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PRADA presents Multiple views for their Spring & Summer 2021 collection
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PRADA presents Multiple views for their Spring & Summer 2021 collection

Fashion Week For Prada Multiple Views SS21, a singular statement is replaced by the perspectives of many: multiple views, by a multitude of global creatives. The collection suggests the approach: different views, for a collection that proposes a myriad interpretations of the Prada man and woman. Congruent yet individually delineated, the collection is proposed in five chapters, which in turn are interpreted by five image-makers and artists. A true conversation.     Terence Nance, Joanna Piotrowska, Martine Syms, Juergen Teller and Willy Vanderperre each propose a film capturing a facet of the Prada collection, distinct and definite in its creative statement and ideology, a point of view on Prada. These inherently and fundamentally echo the traditional fashion show, where each observer has their own physical and ideological vantage-point on the collection, their own opinions, their own observations. It also reflects the reality of this Prada digital presentation: seemingly divergent but again seen by many, this time in their own environments, their own time, their own worlds. This is an embracing and celebration of that multiplicity - when people cannot commune, we can establish a different type of community, united through ideas, goals, beliefs.     Attention is drawn back to clothes - simple clothes, with a use and a value, a longevity and a place within people’s lives. As times become increasingly complex, clothes become straightforward, unostentatious, machines for living and tools for action and activity.     The July 2020 collection focuses on the quintessence of Prada, the meaning. How clothes are worn, where, and why. Often, their meanings are compound and multiplex: simultaneously speaking of sportswear and formality, of classicism and futurism, pieces are paradoxes, situated in multiple worlds - just as their debut here is not only framed by the eye of Prada, but by a panoply of creatives. The silhouette for men is sharp and narrow, fitted, with technologically innovative fabrications of Prada nylon and stretch materials juxtaposed with traditional suiting; for women, the same fabrics are given couture volumes and treatments. Then the reverse: industrial outfits in classic fabrications, leathers, cottons, taffeta, and true sportswear, drawn from Linea Rossa, technically innovative, function dictating form. In simplifying and paring back, a logical conclusion is lingerie: a foundational layer, a vulnerability, a fragility and humanity. Pieces evocative of these clothes in both male and female wardrobes - soft knit, fragile colour, light fabric - are worn as everyday clothing. A coat is clutched over bare skin.     A radicalism is found in purity - simplicity with a complexity, yet an antidote to useless complication in precision and directness. Contradiction is celebrated: in apparent fragility can be found strength, through rigour joy. A sense of lightness not only of physicality but of emotion - the dynamism of sportswear translates throughout, a sense of enjoyment, energy, fun. A reason for fashion. Prada - and fashion - seen with multiple views.     CHAPTER I Willy Vanderperre (b. 1971, Belgium) ‘Prada evolves and changes every season; this season, the part we were shooting and filming felt like an honest collection. Stripped from fashion ideas, which turns that idea into fashion again. It also felt introspective and slightly schizophrenic. A look into the past with the future ahead. I hope that the audience feels that in the movie, a distilled pure and honest presentation of the collection.’     CHAPTER II Juergen Teller (b. 1964, Germany) ‘It was an honour to be asked to photograph and film Miuccia‘s last collection. I thought the men and women looked beautiful, elegant and modern. I enjoyed looking at Miuccia‘s vision and trying to make sense of it as honest and direct as possible.’     CHAPTER III Joanna Piotrowska (b. 1985, Poland) ‘Gesture and physicality are an essential non-verbal form of communication and play a big role in the conceptual and compositional aspects of my work. The finger snap, is a quick and subtle yet attention-demanding action. It is also used to indicate approval or to maintain rhythm. I thought that this short could be an interesting space to work with the snap as a recurring motif that marks the movements and refocuses the viewer’s attention to each new look.’     CHAPTER IV Martine Syms (b. 1988, USA) ‘The video is a collage of multiple formats and features iterative, repetitive movements intercut with beautiful people staring at images of themselves on monitors and screens in Milan and in my studio in Los Angeles. Since the collection pieces have a 60s feeling to them, I tried to include several references to cinema culture and surveillance/sousveillance from that time period to the present. I'm inspired by the way screens have come to make & unmake us, and what it means to be living, breathing, moving fleshy things in a world full of them.’     CHAPTER V Terence Nance (b. 1982, USA) ‘The film that came through was born of speed and play, I have no words through which to decode what the meaning is and was and will be but it may be about ‘time’ - and keeping your organs in that vessel we call a body while it contorts itself to love each second as it goes bye bye.’     #PradaSS21 #PradaMultipleViews For Prada Multiple Views SS21, a singular statement is replaced by the perspectives of many: multiple views, by a multitude of global creatives. The collection suggests the approach: different views, for a collection that proposes a myriad interpretations of the Prada man and woman. Congruent yet individually delineated, the collection is proposed in five chapters, which in turn are interpreted by five image-makers and artists. A true conversation.     Terence Nance, Joanna Piotrowska, Martine Syms, Juergen Teller and Willy Vanderperre each propose a film capturing a facet of the Prada collection, distinct and definite in its creative statement and ideology, a point of view on Prada. These inherently and fundamentally echo the traditional fashion show, where each observer has their own physical and ideological vantage-point on the collection, their own opinions, their own observations. It also reflects the reality of this Prada digital presentation: seemingly divergent but again seen by many, this time in their own environments, their own time, their own worlds. This is an embracing and celebration of that multiplicity - when people cannot commune, we can establish a different type of community, united through ideas, goals, beliefs.     Attention is drawn back to clothes - simple clothes, with a use and a value, a longevity and a place within people’s lives. As times become increasingly complex, clothes become straightforward, unostentatious, machines for living and tools for action and activity.     The July 2020 collection focuses on the quintessence of Prada, the meaning. How clothes are worn, where, and why. Often, their meanings are compound and multiplex: simultaneously speaking of sportswear and formality, of classicism and futurism, pieces are paradoxes, situated in multiple worlds - just as their debut here is not only framed by the eye of Prada, but by a panoply of creatives. The silhouette for men is sharp and narrow, fitted, with technologically innovative fabrications of Prada nylon and stretch materials juxtaposed with traditional suiting; for women, the same fabrics are given couture volumes and treatments. Then the reverse: industrial outfits in classic fabrications, leathers, cottons, taffeta, and true sportswear, drawn from Linea Rossa, technically innovative, function dictating form. In simplifying and paring back, a logical conclusion is lingerie: a foundational layer, a vulnerability, a fragility and humanity. Pieces evocative of these clothes in both male and female wardrobes - soft knit, fragile colour, light fabric - are worn as everyday clothing. A coat is clutched over bare skin.     A radicalism is found in purity - simplicity with a complexity, yet an antidote to useless complication in precision and directness. Contradiction is celebrated: in apparent fragility can be found strength, through rigour joy. A sense of lightness not only of physicality but of emotion - the dynamism of sportswear translates throughout, a sense of enjoyment, energy, fun. A reason for fashion. Prada - and fashion - seen with multiple views.     CHAPTER I Willy Vanderperre (b. 1971, Belgium) ‘Prada evolves and changes every season; this season, the part we were shooting and filming felt like an honest collection. Stripped from fashion ideas, which turns that idea into fashion again. It also felt introspective and slightly schizophrenic. A look into the past with the future ahead. I hope that the audience feels that in the movie, a distilled pure and honest presentation of the collection.’     CHAPTER II Juergen Teller (b. 1964, Germany) ‘It was an honour to be asked to photograph and film Miuccia‘s last collection. I thought the men and women looked beautiful, elegant and modern. I enjoyed looking at Miuccia‘s vision and trying to make sense of it as honest and direct as possible.’     CHAPTER III Joanna Piotrowska (b. 1985, Poland) ‘Gesture and physicality are an essential non-verbal form of communication and play a big role in the conceptual and compositional aspects of my work. The finger snap, is a quick and subtle yet attention-demanding action. It is also used to indicate approval or to maintain rhythm. I thought that this short could be an interesting space to work with the snap as a recurring motif that marks the movements and refocuses the viewer’s attention to each new look.’     CHAPTER IV Martine Syms (b. 1988, USA) ‘The video is a collage of multiple formats and features iterative, repetitive movements intercut with beautiful people staring at images of themselves on monitors and screens in Milan and in my studio in Los Angeles. Since the collection pieces have a 60s feeling to them, I tried to include several references to cinema culture and surveillance/sousveillance from that time period to the present. I'm inspired by the way screens have come to make & unmake us, and what it means to be living, breathing, moving fleshy things in a world full of them.’     CHAPTER V Terence Nance (b. 1982, USA) ‘The film that came through was born of speed and play, I have no words through which to decode what the meaning is and was and will be but it may be about ‘time’ - and keeping your organs in that vessel we call a body while it contorts itself to love each second as it goes bye bye.’     #PradaSS21 #PradaMultipleViews

