@
Vault by Vans Presents The OG Authentic LX Zodiac Pack
885

Vault by Vans Presents The OG Authentic LX Zodiac Pack

Accessories Vault by Vans commences the New Year with a spin on the OG Authentic LX, featuring a mishmash of zodiac signs that nods to cosmic influences and extends to a collection of apparel and accessories.      Leading the pack, the OG Authentic LX in zodiac and black offers an allover embroidered pattern on a full canvas upper, showcasing artwork by Johannes Wieser, a designer and vintage collector based in Stockholm, Sweden.     Johannes worked with Vans to apply an interpretation of his artwork to the collection, which grew organically from a single T-shirt to what the designer describes as an entire universe. He likened the process to Japanese Raku pottery, a hand-molded technique in which a kiln is filled with different herbs and glazes producing dramatically unique variations. The resulting Zodiac Pack represents the mutual respect and ethos created through the partnership.     Johannes’ design carries over to the Vault OG Zodiac chore coat, a 100-percent cotton heavyweight canvas jacket with reversible print, Vault by Vans specific snap closures, dual-entry pockets, cuff adjusters, and a custom woven label.      The collection also includes a Vault by Vans OG Zodiac heavyweight hooded pullover fleece, as well as a short sleeve T-shirt in black, each featuring glow-in-the-dark and puff ink. A Vault by Vans OG Zodiac bucket hat with 100% cotton printed canvas and reversible zodiac and solid black colorways, as well as a Zodiac tote with an internal drop pocket and Vault woven label round out the offering.     The Vault by Vans OG Authentic LX Zodiac Pack is now available at select Vault by Vans retailers. For more information, please visit Vans.eu/Vault.     Vault by Vans commences the New Year with a spin on the OG Authentic LX, featuring a mishmash of zodiac signs that nods to cosmic influences and extends to a collection of apparel and accessories.      Leading the pack, the OG Authentic LX in zodiac and black offers an allover embroidered pattern on a full canvas upper, showcasing artwork by Johannes Wieser, a designer and vintage collector based in Stockholm, Sweden.     Johannes worked with Vans to apply an interpretation of his artwork to the collection, which grew organically from a single T-shirt to what the designer describes as an entire universe. He likened the process to Japanese Raku pottery, a hand-molded technique in which a kiln is filled with different herbs and glazes producing dramatically unique variations. The resulting Zodiac Pack represents the mutual respect and ethos created through the partnership.     Johannes’ design carries over to the Vault OG Zodiac chore coat, a 100-percent cotton heavyweight canvas jacket with reversible print, Vault by Vans specific snap closures, dual-entry pockets, cuff adjusters, and a custom woven label.      The collection also includes a Vault by Vans OG Zodiac heavyweight hooded pullover fleece, as well as a short sleeve T-shirt in black, each featuring glow-in-the-dark and puff ink. A Vault by Vans OG Zodiac bucket hat with 100% cotton printed canvas and reversible zodiac and solid black colorways, as well as a Zodiac tote with an internal drop pocket and Vault woven label round out the offering.     The Vault by Vans OG Authentic LX Zodiac Pack is now available at select Vault by Vans retailers. For more information, please visit Vans.eu/Vault.    

 VALENTINE'S DAY, THE BVLGARI WAY
880

VALENTINE'S DAY, THE BVLGARI WAY

Accessories Your dreams, brought to life with love. This year, Bvlgari indulges the fantasy and electricity of Valentine's Day with signature Roman style. Inspiring us all to give in to dreams and take a chance on love, the Italian Maison extends its exuberant spirit and daring creativity to the most romantic holiday of the year. It is a natural fit, because true love — like Bvlgari design — breaks all the rules.     Capturing the purest of emotions and coursing with that Roman passion for life, Bvlgari Valentine's Day gifts are as striking as love itself. From breath-taking jewels to iconic timepieces, stunning bags, accessories and other irresistible charms, each creation celebrates love with an unapologetic spirit and audacious touch. These are pieces to fall for, again and again.     The force behind Bvlgari's unbridled passion? A single wish: to create gorgeous, unforgettable, joy-filled moments for you and your love.     Your dreams, brought to life with love. This year, Bvlgari indulges the fantasy and electricity of Valentine's Day with signature Roman style. Inspiring us all to give in to dreams and take a chance on love, the Italian Maison extends its exuberant spirit and daring creativity to the most romantic holiday of the year. It is a natural fit, because true love — like Bvlgari design — breaks all the rules.     Capturing the purest of emotions and coursing with that Roman passion for life, Bvlgari Valentine's Day gifts are as striking as love itself. From breath-taking jewels to iconic timepieces, stunning bags, accessories and other irresistible charms, each creation celebrates love with an unapologetic spirit and audacious touch. These are pieces to fall for, again and again.     The force behind Bvlgari's unbridled passion? A single wish: to create gorgeous, unforgettable, joy-filled moments for you and your love.    

Swiss Haute Horlogerie meets Chinese zodiac tradition
876

Swiss Haute Horlogerie meets Chinese zodiac tradition

Watches Steeped in the aesthetic codes of Chinese culture, the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen is the first L.U.C timepiece to display the traditional Chinese timekeeping system, Shí Chen. The animals of the zodiac that symbolises them parade slowly by on an Urushi lacquer disc, accompanied by the symbol of prosperity and its god Lu Xing. This creative new complication exists as an 88-piece limited edition. Its L.U.C 96.29-L Chopard Manufacture movement is housed in a 40 mm ethical 18-carat rose gold case of peerless symbolic and physical finesse.     Carved from a block of ethical 18-carat rose gold, the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen is a talisman timepiece, an allegory of beliefs related to the Chinese zodiac and luck. It represents the first time that an Haute Horlogerie watch displays Shí Chen, the traditional Chinese time system, as a complication. It consists of twelve two-hour units, each one represented by an animal from the zodiac cycle. The day thus begins at 11pm with the hour of the Rat and ends with the hour of the Pig, while noon is in the middle of the hour of the Horse.       The Chinese zodiac bestiary enhanced by the art of Urushi:     The procession of 12 animals slowly parades through a large aperture at 12 o’clock, enabling a dual time read-off: one traditional and the other based on the international system. This succession of zodiac signs also underlines the creativity and mastery of the Chopard Manufacture artisans. In addition, the dial and Shí Chen disc of this timepiece are made of Japanese lacquer. Faithful to Asian traditions, Chopard has worked right from the start with the finest Japanese lacquer artisans, who craft dials using the traditional Urushi lacquer technique.     The 88 dials of the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen are produced by the workshops of the century-old Yamada Heiando company and crafted by Master lacquer specialist Minori Koizumi. In accordance with the distinctive Maki-e technique, gold flakes sprinkled between the layers of lacquer illuminate the 40 mm ethical 18-carat rose gold case from within. Steeped in the aesthetic codes of Chinese culture, the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen is the first L.U.C timepiece to display the traditional Chinese timekeeping system, Shí Chen. The animals of the zodiac that symbolises them parade slowly by on an Urushi lacquer disc, accompanied by the symbol of prosperity and its god Lu Xing. This creative new complication exists as an 88-piece limited edition. Its L.U.C 96.29-L Chopard Manufacture movement is housed in a 40 mm ethical 18-carat rose gold case of peerless symbolic and physical finesse.     Carved from a block of ethical 18-carat rose gold, the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen is a talisman timepiece, an allegory of beliefs related to the Chinese zodiac and luck. It represents the first time that an Haute Horlogerie watch displays Shí Chen, the traditional Chinese time system, as a complication. It consists of twelve two-hour units, each one represented by an animal from the zodiac cycle. The day thus begins at 11pm with the hour of the Rat and ends with the hour of the Pig, while noon is in the middle of the hour of the Horse.       The Chinese zodiac bestiary enhanced by the art of Urushi:     The procession of 12 animals slowly parades through a large aperture at 12 o’clock, enabling a dual time read-off: one traditional and the other based on the international system. This succession of zodiac signs also underlines the creativity and mastery of the Chopard Manufacture artisans. In addition, the dial and Shí Chen disc of this timepiece are made of Japanese lacquer. Faithful to Asian traditions, Chopard has worked right from the start with the finest Japanese lacquer artisans, who craft dials using the traditional Urushi lacquer technique.     The 88 dials of the L.U.C XP Urushi Spirit of Shí Chen are produced by the workshops of the century-old Yamada Heiando company and crafted by Master lacquer specialist Minori Koizumi. In accordance with the distinctive Maki-e technique, gold flakes sprinkled between the layers of lacquer illuminate the 40 mm ethical 18-carat rose gold case from within.

