . What does it mean and why did you decide to name it like that? Are there any new releases coming out via Maha Vana?   For me life on micro and macro level is a constant cycle. There is always construction after deconstruction, there is always life after death, I even believe that the whole universe constantly implodes and explodes which results in an infinite cycle of everything.  This also implies on my creativity, sometimes I like to make melodic music, sometimes very dark and clubby. My creativity is a constant cycle and this album represents that. I have some stuff lined up for Maha Vana. The Cycles remix EP is coming up and I am working on a new project that involves dancefloor minded songs, something different then the Cycles album.      The Free and Rebellious EP was used as the soundtrack and score to the short film Still in the Cage, filmed in Bangkok, Thailand, written and directed by Canadian filmmaker Jodeb and produced by yourself and Skrillex. How would you describe the overall experience of writing songs and producing a film? What was the most challenging and fun part about it? Did you make the music first or the other way around?   This was huge for me, I remember when I signed with OWSLA they mentioned to me they wanted a huge visual thing around my music. I did not realize it would become a really cool short film. I made the music first and after they wrote the script and visual concept. For me the most challenging part was the music. The filmmaking process was mostly Jodeb his area of work, together with his team. OWSLA did a huge screening at the ACE hotel LA. That was such an amazing experience to hear the music and see the movie in a theatre.      Any new updates or upcoming projects?    So the Cycles remix EP is coming up. I have played a few of them already in my latest mix for Axtone house.  Next to that I am working on alot of dancefloor oriented tracks so I can have a nice fresh start when the world opens up again and I can start touring.    ​ What does freedom mean to you?   Freedom to me means to be free from identity. To have no attachment to self and therefore have no attachment to anything or anyone. To simply experience this life and enjoy its ups and downs. To take the time to observe its pleasures and pains. To be peaceful.     What is your personal style and how do you express yourself through fashion? What role does sustainability play in your choice of fashion?   My personal style is always depending on my mood but mostly it is comfort minded with a certain accessory. Because I like my mood to be comfortable in whatever situation and the accessory stance for the playfulness of how I try to experience life.   Sustainability has not played a big part of my choice yet but my sister just started a vintage Indian clothing company in which she revamps existing items with subtle changes. I’ll be getting more into it now.       What gets you up in the morning? What is your morning routine?   Right now what gets me up in the morning is a new day of creating in the studio. My standard morning routine consists of doing a cold shower, meditation and drinking a fresh smoothie. That gets me very pumped up for a nice studio day. Since I don’t travel for shows now and I am not constantly tortured by jetlag’s this has been very ideal for me for studio life, especially when I add a nice workout and breathing exercises to it.      What is your greatest source of inspiration in life? In work?   Life and work are not really separate concepts for me. Maybe because I do not see my work as an obligation. My greatest inspiration is peace. When I have peace of mind I become a beacon of creation. So my whole life is designed to be in this state. Not saying I am trying to avoid the pains and downs of life, but understanding that this is part of the whole.   We had a pleasure interviewing an incredibly talented artist WIWEK.     Born in Utrecht, Indian parents, son of a musician. What was it like, growing up in The Netherlands and when did your musical journey start? Most importantly, who or what inspired you to make music?   I loved growing up here, I grew up with 2 brothers and 2 sisters so it’s been a wild ride haha. My musical journey started around the age of 11. My father bought a playstation game for my brothers for Christmas called ‘music 2000’. I ended up playing it the most at a certain point.    My inspiration came from hearing electronic music for the first time on the radio. Trance became really big early 2000 and I remember hearing a DJ set from Tiesto and it was as u can say a very magical revelation to me. From that day I knew what I was going to be when I grew up.      You are known as the godfather of jungle terror. Can you explain what it is and its origins?   It started as a way to explain to my friends what I was making, because there was no other way how I could explain it, I felt. I then inserted it as a genre on soundcloud for the music I uploaded. I think when I released the Jungle Terror EP’s it really catched on and it became a definition.       How do you approach music production? What type of musical gear do you use?    For me the bass is very important. When the bass is right where I want it everything else kind of flows with it. I mostly use software and samples. My favorites at the moment are the ones where they sample a certain percussion in all the hits possible and you can create your own percussion pattern like it’s played live.      Where do you usually get your music samples?   Basically on all the major sample website platforms like Splice and Loopmasters. Occasionally I record own stuff as well.      You have collaborated with artists like Skrillex, Yellow Claw and Marshmello. How would you describe working with them?   I would say one thing they all had in common is that they worked very fast and instinctively. When something is cool it is cool and you do not change it 200x times. Something I can learn from them because I tend to do that on solo productions.      Your latest EP Time Machine Drums embodies many different percussive and melodic elements, what was the creative process like?   It all started with rhythms I heard in my head. From those rhythms I created an environment that seemed fitting for this. I spend a lot of time trying to find the right percussive sounds for what I wanted to express.       Your most recent debut album Cycles was released on March 8 2019in your label Maha Vana . What does it mean and why did you decide to name it like that? Are there any new releases coming out via Maha Vana?   For me life on micro and macro level is a constant cycle. There is always construction after deconstruction, there is always life after death, I even believe that the whole universe constantly implodes and explodes which results in an infinite cycle of everything.  This also implies on my creativity, sometimes I like to make melodic music, sometimes very dark and clubby. My creativity is a constant cycle and this album represents that. I have some stuff lined up for Maha Vana. The Cycles remix EP is coming up and I am working on a new project that involves dancefloor minded songs, something different then the Cycles album.      The Free and Rebellious EP was used as the soundtrack and score to the short film Still in the Cage, filmed in Bangkok, Thailand, written and directed by Canadian filmmaker Jodeb and produced by yourself and Skrillex. How would you describe the overall experience of writing songs and producing a film? What was the most challenging and fun part about it? Did you make the music first or the other way around?   This was huge for me, I remember when I signed with OWSLA they mentioned to me they wanted a huge visual thing around my music. I did not realize it would become a really cool short film. I made the music first and after they wrote the script and visual concept. For me the most challenging part was the music. The filmmaking process was mostly Jodeb his area of work, together with his team. OWSLA did a huge screening at the ACE hotel LA. That was such an amazing experience to hear the music and see the movie in a theatre.      Any new updates or upcoming projects?    So the Cycles remix EP is coming up. I have played a few of them already in my latest mix for Axtone house.  Next to that I am working on alot of dancefloor oriented tracks so I can have a nice fresh start when the world opens up again and I can start touring.    ​ What does freedom mean to you?   Freedom to me means to be free from identity. To have no attachment to self and therefore have no attachment to anything or anyone. To simply experience this life and enjoy its ups and downs. To take the time to observe its pleasures and pains. To be peaceful.     What is your personal style and how do you express yourself through fashion? What role does sustainability play in your choice of fashion?   My personal style is always depending on my mood but mostly it is comfort minded with a certain accessory. Because I like my mood to be comfortable in whatever situation and the accessory stance for the playfulness of how I try to experience life.   Sustainability has not played a big part of my choice yet but my sister just started a vintage Indian clothing company in which she revamps existing items with subtle changes. I’ll be getting more into it now.       What gets you up in the morning? What is your morning routine?   Right now what gets me up in the morning is a new day of creating in the studio. My standard morning routine consists of doing a cold shower, meditation and drinking a fresh smoothie. That gets me very pumped up for a nice studio day. Since I don’t travel for shows now and I am not constantly tortured by jetlag’s this has been very ideal for me for studio life, especially when I add a nice workout and breathing exercises to it.      What is your greatest source of inspiration in life? In work?   Life and work are not really separate concepts for me. Maybe because I do not see my work as an obligation. My greatest inspiration is peace. When I have peace of mind I become a beacon of creation. So my whole life is designed to be in this state. Not saying I am trying to avoid the pains and downs of life, but understanding that this is part of the whole.  

