Scales and proportions are on the mind of LOEWE’s creative director Jonathan Anderson of late: big and small, high and low; points of view defining perceptions, and perceptions drawing silhouettes. The Fall Winter 2024 precollection campaign extends this play of ratios from clothes-making to image-making.

Shot amongst the miniaturised scenarios of Bekonscot Model Village, the world’s oldest original model village, built in 1929, it features a varied cast of artists and creatives: the ever-evolving community that gathers around LOEWE, which this season features Alison Oliver, Archie Madekwe, Dan Levy, Enzo Vogrincic, Kit Connor, Lesley Manville, Sophie Wilde, and 070 Shake, as well as a special guest appearance by Jonathan Anderson’s nephew, Alfie Anderson.

Photographed once again by Juergen Teller, the campaign reiterates Teller’s unapologetic way to see LOEWE: at once raw and amusing, direct and introspective, with a sense of hyperbole and a sculptural approach to poses. The images are set within the downsized yet fastidiously precise architectures of Bekonscot and emanate a sense of familiar wonder. The childish playfulness of the situations is offset with the dry, puzzling expressions of the subjects. Sophie Wilde leans against the walls of a castle, holding a denim version of the Squeeze bag in her hand. Alison Oliver sinks in a pond, or stands within a fortress, showing off the Flamenco Purse. Enzo Vogrincic barely balances over the railway tunnel, suited in corduroy and holding the Flamenco Backpack. Lesley Manville has her hands occupied with a giant sunflower and the Squeeze bag, while 070 Shake looks at the camera with a miniature deer placed on top of her head. Poses and situations are both crude and whimsical, reflecting and augmenting the lines of the LOEWE Fall Winter 2024 precollection, a mix of cropped and stretched out shapes, outsized bows, and sculptural draping, with iconic LOEWE bags, such as the Puzzle and the Hammock. The Puzzle Fold tote, the Flamenco Purse and the Squeeze bag come in malleable, soft iterations, and pictured as still lifes in miniature settings to highlight scale. Juergen Teller’s eye brings a documentary feel and a dry humour to the endeavour, further positioning LOEWE as visual language rooted, with a dash of magic.