Advertising
Advertising
BOSS LAUNCHES SPRING/SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION AND CAMPAIGN
877

BOSS LAUNCHES SPRING/SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION AND CAMPAIGN

Fashion Creativity, optimism and energy are the watchwords of Spring/Summer 2021 for BOSS. An international cast of up-and-coming talent, led by South Sudanese supermodel Adut Akech, introduces the new collection in a bold campaign directed by Fabien Baron.     Fusing elegance and ease, the looks are more relaxed than ever before. The work of artist William Farr, who combines flowers with found objects such as wire, is a rich point of reference, inspiring the use of metal eyelets throughout the collection. For men, the new season offers agenda-setting updates of classic BOSS pieces.   Graphic patterns combined with new shapes, such as in the combination of a check jacket with tracksuit-style pants. The result? A relaxed, easy-wear outfit that is every bit as elegant as a suit. The sophisticated use of stripes, camouflage and a bold logo graphic across knitwear, sweaters and outerwear underlines the contemporary mood.     Colours range from conker, a masculine red-brown first seen on the FW20 runway, to fresh blue and yellow tones. A selection of updated neutrals, including a rich camel brown and crisp off-white, round out the palette. Worn in combination, the shades infuse each look with an uplifting and dynamic feel.     For women, the collection has a sense of the playful, yet retains the precision and sharpness that defines the BOSS aesthetic. The relaxed mood is evident here too, with elegantly draped fabrics and loose fits providing a contemporary take on femininity. New combinations, such as sharp outerwear worn with track pants, or tailoring with a logo sweatshirt, are both confident and contemporary.     Colours echo those in the men’s collection, with a particular emphasis on zesty yellow and timeless black. Patterns are a key feature here too, while the use of metal elements references William Farr’s juxtaposition of the natural and industrial, and reveals the power of contrasts.   Creativity, optimism and energy are the watchwords of Spring/Summer 2021 for BOSS. An international cast of up-and-coming talent, led by South Sudanese supermodel Adut Akech, introduces the new collection in a bold campaign directed by Fabien Baron.     Fusing elegance and ease, the looks are more relaxed than ever before. The work of artist William Farr, who combines flowers with found objects such as wire, is a rich point of reference, inspiring the use of metal eyelets throughout the collection. For men, the new season offers agenda-setting updates of classic BOSS pieces.   Graphic patterns combined with new shapes, such as in the combination of a check jacket with tracksuit-style pants. The result? A relaxed, easy-wear outfit that is every bit as elegant as a suit. The sophisticated use of stripes, camouflage and a bold logo graphic across knitwear, sweaters and outerwear underlines the contemporary mood.     Colours range from conker, a masculine red-brown first seen on the FW20 runway, to fresh blue and yellow tones. A selection of updated neutrals, including a rich camel brown and crisp off-white, round out the palette. Worn in combination, the shades infuse each look with an uplifting and dynamic feel.     For women, the collection has a sense of the playful, yet retains the precision and sharpness that defines the BOSS aesthetic. The relaxed mood is evident here too, with elegantly draped fabrics and loose fits providing a contemporary take on femininity. New combinations, such as sharp outerwear worn with track pants, or tailoring with a logo sweatshirt, are both confident and contemporary.     Colours echo those in the men’s collection, with a particular emphasis on zesty yellow and timeless black. Patterns are a key feature here too, while the use of metal elements references William Farr’s juxtaposition of the natural and industrial, and reveals the power of contrasts.  

C.P. COMPANY PRESENTS SS2021: NATURAL MUTATION
874

C.P. COMPANY PRESENTS SS2021: NATURAL MUTATION

Fashion In time of global uncertainty, C.P. Company presents a collection that reasserts the fundamental brand principles: years of continuous respect for its customers, achieved through the design language of authenticity, thoughtfulness, and functionality.     Further developing the themes inaugurated with its large-scale THE NEXT LANDSCAPE presentation in January 2020, the SS021 collection, titled NATURAL MUTATIONS, is organized as a series of “exchanges” between natural and synthetic fabrics (and natural and man-made environments), with specific interest in the mutations that arise between these two poles. The designer team uses the full arsenal of C.P. Company sportswear know-how to ask how can a synthetic fabric assume the tactility of a natural fabric whilst retaining its lightweight or hydrophilic qualities? Or how can natural fabrics be adapted to the ultralight versatility of contemporary urban life?     www.cpcompany.com   In time of global uncertainty, C.P. Company presents a collection that reasserts the fundamental brand principles: years of continuous respect for its customers, achieved through the design language of authenticity, thoughtfulness, and functionality.     Further developing the themes inaugurated with its large-scale THE NEXT LANDSCAPE presentation in January 2020, the SS021 collection, titled NATURAL MUTATIONS, is organized as a series of “exchanges” between natural and synthetic fabrics (and natural and man-made environments), with specific interest in the mutations that arise between these two poles. The designer team uses the full arsenal of C.P. Company sportswear know-how to ask how can a synthetic fabric assume the tactility of a natural fabric whilst retaining its lightweight or hydrophilic qualities? Or how can natural fabrics be adapted to the ultralight versatility of contemporary urban life?     www.cpcompany.com  

When Dancing Stars Align: A Conversation Between Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav
871

When Dancing Stars Align: A Conversation Between Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav

Men Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav, two rising stars in the world of contemporary dance, were destined to meet -- both Congolese, queer, Belgium-born artists nee under the sign of Leo in 1993. While astrological, geographical and artistic forces converged to bring these two together professionally, it wasn’t until recently that their paths crossed. Coutsier, who had already collaborated with Beyoncé, reached out to Yav in 2019 to join the “Black Is King” project. Although they didn’t get to work together then, they were each featured in the visual album -- Yav in “SCAR” and Coutsier in “SPIRIT”. After cementing their artistic individuality, they came together to harness the power of Ndeko -- a word that originates from Congo’s Lingala language, which means a strong bond, either blood-related or spiritual, whereby two people are bound by care and respect. We sat down with them to talk about race, identity and the power of movement.      Christian: The first time I heard of Nick was in January 2017. I remember someone telling me that there is a beautiful black dancer that has a very interesting way of moving. At that point, I hadn’t experienced having another black body in the space of contemporary dance. The moment Instagram started to broaden connection possibilities on the platform, that's when I really started to look for people like myself. I remember one day, Nick popped up as a “Suggestion For You”, and that’s really when I saw him for the first time.    Nick: My immediate reaction when I first heard about Christian wasn’t necessarily a defensive one, but more of a question about who that person is and why the comparison is being made. I also didn’t know if the constant comparison was positive or negative, or just a warning about this other guy. In this industry, it’s kind of a privileged place to be the only black guy. So is this other person going to be an ally or is he coming for my spot? All that thinking isn’t conscious hate, it’s just so instilled in how we think and how we are trained to think -- the so-called “There can only be one“ myth. When we physically met, it was kind of like a match made in heaven. For the first time ever, I was like “Okay wow, this is how it actually feels to have another black body in the space.”   Christian: What’s interesting is the way I first started hearing about Nick. I felt this energy as though these people were preparing me for this. I often had white allies, and now I had a black ally, which allowed me to broaden my network of people of colour and black dancers. It was one of the few times where I felt that there were no strings attached.    Nick: I like to be surrounded by people who have that talent and drive. And so when I heard about Christian, I thought “If he’s that good, then let me see how good I can be.” Competition is about pushing the other up -- inspiring and challenging each other to be the best version of ourselves.    Christian: There isn’t always a lot of space to move in contemporary dance when you are the only black person. There are certain opportunities that you can’t get because it’s a project that is told from a certain narrative.    Nick: Both of us being black, queer artists, we had to move through society in a certain way because of structural racism and homophobia. Being black we had to do this, being gay we had to do this, being second-generation immigrants, we had to do this. So it all made us who we are. And I think that the way I moved in society translated into the way I move as a dancer. The body being my main instrument, it does carry its own story. And I remember when I saw Christian move, I thought ”Wow, it is so specific” and it reminded me of the singularity of how I am trying to move. It does take time and maturity to embrace singularity as being an asset.   Christian: There is a logic to movement. It’s very easy for outsiders to say, “Oh yeah, I recognise this from ballet, or this from that.” But something I’ve often noticed with people of colour and black dancers is that the moment they do their own thing, there is something about their movement that doesn’t always appear to be what people normally perceive as logical in dance. But it’s so clear that you take it for what it is. I do think that having your own logic of movement is linked to having a lonely existence. When I started doing gymnastics as a kid, I was the only boy and the only black boy. You’re constantly on an island within a group. The way Nick moves, what happens here in his chest, it’s such a minor detail for others but then I’m like “Ah, I understand this movement.” It’s important to have representation and to see yourself in someone else, but feeling the movement is even more powerful.    Nick: I now kind of understand why we weren’t put together before because we are so powerful together. The colonial system of dividing power to better conquer is still present, including in the dance industry. Now we understand the power that we have together.    Christian: Our star signs are also identical. Over the years, I’ve met a lot of people who are Leo, but rarely someone who is a double Leo, like me. When people are double Leo, it’s so strong. Even if the personalities are different, there is something that is going to work because we’re powered by the same energetical forces within the universe.    Nick: It’s an unapologetic way of being. Something that has allowed us to be so sure and assertive about who we are was to not wait for that external validation.    Christian: In dance, the movements are stronger than myself so I don’t feel the need to adapt to other dance aesthetics. As a black man in society, however, that’s where I adapt my movements. For a very long time, when I would go to the hairdresser, I would speak in a very low voice, walk in a different way, and just adapt very small things. And I still do it because in order to survive, that’s where I really need to adapt my movements. In spaces where you’re underrepresented, people don’t always have the knowledge, desire or awareness of wanting it to be an inclusive place.    Nick: As a gay person, you need to adapt all the time, and so you just become really good at it. It shouldn’t be this way but it’s unfortunately still the case, as being your true, authentic self is still not accepted everywhere. Working with movement, the body and dance in that way allows me to make lemonade out of not-so-tasty lemons, so to speak. From a cathartic point of view, my adaptability in life does translate itself in my dancing, my work and my research around movement.   Christian: Walking in the streets as a queer man with your partner is a very precious part of me and not every place is a place to share that in the way that we would like to share it. Our society is not built on that, and that’s when I started realising that adapting isn’t always a bad thing.    Nick: When I started to create my own work, my artistic spontaneity would be sparked by sonorities and movements that would go back to my African roots. When I met Christian, it was really serendipitous because it was the moment I started to deconstruct a lot of things and give value to that part of myself. You live in this constant duality, which can be a power, but for the longest time it was something that I couldn’t identify with. I questioned my legitimacy as a black man, asking “Am I really the person who can talk about structural racism?” But being a second-generation immigrant is an identity in itself and so I gave power to my Congolese roots.    Christian: It is different when as a black person, you dance with another black person. When Nick and I were dancing during this shoot, it’s as if we were an extension of each other, almost like one body. There is a sense of home that I usually have to find within myself.    Nick: And as movement is such a big part of us, both in life and in dance, it was important for us to work with a photographer who could encapsulate all of that. Julien Vallon was a perfect fit, and we decided to name this photo series “Ndeko”, as it captures the way Christian and I feel about one another -- when you recognise yourself in the other. “I see you Ndeko”.      TEAM CREDITS:   Photographer Julien Vallon Fashion by Gabriella Norberg Talents Nick Coutsier & Christian Yav Words and edit by Berenice Magistretti editor: Timotej Letonja Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav, two rising stars in the world of contemporary dance, were destined to meet -- both Congolese, queer, Belgium-born artists nee under the sign of Leo in 1993. While astrological, geographical and artistic forces converged to bring these two together professionally, it wasn’t until recently that their paths crossed. Coutsier, who had already collaborated with Beyoncé, reached out to Yav in 2019 to join the “Black Is King” project. Although they didn’t get to work together then, they were each featured in the visual album -- Yav in “SCAR” and Coutsier in “SPIRIT”. After cementing their artistic individuality, they came together to harness the power of Ndeko -- a word that originates from Congo’s Lingala language, which means a strong bond, either blood-related or spiritual, whereby two people are bound by care and respect. We sat down with them to talk about race, identity and the power of movement.      Christian: The first time I heard of Nick was in January 2017. I remember someone telling me that there is a beautiful black dancer that has a very interesting way of moving. At that point, I hadn’t experienced having another black body in the space of contemporary dance. The moment Instagram started to broaden connection possibilities on the platform, that's when I really started to look for people like myself. I remember one day, Nick popped up as a “Suggestion For You”, and that’s really when I saw him for the first time.    Nick: My immediate reaction when I first heard about Christian wasn’t necessarily a defensive one, but more of a question about who that person is and why the comparison is being made. I also didn’t know if the constant comparison was positive or negative, or just a warning about this other guy. In this industry, it’s kind of a privileged place to be the only black guy. So is this other person going to be an ally or is he coming for my spot? All that thinking isn’t conscious hate, it’s just so instilled in how we think and how we are trained to think -- the so-called “There can only be one“ myth. When we physically met, it was kind of like a match made in heaven. For the first time ever, I was like “Okay wow, this is how it actually feels to have another black body in the space.”   Christian: What’s interesting is the way I first started hearing about Nick. I felt this energy as though these people were preparing me for this. I often had white allies, and now I had a black ally, which allowed me to broaden my network of people of colour and black dancers. It was one of the few times where I felt that there were no strings attached.    Nick: I like to be surrounded by people who have that talent and drive. And so when I heard about Christian, I thought “If he’s that good, then let me see how good I can be.” Competition is about pushing the other up -- inspiring and challenging each other to be the best version of ourselves.    Christian: There isn’t always a lot of space to move in contemporary dance when you are the only black person. There are certain opportunities that you can’t get because it’s a project that is told from a certain narrative.    Nick: Both of us being black, queer artists, we had to move through society in a certain way because of structural racism and homophobia. Being black we had to do this, being gay we had to do this, being second-generation immigrants, we had to do this. So it all made us who we are. And I think that the way I moved in society translated into the way I move as a dancer. The body being my main instrument, it does carry its own story. And I remember when I saw Christian move, I thought ”Wow, it is so specific” and it reminded me of the singularity of how I am trying to move. It does take time and maturity to embrace singularity as being an asset.   Christian: There is a logic to movement. It’s very easy for outsiders to say, “Oh yeah, I recognise this from ballet, or this from that.” But something I’ve often noticed with people of colour and black dancers is that the moment they do their own thing, there is something about their movement that doesn’t always appear to be what people normally perceive as logical in dance. But it’s so clear that you take it for what it is. I do think that having your own logic of movement is linked to having a lonely existence. When I started doing gymnastics as a kid, I was the only boy and the only black boy. You’re constantly on an island within a group. The way Nick moves, what happens here in his chest, it’s such a minor detail for others but then I’m like “Ah, I understand this movement.” It’s important to have representation and to see yourself in someone else, but feeling the movement is even more powerful.    Nick: I now kind of understand why we weren’t put together before because we are so powerful together. The colonial system of dividing power to better conquer is still present, including in the dance industry. Now we understand the power that we have together.    Christian: Our star signs are also identical. Over the years, I’ve met a lot of people who are Leo, but rarely someone who is a double Leo, like me. When people are double Leo, it’s so strong. Even if the personalities are different, there is something that is going to work because we’re powered by the same energetical forces within the universe.    Nick: It’s an unapologetic way of being. Something that has allowed us to be so sure and assertive about who we are was to not wait for that external validation.    Christian: In dance, the movements are stronger than myself so I don’t feel the need to adapt to other dance aesthetics. As a black man in society, however, that’s where I adapt my movements. For a very long time, when I would go to the hairdresser, I would speak in a very low voice, walk in a different way, and just adapt very small things. And I still do it because in order to survive, that’s where I really need to adapt my movements. In spaces where you’re underrepresented, people don’t always have the knowledge, desire or awareness of wanting it to be an inclusive place.    Nick: As a gay person, you need to adapt all the time, and so you just become really good at it. It shouldn’t be this way but it’s unfortunately still the case, as being your true, authentic self is still not accepted everywhere. Working with movement, the body and dance in that way allows me to make lemonade out of not-so-tasty lemons, so to speak. From a cathartic point of view, my adaptability in life does translate itself in my dancing, my work and my research around movement.   Christian: Walking in the streets as a queer man with your partner is a very precious part of me and not every place is a place to share that in the way that we would like to share it. Our society is not built on that, and that’s when I started realising that adapting isn’t always a bad thing.    Nick: When I started to create my own work, my artistic spontaneity would be sparked by sonorities and movements that would go back to my African roots. When I met Christian, it was really serendipitous because it was the moment I started to deconstruct a lot of things and give value to that part of myself. You live in this constant duality, which can be a power, but for the longest time it was something that I couldn’t identify with. I questioned my legitimacy as a black man, asking “Am I really the person who can talk about structural racism?” But being a second-generation immigrant is an identity in itself and so I gave power to my Congolese roots.    Christian: It is different when as a black person, you dance with another black person. When Nick and I were dancing during this shoot, it’s as if we were an extension of each other, almost like one body. There is a sense of home that I usually have to find within myself.    Nick: And as movement is such a big part of us, both in life and in dance, it was important for us to work with a photographer who could encapsulate all of that. Julien Vallon was a perfect fit, and we decided to name this photo series “Ndeko”, as it captures the way Christian and I feel about one another -- when you recognise yourself in the other. “I see you Ndeko”.      TEAM CREDITS:   Photographer Julien Vallon Fashion by Gabriella Norberg Talents Nick Coutsier & Christian Yav Words and edit by Berenice Magistretti editor: Timotej Letonja