AWAKENINGS CELEBRATES 25TH ANNIVERSARY WITH TWO FESTIVALS IN 2022
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AWAKENINGS CELEBRATES 25TH ANNIVERSARY WITH TWO FESTIVALS IN 2022

Music World-renowned techno brand Awakenings is celebrating their 25th anniversary in 2022 and is planning to go all out. With a brand new location, an added day to the programming and a revamp of the entire festival set up — including a campsite — visitors will be treated to something unlike they’ve ever seen before from Awakenings. With the new expansion, Awakenings also becomes the first multi-day techno festival in the Netherlands to host a campsite, filling a gap that has existed in many techno-enthusiast’s summers for a long time. The reinvented festival will take place from the 29th until the 31st of July in Hilvarenbeek. Details regarding the second festival will be revealed through Awakenings social channels on Monday, November 22nd.      1997 - 2022: Awakenings is internationally renowned as one of the best organisations when it comes to techno events. With their iconic shows at the Gashouder in Amsterdam, fantastical stages, impressive light-shows and unparalleled sound design, Awakenings has proven to go bigger and better than the competition. What started as a single event during Easter in 1997 has grown to an industry-leading phenomena, attracting visitors from all over the world, from the far East to Latin America. Now with the 25th anniversary approaching, Awakenings plans to outdo themselves. Rocco Veenboer, head honcho and founder of Awakenings has long had a dream of organising his very own three-day festival with campsites.      “From a business standpoint, I always want to keep moving, never stagnating. Nothing is ever truly finished and there’s always room for improvement. Our team continuously look at ways to make things more beautiful and impactful. Awakenings Festival started as a single day event, and  expanded to two days in 2014. But, we felt like there was still room for more, especially because the community had so much to say about missing a multiple day techno event here in the Netherlands. With this renewed concept, we’re extremely happy to make that dream come to life.”   Awakenings Summer Festival will be home to nine stages, a combination of open air areas as well as tents and having big plans to make use of the adjacent lake. With an added day Awakenings has more space for experimentation, meaning that many sub-genres and young and upcoming talent will be well-represented at the festival. To cater to the campsite, there will be an additional schedule, jam-packed with surprises.     Sustainability and innovations:   Awakenings always strives to be on the forefront of sustainability, the past decade the festival has been serving a 95% vegetarian menu with only organic meat for the other 5% – utilizing a self-developed recycling system for plastic cups. In 2022 the festival will start using biofuels - obtained from horticulture - to power their generators, drastically cutting down on their CO2 emissions. An equally exciting innovation is the restructuring of the sound equipment. By using new cutting-edge ways to position and install speakers, the decibels can be lowered without compromising the experience for visitors, making less of an impact on the environment and the ears of festival-goers.     Line-up and tickets:   The line-up for Awakenings Summer Festival will be announced at the end of January of 2022, alongside official ticket sales. Visitors will be able to choose full weekend tickets covering all three days, as well as a single day ticket for Saturday or Sunday. The campsite will feature empty space for visitors to create their own tent, as well as pre-set-up tents and luxury bungalows, to cater to everyone’s wishes.     World-renowned techno brand Awakenings is celebrating their 25th anniversary in 2022 and is planning to go all out. With a brand new location, an added day to the programming and a revamp of the entire festival set up — including a campsite — visitors will be treated to something unlike they’ve ever seen before from Awakenings. With the new expansion, Awakenings also becomes the first multi-day techno festival in the Netherlands to host a campsite, filling a gap that has existed in many techno-enthusiast’s summers for a long time. The reinvented festival will take place from the 29th until the 31st of July in Hilvarenbeek. Details regarding the second festival will be revealed through Awakenings social channels on Monday, November 22nd.      1997 - 2022: Awakenings is internationally renowned as one of the best organisations when it comes to techno events. With their iconic shows at the Gashouder in Amsterdam, fantastical stages, impressive light-shows and unparalleled sound design, Awakenings has proven to go bigger and better than the competition. What started as a single event during Easter in 1997 has grown to an industry-leading phenomena, attracting visitors from all over the world, from the far East to Latin America. Now with the 25th anniversary approaching, Awakenings plans to outdo themselves. Rocco Veenboer, head honcho and founder of Awakenings has long had a dream of organising his very own three-day festival with campsites.      “From a business standpoint, I always want to keep moving, never stagnating. Nothing is ever truly finished and there’s always room for improvement. Our team continuously look at ways to make things more beautiful and impactful. Awakenings Festival started as a single day event, and  expanded to two days in 2014. But, we felt like there was still room for more, especially because the community had so much to say about missing a multiple day techno event here in the Netherlands. With this renewed concept, we’re extremely happy to make that dream come to life.”   Awakenings Summer Festival will be home to nine stages, a combination of open air areas as well as tents and having big plans to make use of the adjacent lake. With an added day Awakenings has more space for experimentation, meaning that many sub-genres and young and upcoming talent will be well-represented at the festival. To cater to the campsite, there will be an additional schedule, jam-packed with surprises.     Sustainability and innovations:   Awakenings always strives to be on the forefront of sustainability, the past decade the festival has been serving a 95% vegetarian menu with only organic meat for the other 5% – utilizing a self-developed recycling system for plastic cups. In 2022 the festival will start using biofuels - obtained from horticulture - to power their generators, drastically cutting down on their CO2 emissions. An equally exciting innovation is the restructuring of the sound equipment. By using new cutting-edge ways to position and install speakers, the decibels can be lowered without compromising the experience for visitors, making less of an impact on the environment and the ears of festival-goers.     Line-up and tickets:   The line-up for Awakenings Summer Festival will be announced at the end of January of 2022, alongside official ticket sales. Visitors will be able to choose full weekend tickets covering all three days, as well as a single day ticket for Saturday or Sunday. The campsite will feature empty space for visitors to create their own tent, as well as pre-set-up tents and luxury bungalows, to cater to everyone’s wishes.    

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Editorial collaboration with Puma starring Yade Lauren
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Editorial collaboration with Puma starring Yade Lauren

Music   We are excited to share one of our latest collaborations with Dutch singer and songwriter Yade Lauren.     Things are going very well for the young talent. Last month Yade left the record label Top Notch and is from now on releasing her music independently. Her first fully independently released single, ’In De Nacht’ entered the Dutch Top 50 at number 1 and on Spotify and knocked none other than Adele off her throne.   On top of that she very recently won 4 awards at the NPO FunX Music Awards: Best Singer, Best Female Artist of the Year, Best Collabo - with Dutch rapper Kevin for their track ‘Samen’ - and Best Song for the single ‘Praat Met Mij’ (also with Kevin). Yade’s creativity shines through in everything she does being responsible for all creative input herself and it’s paying off big time.   Her breakthrough came when her first album ‘Reflecties’ was released in 2020. The album contains 10 personal and sensitive songs, which she describes as a diary. She talks about her father as well as her first love who she met not even very long ago. While writing about the honest truth and speaking about subjects which are not talked about enough, she wants to inspire others. Expressing feelings through her work helps the singer and songwriter to deal with personal experiences. - „I think sometimes it's just necessary. It's very therapeutic and it’s a way to let go. It's more than just words, it’s a feeling.“   In 2021 Yade teamed up with PUMA Benelux to be an Ambassador, kicking it off with being part of the ’She Moves Us’ movement. Through this PUMA wants to give female ambassadors (such as Dua Lipa and Cara Delevingne) a platform to speak out loud and inspire, empower and celebrate women worldwide. Talk shows, interviews and stories are building a bridge between the ambassadors and other women. Talking to Yade and working with her made it very clear, ’She Moves Us' fits her own vision very well. Through her music and way of expression she loves to inspire other women and embraces it with the campaign. In her own songs, she talks a lot about her own insecurities and obstacles that she had to overcome. When you ask her, she takes this very personal and serious, she wants to spread a message. “Women are magically powerful, but they don't always realize it themselves. Believe in yourself,“ she says.   Yade is wearing the recently released PUMA ’Suede Mayu’ sneaker in black and beige colorways. The platform’s over-the-top proportions, give the silhouette a chic and fresh look. The upper takes cues from one of PUMA’s most iconic styles with a re-designed bold platform but keeping it lightweight and comfy. The blown up proportions of the ’Suede Mayu’ push forward the original DNA of the shoe.     Get your PUMA sneakers here.   We had the pleasure to work with this talented woman and are excited to see what the future holds for Yade Lauren.     Photography: Aicha Abdoun  Styling: Magdalena Roe  MUAH: Sisley Angenois  Text: Magdalena Roe  Editor-in-chief: Timotej Letonja Location: Conservatorium Hotel   We are excited to share one of our latest collaborations with Dutch singer and songwriter Yade Lauren.     Things are going very well for the young talent. Last month Yade left the record label Top Notch and is from now on releasing her music independently. Her first fully independently released single, ’In De Nacht’ entered the Dutch Top 50 at number 1 and on Spotify and knocked none other than Adele off her throne.   On top of that she very recently won 4 awards at the NPO FunX Music Awards: Best Singer, Best Female Artist of the Year, Best Collabo - with Dutch rapper Kevin for their track ‘Samen’ - and Best Song for the single ‘Praat Met Mij’ (also with Kevin). Yade’s creativity shines through in everything she does being responsible for all creative input herself and it’s paying off big time.   Her breakthrough came when her first album ‘Reflecties’ was released in 2020. The album contains 10 personal and sensitive songs, which she describes as a diary. She talks about her father as well as her first love who she met not even very long ago. While writing about the honest truth and speaking about subjects which are not talked about enough, she wants to inspire others. Expressing feelings through her work helps the singer and songwriter to deal with personal experiences. - „I think sometimes it's just necessary. It's very therapeutic and it’s a way to let go. It's more than just words, it’s a feeling.“   In 2021 Yade teamed up with PUMA Benelux to be an Ambassador, kicking it off with being part of the ’She Moves Us’ movement. Through this PUMA wants to give female ambassadors (such as Dua Lipa and Cara Delevingne) a platform to speak out loud and inspire, empower and celebrate women worldwide. Talk shows, interviews and stories are building a bridge between the ambassadors and other women. Talking to Yade and working with her made it very clear, ’She Moves Us' fits her own vision very well. Through her music and way of expression she loves to inspire other women and embraces it with the campaign. In her own songs, she talks a lot about her own insecurities and obstacles that she had to overcome. When you ask her, she takes this very personal and serious, she wants to spread a message. “Women are magically powerful, but they don't always realize it themselves. Believe in yourself,“ she says.   Yade is wearing the recently released PUMA ’Suede Mayu’ sneaker in black and beige colorways. The platform’s over-the-top proportions, give the silhouette a chic and fresh look. The upper takes cues from one of PUMA’s most iconic styles with a re-designed bold platform but keeping it lightweight and comfy. The blown up proportions of the ’Suede Mayu’ push forward the original DNA of the shoe.     Get your PUMA sneakers here.   We had the pleasure to work with this talented woman and are excited to see what the future holds for Yade Lauren.     Photography: Aicha Abdoun  Styling: Magdalena Roe  MUAH: Sisley Angenois  Text: Magdalena Roe  Editor-in-chief: Timotej Letonja Location: Conservatorium Hotel