DIOR PRESENTS THE MEN’S SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION AND THE ARTISTIC COLLABORATION WITH AMOAKO BOAFO
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DIOR PRESENTS THE MEN’S SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION AND THE ARTISTIC COLLABORATION WITH AMOAKO BOAFO

Fashion Week THERE IS THE WESTERN WORLD’S PERCEPTION OF AFRICA AND THEN THERE IS ACTUALLY THE REAL AFRICA. THE AFRICA YOU COME FROM OR HAVE REGULARLY VISITED. KIM JONES AND AMOAKO BOAFO REPRESENT BOTH. BOAFO, A PAINTER BORN IN ACCRA, GHANA; JONES, BORN IN LONDON WITH A CHILDHOOD SPENT IN ETHIOPIA, BOTSWANA, KENYA, TANZANIA AND VARIOUS OTHER PLACES IN AFRICA, INCLUDING BOAFO’S NATIVE GHANA. A HOME I IMAGINE HE WAS REMINDED OF WHEN HE CAME ACROSS AMOAKO’S ART IN 2019 AT THE RUBELL MUSEUM IN MIAMI WHERE HE WAS A RESIDENT ARTIST. AMOAKO’S ART DROWNS THE VIEWER IN THE SHIMMERING LIGHT OF THE BLACK GAZE, WHICH WE SO RARELY SEE IN FASHION OR THE ART WORLD. EACH OF HIS SUBJECTS CELEBRATES BLACK LIFE, BLACK SKIN SHROUDED IN EXUBERANT COLORS SPLAYED ACROSS HIS CANVASES. COMBINING HIS TOOLS WITH AMOAKO’S, KIM BRINGS TO LIFE A WARDROBE INTENDED FOR THE PAINTER’S SUBJECTS. PULLING THESE BEAUTIFUL CHARACTERS OFF THE MUSEUM’S AND COLLECTORS’ WALLS WHERE THESE WORKS NORMALLY DWELL AND BRINGING THEM TO A SPACE WHERE AFRICAN CULTURE IS AT TIMES REFERENCED BUT RARELY FULLY ACKNOWLEDGED IS WHERE KIM’S TALENT AS A DESIGNER EXTENDS BEYOND JUST A GARMENT AND ASCENDS TO WHERE ALL ARTISTS ASPIRE TO GO... TO THE HEART OF A STORY, AND THE MOST POWERFUL STORY IS A STORY RARELY TOLD.     A CORNUCOPIA OF STRIPES, FLORALS AND NEONS. THE COLORS, CUTS, PROPORTIONS, PARING, AND LAYERING OF THE GARMENTS ARE ALL ARTFULLY MANIPULATED BY THE BLACK GAZE OF AMOAKO’S PAINTINGS. KIM DOESN’T HIDE HIS HAND, WHICH GUIDES THIS COLLECTION PURPOSELY, BECAUSE THE HAND IS AFRICA, AND THROUGH THAT, EDUCATION IS GAINED, A STORY IS TOLD AND A PAINTER AND HIS SUBJECTS ARE CELEBRATED IN THE CONTEXT OF A DIOR COLLECTION THAT SHOWS ANOTHER CHAMBER OF KIM’S VAST INFLUENCES AND HIS ABILITY TO HARNESS THE CULTURES HE HAS EXPERIENCED IN HIS LIFETIME. THIS ISN’T JUST A COLLECTION; THIS A SYMBIOTIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TWO ARTISTS THAT GIVES BIRTH TO A COLLECTION OF CLOTHING THAT IS MORE THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS. TWO MEN WHO LOVE AFRICA AND ITS PEOPLE, TELLING THEIR STORIES IN SPACES THESE SUBJECTS RARELY GET TO GRACE, AND IN THAT LIES THE POINT OF ALL THIS. THERE IS THE WESTERN WORLD’S PERCEPTION OF AFRICA AND THEN THERE IS ACTUALLY THE REAL AFRICA. THE AFRICA YOU COME FROM OR HAVE REGULARLY VISITED. KIM JONES AND AMOAKO BOAFO REPRESENT BOTH. BOAFO, A PAINTER BORN IN ACCRA, GHANA; JONES, BORN IN LONDON WITH A CHILDHOOD SPENT IN ETHIOPIA, BOTSWANA, KENYA, TANZANIA AND VARIOUS OTHER PLACES IN AFRICA, INCLUDING BOAFO’S NATIVE GHANA. A HOME I IMAGINE HE WAS REMINDED OF WHEN HE CAME ACROSS AMOAKO’S ART IN 2019 AT THE RUBELL MUSEUM IN MIAMI WHERE HE WAS A RESIDENT ARTIST. AMOAKO’S ART DROWNS THE VIEWER IN THE SHIMMERING LIGHT OF THE BLACK GAZE, WHICH WE SO RARELY SEE IN FASHION OR THE ART WORLD. EACH OF HIS SUBJECTS CELEBRATES BLACK LIFE, BLACK SKIN SHROUDED IN EXUBERANT COLORS SPLAYED ACROSS HIS CANVASES. COMBINING HIS TOOLS WITH AMOAKO’S, KIM BRINGS TO LIFE A WARDROBE INTENDED FOR THE PAINTER’S SUBJECTS. PULLING THESE BEAUTIFUL CHARACTERS OFF THE MUSEUM’S AND COLLECTORS’ WALLS WHERE THESE WORKS NORMALLY DWELL AND BRINGING THEM TO A SPACE WHERE AFRICAN CULTURE IS AT TIMES REFERENCED BUT RARELY FULLY ACKNOWLEDGED IS WHERE KIM’S TALENT AS A DESIGNER EXTENDS BEYOND JUST A GARMENT AND ASCENDS TO WHERE ALL ARTISTS ASPIRE TO GO... TO THE HEART OF A STORY, AND THE MOST POWERFUL STORY IS A STORY RARELY TOLD.     A CORNUCOPIA OF STRIPES, FLORALS AND NEONS. THE COLORS, CUTS, PROPORTIONS, PARING, AND LAYERING OF THE GARMENTS ARE ALL ARTFULLY MANIPULATED BY THE BLACK GAZE OF AMOAKO’S PAINTINGS. KIM DOESN’T HIDE HIS HAND, WHICH GUIDES THIS COLLECTION PURPOSELY, BECAUSE THE HAND IS AFRICA, AND THROUGH THAT, EDUCATION IS GAINED, A STORY IS TOLD AND A PAINTER AND HIS SUBJECTS ARE CELEBRATED IN THE CONTEXT OF A DIOR COLLECTION THAT SHOWS ANOTHER CHAMBER OF KIM’S VAST INFLUENCES AND HIS ABILITY TO HARNESS THE CULTURES HE HAS EXPERIENCED IN HIS LIFETIME. THIS ISN’T JUST A COLLECTION; THIS A SYMBIOTIC RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN TWO ARTISTS THAT GIVES BIRTH TO A COLLECTION OF CLOTHING THAT IS MORE THAN THE SUM OF ITS PARTS. TWO MEN WHO LOVE AFRICA AND ITS PEOPLE, TELLING THEIR STORIES IN SPACES THESE SUBJECTS RARELY GET TO GRACE, AND IN THAT LIES THE POINT OF ALL THIS.