MONTBLANC M_GRAM 4810 COLLECTION
862

MONTBLANC M_GRAM 4810 COLLECTION

Watches “While Montblanc is an iconic brand that carries so much meaning to so many people, we felt it was time to introduce a new signature logo pattern to give a new generation of Montblanc customers an exciting identity to rally around. Our M_Gram 4810 collection has a distinctive identity that is unmistakably Montblanc, owning all the qualities of an icon in-the-making,” says Nicolas Baretzki, Montblanc CEO.     The two-colour tone M pattern is inspired by the geometry and lettering of graphics from the Montblanc archives, underscoring the richness of the Maison’s heritage. It is derived from the Montblanc wordmark developed in the 1920s and used – only slightly altered - in the Maison’s communications alongside the iconic Montblanc logo until this day. The bold and pointed shape of the letter with its geometric look captures the Art Deco style of the 1920s, one of the most important periods for the brand. In addition to the development of a very distinctive look, it was during that decade that Montblanc launched into new categories, including its foray into leather goods from 1926 onwards.     “What differentiates our graphic typography from other logo-driven monograms is the idea of not constructing something entirely new but rather converting existing typography through inspiration,’ explains Zaim Kamal, Montblanc Creative Director. “With a heritage that spans nearly 115 years, there was so much to draw from to create a new pattern that is certainly inspired by history but that looks to the future of the Maison. The new design is a connection point to the Montblanc community, a badge of belonging that each owner can interpret anyway he or she likes.”     The PVC coated-canvas resistant to scratchesandeverydaywearispairedwithblack leather trimming details to enhance the craftsmanship of the Montblanc M_Gram 4810 collection, while giving it a sophisticated design twist. The Montblanc logo script in white on the front of each piece stands out against the elegant black and blue combination to emphasize the Maison’s brand identity.     Pieces from the new collection take center stage in What Moves You, Makes You, Montblanc’s new global brand campaign that spotlights the exceptional individuals who are rede ning what success means today, driven by a higher purpose and a love of what they do. Actor Taron Egerton is featured with his Montblanc M_Gram 4810 Backpack, while singer, actor and writer Chen Kun sports his Montblanc M_Gram 4810 Beltbag. Whether a Backpack with a ap, a Document Case, a Tote, a Belt Bag, a Medium Pouch, a Duf e Bag, an Envelope or a Sling Backpack - the relaxed elegance of Montblanc M_Gram 4810 collection makes each piece a perfect companion for seamlessly moving through the day and into the evening, from business meetings to leisure pursuits. Montblanc’s latest technology innovations pieces have also received the Montblanc M_Gram 4810 treatment, with the pattern embossed on the new Montblanc MB 01 Headphones as well as being featured on the dial and PVC canvas watchstrap of the Montblanc’s Summit 2 smartwatch. “While Montblanc is an iconic brand that carries so much meaning to so many people, we felt it was time to introduce a new signature logo pattern to give a new generation of Montblanc customers an exciting identity to rally around. Our M_Gram 4810 collection has a distinctive identity that is unmistakably Montblanc, owning all the qualities of an icon in-the-making,” says Nicolas Baretzki, Montblanc CEO.     The two-colour tone M pattern is inspired by the geometry and lettering of graphics from the Montblanc archives, underscoring the richness of the Maison’s heritage. It is derived from the Montblanc wordmark developed in the 1920s and used – only slightly altered - in the Maison’s communications alongside the iconic Montblanc logo until this day. The bold and pointed shape of the letter with its geometric look captures the Art Deco style of the 1920s, one of the most important periods for the brand. In addition to the development of a very distinctive look, it was during that decade that Montblanc launched into new categories, including its foray into leather goods from 1926 onwards.     “What differentiates our graphic typography from other logo-driven monograms is the idea of not constructing something entirely new but rather converting existing typography through inspiration,’ explains Zaim Kamal, Montblanc Creative Director. “With a heritage that spans nearly 115 years, there was so much to draw from to create a new pattern that is certainly inspired by history but that looks to the future of the Maison. The new design is a connection point to the Montblanc community, a badge of belonging that each owner can interpret anyway he or she likes.”     The PVC coated-canvas resistant to scratchesandeverydaywearispairedwithblack leather trimming details to enhance the craftsmanship of the Montblanc M_Gram 4810 collection, while giving it a sophisticated design twist. The Montblanc logo script in white on the front of each piece stands out against the elegant black and blue combination to emphasize the Maison’s brand identity.     Pieces from the new collection take center stage in What Moves You, Makes You, Montblanc’s new global brand campaign that spotlights the exceptional individuals who are rede ning what success means today, driven by a higher purpose and a love of what they do. Actor Taron Egerton is featured with his Montblanc M_Gram 4810 Backpack, while singer, actor and writer Chen Kun sports his Montblanc M_Gram 4810 Beltbag. Whether a Backpack with a ap, a Document Case, a Tote, a Belt Bag, a Medium Pouch, a Duf e Bag, an Envelope or a Sling Backpack - the relaxed elegance of Montblanc M_Gram 4810 collection makes each piece a perfect companion for seamlessly moving through the day and into the evening, from business meetings to leisure pursuits. Montblanc’s latest technology innovations pieces have also received the Montblanc M_Gram 4810 treatment, with the pattern embossed on the new Montblanc MB 01 Headphones as well as being featured on the dial and PVC canvas watchstrap of the Montblanc’s Summit 2 smartwatch.