In conversation with Les Twins
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In conversation with Les Twins

Events We had a delight speaking with two incredible artists Les Twins.       When and how did you start dancing and what role does it play in your life?   The love of dance runs in our family: our roots are strong — we’re the last of 11 siblings, and when you’re from Guadeloupe, you know how to dance! Our mother was a singer and a dancer; everyone in our family has their own dance style. But in Sarcelles, being twins and dancers hasn’t always been an advantage. There are lots of reasons why we’ve never stopped moving. Our life has given us a lot, physically, to express through dance but it goes beyond movement. We have a lot to say. It’s about who we are, where we come from, and what we have become through dance.     If you had to name one life-changing event, which would it be?   When we realized that dance could take us so far. From that moment we decided to incorporate it in everything we do — video, personal style, music, staging, producing. We never do anything by halves. We both want to be the best. And thanks to a little brotherly competition and rivalry, we evolve a little more every day. Movement lets us transform emotion — everything we’ve experienced, everything we are is right there in our moves.  .   How do you express yourselves through fashion?   We wear pieces that stand out, that not everyone else is wearing. We want to express our own aesthetic with the things we wear. That’s what we tried to do with our capsule collection for Hennessy as well. It’s a real source of pride for us to be the bridge between Hennessy and fashion. We have experience in the fashion industry, so doing a Les Twins capsule collection was a perfect fit, and Hennessy really let us put it together the way we wanted.      How did the collaboration with Hennessy come to life?    Hennessy came to us with the question if we wanted to collaborate with them. Of course, we were very honored and it immediately felt good. What’s amazing to us is Hennessy’s willingness to make this collaboration so personal, representing France through two people of color whose story is two centuries removed from Hennessy’s story - and yet so similar. We had a very urban image of Hennessy because it’s been a part of our orbit ever since we started dancing: our friends order it in nightclubs, it’s part of street culture, and hip-hop especially. So it was a natural collaboration even if we don’t drink often, personally. To be masters of our art, of movement, we need to have complete control of our bodies.      There are two original limited edition bottles designed. Each bottle features a likeness of one of you. Are there any differences in your characters?   We’re identical but different in life, in our personalities, and dance. We’re like yin and yang. When we dance together, the power is incredible. Each of us is strong on our own, but together we are unique. We bring together two different dreams. We succeeded in leveling up to go wherever we want, to open doors that never would have been open to us before. Les Twins are unique, but there’s also a lot more to us — together and individually — than meets the eye.      How do you like to drink your Hennessy?   We both made our own cocktail together with Hennessy and mixologist the mixologist Clément Faure who captured our personalities and translated that into cocktails. Larry’s cocktail is called ‘CA BLAZE COCKTAIL’. It’s a fizzy cocktail with floral, spicy accents, it showcases the full-bodied of Hennessy Very Special combined with vanilla and elderflower. The cocktail of Laurent is called the ‘LIL BEAST COCKTAIL’. It’s a bit more reserved than Larry’s cocktail. The rich taste of Hennessy Very Special is complemented by notes of almond and nutmeg recalling French pastries, counterbalanced by the acidic tang of lemon juice.     What does Freedom mean to you?   Freedom to us is the ability to create. What we create is emotion, art, a street spirit. It’s like osmosis, a mix: we “dance” our life. Our movement is what makes us unique.  We had a delight speaking with two incredible artists Les Twins.       When and how did you start dancing and what role does it play in your life?   The love of dance runs in our family: our roots are strong — we’re the last of 11 siblings, and when you’re from Guadeloupe, you know how to dance! Our mother was a singer and a dancer; everyone in our family has their own dance style. But in Sarcelles, being twins and dancers hasn’t always been an advantage. There are lots of reasons why we’ve never stopped moving. Our life has given us a lot, physically, to express through dance but it goes beyond movement. We have a lot to say. It’s about who we are, where we come from, and what we have become through dance.     If you had to name one life-changing event, which would it be?   When we realized that dance could take us so far. From that moment we decided to incorporate it in everything we do — video, personal style, music, staging, producing. We never do anything by halves. We both want to be the best. And thanks to a little brotherly competition and rivalry, we evolve a little more every day. Movement lets us transform emotion — everything we’ve experienced, everything we are is right there in our moves.  .   How do you express yourselves through fashion?   We wear pieces that stand out, that not everyone else is wearing. We want to express our own aesthetic with the things we wear. That’s what we tried to do with our capsule collection for Hennessy as well. It’s a real source of pride for us to be the bridge between Hennessy and fashion. We have experience in the fashion industry, so doing a Les Twins capsule collection was a perfect fit, and Hennessy really let us put it together the way we wanted.      How did the collaboration with Hennessy come to life?    Hennessy came to us with the question if we wanted to collaborate with them. Of course, we were very honored and it immediately felt good. What’s amazing to us is Hennessy’s willingness to make this collaboration so personal, representing France through two people of color whose story is two centuries removed from Hennessy’s story - and yet so similar. We had a very urban image of Hennessy because it’s been a part of our orbit ever since we started dancing: our friends order it in nightclubs, it’s part of street culture, and hip-hop especially. So it was a natural collaboration even if we don’t drink often, personally. To be masters of our art, of movement, we need to have complete control of our bodies.      There are two original limited edition bottles designed. Each bottle features a likeness of one of you. Are there any differences in your characters?   We’re identical but different in life, in our personalities, and dance. We’re like yin and yang. When we dance together, the power is incredible. Each of us is strong on our own, but together we are unique. We bring together two different dreams. We succeeded in leveling up to go wherever we want, to open doors that never would have been open to us before. Les Twins are unique, but there’s also a lot more to us — together and individually — than meets the eye.      How do you like to drink your Hennessy?   We both made our own cocktail together with Hennessy and mixologist the mixologist Clément Faure who captured our personalities and translated that into cocktails. Larry’s cocktail is called ‘CA BLAZE COCKTAIL’. It’s a fizzy cocktail with floral, spicy accents, it showcases the full-bodied of Hennessy Very Special combined with vanilla and elderflower. The cocktail of Laurent is called the ‘LIL BEAST COCKTAIL’. It’s a bit more reserved than Larry’s cocktail. The rich taste of Hennessy Very Special is complemented by notes of almond and nutmeg recalling French pastries, counterbalanced by the acidic tang of lemon juice.     What does Freedom mean to you?   Freedom to us is the ability to create. What we create is emotion, art, a street spirit. It’s like osmosis, a mix: we “dance” our life. Our movement is what makes us unique. 

