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BETTY CATROUX YVES SAINT LAURENT FEMININE SINGULAR
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BETTY CATROUX YVES SAINT LAURENT FEMININE SINGULAR

Exhibition Exhibition organized by the Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris In partnership with Saint Laurent     The Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris is delighted to reopen its doors on Thursday, October 8th, 2020, showcasing “Betty Catroux, Yves Saint Laurent – Feminine Singular” exhibition.   The Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris devotes a special exhibition to Betty Catroux, fashion icon and Yves Saint Laurent’s ‘female double.’ The pieces displayed in the exhibition come from a major donation Betty Catroux made to the Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent, which is the largest ever received and particularly significant because these pieces embody both the signature style that Yves Saint Laurent continually upheld and his strong bond with Betty Catroux.   Madison Cox, president of the Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent, gave Anthony Vaccarello carte blanche for this exhibition to be held at the Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris. Anthony Vaccarello, Saint Laurent’s artistic director, approaches Betty Catroux’s wardrobe from an aesthetic perspective by selecting the pieces that best reveal her unique personality and ongoing influence on the label’s signature style.   Published by Gallimard, the exhibition catalogue is the first monograph dedicated to fashion icon Betty Catroux. It includes never-before-seen documents and images. Available at the Musée Yves Saint Laurent in Paris. Also, a unique book published by Saint Laurent Rive Droite editions and designed by Anthony Vaccarello retracing Betty Catroux’s exhibition in photos will be sold exclusively at the Saint Laurent Rive Droite store in Paris. The museum will be open from Thursday to Sunday, from 11 am to 6 pm. For more information about the visit and safety measures : museeyslparis.com     EXHIBITION: Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris 5 avenue Marceau, Paris 16ème   Exhibition organized by the Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris In partnership with Saint Laurent     The Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris is delighted to reopen its doors on Thursday, October 8th, 2020, showcasing “Betty Catroux, Yves Saint Laurent – Feminine Singular” exhibition.   The Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris devotes a special exhibition to Betty Catroux, fashion icon and Yves Saint Laurent’s ‘female double.’ The pieces displayed in the exhibition come from a major donation Betty Catroux made to the Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent, which is the largest ever received and particularly significant because these pieces embody both the signature style that Yves Saint Laurent continually upheld and his strong bond with Betty Catroux.   Madison Cox, president of the Fondation Pierre Bergé – Yves Saint Laurent, gave Anthony Vaccarello carte blanche for this exhibition to be held at the Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris. Anthony Vaccarello, Saint Laurent’s artistic director, approaches Betty Catroux’s wardrobe from an aesthetic perspective by selecting the pieces that best reveal her unique personality and ongoing influence on the label’s signature style.   Published by Gallimard, the exhibition catalogue is the first monograph dedicated to fashion icon Betty Catroux. It includes never-before-seen documents and images. Available at the Musée Yves Saint Laurent in Paris. Also, a unique book published by Saint Laurent Rive Droite editions and designed by Anthony Vaccarello retracing Betty Catroux’s exhibition in photos will be sold exclusively at the Saint Laurent Rive Droite store in Paris. The museum will be open from Thursday to Sunday, from 11 am to 6 pm. For more information about the visit and safety measures : museeyslparis.com     EXHIBITION: Musée Yves Saint Laurent Paris 5 avenue Marceau, Paris 16ème  

American Vintage - Masculine. Feminine. Plural.
563

American Vintage - Masculine. Feminine. Plural.