In conversation with Connor Jessup
857

In conversation with Connor Jessup

Men We had a pleasure speaking with Connor Jessup, our digital cover star.     In the past you did film photography, do you still do anything in that direction?   A little. I'd like to do more. I take pics on-set with my little Olympus point-and-shoot, but otherwise my cameras are dusty. I struggle here at home, for some reason. I'm better in other places. Photography is good for me. I have a bad habit of drifting and it makes me pay attention. It makes my memory click on and record. And worrying about a single moment, a single idea, instead of a whole string of them, is a happy change of pace.     We heard you are a movie buff. Have you watched any cool new movies recently during quarantine and which would you recommend?   So many. My best friend and I quarantined together from March to July and we watched a movie every night. I fell mad for Jane Campion's Bright Star. She found the exact center between sensuality and wordiness. Ben Whishaw fuck! I watched it 3x in two days. A friend recommended Truffaut's Small Change. So wise and wonderful. Ang Lee's Sense and Sensibility, which we somehow hadn't seen. It's an absolute masterclass in how to move talking people around rooms. Jafar Panahi's The White Balloon, Mia Hansen-Løve's Father of My Children, William Wyler's The Heiress (Olivia de Havilland!), a herd of surprising François Ozon movies: In the House, Swimming Pool, Summer of 85. James L. Brooks' Broadcast News, Kelly Reichardt's First Cow, Kirsten Johnson's Dick Johnson is Dead. We did a Carol Ballard marathon. Fly Away Home and Duma are beautiful movies.     We have seen Locke & Key, a Netflix hit series where you star as one of the lead characters. Is there a season two in the works and what are some of your favorite moments from the first season?   We're shooting season two now! It should come out sometime next year. It'll sound cheap, but my memories of the first season are mostly tangled up with people, not work. One of the pleasures of TV is that you get to build relationships over time. There's a deepening that happens. You share so many long, cold nights and early mornings and sleepy lunches and casual bitchings. You see each other's vulnerabilities and frustrations and capacities. There's a sort of beautiful, collective delirium that moves in. A lot of cry-laughing. I remember getting caught in a 3am thunderstorm with Emilia and Griffin and laughing so hard I literally couldn't walk.     Have you been able to be creative during these weird current times and have you learnt anything new?   In waves. I got a lot of writing done between April and July, but I've been stuck since. My brain is not very schematic, so the transition from gathering to ordering is hard for me. I can be really unkind to myself. None of the struggle is original, so I won’t bore you. But there were a few productive months! I realized I had always thought of writing as a technical process, and that I needed to start thinking of it as an emotional one....as basic as that sounds. I learned that I can't write drunk.     What is your daily beauty routine like? And what beauty products you cannot go without?   My beauty routine is so quick it's almost homophobic. I won't embarress myself by saying more.     Tell us something about yourself that isn't on your resume.   When I was in fifth grade, I performed "It's Raining Men" in drag for a school lip sync competition.      Are there any other exciting new projects you are working on?   I'll be shooting Locke & Key for a while, but there's a short film I'm hoping to make in Japan whenever I can. Beyond that, I'm trying to focus on writing my first feature. It's a grief adventure movie about a boy and a god.     PHOTO CREDITS: talent and photography: CONNOR JESSUP editor: TIMOTEJ LETONJA stylist: DONTE MCGUINE make-up: BRENDA THURSTON We had a pleasure speaking with Connor Jessup, our digital cover star.     In the past you did film photography, do you still do anything in that direction?   A little. I'd like to do more. I take pics on-set with my little Olympus point-and-shoot, but otherwise my cameras are dusty. I struggle here at home, for some reason. I'm better in other places. Photography is good for me. I have a bad habit of drifting and it makes me pay attention. It makes my memory click on and record. And worrying about a single moment, a single idea, instead of a whole string of them, is a happy change of pace.     We heard you are a movie buff. Have you watched any cool new movies recently during quarantine and which would you recommend?   So many. My best friend and I quarantined together from March to July and we watched a movie every night. I fell mad for Jane Campion's Bright Star. She found the exact center between sensuality and wordiness. Ben Whishaw fuck! I watched it 3x in two days. A friend recommended Truffaut's Small Change. So wise and wonderful. Ang Lee's Sense and Sensibility, which we somehow hadn't seen. It's an absolute masterclass in how to move talking people around rooms. Jafar Panahi's The White Balloon, Mia Hansen-Løve's Father of My Children, William Wyler's The Heiress (Olivia de Havilland!), a herd of surprising François Ozon movies: In the House, Swimming Pool, Summer of 85. James L. Brooks' Broadcast News, Kelly Reichardt's First Cow, Kirsten Johnson's Dick Johnson is Dead. We did a Carol Ballard marathon. Fly Away Home and Duma are beautiful movies.     We have seen Locke & Key, a Netflix hit series where you star as one of the lead characters. Is there a season two in the works and what are some of your favorite moments from the first season?   We're shooting season two now! It should come out sometime next year. It'll sound cheap, but my memories of the first season are mostly tangled up with people, not work. One of the pleasures of TV is that you get to build relationships over time. There's a deepening that happens. You share so many long, cold nights and early mornings and sleepy lunches and casual bitchings. You see each other's vulnerabilities and frustrations and capacities. There's a sort of beautiful, collective delirium that moves in. A lot of cry-laughing. I remember getting caught in a 3am thunderstorm with Emilia and Griffin and laughing so hard I literally couldn't walk.     Have you been able to be creative during these weird current times and have you learnt anything new?   In waves. I got a lot of writing done between April and July, but I've been stuck since. My brain is not very schematic, so the transition from gathering to ordering is hard for me. I can be really unkind to myself. None of the struggle is original, so I won’t bore you. But there were a few productive months! I realized I had always thought of writing as a technical process, and that I needed to start thinking of it as an emotional one....as basic as that sounds. I learned that I can't write drunk.     What is your daily beauty routine like? And what beauty products you cannot go without?   My beauty routine is so quick it's almost homophobic. I won't embarress myself by saying more.     Tell us something about yourself that isn't on your resume.   When I was in fifth grade, I performed "It's Raining Men" in drag for a school lip sync competition.      Are there any other exciting new projects you are working on?   I'll be shooting Locke & Key for a while, but there's a short film I'm hoping to make in Japan whenever I can. Beyond that, I'm trying to focus on writing my first feature. It's a grief adventure movie about a boy and a god.     PHOTO CREDITS: talent and photography: CONNOR JESSUP editor: TIMOTEJ LETONJA stylist: DONTE MCGUINE make-up: BRENDA THURSTON