Nina Kraviz' new single is a natural evolution and continuation of her debut album
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Nina Kraviz' new single is a natural evolution and continuation of her debut album

Music “This Time” is the second single of Nina Kraviz’s upcoming album.    For “This Time” the renowned producer, singer and DJ takes inspiration from Cindy Lauper,  Laura Branigan and early Madonna records yet the song has kept that signature Nina Kraviz feel.     “I put my main focus on the arrangement and on the vocals to create a warm yet sultry atmosphere that my favourite pop music is known for.” - Nina Kraviz     Whilst “This Time” and “Skyscrapers” see Nina further explore her abilities as a singer, song writer and producer in a pop-leaning music field, they are also a natural evolution and continuation of Nina’s debut album. Upcoming Nina Kraviz Tour Dates:   19-Nov-2021 Space, Miami 20-Nov-2021 Timewarp, New York 26-Nov-2021 ApeX, Newcastle  27-Nov-2021 Warehouse Project, Manchester  27-Nov-2021 Hydra, London  4-Dec-2021 Contact Festival, Munich  5-Dec-2021 Berghain, Berlin  16-Dec-2021 Sandstorm Festival, Saudi  17-Dec-2021 Soho, New Delhi  18-Dec-2021 Hilltop, Goa  19-Dec-2021 Laslit Pleasuredome, Bangalore  30-Dec-2021 The Sec Hydro, Glasgow  30-Dec-2021 Awakenings, Amsterdam  31-Dec-2021 Romexpo, Bucharest “This Time” is the second single of Nina Kraviz’s upcoming album.    For “This Time” the renowned producer, singer and DJ takes inspiration from Cindy Lauper,  Laura Branigan and early Madonna records yet the song has kept that signature Nina Kraviz feel.     “I put my main focus on the arrangement and on the vocals to create a warm yet sultry atmosphere that my favourite pop music is known for.” - Nina Kraviz     Whilst “This Time” and “Skyscrapers” see Nina further explore her abilities as a singer, song writer and producer in a pop-leaning music field, they are also a natural evolution and continuation of Nina’s debut album. Upcoming Nina Kraviz Tour Dates:   19-Nov-2021 Space, Miami 20-Nov-2021 Timewarp, New York 26-Nov-2021 ApeX, Newcastle  27-Nov-2021 Warehouse Project, Manchester  27-Nov-2021 Hydra, London  4-Dec-2021 Contact Festival, Munich  5-Dec-2021 Berghain, Berlin  16-Dec-2021 Sandstorm Festival, Saudi  17-Dec-2021 Soho, New Delhi  18-Dec-2021 Hilltop, Goa  19-Dec-2021 Laslit Pleasuredome, Bangalore  30-Dec-2021 The Sec Hydro, Glasgow  30-Dec-2021 Awakenings, Amsterdam  31-Dec-2021 Romexpo, Bucharest

AREA21 release debut album 'Greatest Hits Vol. 1'
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AREA21 release debut album 'Greatest Hits Vol. 1'

Music AREA21 have released their long-awaited debut album Greatest Hits Vol. 1. The album is a culmination of not only the 12 songs written, produced and performed by acclaimed DJ/producer Martin Garrix and Producer/songwriter Maejor, who between them have worked with some of music’s biggest artists including Bono, G-Eazy, Justin Bieber, Dua Lipa and Khalid, but also a global visual project in the form of a series of videos by award-winning animation studio Titmouse, Inc. (Dua Lipa, Run the Jewels) which took 9 months to complete, with work by 60 artists from 10 countries. This album also marks the first album release by AREA21 co-creator Garrix.       Maejor: ‘’It was really important for us to have a full body of work because there’s so much stylistic range on the album. I feel like if we had the pressure to compress it into something smaller, it wouldn’t have worked.’'     Martin Garrix: ‘’I’ve never released this many songs before at the same time, so I’m nervous about it. But that nervousness gets overshadowed by excitement, adrenaline and passion. This project means so much to us both musically and conceptually. I’ve had some of the best moments of my life working on these songs and we can’t wait to finally share them with the world.’’     Over the past 9 months, AREA21 have released a series of songs and videos detailing the interstellar adventures of Garrix and Maejor’s alien alter egos, M & M, with a narrative that tackled some of life’s biggest questions and transformed them into music that’s thought-provoking and relatable. In fact, it was M & M who inspired the album title.  Notes Maejor, “When the aliens first came to Earth, all of their favorite albums had the title ‘Greatest Hits.’ They didn’t know you were supposed to have many albums out before you made a greatest hits album.” Greatest Hits Vol. 1  includes previous releases such as “La La La,” “Lovin’ Every Minute,” “Own The Night” and “Followers,” but also sends 6 brand new tracksinto the stratosphere including the lead single and latest in the series of animated videos‘Time Machine.’    In ‘Time Machine’ they contemplate going back to relive simple moments of their youth, but in the end realize that enjoying life in the moment is most important. The video mirrors this sentiment with a wistful look back at alien travelers M & M’s early years as well as a recap of their journey so far here on earth and features the characters they’ve met along the way including a Marvel-style group shot at the end as the M & M spaceship takes off.  Where they’re headed will be revealed in the next chapter. Stay tuned.     AREA21 have released their long-awaited debut album Greatest Hits Vol. 1. The album is a culmination of not only the 12 songs written, produced and performed by acclaimed DJ/producer Martin Garrix and Producer/songwriter Maejor, who between them have worked with some of music’s biggest artists including Bono, G-Eazy, Justin Bieber, Dua Lipa and Khalid, but also a global visual project in the form of a series of videos by award-winning animation studio Titmouse, Inc. (Dua Lipa, Run the Jewels) which took 9 months to complete, with work by 60 artists from 10 countries. This album also marks the first album release by AREA21 co-creator Garrix.       Maejor: ‘’It was really important for us to have a full body of work because there’s so much stylistic range on the album. I feel like if we had the pressure to compress it into something smaller, it wouldn’t have worked.’'     Martin Garrix: ‘’I’ve never released this many songs before at the same time, so I’m nervous about it. But that nervousness gets overshadowed by excitement, adrenaline and passion. This project means so much to us both musically and conceptually. I’ve had some of the best moments of my life working on these songs and we can’t wait to finally share them with the world.’’     Over the past 9 months, AREA21 have released a series of songs and videos detailing the interstellar adventures of Garrix and Maejor’s alien alter egos, M & M, with a narrative that tackled some of life’s biggest questions and transformed them into music that’s thought-provoking and relatable. In fact, it was M & M who inspired the album title.  Notes Maejor, “When the aliens first came to Earth, all of their favorite albums had the title ‘Greatest Hits.’ They didn’t know you were supposed to have many albums out before you made a greatest hits album.” Greatest Hits Vol. 1  includes previous releases such as “La La La,” “Lovin’ Every Minute,” “Own The Night” and “Followers,” but also sends 6 brand new tracksinto the stratosphere including the lead single and latest in the series of animated videos‘Time Machine.’    In ‘Time Machine’ they contemplate going back to relive simple moments of their youth, but in the end realize that enjoying life in the moment is most important. The video mirrors this sentiment with a wistful look back at alien travelers M & M’s early years as well as a recap of their journey so far here on earth and features the characters they’ve met along the way including a Marvel-style group shot at the end as the M & M spaceship takes off.  Where they’re headed will be revealed in the next chapter. Stay tuned.    