Isabel Marant Spring Summer 2021 Men’s Collection
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Isabel Marant Spring Summer 2021 Men’s Collection

Fashion Week This summer, the Isabel Marant man escapes from Paris to Pantin. Along the Canal de l’Ourcq, the concrete passagewaysof the CN D echo both the raw energy of the look and the frank geometry of the eece pieces.     Flexibility and freedom come from dancing. This cloakroom of everyday life lives in motion. The long coats’ sleeves as well as those of the shirts and knitwear roll up, revealing the wrists. Multicoloured nylon jackets are tied at the waist, indicating a signature form of irreverence.     Naturally, one print matches another as if they were made for each other. The sportswear codes are mixing with those of ikat pieces which look as though they had been brought back from a trip. On a pastel weave, the bright colours take the wardrobe to the sunny beaches.     He’s there behind the tinted lenses of the rst Isabel Marant sunglasses.     Photo Credits: Photographe : Marton Perlaki Models : Alpha Dia & Braien Vaiksaar Place : Centre National de la Danse à Pantin This summer, the Isabel Marant man escapes from Paris to Pantin. Along the Canal de l’Ourcq, the concrete passagewaysof the CN D echo both the raw energy of the look and the frank geometry of the eece pieces.     Flexibility and freedom come from dancing. This cloakroom of everyday life lives in motion. The long coats’ sleeves as well as those of the shirts and knitwear roll up, revealing the wrists. Multicoloured nylon jackets are tied at the waist, indicating a signature form of irreverence.     Naturally, one print matches another as if they were made for each other. The sportswear codes are mixing with those of ikat pieces which look as though they had been brought back from a trip. On a pastel weave, the bright colours take the wardrobe to the sunny beaches.     He’s there behind the tinted lenses of the rst Isabel Marant sunglasses.     Photo Credits: Photographe : Marton Perlaki Models : Alpha Dia & Braien Vaiksaar Place : Centre National de la Danse à Pantin

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Exclusive Editorial in collaboration with CELINE by Jasper Rens van Es
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Exclusive Editorial in collaboration with CELINE by Jasper Rens van Es

Men  Exclusive editorial inspired by hustlers in the 70's, this Numéro x Celine by Hedi Slimane special is shot exclusively for Numéro online in the iconic Soho House Amsterdam.     TEAM CREDITS: All fashion: Celine by Hedi Slimane Photography Jasper Rens van Es Styling & Creative Direction Gino Gurrieri Casting Timotej Letonja Hair & Make-up Wout Philippo Asisstant make-up artist: Mahis Chaitoe Models Masao Dae Parris via Riches MGMT and Nika Jovanovic via The Troopers Special thanks Soho House Amsterdam and Xavier  Exclusive editorial inspired by hustlers in the 70's, this Numéro x Celine by Hedi Slimane special is shot exclusively for Numéro online in the iconic Soho House Amsterdam.     TEAM CREDITS: All fashion: Celine by Hedi Slimane Photography Jasper Rens van Es Styling & Creative Direction Gino Gurrieri Casting Timotej Letonja Hair & Make-up Wout Philippo Asisstant make-up artist: Mahis Chaitoe Models Masao Dae Parris via Riches MGMT and Nika Jovanovic via The Troopers Special thanks Soho House Amsterdam and Xavier

‘The adventures of Zoooom with friends’ Digital Paris Fashion Week, July 2020.
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‘The adventures of Zoooom with friends’ Digital Paris Fashion Week, July 2020.