In conversation with Danny Griffin
856

In conversation with Danny Griffin

Men We had a delight starting the year and having a fun conversation with actor Danny Griffin.     Tell us something that is not on your resume.   This is probably a little odd, but since I was about 10, I have had a love for horses. I started horseback riding when I was about 11 years old. Throughout the years, I have not been able to do it as much as I would like to; however, I've got back into it recently.      What has been the biggest lesson learnt this year for you?   Well, it's been a really weird year, not just for me but for the world. I can be quite an impatient person; it's something I need to work on. However, I have gotten to work on my patience with all the downtime there has been.        Have you learnt or explored any other new passions during this year?   I actually got into gaming this year; for about 3months straight, I was very hooked on a particular game. I played it with my friends, which was just great fun, basically hanging out virtually with your mates and catching up.         When did you start acting and when did you know it was what you wanted to do as a career?    I was 15, and  I discovered I could make acting my career.  I  just finished watching an episode of Doctor Who, and I loved the main actor Matt Smith.  Upon googling him, I found out that he was an Actor who studied acting at the National Youth Theatre. I had no idea you could study acting, let alone make a career out of it. That's when I decided I wanted to pursue the craft and I moved to London to study it.      Do you have any other hobbies/ interests growing up that you enjoyed doing?    Well, I was lucky enough to grow up In Cornwall. I had the beach down the road, where I enjoyed surfing and sailing a bit. I also enjoyed climbing and had a free climbing wall in my back garden (a Tree) ha. I love horseback riding. I used to go every Saturday, and I  was the only guy who did it!  I didn't care; I was 12. I was also really into swimming, Hockey and Rock Climbing.        What was it like playing 'Sky' on Netflix Fate of Winx Saga? Are you similar to your character?   I enjoyed playing 'Sky'. What is so interesting about 'Sky' is that he is a little like an Iceberg. He seems kinda normal on top, but underneath there's so much going on. That is true for many of the show's characters and was something I found very relatable. We all have something going on beneath the surface. We may seem polished on the outside, but it can be a different story on the inside.        You have some pretty intense fight scenes. What was it like working with a sword?    I wish I could tell you that the swords were real! I wanted one so badly. When John, our swordsmith, came to give me my sword, I felt so excited. The little kid who used to watch 'Aragorn' from Lord of the Rings was about to be given his first sword, only to pick it up and find out it was plastic.... My first response was, "Where is the real one? "   The fight scenes were so much fun, and my co-star Freddy only made it easier. We had an amazing stunt team, who came up with some outstanding choreography, which Freddy and I trained a great deal to get down as smooth and as fast as possible.      What are some of your favorite memories from working on set?   I have so many. Every day on set was memorable. The whole cast is such down to earth lovely people, and it just became like going to work with your friends. I have a lot of scenes with Rob Collier, who is probably one of the funniest people I've ever met. He would come to set, and as a warm-up he would start rapping or "spitting bars," as he calls it.      How have you been keeping busy during quarantine? Any tips or suggestions for readers struggling?   It is an incredibly hard time for everyone. And one suggestion that would work for someone wouldn't work for someone else. All I can say is try and have a routine, even if it's just getting up at a reasonable time and making your bed.       Anything you would like to say to your fans?   I am so grateful to anyone who supports me.  Thank you for all your kindness and lovely comments about the show. I hope you enjoy our take on Fate the Winx Saga. Follow me on Instagram @Danny_Griffin_ to keep up with my future projects and Fate the Winx Saga news.       TEAM CREDITS: Photographer: Joseph Sinclair using Hasselblad.     Styling: Ella Gaskell   Grooming: Charli Avery   We had a delight starting the year and having a fun conversation with actor Danny Griffin.     Tell us something that is not on your resume.   This is probably a little odd, but since I was about 10, I have had a love for horses. I started horseback riding when I was about 11 years old. Throughout the years, I have not been able to do it as much as I would like to; however, I've got back into it recently.      What has been the biggest lesson learnt this year for you?   Well, it's been a really weird year, not just for me but for the world. I can be quite an impatient person; it's something I need to work on. However, I have gotten to work on my patience with all the downtime there has been.        Have you learnt or explored any other new passions during this year?   I actually got into gaming this year; for about 3months straight, I was very hooked on a particular game. I played it with my friends, which was just great fun, basically hanging out virtually with your mates and catching up.         When did you start acting and when did you know it was what you wanted to do as a career?    I was 15, and  I discovered I could make acting my career.  I  just finished watching an episode of Doctor Who, and I loved the main actor Matt Smith.  Upon googling him, I found out that he was an Actor who studied acting at the National Youth Theatre. I had no idea you could study acting, let alone make a career out of it. That's when I decided I wanted to pursue the craft and I moved to London to study it.      Do you have any other hobbies/ interests growing up that you enjoyed doing?    Well, I was lucky enough to grow up In Cornwall. I had the beach down the road, where I enjoyed surfing and sailing a bit. I also enjoyed climbing and had a free climbing wall in my back garden (a Tree) ha. I love horseback riding. I used to go every Saturday, and I  was the only guy who did it!  I didn't care; I was 12. I was also really into swimming, Hockey and Rock Climbing.        What was it like playing 'Sky' on Netflix Fate of Winx Saga? Are you similar to your character?   I enjoyed playing 'Sky'. What is so interesting about 'Sky' is that he is a little like an Iceberg. He seems kinda normal on top, but underneath there's so much going on. That is true for many of the show's characters and was something I found very relatable. We all have something going on beneath the surface. We may seem polished on the outside, but it can be a different story on the inside.        You have some pretty intense fight scenes. What was it like working with a sword?    I wish I could tell you that the swords were real! I wanted one so badly. When John, our swordsmith, came to give me my sword, I felt so excited. The little kid who used to watch 'Aragorn' from Lord of the Rings was about to be given his first sword, only to pick it up and find out it was plastic.... My first response was, "Where is the real one? "   The fight scenes were so much fun, and my co-star Freddy only made it easier. We had an amazing stunt team, who came up with some outstanding choreography, which Freddy and I trained a great deal to get down as smooth and as fast as possible.      What are some of your favorite memories from working on set?   I have so many. Every day on set was memorable. The whole cast is such down to earth lovely people, and it just became like going to work with your friends. I have a lot of scenes with Rob Collier, who is probably one of the funniest people I've ever met. He would come to set, and as a warm-up he would start rapping or "spitting bars," as he calls it.      How have you been keeping busy during quarantine? Any tips or suggestions for readers struggling?   It is an incredibly hard time for everyone. And one suggestion that would work for someone wouldn't work for someone else. All I can say is try and have a routine, even if it's just getting up at a reasonable time and making your bed.       Anything you would like to say to your fans?   I am so grateful to anyone who supports me.  Thank you for all your kindness and lovely comments about the show. I hope you enjoy our take on Fate the Winx Saga. Follow me on Instagram @Danny_Griffin_ to keep up with my future projects and Fate the Winx Saga news.       TEAM CREDITS: Photographer: Joseph Sinclair using Hasselblad.     Styling: Ella Gaskell   Grooming: Charli Avery  