In conversation with Andrew Matarazzo
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In conversation with Andrew Matarazzo

Music We had a great pleasure speaking artist Andrew Matarazzo.       ‘Don't Say Love,” is your fourth music single and it sounds a lot different than your previous tracks. What was the inspiration behind the sound and lyrics?   A: I’ve been calling DSL the ‘anti-love song’ because, for me, it expresses that point in your life where you’ve been jaded by repeated failed love, and you’re sort of numb to the emotional aspect of it. Connection becomes all physical and just for fun. I wanted the lyrics to have no emotions, which is opposite of my last few songs.     I noticed you refer to your music videos as ‘music pictures.” What’s different about your music videos?   A: As much as I love music, I’m an actor first and foremost, and I think music videos were the first medium where I was able to allow both those sides of myself to fuse together. I really try to create mini movies that go hand-in-hand with the track, almost like a soundtrack to whatever film I'm emulating. Also, these music videos have been an incredible way for me to flex all of my artist muscles. I produce, direct, act, sing and creative direct all of them. I really approach it much more like a short film than a traditional music video.     As an actor, how has the industry changed for you post pandemic?   A: I’ve been feeling the aftershock a lot more recently. So much has changed. The inner workings and the playing field has shifted a lot. The audition process has become a lot less intimate because we’re sending tapes in now rather than meeting people face-to-face. There’s been some interesting shifts, but it feels a lot more like performing for an empty room. There’s a sense of feeling unseen and unheard sometimes.     You’ve been to the Netherlands before. What was your favorite part about visiting?   A: The fans there are so loving and friendly! I’ve done a few conventions there and I remember the energy being unique to some of the other’s I had attended. I’m also a huge fan of museums and architecture and there's no shortage of incredible places there. Beautiful cities all around.     Heartbreak seems to be a recurring theme in your music. Are they all about the same person?   A: Unfortunately for me, no. I’ve known two great loves in my life. Music is a really powerful way of closing chapters and putting feelings to rest. As much as it’s a great place to pull inspiration from, I hope I never have to go through those parts again.     What are some TV shows that have inspired you as an actor?   A: Wow, that list is endless. I rewatched a lot of series during the lockdown, and found some new ones. Madmen, The Sopranos, Succession, Euphoria, Game of a Thrones, Sharp Objects...So many!     Is there a motto you live by?   A: Something I’ve really been cautiously trying to do is return the energy I receive. I noticed there was a lot of unbalanced relationships in my life where, either, I was giving too much energy to people who gave me none, as well as failing to give back energy to people who were giving me so much of theirs. It’s something I’m practicing and it's really interesting who falls in and out of your life when you match them where they’re at.     Congratulations on the music video. The visuals are striking. What was the inspiration for the imagery?   A: I based the video off Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner. I wanted it to feel almost like a third installment to the series. More in the future than the last film. It was such a massive challenge to do a sci-fi, futuristic video like this on a smaller scale, but it was an amazing pay off to see all the details come together. I’m very proud of what we did. Andrews' song and music video for ‘Don't Say Love’ is out now on all streaming platforms.     Talent - Andrew Matarazzo   Photographer - Alex Evans  Stylist - Benjamin Holtrop  Groomer - Lisa-Marie Powell  We had a great pleasure speaking artist Andrew Matarazzo.       ‘Don't Say Love,” is your fourth music single and it sounds a lot different than your previous tracks. What was the inspiration behind the sound and lyrics?   A: I’ve been calling DSL the ‘anti-love song’ because, for me, it expresses that point in your life where you’ve been jaded by repeated failed love, and you’re sort of numb to the emotional aspect of it. Connection becomes all physical and just for fun. I wanted the lyrics to have no emotions, which is opposite of my last few songs.     I noticed you refer to your music videos as ‘music pictures.” What’s different about your music videos?   A: As much as I love music, I’m an actor first and foremost, and I think music videos were the first medium where I was able to allow both those sides of myself to fuse together. I really try to create mini movies that go hand-in-hand with the track, almost like a soundtrack to whatever film I'm emulating. Also, these music videos have been an incredible way for me to flex all of my artist muscles. I produce, direct, act, sing and creative direct all of them. I really approach it much more like a short film than a traditional music video.     As an actor, how has the industry changed for you post pandemic?   A: I’ve been feeling the aftershock a lot more recently. So much has changed. The inner workings and the playing field has shifted a lot. The audition process has become a lot less intimate because we’re sending tapes in now rather than meeting people face-to-face. There’s been some interesting shifts, but it feels a lot more like performing for an empty room. There’s a sense of feeling unseen and unheard sometimes.     You’ve been to the Netherlands before. What was your favorite part about visiting?   A: The fans there are so loving and friendly! I’ve done a few conventions there and I remember the energy being unique to some of the other’s I had attended. I’m also a huge fan of museums and architecture and there's no shortage of incredible places there. Beautiful cities all around.     Heartbreak seems to be a recurring theme in your music. Are they all about the same person?   A: Unfortunately for me, no. I’ve known two great loves in my life. Music is a really powerful way of closing chapters and putting feelings to rest. As much as it’s a great place to pull inspiration from, I hope I never have to go through those parts again.     What are some TV shows that have inspired you as an actor?   A: Wow, that list is endless. I rewatched a lot of series during the lockdown, and found some new ones. Madmen, The Sopranos, Succession, Euphoria, Game of a Thrones, Sharp Objects...So many!     Is there a motto you live by?   A: Something I’ve really been cautiously trying to do is return the energy I receive. I noticed there was a lot of unbalanced relationships in my life where, either, I was giving too much energy to people who gave me none, as well as failing to give back energy to people who were giving me so much of theirs. It’s something I’m practicing and it's really interesting who falls in and out of your life when you match them where they’re at.     Congratulations on the music video. The visuals are striking. What was the inspiration for the imagery?   A: I based the video off Ridley Scott’s Blade Runner. I wanted it to feel almost like a third installment to the series. More in the future than the last film. It was such a massive challenge to do a sci-fi, futuristic video like this on a smaller scale, but it was an amazing pay off to see all the details come together. I’m very proud of what we did. Andrews' song and music video for ‘Don't Say Love’ is out now on all streaming platforms.     Talent - Andrew Matarazzo   Photographer - Alex Evans  Stylist - Benjamin Holtrop  Groomer - Lisa-Marie Powell 

In conversation with Tate McRae
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In conversation with Tate McRae