Fashion Week This season’s story is somewhatunique and calls for a di erentkind of introduction. You see, a motley crew of characters had ar- rived in Paris, one unrulier than the other. Zoooom with friends, they called them, for Zoooom was their guide and time travelled fast in their pace.   In the age-old City of Lights, no stranger to the rebel, our colour- ful characters loaded their LouisVuitton trunks with the nest n-eries they could nd, boarded abarge and sailed into the sun, which always rises in the East...   Through the ve days of fashionweek, the colourful rascals swept through the city’s gilded salons, went wild at Louis Vuitton, and cruised down the River Seine leav- ing behind them a rainbow tracetrans xed across the Paris sky.   And when they left, Paris felt a little empty. Where did Zoooom with friends go? Would they everreturn? Sure they would, but rstthey had a voyage to make. What you had witnessed here could be the end of a particularly riotous story. But it wasn’t. It was the beginning.   “Sacrebleu!” cried the good folk of Paris as Zoooom with friends turned tradition on its head, painting the town and the hallowed halls of Asnières. But fright soon turned to fondness, for unusual as they were, they brought only good intentions. This season’s story is somewhatunique and calls for a di erentkind of introduction. You see, a motley crew of characters had ar- rived in Paris, one unrulier than the other. Zoooom with friends, they called them, for Zoooom was their guide and time travelled fast in their pace.   In the age-old City of Lights, no stranger to the rebel, our colour- ful characters loaded their LouisVuitton trunks with the nest n-eries they could nd, boarded abarge and sailed into the sun, which always rises in the East...   Through the ve days of fashionweek, the colourful rascals swept through the city’s gilded salons, went wild at Louis Vuitton, and cruised down the River Seine leav- ing behind them a rainbow tracetrans xed across the Paris sky.   And when they left, Paris felt a little empty. Where did Zoooom with friends go? Would they everreturn? Sure they would, but rstthey had a voyage to make. What you had witnessed here could be the end of a particularly riotous story. But it wasn’t. It was the beginning.   “Sacrebleu!” cried the good folk of Paris as Zoooom with friends turned tradition on its head, painting the town and the hallowed halls of Asnières. But fright soon turned to fondness, for unusual as they were, they brought only good intentions.

INTRODUCING THE SECOND CHAPTER OF #ACCIDENTALINFLUENCER – THE DIGITAL PROJECT DEDICATED TO THE GUCCI TENNIS 1977
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INTRODUCING THE SECOND CHAPTER OF #ACCIDENTALINFLUENCER – THE DIGITAL PROJECT DEDICATED TO THE GUCCI TENNIS 1977

Fashion Gucci announces the second chapter of its digital project #AccidentalInfluencer, the intriguing and playful take on the idea of imitation and replication, seen through the lenses of London based artist, photographer and director Max Siedentopf – which debuted last February.     The focus is once again on the range of Gucci Tennis 1977 sneakers, this time enriched by the recently introduced styles from the Gucci Off The Grid collection, designed by Creative Director Alessandro Michele with motifs of the House and constructed with recycled, organic, bio-based and sustainably sourced materials – including ECONYL®, a regenerated nylon made from nylon offcuts and pre- and post-consumer waste.     For this new chapter, Siedentopf leads us through the every-day life of these eclectic characters accidentally matching furniture pieces and objects in their homes. The result is an array of hypnotical and haunting scenes, where individuals seem to suggest improbable visual coincidences between their looks and settings.     The campaign will be launched on Gucci’s social media platforms, and will also include bespoke videos for TikTok, dedicated clips for Instagram Stories, and a section on the Gucci App that allows customers to virtually “try on” the Gucci Tennis 1977, using the pioneering augmented reality technology the House has introduced in June 2019.     #accidentalinfluencer Gucci announces the second chapter of its digital project #AccidentalInfluencer, the intriguing and playful take on the idea of imitation and replication, seen through the lenses of London based artist, photographer and director Max Siedentopf – which debuted last February.     The focus is once again on the range of Gucci Tennis 1977 sneakers, this time enriched by the recently introduced styles from the Gucci Off The Grid collection, designed by Creative Director Alessandro Michele with motifs of the House and constructed with recycled, organic, bio-based and sustainably sourced materials – including ECONYL®, a regenerated nylon made from nylon offcuts and pre- and post-consumer waste.     For this new chapter, Siedentopf leads us through the every-day life of these eclectic characters accidentally matching furniture pieces and objects in their homes. The result is an array of hypnotical and haunting scenes, where individuals seem to suggest improbable visual coincidences between their looks and settings.     The campaign will be launched on Gucci’s social media platforms, and will also include bespoke videos for TikTok, dedicated clips for Instagram Stories, and a section on the Gucci App that allows customers to virtually “try on” the Gucci Tennis 1977, using the pioneering augmented reality technology the House has introduced in June 2019.     #accidentalinfluencer

Berluti & Brian Rochefort collaborate
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Berluti & Brian Rochefort collaborate