Vault by Vans Presents Latest Old Skool VLT LX in Pop Monochrome Colors
852

Vault by Vans Presents Latest Old Skool VLT LX in Pop Monochrome Colors

Accessories Vault by Vans presents its latest Old Skool VLT LX premium pack in three pop monochrome colorways.     The Vault Old Skool collection is anchored by a bold flame colorway destined to become a statement piece and is supported by two additional offerings in deep blue and lemon chrome. Faux croc-skin uppers deliver visual texture and depth to this Classic Old Skool silhouette.     Built with molded drop-in sockliners for long-lasting comfort and superior fit, the Old Skool VLT LX  also features original details like the iconic Sidestripe and heel tab, side walls hand-wrapped high and tight, and the legendary waffle outsole harking back to the heritage of this timeless original.      The Old Skool VLT LX is available now at select Vault by Vans retailers. For more information, visit Vans.eu/vault. Vault by Vans presents its latest Old Skool VLT LX premium pack in three pop monochrome colorways.     The Vault Old Skool collection is anchored by a bold flame colorway destined to become a statement piece and is supported by two additional offerings in deep blue and lemon chrome. Faux croc-skin uppers deliver visual texture and depth to this Classic Old Skool silhouette.     Built with molded drop-in sockliners for long-lasting comfort and superior fit, the Old Skool VLT LX  also features original details like the iconic Sidestripe and heel tab, side walls hand-wrapped high and tight, and the legendary waffle outsole harking back to the heritage of this timeless original.      The Old Skool VLT LX is available now at select Vault by Vans retailers. For more information, visit Vans.eu/vault.

In conversation with James Yates
851

In conversation with James Yates

Lifestyle We had a pleasure speaking with James Yates, who just launched his new app Y-17.      Tell us about your newly launched app Y-17?   Y-17 is an on demand, follow along workout for all fitness abilities. It is HIIT style training, using primarily bodyweight that encourages people to keep moving, following the class which I take and participate in whilst encouraging the participants. Each class caters to people of all fitness abilities and I give instruction at the start as to how to make it easier or harder depending on your fitness levels.  On top of this, each person gets an individualised plan, which is created based on their goals along with recipes to follow if they need some inspo. There will be a weekly mental health message sent out along with a mental health page and down the line a nutrition page with advice from experts.  The higher levels subscription will also have access to a direct chat to me here I can respond to them, and even with personal video responses.  Live classes and yoga classes will be available to sign up also.      What have been some of your highlights of this year, looking back and what are you most looking forward to in 2021?   Highlights of the year for 2020… hmmm. I actually feel fairly fortunate that this year has presented a lot of opportunity to me. Work wise I have worked with some huge brands, and feel I have progressed so that is a nice takeaway from 2020. Shooting for Armani in Milan was great and the team was amazing. I also created an app from nothing, which was a cool experience for me. It has been incredible to see how many people are already joining in the classes and the feedback have got has been wonderful that has been brilliant for me personally. I love the fact I am able to help people keeping healthy even in all these lockdowns. Personally, I also have progressed mentally and find myself in a much better position this year. I feel I have grown up and matured and understand myself better and what I need for myself toby in the best position possible. It is nice to have come through a year like we have all had and have that understanding.        What made you decide and inspired you to launch an app?    I had a couple books come out a few years ago now that were really successful and I wanted to build on that and help people with a more visual tool. I did live workouts on instagram initially to help people during lockdown.  And then with the lockdowns and gyms closing I thought that it was as good a time as any. So I started filming my workouts and offering encouragement through them to give people the motivation and guidance for them to workout. I wanted the app to feel personal so I added a chat feature where they can message me and can reply directly to them with video messages to answer any questions and make them feel like we are working out together and a part of a community.     What is the biggest lesson you have learnt this year?    I have learned a couple things this year. 1st is patience. I am terrible at being patient, and in year like 2020 its been vitally important to be that, and appreciate where you are and what you have already. Also, I have learned how people are amazing when they feel sense of community and can buy into something together. I have seen this in local communities response to the pandemic, people helping the aged, nurses, those in need, but also within my training app, where people are encouraging, love that feel of togetherness training and personally think that community interaction is something that is wonderful to be a part of.      How important is in your own words mental and physical strength?    Strength to me is vital, both mentally and physically, but I often think it is misinterpreted. A lot of times what people, and I include myself in this, perceive things to maybe be weakness but actually they are quite often the strongest of actions. Being able to admit you’re struggling or something is actually as strong as it gets, or asking for help. I think this year we have seen how strong people can be mentally when tested, but again, when we’ve struggled we have come through. The pandemic has also shown how vital physical fitness is, with those most healthy being almost completely unaffected other than in some rare circumstances. People are incredible, and in a year when we have had so much thrown at us, I think we have on the most part, faced it up and dealt with it. We had a pleasure speaking with James Yates, who just launched his new app Y-17.      Tell us about your newly launched app Y-17?   Y-17 is an on demand, follow along workout for all fitness abilities. It is HIIT style training, using primarily bodyweight that encourages people to keep moving, following the class which I take and participate in whilst encouraging the participants. Each class caters to people of all fitness abilities and I give instruction at the start as to how to make it easier or harder depending on your fitness levels.  On top of this, each person gets an individualised plan, which is created based on their goals along with recipes to follow if they need some inspo. There will be a weekly mental health message sent out along with a mental health page and down the line a nutrition page with advice from experts.  The higher levels subscription will also have access to a direct chat to me here I can respond to them, and even with personal video responses.  Live classes and yoga classes will be available to sign up also.      What have been some of your highlights of this year, looking back and what are you most looking forward to in 2021?   Highlights of the year for 2020… hmmm. I actually feel fairly fortunate that this year has presented a lot of opportunity to me. Work wise I have worked with some huge brands, and feel I have progressed so that is a nice takeaway from 2020. Shooting for Armani in Milan was great and the team was amazing. I also created an app from nothing, which was a cool experience for me. It has been incredible to see how many people are already joining in the classes and the feedback have got has been wonderful that has been brilliant for me personally. I love the fact I am able to help people keeping healthy even in all these lockdowns. Personally, I also have progressed mentally and find myself in a much better position this year. I feel I have grown up and matured and understand myself better and what I need for myself toby in the best position possible. It is nice to have come through a year like we have all had and have that understanding.        What made you decide and inspired you to launch an app?    I had a couple books come out a few years ago now that were really successful and I wanted to build on that and help people with a more visual tool. I did live workouts on instagram initially to help people during lockdown.  And then with the lockdowns and gyms closing I thought that it was as good a time as any. So I started filming my workouts and offering encouragement through them to give people the motivation and guidance for them to workout. I wanted the app to feel personal so I added a chat feature where they can message me and can reply directly to them with video messages to answer any questions and make them feel like we are working out together and a part of a community.     What is the biggest lesson you have learnt this year?    I have learned a couple things this year. 1st is patience. I am terrible at being patient, and in year like 2020 its been vitally important to be that, and appreciate where you are and what you have already. Also, I have learned how people are amazing when they feel sense of community and can buy into something together. I have seen this in local communities response to the pandemic, people helping the aged, nurses, those in need, but also within my training app, where people are encouraging, love that feel of togetherness training and personally think that community interaction is something that is wonderful to be a part of.      How important is in your own words mental and physical strength?    Strength to me is vital, both mentally and physically, but I often think it is misinterpreted. A lot of times what people, and I include myself in this, perceive things to maybe be weakness but actually they are quite often the strongest of actions. Being able to admit you’re struggling or something is actually as strong as it gets, or asking for help. I think this year we have seen how strong people can be mentally when tested, but again, when we’ve struggled we have come through. The pandemic has also shown how vital physical fitness is, with those most healthy being almost completely unaffected other than in some rare circumstances. People are incredible, and in a year when we have had so much thrown at us, I think we have on the most part, faced it up and dealt with it.