Music Tate McRae, Canadian singer, songwriter and dancer, caught the attention of multiple record labels after her original song “One Day” went viral on her YouTube channel with over 37 million views. She gained her worldwide recognition with her international hit “You Broke Me First” and got featured as the youngest musician on Forbes’30 under 30 list in 2020. At the young age of 18 she is one of the biggest breakthrough artist at the moment.     Tate, you started as a dancer before you recorded your first song. You danced at YYC Dance Project, a dance company owned by your mother and did also ballet training at the School of Alberta Ballet. After that you placed third on the 13thseason of US reality show “So You Think You Can Dance”. What does dance mean to you in your life?   Dance means everything to me. I mean, I feel like it was my first found passion in life. So obviously, that's going to be so special to me. And it felt like for the longest time it was the only thing that I could do that helped me escape from the world. It wasn't until I found writing that I realized I had two passions that were like super, super close to me and I just always wanted to keep working towards.     Your YouTube channel “Create With Tate” is actually where you introduced your first song ever, “One Day” at the age of 14. How did it feel when the song attracted over 37 million views and caught the attention of 11 record labels? Did you ever dream of doing music before that?   In my head, from a young age, I was like “I want to be a pop star”. I always said that to my mom. When you're young, there's always that vision in your head, but you're just like “I have no idea how to get there”. And as a dancer, I was asking myself how am I gonna become a pop star from literally not even singing. I feel like once the music thing just naturally started to happen and naturally came into my life, it was all very in the moment. The exciting, surreal moments that were happening that I would have never really expected because I was just writing because it was fun for me.     You write your own songs. Where do you draw inspiration from for your lyrics?   I draw inspiration from a lot of different aspects, but especially from my own life. I always say that I'm really bad at explaining myself and explaining my emotions. So the only way that I can actually feel like I get a weight off my chest is if I write it down and put it into my notes or my journal or into some sort of song. And that's also how I solve situations in my head. It makes it a lot more clear if I can just put it down on paper, otherwise I would be a ball of problems and would not know how to get them out of me.     Who and why are your biggest influences in the music industry?   That's really tough. I grew up listening to so much music because my mom was a dance teacher and I was a dancer. So I was just constantly surrounded by music my entire life. I think in the music aspect, I couldn't really nail down who or what I take reference from because I referenced so many different genres in my music, like hip hop music and then also country music and pop music. I feel like the spectrum is so wide. But then obviously as a dancer and a singer, I've always looked up to on stage performances from Britney Spears or J.Lo, or Ciara, dancers who fully bring a performance on stage. As a dancer, I definitely look up to that and want to be able to do something like that when I'm older.     What about in your life. Who and why are your biggest idols in life?   My parents are a really big inspiration to me. I don't know how they do it, but how they support me through every single dream I've ever had, even if it is the most crazy thing I've ever said to them, they were always like ”Okay, go ahead”. They gave me the ability to do that and have always supported me since I was super young. Even when I didn't have anything in front of me at all and I was at the bottom, they've always supported me to keep working and keep going for it. And that's exactly how I think kids should be raised, being able to chase their dreams and not feel afraid to do so.     2020 was a big year for you. You were featured on Billboard’s 21 Under 21 One to watch list, named as the youngest person on Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list and as one of Rolling Stones’ top 10 biggest breakthrough artists of 2020. You achieved all this at a very young age. How do all these achievements make you feel?   I think it's really exciting. Obviously it's such an honor to be amongst all those artists and recognized like that. I feel very blessed, but also the more things I see like that on the internet, the more pressure I put on myself to keep pushing to go farther. And I think I've always been like that, if something happens it’s all right, now I have to level up. And now I have to challenge myself even more in my writing and even more in my music. But yeah, really such a huge honor and I still can't even wrap my head around half the things that have happened in this year.     Your breakout hit “You Broke Me First” came out during the pandemic, the weirdest times of our lives, when everything was completely digital. How challenging was it for you to launch this hit and go through the success of it in such unusual times for the artists?   I think because it had never happened before, it was very foreign to everyone, myself and everyone around me. I didn't really realize the weight of having a global hit. I feel like I was sitting in my bedroom in my small town in Canada, literally not quite understanding what exactly was happening. I was seeing myself on TV, but it was all pre-taped and I was sitting on my couch and I was on the radio apparently every second. And I wouldn't have known because I was in my house. So it was a very weird moment because I was getting all these texts and all these congratulations and I couldn't even wrap my head around what was going on, I had no idea. And then I finally got to LA and I was like “Oh, this song was big”. That was a weird moment for me because I didn't even know, I felt so naive throughout the whole thing. I'm very grateful that now I'm able to see it on people's faces when I perform finally.     How does it feel now that you’re actually able to perform live? How different of a feeling it is comparing to digital performances? How are you experiencing this transition?   I fell in love with it. I've been doing so many festivals this summer and literally nothing compares to the feeling of being on stage and fans screaming your songs back. It’s honestly the most validating experience and rush of emotion as an artist. I can't describe how amazing it is to be on stage. And I'm so excited for many years of performing ahead of me, cause it's my favorite feeling. I mean, it's so fun for me. I'm getting to live my dream of dancing and singing at the same time and people actually watch, it's really cool.     This May you performed a global virtual show “Too Young to Be Sad”, which featured a two piece band and background dancers. I know you’ll be on tour with Shawn Mendes next year and probably have a lot of your own concerts as well. If you had to describe your excitement to perform live in front of your fans, how would you describe it?   I don't think I ever really thought of the day that I would be going on tour with Shawn Mendes. Honestly, it's all so surreal to me. I always thought it would be a dream come true to go on stage with a big artist and to be able to tour around the world. I'm just so grateful, I literally don't know how to explain it. I met Sean the other day and he was the sweetest guy in the entire world. It’s just crazy, I'm 18 and I'm about to go on tour with Shawn Mendes.    None of it feels real. I feel like I'm living in a fever dream. It's all very foggy and I feel like I'm going through it and just trying to be as present as possible because me and my family have no idea what's going on.     You have a huge following and fan base on social media. This is where people got to meet and know you. How do you look at social media now? Do you feel like privatizing your life more than before?   I'm already a private person enough. Even with my friends and stuff, I keep to myself a lot. I'm kind of a loner, but I feel like when I go on a social media, I just share every single moment that kind of happens in my career and every exciting thing that goes on and I try to be as connected with my fans as possible because I feel like they're my friends. They're people that are my age, I see them at concerts and that's cool, so I just get to share everything with them.   I think you definitely have to pick and choose what moments you put out on the internet, because once it's on the internet it stays on the internet forever and then you can't take it back. Honestly, there's so many moments in life that don't need to be caught on camera. There's so many moments when you're with your family or you're with your friends and you don't need phones out. You don't need anything, you don't need social media. And those moments are amazing as well as the moments that are being videotaped. It’s finding the balance between being a regular person and living your life and enjoying it and enjoying the people around you and then finding the moments you want to share with the world.     When do you feel the most free? What does freedom represent to you?   Actually one of the only times I feel free is when I'm on stage. It's very weird and funny, because I'm really bad at talking in big groups. If I'm in a big group of people, I will not speak, I'm pretty quiet. But for some reason when I'm on stage, I have a literal blabbermouth, I literally can't shut up and it's thousands of people. I feel like on stages, it's that weird feeling of there's so much love in one spot that you feel like you can do anything. And that's how I feel like on stage, I feel like I could literally fall over and people would still be happy. All I want is just being on stage, it's so fun. It's the biggest adrenaline rush and high of your life.     What are the next projects we can expect from you that you can tell us about?    I'm writing an album right now and it's almost finished. And I'm releasing my first single very soon actually. I've been teasing it on TikTok and I'm really excited. It's all based on real stories and situations that I've gone through in the past five months of moving to LA as an 18 year old. It's pretty cool, it just kind of sums up my life and people I've met and it's going to be released next year. I'm very pumped because we've just shot the music video.     Is there one particular project that is coming up that has you the most excited about?   Music wise, all I want to do is get out everything I've been writing. And obviously tours and everything that's going on next year for travel is going to be incredible. But there's this one song I wrote and I think it's the most personal and vulnerable song I've ever written in my entire life. Every time I listen to it, it literally makes me cry. I'm curious to see what happens if I were to put it out and see how people react, because it feels like it's also a bit of a risk because it's so vulnerable. It will be a ballad, it's so sad. It's insane.     With so many emotion people can easily get lost in the music. Just forget about everything else going on in the world or in your life. It's like an escape from reality.   Oh, I hope so. I hope my album is as an escape from reality, for a lot of people.   