Men Connectivity becomes an art form in the face of separation. For the beginning of 2021, Berluti adapts to the challenges of our moment in time in a long-distance collaboration with the ceramic artist Brian Rochefort for its first creative collaboration on ready-to-wear. Recognising the values of a new era, creative Director Kris Van Assche embraces a desire for communication and concord in a collection of clothing created in partnership with the American sculptor. True to its conception – adigital effort between the designer’s home in Paris and Brian Rochefort’s studio inLos Angeles – the behind-the-scenes of the collaboration was previewed in a video between the two collaborators, screened online as part of Digital Paris Fashion Week on 9 July 2020. The film can be accessed on YouTube.com/Berluti.     The garments and accessories – to be fully unveiled and launched in stores in January 2021 – expand on the new codes established for Berluti under Kris Van Assche. A passionate ceramics collector, the creative Director’s vision is continually informed by the textures and colours related to ceramic art.This, in turn, draws natural parallels to the patina methods practised by Berluti’s own artisans in Italy. In Brian Rochefort oeuvre – an experimental and progressive force in the ceramic arena –Kris Van Assche identified a common thread with the sartorial dialogue between tradition and change embodied by Berluti. Inspired by volcanoes and exotic plants, the artist’s exuberant signature blendsintuitively with the augmented natural texture and colour language exercised at the house.     Berluti approaches the concept of collaborations from a supplementary and illuminating perspective. When, in 2019, Kris Van Assche partnered with the furniture house Pierre Jeanneret, the collaboration illustrated aspects of craft and colour shared by the two parties. For the evolving clientele of Berluti, the approach manifests in curiosity by association: a new proposal within an aesthetic to which the client already relates. In his collaboration with Brian Rochefort, Kris Van Assche builds on the character of Berluti in a gesture of connectivity and communication key to the time in which we find ourselves.     “Right now, collaboration feels like a meaningful way to create something new. As something of aceramics nerd, I have admired Brian Rochefort’s expression for a long time, and am fortunate enough to own one of his works. I couldn’t be more excited to interpret his vision through the lens of Berluti,”comments Kris Van Assche. Creative Director of Berluti. Connectivity becomes an art form in the face of separation. For the beginning of 2021, Berluti adapts to the challenges of our moment in time in a long-distance collaboration with the ceramic artist Brian Rochefort for its first creative collaboration on ready-to-wear. Recognising the values of a new era, creative Director Kris Van Assche embraces a desire for communication and concord in a collection of clothing created in partnership with the American sculptor. True to its conception – adigital effort between the designer’s home in Paris and Brian Rochefort’s studio inLos Angeles – the behind-the-scenes of the collaboration was previewed in a video between the two collaborators, screened online as part of Digital Paris Fashion Week on 9 July 2020. The film can be accessed on YouTube.com/Berluti.     The garments and accessories – to be fully unveiled and launched in stores in January 2021 – expand on the new codes established for Berluti under Kris Van Assche. A passionate ceramics collector, the creative Director’s vision is continually informed by the textures and colours related to ceramic art.This, in turn, draws natural parallels to the patina methods practised by Berluti’s own artisans in Italy. In Brian Rochefort oeuvre – an experimental and progressive force in the ceramic arena –Kris Van Assche identified a common thread with the sartorial dialogue between tradition and change embodied by Berluti. Inspired by volcanoes and exotic plants, the artist’s exuberant signature blendsintuitively with the augmented natural texture and colour language exercised at the house.     Berluti approaches the concept of collaborations from a supplementary and illuminating perspective. When, in 2019, Kris Van Assche partnered with the furniture house Pierre Jeanneret, the collaboration illustrated aspects of craft and colour shared by the two parties. For the evolving clientele of Berluti, the approach manifests in curiosity by association: a new proposal within an aesthetic to which the client already relates. In his collaboration with Brian Rochefort, Kris Van Assche builds on the character of Berluti in a gesture of connectivity and communication key to the time in which we find ourselves.     “Right now, collaboration feels like a meaningful way to create something new. As something of aceramics nerd, I have admired Brian Rochefort’s expression for a long time, and am fortunate enough to own one of his works. I couldn’t be more excited to interpret his vision through the lens of Berluti,”comments Kris Van Assche. Creative Director of Berluti.

FENTY releases 6-20 as third drop
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FENTY releases 6-20 as third drop

Fashion The peak of FENTY’s summer trip, Drop 3 brings the shapes, prints and emotion of the release together in an after-party.     Celebrating the free spirit and curious nature of youth, the psychedelic print hinted at in the previous two drops is in full flow now as a full-bleed digital print on a stretch jersey T-shirt, leggings, and long-sleeved dress with the release’s signature side-slit. Drop 1’s tie-dye pinstripe poplin shirt and pencil skirt are also reborn in the acid flower print, along with the draped white silk shirt and bascule hoodie.     There’s a late 90s/ early 00s undertone to certain silhouettes, evoking nostalgia for the youth culture of that era: a backless top in two colorways, a white bustier top that drops to the floor, and a one-strap asymmetric dress, all in chiffon. Playing to the casual styling common to every youth aesthetic, each piece can be dressed down with jeans or cropped shorts.     Drop 3 is where we introduce our new fashion jewelry offering, in keeping with the theme of casual, multifunctional styling. Psyche flower charms made from resin and strass in red, green, pink, silver and gold adorn various lengths of a brass ball chain necklace with palladium finish. Transforming to suit every mood and outfit, the chain works as a long necklace, belly chain, doubled up necklace, tripled up anklet or bracelet. A single flower earring comes with its own super dangly chain.     That completes our 6-20 release, embodying the free, fun spirit and limitless possibilities of youth. Available now on FENTY.com   The peak of FENTY’s summer trip, Drop 3 brings the shapes, prints and emotion of the release together in an after-party.     Celebrating the free spirit and curious nature of youth, the psychedelic print hinted at in the previous two drops is in full flow now as a full-bleed digital print on a stretch jersey T-shirt, leggings, and long-sleeved dress with the release’s signature side-slit. Drop 1’s tie-dye pinstripe poplin shirt and pencil skirt are also reborn in the acid flower print, along with the draped white silk shirt and bascule hoodie.     There’s a late 90s/ early 00s undertone to certain silhouettes, evoking nostalgia for the youth culture of that era: a backless top in two colorways, a white bustier top that drops to the floor, and a one-strap asymmetric dress, all in chiffon. Playing to the casual styling common to every youth aesthetic, each piece can be dressed down with jeans or cropped shorts.     Drop 3 is where we introduce our new fashion jewelry offering, in keeping with the theme of casual, multifunctional styling. Psyche flower charms made from resin and strass in red, green, pink, silver and gold adorn various lengths of a brass ball chain necklace with palladium finish. Transforming to suit every mood and outfit, the chain works as a long necklace, belly chain, doubled up necklace, tripled up anklet or bracelet. A single flower earring comes with its own super dangly chain.     That completes our 6-20 release, embodying the free, fun spirit and limitless possibilities of youth. Available now on FENTY.com  

AGANOVICH COUTURE  2020/2021
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AGANOVICH COUTURE 2020/2021