Fashion Rooted in the DNA of American Vintage from the very start, the brand’s unisex approach to clothing takes a twin turn this season. Masculine and feminine cover their tracks and reinvent their own rules.   Shared materials, swapped pieces, same cuts. Between a man’s and a woman’s wardrobe, interchange organic cotton tees or oversized polos. In a range of vintage colours, you’ll love the softness of cotton fleece, the sharper lines of a zipped mock polo neck or the rectilinear geometry of sportswear zippers that stand out on gender-fluid silhouettes.   In autumn, the sizing also pairs up to better adapt to each individual. A matching ensemble, in the form of a suit, denim overalls, a long wool coat or a technical bomber jacket, comes together in a new symbiosis. Crafted for men and women, the iconic brand materials, in cotton and knitwear, declare a mutual and unique harmony, echoing the reinterpreted basics of the House. Rooted in the DNA of American Vintage from the very start, the brand’s unisex approach to clothing takes a twin turn this season. Masculine and feminine cover their tracks and reinvent their own rules.   Shared materials, swapped pieces, same cuts. Between a man’s and a woman’s wardrobe, interchange organic cotton tees or oversized polos. In a range of vintage colours, you’ll love the softness of cotton fleece, the sharper lines of a zipped mock polo neck or the rectilinear geometry of sportswear zippers that stand out on gender-fluid silhouettes.   In autumn, the sizing also pairs up to better adapt to each individual. A matching ensemble, in the form of a suit, denim overalls, a long wool coat or a technical bomber jacket, comes together in a new symbiosis. Crafted for men and women, the iconic brand materials, in cotton and knitwear, declare a mutual and unique harmony, echoing the reinterpreted basics of the House.

Get Heated with Moose Knuckles' FW20 Campaign
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Get Heated with Moose Knuckles' FW20 Campaign

Fashion For its FW20 Campaign, Canadian outerwear brand, Moose Knuckles, metaphorically inspires the world's population into action.     By definition, heat is the state of having or generating a high degree of warmth, the condition or quality of being hot, or the process of making something hot or warm. Concurrently, it means to excite emotionally or to become intense. That duality struck a chord with the Canadian outerwear brand, as an avenue to both champion their product's utility and reinvigorate a global audience. The time has come to Bring The Heat.   Moose Knuckles takes pride in the fact that they make the world's highest quality coats. But in a world so drastically in need of change, that legacy isn't enough. The Bring The Heat campaign functions as the link,bridging the gap between product and emotion.   "We're inspired by the fearless community of creators who've kept pursuing their passions despite the many barriers that stand in their way." - Dominique Lagleva, Global Marketing Director   Resplendent colorsmelt together, forming a thermographic map-like filterthat will dress the campaign's key visuals. As the rollout continues, brand collaborators and creatives across the globewill be encouraged to join in, creating content and sharing personal interpretations and narratives on what "bringing the heat" means to them. Moose Knuckles plans to pass the proverbial mic to whoever has a story to tell, encouraging the return to action the world needs, despite all obstacles, cold or otherwise.    Moose Knuckles recruited a crew of heat makers to bolster the campaign's incalescence. Young Thug and Kehlani will take center stage in looks meticulously crafted by Kyle Luu, while Sandy Kim captures all the action.    "It's exciting to work with so many amazing creatives. Watching their various styles and approaches mesh together and form something greater than the sum of its parts is what this is all about—true collaboration on all fronts." Brody Baker, Creative Director   Initially, the campaign will serve as the debut of the Power Puff collection, a line of contemporary reinterpretations of the puffer silhouette, complete with premium goose down and a host of other functional elements guaranteed to keep you warm and dry. Uniques, the brand's more adventurous puffer line, Wool, Cloud, and Shearlingproducts will also be featured as the season progresses.    The campaign launches on October 7th, 2020, and the products will be available for purchase at mooseknucklescanada.com, Moose Knuckles Stores, select pop-up locations, and luxury retailers worldwide.      For its FW20 Campaign, Canadian outerwear brand, Moose Knuckles, metaphorically inspires the world's population into action.     By definition, heat is the state of having or generating a high degree of warmth, the condition or quality of being hot, or the process of making something hot or warm. Concurrently, it means to excite emotionally or to become intense. That duality struck a chord with the Canadian outerwear brand, as an avenue to both champion their product's utility and reinvigorate a global audience. The time has come to Bring The Heat.   Moose Knuckles takes pride in the fact that they make the world's highest quality coats. But in a world so drastically in need of change, that legacy isn't enough. The Bring The Heat campaign functions as the link,bridging the gap between product and emotion.   "We're inspired by the fearless community of creators who've kept pursuing their passions despite the many barriers that stand in their way." - Dominique Lagleva, Global Marketing Director   Resplendent colorsmelt together, forming a thermographic map-like filterthat will dress the campaign's key visuals. As the rollout continues, brand collaborators and creatives across the globewill be encouraged to join in, creating content and sharing personal interpretations and narratives on what "bringing the heat" means to them. Moose Knuckles plans to pass the proverbial mic to whoever has a story to tell, encouraging the return to action the world needs, despite all obstacles, cold or otherwise.    Moose Knuckles recruited a crew of heat makers to bolster the campaign's incalescence. Young Thug and Kehlani will take center stage in looks meticulously crafted by Kyle Luu, while Sandy Kim captures all the action.    "It's exciting to work with so many amazing creatives. Watching their various styles and approaches mesh together and form something greater than the sum of its parts is what this is all about—true collaboration on all fronts." Brody Baker, Creative Director   Initially, the campaign will serve as the debut of the Power Puff collection, a line of contemporary reinterpretations of the puffer silhouette, complete with premium goose down and a host of other functional elements guaranteed to keep you warm and dry. Uniques, the brand's more adventurous puffer line, Wool, Cloud, and Shearlingproducts will also be featured as the season progresses.    The campaign launches on October 7th, 2020, and the products will be available for purchase at mooseknucklescanada.com, Moose Knuckles Stores, select pop-up locations, and luxury retailers worldwide.     