Tate McRae, Canadian singer, songwriter and dancer, caught the attention of multiple record labels after her original song “One Day” went viral on her YouTube channel with over 37 million views. She gained her worldwide recognition with her international hit “You Broke Me First” and got featured as the youngest musician on Forbes’30 under 30 list in 2020. At the young age of 18 she is one of the biggest breakthrough artist at the moment.     Tate, you started as a dancer before you recorded your first song. You danced at YYC Dance Project, a dance company owned by your mother and did also ballet training at the School of Alberta Ballet. After that you placed third on the 13thseason of US reality show “So You Think You Can Dance”. What does dance mean to you in your life?   Dance means everything to me. I mean, I feel like it was my first found passion in life. So obviously, that's going to be so special to me. And it felt like for the longest time it was the only thing that I could do that helped me escape from the world. It wasn't until I found writing that I realized I had two passions that were like super, super close to me and I just always wanted to keep working towards.     Your YouTube channel “Create With Tate” is actually where you introduced your first song ever, “One Day” at the age of 14. How did it feel when the song attracted over 37 million views and caught the attention of 11 record labels? Did you ever dream of doing music before that?   In my head, from a young age, I was like “I want to be a pop star”. I always said that to my mom. When you're young, there's always that vision in your head, but you're just like “I have no idea how to get there”. And as a dancer, I was asking myself how am I gonna become a pop star from literally not even singing. I feel like once the music thing just naturally started to happen and naturally came into my life, it was all very in the moment. The exciting, surreal moments that were happening that I would have never really expected because I was just writing because it was fun for me.     You write your own songs. Where do you draw inspiration from for your lyrics?   I draw inspiration from a lot of different aspects, but especially from my own life. I always say that I'm really bad at explaining myself and explaining my emotions. So the only way that I can actually feel like I get a weight off my chest is if I write it down and put it into my notes or my journal or into some sort of song. And that's also how I solve situations in my head. It makes it a lot more clear if I can just put it down on paper, otherwise I would be a ball of problems and would not know how to get them out of me.     Who and why are your biggest influences in the music industry?   That's really tough. I grew up listening to so much music because my mom was a dance teacher and I was a dancer. So I was just constantly surrounded by music my entire life. I think in the music aspect, I couldn't really nail down who or what I take reference from because I referenced so many different genres in my music, like hip hop music and then also country music and pop music. I feel like the spectrum is so wide. But then obviously as a dancer and a singer, I've always looked up to on stage performances from Britney Spears or J.Lo, or Ciara, dancers who fully bring a performance on stage. As a dancer, I definitely look up to that and want to be able to do something like that when I'm older.     What about in your life. Who and why are your biggest idols in life?   My parents are a really big inspiration to me. I don't know how they do it, but how they support me through every single dream I've ever had, even if it is the most crazy thing I've ever said to them, they were always like ”Okay, go ahead”. They gave me the ability to do that and have always supported me since I was super young. Even when I didn't have anything in front of me at all and I was at the bottom, they've always supported me to keep working and keep going for it. And that's exactly how I think kids should be raised, being able to chase their dreams and not feel afraid to do so.     2020 was a big year for you. You were featured on Billboard’s 21 Under 21 One to watch list, named as the youngest person on Forbes’ 30 Under 30 list and as one of Rolling Stones’ top 10 biggest breakthrough artists of 2020. You achieved all this at a very young age. How do all these achievements make you feel?   I think it's really exciting. Obviously it's such an honor to be amongst all those artists and recognized like that. I feel very blessed, but also the more things I see like that on the internet, the more pressure I put on myself to keep pushing to go farther. And I think I've always been like that, if something happens it’s all right, now I have to level up. And now I have to challenge myself even more in my writing and even more in my music. But yeah, really such a huge honor and I still can't even wrap my head around half the things that have happened in this year.     Your breakout hit “You Broke Me First” came out during the pandemic, the weirdest times of our lives, when everything was completely digital. How challenging was it for you to launch this hit and go through the success of it in such unusual times for the artists?   I think because it had never happened before, it was very foreign to everyone, myself and everyone around me. I didn't really realize the weight of having a global hit. I feel like I was sitting in my bedroom in my small town in Canada, literally not quite understanding what exactly was happening. I was seeing myself on TV, but it was all pre-taped and I was sitting on my couch and I was on the radio apparently every second. And I wouldn't have known because I was in my house. So it was a very weird moment because I was getting all these texts and all these congratulations and I couldn't even wrap my head around what was going on, I had no idea. And then I finally got to LA and I was like “Oh, this song was big”. That was a weird moment for me because I didn't even know, I felt so naive throughout the whole thing. I'm very grateful that now I'm able to see it on people's faces when I perform finally.     How does it feel now that you’re actually able to perform live? How different of a feeling it is comparing to digital performances? How are you experiencing this transition?   I fell in love with it. I've been doing so many festivals this summer and literally nothing compares to the feeling of being on stage and fans screaming your songs back. It’s honestly the most validating experience and rush of emotion as an artist. I can't describe how amazing it is to be on stage. And I'm so excited for many years of performing ahead of me, cause it's my favorite feeling. I mean, it's so fun for me. I'm getting to live my dream of dancing and singing at the same time and people actually watch, it's really cool.     This May you performed a global virtual show “Too Young to Be Sad”, which featured a two piece band and background dancers. I know you’ll be on tour with Shawn Mendes next year and probably have a lot of your own concerts as well. If you had to describe your excitement to perform live in front of your fans, how would you describe it?   I don't think I ever really thought of the day that I would be going on tour with Shawn Mendes. Honestly, it's all so surreal to me. I always thought it would be a dream come true to go on stage with a big artist and to be able to tour around the world. I'm just so grateful, I literally don't know how to explain it. I met Sean the other day and he was the sweetest guy in the entire world. It’s just crazy, I'm 18 and I'm about to go on tour with Shawn Mendes.    None of it feels real. I feel like I'm living in a fever dream. It's all very foggy and I feel like I'm going through it and just trying to be as present as possible because me and my family have no idea what's going on.     You have a huge following and fan base on social media. This is where people got to meet and know you. How do you look at social media now? Do you feel like privatizing your life more than before?   I'm already a private person enough. Even with my friends and stuff, I keep to myself a lot. I'm kind of a loner, but I feel like when I go on a social media, I just share every single moment that kind of happens in my career and every exciting thing that goes on and I try to be as connected with my fans as possible because I feel like they're my friends. They're people that are my age, I see them at concerts and that's cool, so I just get to share everything with them.   I think you definitely have to pick and choose what moments you put out on the internet, because once it's on the internet it stays on the internet forever and then you can't take it back. Honestly, there's so many moments in life that don't need to be caught on camera. There's so many moments when you're with your family or you're with your friends and you don't need phones out. You don't need anything, you don't need social media. And those moments are amazing as well as the moments that are being videotaped. It’s finding the balance between being a regular person and living your life and enjoying it and enjoying the people around you and then finding the moments you want to share with the world.     When do you feel the most free? What does freedom represent to you?   Actually one of the only times I feel free is when I'm on stage. It's very weird and funny, because I'm really bad at talking in big groups. If I'm in a big group of people, I will not speak, I'm pretty quiet. But for some reason when I'm on stage, I have a literal blabbermouth, I literally can't shut up and it's thousands of people. I feel like on stages, it's that weird feeling of there's so much love in one spot that you feel like you can do anything. And that's how I feel like on stage, I feel like I could literally fall over and people would still be happy. All I want is just being on stage, it's so fun. It's the biggest adrenaline rush and high of your life.     What are the next projects we can expect from you that you can tell us about?    I'm writing an album right now and it's almost finished. And I'm releasing my first single very soon actually. I've been teasing it on TikTok and I'm really excited. It's all based on real stories and situations that I've gone through in the past five months of moving to LA as an 18 year old. It's pretty cool, it just kind of sums up my life and people I've met and it's going to be released next year. I'm very pumped because we've just shot the music video.     Is there one particular project that is coming up that has you the most excited about?   Music wise, all I want to do is get out everything I've been writing. And obviously tours and everything that's going on next year for travel is going to be incredible. But there's this one song I wrote and I think it's the most personal and vulnerable song I've ever written in my entire life. Every time I listen to it, it literally makes me cry. I'm curious to see what happens if I were to put it out and see how people react, because it feels like it's also a bit of a risk because it's so vulnerable. It will be a ballad, it's so sad. It's insane.     With so many emotion people can easily get lost in the music. Just forget about everything else going on in the world or in your life. It's like an escape from reality.   Oh, I hope so. I hope my album is as an escape from reality, for a lot of people.  