Fashion Week "In the Autumn of 2019 Erik Madigan Heck appeared at our studio in Paris ‘ready to play’. He just wanted an uninterrupted  day on his own in our studio. A fan of stop-motion animation there was loose objective to make a film with the material.  The film never happened and very soon the world had turned upside down. When the FHCM announced we would be going digital for our our first post-Covid outing we naturally thought of our longtime  friend and collaborator and the unfinished work.  After 3 months of intense emotions and self-questioning Le Grand Cirque is both an ode to his heroes and a nod to our inspirations  while giving us a much needed kick back into the medium we love.''   "In the Autumn of 2019 Erik Madigan Heck appeared at our studio in Paris ‘ready to play’. He just wanted an uninterrupted  day on his own in our studio. A fan of stop-motion animation there was loose objective to make a film with the material.  The film never happened and very soon the world had turned upside down. When the FHCM announced we would be going digital for our our first post-Covid outing we naturally thought of our longtime  friend and collaborator and the unfinished work.  After 3 months of intense emotions and self-questioning Le Grand Cirque is both an ode to his heroes and a nod to our inspirations  while giving us a much needed kick back into the medium we love.''  

Fall-Winter 2020/21 Haute Couture collection Photographed and captured by Mikael Jansson
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Fall-Winter 2020/21 Haute Couture collection Photographed and captured by Mikael Jansson

Fashion Week “I was thinking about a punk princess coming out of ‘Le Palace’ at dawn,” reveals Virginie Viard. “With a taffeta dress, big hair, feathers and lots of jewellery. This collection is more inspired by Karl Lagerfeld than Gabrielle Chanel. Karl would go to ‘Le Palace’, he would accompany these very sophisticated and very dressed up women, who were very eccentric too.”   While the Spring-Summer 2020 Haute Couture collection was clearly influenced by the simplicity and rigour of the abbey at Aubazine, where Gabrielle Chanel had been placed as a child, the thirty looks of the Fall-Winter 2020/21 Haute Couture collection are marked by a desire for shimmering opulence and jewelry. Some are even accompanied with jewels from the CHANEL High Jewelry collections.   “I like working like this, going in the opposite direction of what I did last time. I wanted complexity, sophistication.”   All of CHANEL’s embroidery partners, including the Métiers d’art Lesage and Montex, as well as Lemarié and Goossens have contributed to the precious tweeds embellished with sequins, strass, stones and beads. A diamond-like braiding adorns the ink black trouser suits. Short dresses with cinched waists and corolla skirts rustle alongside long dresses with a very Grand Siècle allure and the noble authority of heroines escaping from 19th century tableaux.   “It’s true that I thought about paintings, but it was more German paintings,” says Virginie Viard. “I really had Karl’s world in mind…”   Black and anthracite grey tonalities are illuminated with flashes of pink. Painted laces enrich bolero jackets along with tweeds made of silver streaked ribbon; a jacket with an entirely smocked waist is worn over tapered boot-trousers in black suede, the ultimate sign of an ultra-rock romanticism. “For me, Haute Couture is romantic by its very essence. There is so much love in each one of these silhouettes.”   See more on chanel.com   #CHANELHauteCouture “I was thinking about a punk princess coming out of ‘Le Palace’ at dawn,” reveals Virginie Viard. “With a taffeta dress, big hair, feathers and lots of jewellery. This collection is more inspired by Karl Lagerfeld than Gabrielle Chanel. Karl would go to ‘Le Palace’, he would accompany these very sophisticated and very dressed up women, who were very eccentric too.”   While the Spring-Summer 2020 Haute Couture collection was clearly influenced by the simplicity and rigour of the abbey at Aubazine, where Gabrielle Chanel had been placed as a child, the thirty looks of the Fall-Winter 2020/21 Haute Couture collection are marked by a desire for shimmering opulence and jewelry. Some are even accompanied with jewels from the CHANEL High Jewelry collections.   “I like working like this, going in the opposite direction of what I did last time. I wanted complexity, sophistication.”   All of CHANEL’s embroidery partners, including the Métiers d’art Lesage and Montex, as well as Lemarié and Goossens have contributed to the precious tweeds embellished with sequins, strass, stones and beads. A diamond-like braiding adorns the ink black trouser suits. Short dresses with cinched waists and corolla skirts rustle alongside long dresses with a very Grand Siècle allure and the noble authority of heroines escaping from 19th century tableaux.   “It’s true that I thought about paintings, but it was more German paintings,” says Virginie Viard. “I really had Karl’s world in mind…”   Black and anthracite grey tonalities are illuminated with flashes of pink. Painted laces enrich bolero jackets along with tweeds made of silver streaked ribbon; a jacket with an entirely smocked waist is worn over tapered boot-trousers in black suede, the ultimate sign of an ultra-rock romanticism. “For me, Haute Couture is romantic by its very essence. There is so much love in each one of these silhouettes.”   See more on chanel.com   #CHANELHauteCouture