Gucci collaborates with The North Face
847

Gucci collaborates with The North Face

Fashion Gucci reveals its collaboration with The North Face that celebrates the spirit of exploration. Whether literal exploration of places and cultures or the more metaphorical adventures encouraged today by Creative Director Alessandro Michele, Gucci has always catered to the curious, presentingitsclothes as tools that push the wearer into different territories.     The North Face famously outfits those who seek adventure. But there are also deeper parallels between the stories of Gucci and its new partner. Since their founding in San Francisco in 1966, the brand has committed to pioneering product innovation and enabling all forms of exploration.  It is a well acknowledged notion that travel leads to self-discovery, and in this conviction The North Face is aligned with Gucci, which similarly empowers people in their quest to celebrate and express their own characters and personalities, embedding Alessandro Michele’s approach towards fashion as a powerful instrument of freedom.     To promote this new partnership, Alessandro Michele has conceived a campaign shot by Daniel Shea, set in the Alps. In stills and video, as well as through content created for TikTok, we are led through a trip to the great outdoors with a group of Gucci-clad hikers, who camp by the lakes. The forests and peaks of the region form a vast and breath-taking scenic backdrop to the imagery, which in capturing colorful candid moments of group activity are reminiscent of holiday snaps, effortlessly showcasing the distinctive products.The campaign’s atmosphere evokes the aesthetic of the 70’s, when The North Face was a thriving outdoor retailer based in Berkeley, CA and shared a factory and storefront adjacent to Credence Clearwater Revival’s practice studio, whose iconic song “Bad Moon Rising” is featured throughout the video campaign.     This special cross-category collection for men and women comprises ready-to-wear, soft accessories, luggage and shoes, as well as some more unexpected pieces linked to the outdoor world of The North Face, such as tents and sleeping bags.     The North Face x Gucci Collection is in line with the commitments of both the two brands to eco-sustainable activities.  Luggage contain ECONYL®— a nylon fabric sourced from regenerated materials (from fish nets, carpets and other scraps) that can be recycled and recreated, aiding in decreasing its ecological footprint.Additionally, the color palette was inspired by the 70’s and curated from The North Face materials library. Archival fabrics have been partially incorporated into the collection to give them a new life.     Packaging for the pieces come in vibrant pink featuring The North Face X Gucci logo. The garment and carrier bags, boxes and pouches have been strategically designed to reduce the environmental impact at every step of creation. All paper and cardboard come from sustainably managed forest sources and an uncoated paper has been used to ensure it is fully recyclable. To reduce the amount of paper, boxes are equipped with handles to avoid using shopping bags. Larger items come in shopping bags and cotton covers without boxes.     Debuting in China, the collectionwill be distributed through distinctly designed stores and ephemeral Gucci Pins, where the special bright floral patterns of the range will be used to dress the spaces and effect façade takeovers.A limited selection of The North Face x Gucci pieces will also be available on gucci.com, with some exciting online exclusives.      Shining a light on the collection’s motifs, Gucci Artwalls will be unveiled in five cities – Hong-Kong, Shanghai, London, New York and Milan – and will feature dedicated imagery with a variety of creative executions. Though all different, these pieces of street art will all incorporate The North Face x Gucci logo.              Credits for the campaign: Creative Director: Alessandro Michele Art Director: Christopher Simmonds Photographer & Director: Daniel Shea Make Up: Thomas De Kluyver Hair stylist: Alex Brownsell Gucci reveals its collaboration with The North Face that celebrates the spirit of exploration. Whether literal exploration of places and cultures or the more metaphorical adventures encouraged today by Creative Director Alessandro Michele, Gucci has always catered to the curious, presentingitsclothes as tools that push the wearer into different territories.     The North Face famously outfits those who seek adventure. But there are also deeper parallels between the stories of Gucci and its new partner. Since their founding in San Francisco in 1966, the brand has committed to pioneering product innovation and enabling all forms of exploration.  It is a well acknowledged notion that travel leads to self-discovery, and in this conviction The North Face is aligned with Gucci, which similarly empowers people in their quest to celebrate and express their own characters and personalities, embedding Alessandro Michele’s approach towards fashion as a powerful instrument of freedom.     To promote this new partnership, Alessandro Michele has conceived a campaign shot by Daniel Shea, set in the Alps. In stills and video, as well as through content created for TikTok, we are led through a trip to the great outdoors with a group of Gucci-clad hikers, who camp by the lakes. The forests and peaks of the region form a vast and breath-taking scenic backdrop to the imagery, which in capturing colorful candid moments of group activity are reminiscent of holiday snaps, effortlessly showcasing the distinctive products.The campaign’s atmosphere evokes the aesthetic of the 70’s, when The North Face was a thriving outdoor retailer based in Berkeley, CA and shared a factory and storefront adjacent to Credence Clearwater Revival’s practice studio, whose iconic song “Bad Moon Rising” is featured throughout the video campaign.     This special cross-category collection for men and women comprises ready-to-wear, soft accessories, luggage and shoes, as well as some more unexpected pieces linked to the outdoor world of The North Face, such as tents and sleeping bags.     The North Face x Gucci Collection is in line with the commitments of both the two brands to eco-sustainable activities.  Luggage contain ECONYL®— a nylon fabric sourced from regenerated materials (from fish nets, carpets and other scraps) that can be recycled and recreated, aiding in decreasing its ecological footprint.Additionally, the color palette was inspired by the 70’s and curated from The North Face materials library. Archival fabrics have been partially incorporated into the collection to give them a new life.     Packaging for the pieces come in vibrant pink featuring The North Face X Gucci logo. The garment and carrier bags, boxes and pouches have been strategically designed to reduce the environmental impact at every step of creation. All paper and cardboard come from sustainably managed forest sources and an uncoated paper has been used to ensure it is fully recyclable. To reduce the amount of paper, boxes are equipped with handles to avoid using shopping bags. Larger items come in shopping bags and cotton covers without boxes.     Debuting in China, the collectionwill be distributed through distinctly designed stores and ephemeral Gucci Pins, where the special bright floral patterns of the range will be used to dress the spaces and effect façade takeovers.A limited selection of The North Face x Gucci pieces will also be available on gucci.com, with some exciting online exclusives.      Shining a light on the collection’s motifs, Gucci Artwalls will be unveiled in five cities – Hong-Kong, Shanghai, London, New York and Milan – and will feature dedicated imagery with a variety of creative executions. Though all different, these pieces of street art will all incorporate The North Face x Gucci logo.              Credits for the campaign: Creative Director: Alessandro Michele Art Director: Christopher Simmonds Photographer & Director: Daniel Shea Make Up: Thomas De Kluyver Hair stylist: Alex Brownsell

loading
More articles