SUPERFLY GUY
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SUPERFLY GUY

Music These days Wiz Khalifa isn’t giving any fucks anymore, if ever he did: “I focus on having the balls to say how I really feel.”     It’s a cute segment in a short documentary series that Apple TV put up on YouTube a few years back, about American rap superstar Wiz Khalifa (34). It shows a young Wiz – decidedly less tattooed at the time – performing in front of a handful of passerbys in a shopping mall. The story then cuts ahead in time: Wiz performing the same song in a crowded bar that’s not paying too much attention. The next jump has Wiz holding up the microphone to a huge crowd, the audience singing the lyrics of that same track back to him word by word.   What’s striking, apart from the displayed persistence, is that Wiz maintains the same easygoing demeanor in each shot. As if in the shopping mall he was performing to a sold out stadium, and in a sold out stadium he’s performing to a hand full of passerbys.   The track that catapulted him into stardom, Black and Yellow in 2011, was at that point still ahead of him. His mega hit song with Charlie Puth, See you again, is from 2015. With over five bilion (!) views it is still the fifth most streamed video on YouTube ever.   Today we catch Wiz, originally from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in his Los Angeles mansion, where he’s on his couch smoking a joint – as he explains over the phone – after a workout. He is a bit (by means of understatement) of an ambassador for marihuana. In fact, the guy has his own weed strain named after him: Khalifa Kush, a hybrid marihuana.     Being from Amsterdam and having smoked a joint or two myself, I know how it affects me. It’s quite incredible to me how you combine working out, being a superstar, being a dad, while smoking weed by the ounces.   “Weed is medicine to me. It relaxes me, it motivates me, it wakes me up, it puts me to sleep, it settles stomach after I eat. So it works for me in all those ways, while for another person it might just do one or two of these things. But there are ways to do it. I’m able to bring it to people, make them experience it in a way they have never before so they have a positive reaction to it.”     The other day you put an interesting post up on your Insta: ‘The moment I stopped giving a fuck was the moment stuff started happening’. Could you elaborate on that?   “I think that it is a mindset that stretches across the board, but it is really, really important when you live the lifestyle that I do. I’m basing everything off of my ideas and my own inspiration. Things build up over a period of time and then it starts to happen that other people will have an input. People come in that try to bring me down or try to sway me away from my ideas or what I think could be successful. I just think it’s really import to remind yourself that whatever got you in the game, it wasn’t to make certain other people happy. It wasn’t to seek them, or have their reactions. When you let that kick in, a lot of good stuff happens.”     What kind of fucks did you stop giving?   “I never really gave a lot of fucks anyway. It is mostly about what other people expect, or even about my own expectations of what the results will be. Some people are validation or gratification driven. To throw all that away and just trust the process and enjoy the moment, that is what I want.”     From what I’ve understood you are working on an album right now?   “Actually, I have multiple projects coming up. Some projects that are close to me that are ready for the fans, for the core fan base. I’ve got a group project with Juicy J that is finished, I’m executive producer on Snoop’s next album. And I’m working on my next really big release. I’m gonna start dropping singles for that pretty much when I get off the phone with you.”     You are quite the prolific artist, even if I would only look at your 2020 output. EP’s, albums, projects: what is the distinction between these formats for you?   “For me it’s about how people digest music. These days you can have a project, you can have an album, you can release a single. The main goal is to stay busy and keep the fans aggravated. Have everything lined up for music to be released, me being able to do what I gotta do. I want to put on good music for people to really match on to, gravitate to, keep it moving and rock out the shows we do.”     What is the inspiration for your upcoming album: is there a certain message, or how is it driven?   “It’s really just based on where I am at in my life now, the things I enjoy. I have always had different sides to myself, wether it’s more introspective, or kind of motivational, or has a weed smoking trippy vibe. And then there’s the more upbeat stuff, kinda hardcore, a lot of low end, a lot of base, to just make a move. So it’s about finding the right spot, which songs to drop and when. It is what is exciting about where I am at this stage in my career, that with whatever journey I’m having, I have people turning on, taking them on that journey with me. It’s the beauty of releasing music now, there is really no pressure.”     You mention the word introspective. With you being at the center of attention in everything you do, it is almost hard to imagine you having an introspective side to your persona.   “I think it’s all about how you interpret the music. Everything that I say has a meaning, even if it is a curse word, there’s a purpose for it. So it’s all about digging deep into my catalogue and knowing what I’m capable of. I’m at the point where don’t have to prove anything to anybody. The more fun that I have, I know people are gonna have it as well. The cool thing about being an artist and expressing yourself is that there is a million people out there going through the same thing as you are. However I say it, however it touches people; I don’t really focus too much on how it’s going to be received. I focus on having the balls to say how I really feel.”     Do you ever still feel shy about expressing yourself, exposing sides of yourself in your music?   “No, I’m not shy at all. People that really gravitate towards me, by now I think they know everything about me. And I think they want to hear realness, transparency. Whatever the message is, people have to feel that it’s authentic. And thats my real job, to be one hundred percent a real person, a real artist. As longs as people are getting that, I’m cool.”     You’ve had this incredible, massive succes, and already quite early on in your career. What do you reach for once you have made it that big?   “For me it’s about opening stuff up, progressing and doing things in a new way. Creating great experiences for the fans is my main objective, besides fully expressing myself. Music can help you reach your goals, it can make you feel confident, it can help you pick an outfit for the night, it can have you fall in love with someone. To be able to contribute to that is really exiting to me.”       EDITORIAL TEAM CREDITS:    Photographer: Marcus Cooper  Talent: Wiz Khalifa  Stylist: Christian Stroble  Casting: Timotej Letonja  Grooming: Tracy Love  Personal stylist: Lauren Matos  Styling assistant: Makaela Mendez   Production design: Nico Stahl Special thanks to Netta Frankel at IMG Models  Market assistant: danenikkoalvero  These days Wiz Khalifa isn’t giving any fucks anymore, if ever he did: “I focus on having the balls to say how I really feel.”     It’s a cute segment in a short documentary series that Apple TV put up on YouTube a few years back, about American rap superstar Wiz Khalifa (34). It shows a young Wiz – decidedly less tattooed at the time – performing in front of a handful of passerbys in a shopping mall. The story then cuts ahead in time: Wiz performing the same song in a crowded bar that’s not paying too much attention. The next jump has Wiz holding up the microphone to a huge crowd, the audience singing the lyrics of that same track back to him word by word.   What’s striking, apart from the displayed persistence, is that Wiz maintains the same easygoing demeanor in each shot. As if in the shopping mall he was performing to a sold out stadium, and in a sold out stadium he’s performing to a hand full of passerbys.   The track that catapulted him into stardom, Black and Yellow in 2011, was at that point still ahead of him. His mega hit song with Charlie Puth, See you again, is from 2015. With over five bilion (!) views it is still the fifth most streamed video on YouTube ever.   Today we catch Wiz, originally from Pittsburg, Pennsylvania, in his Los Angeles mansion, where he’s on his couch smoking a joint – as he explains over the phone – after a workout. He is a bit (by means of understatement) of an ambassador for marihuana. In fact, the guy has his own weed strain named after him: Khalifa Kush, a hybrid marihuana.     Being from Amsterdam and having smoked a joint or two myself, I know how it affects me. It’s quite incredible to me how you combine working out, being a superstar, being a dad, while smoking weed by the ounces.   “Weed is medicine to me. It relaxes me, it motivates me, it wakes me up, it puts me to sleep, it settles stomach after I eat. So it works for me in all those ways, while for another person it might just do one or two of these things. But there are ways to do it. I’m able to bring it to people, make them experience it in a way they have never before so they have a positive reaction to it.”     The other day you put an interesting post up on your Insta: ‘The moment I stopped giving a fuck was the moment stuff started happening’. Could you elaborate on that?   “I think that it is a mindset that stretches across the board, but it is really, really important when you live the lifestyle that I do. I’m basing everything off of my ideas and my own inspiration. Things build up over a period of time and then it starts to happen that other people will have an input. People come in that try to bring me down or try to sway me away from my ideas or what I think could be successful. I just think it’s really import to remind yourself that whatever got you in the game, it wasn’t to make certain other people happy. It wasn’t to seek them, or have their reactions. When you let that kick in, a lot of good stuff happens.”     What kind of fucks did you stop giving?   “I never really gave a lot of fucks anyway. It is mostly about what other people expect, or even about my own expectations of what the results will be. Some people are validation or gratification driven. To throw all that away and just trust the process and enjoy the moment, that is what I want.”     From what I’ve understood you are working on an album right now?   “Actually, I have multiple projects coming up. Some projects that are close to me that are ready for the fans, for the core fan base. I’ve got a group project with Juicy J that is finished, I’m executive producer on Snoop’s next album. And I’m working on my next really big release. I’m gonna start dropping singles for that pretty much when I get off the phone with you.”     You are quite the prolific artist, even if I would only look at your 2020 output. EP’s, albums, projects: what is the distinction between these formats for you?   “For me it’s about how people digest music. These days you can have a project, you can have an album, you can release a single. The main goal is to stay busy and keep the fans aggravated. Have everything lined up for music to be released, me being able to do what I gotta do. I want to put on good music for people to really match on to, gravitate to, keep it moving and rock out the shows we do.”     What is the inspiration for your upcoming album: is there a certain message, or how is it driven?   “It’s really just based on where I am at in my life now, the things I enjoy. I have always had different sides to myself, wether it’s more introspective, or kind of motivational, or has a weed smoking trippy vibe. And then there’s the more upbeat stuff, kinda hardcore, a lot of low end, a lot of base, to just make a move. So it’s about finding the right spot, which songs to drop and when. It is what is exciting about where I am at this stage in my career, that with whatever journey I’m having, I have people turning on, taking them on that journey with me. It’s the beauty of releasing music now, there is really no pressure.”     You mention the word introspective. With you being at the center of attention in everything you do, it is almost hard to imagine you having an introspective side to your persona.   “I think it’s all about how you interpret the music. Everything that I say has a meaning, even if it is a curse word, there’s a purpose for it. So it’s all about digging deep into my catalogue and knowing what I’m capable of. I’m at the point where don’t have to prove anything to anybody. The more fun that I have, I know people are gonna have it as well. The cool thing about being an artist and expressing yourself is that there is a million people out there going through the same thing as you are. However I say it, however it touches people; I don’t really focus too much on how it’s going to be received. I focus on having the balls to say how I really feel.”     Do you ever still feel shy about expressing yourself, exposing sides of yourself in your music?   “No, I’m not shy at all. People that really gravitate towards me, by now I think they know everything about me. And I think they want to hear realness, transparency. Whatever the message is, people have to feel that it’s authentic. And thats my real job, to be one hundred percent a real person, a real artist. As longs as people are getting that, I’m cool.”     You’ve had this incredible, massive succes, and already quite early on in your career. What do you reach for once you have made it that big?   “For me it’s about opening stuff up, progressing and doing things in a new way. Creating great experiences for the fans is my main objective, besides fully expressing myself. Music can help you reach your goals, it can make you feel confident, it can help you pick an outfit for the night, it can have you fall in love with someone. To be able to contribute to that is really exiting to me.”       EDITORIAL TEAM CREDITS:    Photographer: Marcus Cooper  Talent: Wiz Khalifa  Stylist: Christian Stroble  Casting: Timotej Letonja  Grooming: Tracy Love  Personal stylist: Lauren Matos  Styling assistant: Makaela Mendez   Production design: Nico Stahl Special thanks to Netta Frankel at IMG Models  Market assistant: danenikkoalvero 

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