RALPH & RUSSO PRESENT FIRST COUTURE COLLECTION IN DIGITAL FORMAT FOR AUTUMN-WINTER 2020/2021
372

RALPH & RUSSO PRESENT FIRST COUTURE COLLECTION IN DIGITAL FORMAT FOR AUTUMN-WINTER 2020/2021

Fashion Week With the global coronavirus pandemic presenting unprecedented changes to the industry and the safety of all brand supporters at heart, Ralph & Russo, in partnership with the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, bring their Autumn-Winter 2020/2021 couture collection to the global stage in the form of a unique digital experience. Illustrating the journey behind this season, the experience showcases the way in which this collection was brought to life, through a number of digitised looks on our custom brand avatar, several pieces made in our atelier, and the balance of the offering created in sketch form.     Reflecting on the far-reaching beauty of our natural world and the digitally charged future, Creative Director Tamara Ralph presents a collection infused with wonder. Encouraging all to take refuge during this difficult time in the world of fantasy, to look beyond and to dream, this season all are invited to partake in a special experience as we unveil our Autumn-Winter 2020/2021 couture collection through the lens of technology.     Abundant with vibrant tones of yellow-gold and sky blue, hues of lavender and fuchsia pink, the collection harkens to the natural palette of our planet, citing seven of the globe’s most unique and awe-inspiring locations, and enhancing silhouettes with intricate floral details. From three-dimensional organza blooms to swathes of floral taffeta and tweed - each distorted, blurred like water colours, and digitally printed – the collection defies singularity, bridging the gap between technology and the elements.     Uniquely presented against the seven contemporary wonders of the world, this season is brought to life by an equally international individual; our very own avatar and muse, Hauli. Named in traditional Swahili after strength and power, Hauli is at once rooted in African origins and a reflection of womankind; of the beautiful and inspiring women bringing courage and positive change to all four corners of the world.     In combining two seemingly opposed dimensions, Tamara Ralph not only presents the brand’s first ever digital show experience, but continues to represent art and the world in its purest form; as truly knowing no bounds. With the global coronavirus pandemic presenting unprecedented changes to the industry and the safety of all brand supporters at heart, Ralph & Russo, in partnership with the Fédération de la Haute Couture et de la Mode, bring their Autumn-Winter 2020/2021 couture collection to the global stage in the form of a unique digital experience. Illustrating the journey behind this season, the experience showcases the way in which this collection was brought to life, through a number of digitised looks on our custom brand avatar, several pieces made in our atelier, and the balance of the offering created in sketch form.     Reflecting on the far-reaching beauty of our natural world and the digitally charged future, Creative Director Tamara Ralph presents a collection infused with wonder. Encouraging all to take refuge during this difficult time in the world of fantasy, to look beyond and to dream, this season all are invited to partake in a special experience as we unveil our Autumn-Winter 2020/2021 couture collection through the lens of technology.     Abundant with vibrant tones of yellow-gold and sky blue, hues of lavender and fuchsia pink, the collection harkens to the natural palette of our planet, citing seven of the globe’s most unique and awe-inspiring locations, and enhancing silhouettes with intricate floral details. From three-dimensional organza blooms to swathes of floral taffeta and tweed - each distorted, blurred like water colours, and digitally printed – the collection defies singularity, bridging the gap between technology and the elements.     Uniquely presented against the seven contemporary wonders of the world, this season is brought to life by an equally international individual; our very own avatar and muse, Hauli. Named in traditional Swahili after strength and power, Hauli is at once rooted in African origins and a reflection of womankind; of the beautiful and inspiring women bringing courage and positive change to all four corners of the world.     In combining two seemingly opposed dimensions, Tamara Ralph not only presents the brand’s first ever digital show experience, but continues to represent art and the world in its purest form; as truly knowing no bounds.

At home with Casil McArthur
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At home with Casil McArthur

Culture At home with Casil McArthur, captured by Antonio Eugenio.       Who are you and what is your profession? I am Casil, a man who loves pretty things and who is trying to change what masculinity means to people. My profession is modeling, and as a trans man, I feel very lucky to be given this type of platform to be able to bring my world into the homes and sight of people who may not think too much on trans experience.    How do you think Covid-19 will affect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion?  Obviously because photoshoots and runway shows always involve a lot of crew/people working close together to create something, I think the epidemic has effected the industry on every level.  It'll be a long time before things can go "back to normal" so the best thing fashion can do is be as innovative with its creative process as possible, video call and zoom shoots it is for now!      How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined? Being creative in quarantine is very easy with all the free time. I've spent my time drawing, writing songs and playing video games. But I do believe my fashion creativity has been lacking, for now I am okay with not focusing on outfits and style all the time.      What is in your planning or was in your planning for this year and how will Covid -19 effect that? I was in London when the travel ban was about to take place, luckily I got home before I ended up spending the duration of quarantine in a different country.  I had a few plans to travel for work this year which is no longer possible for an undetermined but probably very long amount of time, I think this coming fashion week in September won't play out as usual which is sad. But I'm excited to see how the industry handles these hurdles.      What is your daily beauty routine like? And what beauty products you cannot go without? Nothing too special, I've finally gotten my skin to balance out so skin care has gotten super easy (I suffered from very bad cystic acne for a while due to hormone imbalances, I found out its not great too forget to take my testosterone for a month.... oops.) I wash my face every night before I go to sleep, and then I use pure vitamin E oil to keep my skin hydrated and to help with any lasting scarring and fine lines I massage my skin with small circles gently using my ring fingers. I spend maybe 15 minutes for my whole routine. I just ran put of this product, but I was using Elysian finishing treatment after the vitamin e oil and that left my skin incredible looking/feeling. I cant live without it, I have to get more!     What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined and how did you learn it? I learned how to hitch a car onto a towing trailer, to help my friend. Trial, error, and then FINALLY, YouTube! A good lesson for life!           Tell us something about yourself that isn't on your resume. I really miss being a barista and working at the cute coffee shop in my town. I love coffee and teas, I love creating drinks for people to enjoy. It's a relaxing job even on the most hectic of days and the constant flow of regular and new faces is always a joy.      What's the first place you'd want to go when it's safe again to travel and go out of our homes and why there? I haven't really thought of that, maybe on a road trip with friends? I've always wanted to see Zion national park, I hope I can go there soon one day.      What is your favorite song at the moment and why? Do you have a playlist that you would like to share with us?  Agostina by Puscifer, I just really really really love the guitar and bass towards the end. It gives me goosebumps. So good.  I don't really have a playlist because I don't use music apps. I like CDs, I prefer listening to full albums, my favorites are from Tool, all of their albums are episodic.        What is the first thing you like to do when you wake up, and last thing you like to do before going to bed? I like to make a cup of tea and check my animal crossing in the morning(a very cute video game I love.) Before bed I like to watch what Trevor Noah and Markiplier have uploaded for the day on YT, then I do a meditation to help me sleep.       What is your go-to work-out for staying in shape? What does working out mean to you? I don't really care for working out. I know that I should and I'll have to become serious with it as I get older but for now, I just like doing exercises that involve laying or sitting down on the floor. I've been walking a ton recently.        What is your favorite painting and has it inspired you for any of your work thus far?  I'm not sure I could name a single painting, I like tons of art but I never remember the names of them. I own a few prints of anthropomorphic goat paintings from an artist who is local to my state named Dusty Ray, I /LOVE/ their artwork. I also commissioned a goat art piece from @Jhuisk on Instagram, they're also local to Colorado and I'm so so so excited to meet with them to receive it once it's safe! ♡     What does Pride mean to you?  To uplift the amazing black and brown trans women of our community. We can't forget to thank who came before us, and why we even have pride to begin with.  There would be no pride without Marsha P Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, we would have no pride without black trans women.  We have to make sure trans women of color are supported, protected, loved, hired, paid, encouraged, thanked, and that should be year round.      Tell us about your activism activities for the Trans community.  Right now my activism has been going to protests in my state for Black lives matter, fighting against police brutality, and racism. Black people are dying at a higher rate from covid and because of systemic racism many do not have the privilege to have been able to quarantine. These marches are more important than staying in quarantine especially when so many simply cannot do that even if they desperately need and want too. We all need to be focusing, and keep going to these protests.   In the words of my friends Jame and Camille.  "This doesn't end until our officials, recognize the grievances of a people and the potency of a moment to radically redress their communities. Too demand of our congress, our house, our nation, a full and comprehensive reparations program. Until they will demand Healthcare as a human right and cut its ties from one's market exploitation. Until they will guarantee dignity and the means to live to all of our citizens. Until they will do what they were put there to do and actualize what the only legitimate role of a government is: to secure the freedom of individuals within a collective to self determine their own lives and allow our finest human capacities to flourish."   We must not allow those who wish to see this moment pass, to hijack the now. We need to defund the police and I personally believe we must fight to abolish them. Abolish ICE, predatory social work, the military, and landlords.    Create autonomous zones. Keep marching.  At home with Casil McArthur, captured by Antonio Eugenio.       Who are you and what is your profession? I am Casil, a man who loves pretty things and who is trying to change what masculinity means to people. My profession is modeling, and as a trans man, I feel very lucky to be given this type of platform to be able to bring my world into the homes and sight of people who may not think too much on trans experience.    How do you think Covid-19 will affect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion?  Obviously because photoshoots and runway shows always involve a lot of crew/people working close together to create something, I think the epidemic has effected the industry on every level.  It'll be a long time before things can go "back to normal" so the best thing fashion can do is be as innovative with its creative process as possible, video call and zoom shoots it is for now!      How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined? Being creative in quarantine is very easy with all the free time. I've spent my time drawing, writing songs and playing video games. But I do believe my fashion creativity has been lacking, for now I am okay with not focusing on outfits and style all the time.      What is in your planning or was in your planning for this year and how will Covid -19 effect that? I was in London when the travel ban was about to take place, luckily I got home before I ended up spending the duration of quarantine in a different country.  I had a few plans to travel for work this year which is no longer possible for an undetermined but probably very long amount of time, I think this coming fashion week in September won't play out as usual which is sad. But I'm excited to see how the industry handles these hurdles.      What is your daily beauty routine like? And what beauty products you cannot go without? Nothing too special, I've finally gotten my skin to balance out so skin care has gotten super easy (I suffered from very bad cystic acne for a while due to hormone imbalances, I found out its not great too forget to take my testosterone for a month.... oops.) I wash my face every night before I go to sleep, and then I use pure vitamin E oil to keep my skin hydrated and to help with any lasting scarring and fine lines I massage my skin with small circles gently using my ring fingers. I spend maybe 15 minutes for my whole routine. I just ran put of this product, but I was using Elysian finishing treatment after the vitamin e oil and that left my skin incredible looking/feeling. I cant live without it, I have to get more!     What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined and how did you learn it? I learned how to hitch a car onto a towing trailer, to help my friend. Trial, error, and then FINALLY, YouTube! A good lesson for life!           Tell us something about yourself that isn't on your resume. I really miss being a barista and working at the cute coffee shop in my town. I love coffee and teas, I love creating drinks for people to enjoy. It's a relaxing job even on the most hectic of days and the constant flow of regular and new faces is always a joy.      What's the first place you'd want to go when it's safe again to travel and go out of our homes and why there? I haven't really thought of that, maybe on a road trip with friends? I've always wanted to see Zion national park, I hope I can go there soon one day.      What is your favorite song at the moment and why? Do you have a playlist that you would like to share with us?  Agostina by Puscifer, I just really really really love the guitar and bass towards the end. It gives me goosebumps. So good.  I don't really have a playlist because I don't use music apps. I like CDs, I prefer listening to full albums, my favorites are from Tool, all of their albums are episodic.        What is the first thing you like to do when you wake up, and last thing you like to do before going to bed? I like to make a cup of tea and check my animal crossing in the morning(a very cute video game I love.) Before bed I like to watch what Trevor Noah and Markiplier have uploaded for the day on YT, then I do a meditation to help me sleep.       What is your go-to work-out for staying in shape? What does working out mean to you? I don't really care for working out. I know that I should and I'll have to become serious with it as I get older but for now, I just like doing exercises that involve laying or sitting down on the floor. I've been walking a ton recently.        What is your favorite painting and has it inspired you for any of your work thus far?  I'm not sure I could name a single painting, I like tons of art but I never remember the names of them. I own a few prints of anthropomorphic goat paintings from an artist who is local to my state named Dusty Ray, I /LOVE/ their artwork. I also commissioned a goat art piece from @Jhuisk on Instagram, they're also local to Colorado and I'm so so so excited to meet with them to receive it once it's safe! ♡     What does Pride mean to you?  To uplift the amazing black and brown trans women of our community. We can't forget to thank who came before us, and why we even have pride to begin with.  There would be no pride without Marsha P Johnson and Sylvia Rivera, we would have no pride without black trans women.  We have to make sure trans women of color are supported, protected, loved, hired, paid, encouraged, thanked, and that should be year round.      Tell us about your activism activities for the Trans community.  Right now my activism has been going to protests in my state for Black lives matter, fighting against police brutality, and racism. Black people are dying at a higher rate from covid and because of systemic racism many do not have the privilege to have been able to quarantine. These marches are more important than staying in quarantine especially when so many simply cannot do that even if they desperately need and want too. We all need to be focusing, and keep going to these protests.   In the words of my friends Jame and Camille.  "This doesn't end until our officials, recognize the grievances of a people and the potency of a moment to radically redress their communities. Too demand of our congress, our house, our nation, a full and comprehensive reparations program. Until they will demand Healthcare as a human right and cut its ties from one's market exploitation. Until they will guarantee dignity and the means to live to all of our citizens. Until they will do what they were put there to do and actualize what the only legitimate role of a government is: to secure the freedom of individuals within a collective to self determine their own lives and allow our finest human capacities to flourish."   We must not allow those who wish to see this moment pass, to hijack the now. We need to defund the police and I personally believe we must fight to abolish them. Abolish ICE, predatory social work, the military, and landlords.    Create autonomous zones. Keep marching. 

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