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GLENN MARTENS APPOINTED CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF DIESEL
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GLENN MARTENS APPOINTED CREATIVE DIRECTOR OF DIESEL

Fashion OTB is proud to announce the appointment of Glenn Martens as Creative Director of Diesel effective immediately. In his new role, Glenn will overview the global brand’s style, communications, interior design, and more in general its overall creativity.     Born in 1983, Glenn Martens is a Belgian designer who started his career at Jean Paul Gaultier, and since 2013 he is the Creative Director of Parisian brand Y/Project. In 2017 Glenn won the ANDAM award (of which OTB is one of the historical supporters), and in 2018 Glenn was one of the guest designers of Diesel’s experimental capsule series Diesel Red Tag.     Thus Renzo Rosso, President of OTB: “Ever since I met Glenn in 2017 I saw his experience grow and his talent cement. Working with him on Diesel Red Tag, going through our company’s archives and heritage together, seeing him interact with the brand, brought us closer, and I am happy to now see him take the helm of Diesel, where he will marry his design vision with the iconoclastic values of this unique brand”.      “I am extremely honored and excited to join the Diesel family. Synonymous with radicality, honesty, and optimism, Diesel helped shape the way we see the future. Its unique voice has made it an undeniable icon. Today, more than ever, I feel the need to celebrate these founding values, to build bridges through a message of hope”, is the comment of Glenn Martens.  OTB is proud to announce the appointment of Glenn Martens as Creative Director of Diesel effective immediately. In his new role, Glenn will overview the global brand’s style, communications, interior design, and more in general its overall creativity.     Born in 1983, Glenn Martens is a Belgian designer who started his career at Jean Paul Gaultier, and since 2013 he is the Creative Director of Parisian brand Y/Project. In 2017 Glenn won the ANDAM award (of which OTB is one of the historical supporters), and in 2018 Glenn was one of the guest designers of Diesel’s experimental capsule series Diesel Red Tag.     Thus Renzo Rosso, President of OTB: “Ever since I met Glenn in 2017 I saw his experience grow and his talent cement. Working with him on Diesel Red Tag, going through our company’s archives and heritage together, seeing him interact with the brand, brought us closer, and I am happy to now see him take the helm of Diesel, where he will marry his design vision with the iconoclastic values of this unique brand”.      “I am extremely honored and excited to join the Diesel family. Synonymous with radicality, honesty, and optimism, Diesel helped shape the way we see the future. Its unique voice has made it an undeniable icon. Today, more than ever, I feel the need to celebrate these founding values, to build bridges through a message of hope”, is the comment of Glenn Martens. 

Louis Vuitton for Spring & Summer 2021
556

Louis Vuitton for Spring & Summer 2021

Fashion Week Stepping into a territory that is still stylistically vague. A sensitive zone that erases gender and promises exponential creative possibilities. What does an in-between garment look like? What kind of cut can dissolve masculine and feminine? What wardrobe might s/he look good in? A fascinating new exploration for fashion, and the promise of a great journey that Louis Vuitton sets out to discover by abolishing these last boundaries. Finding expression in a landscape that is tenuous and vast, but also neutral: giving it colour, forging its character, inciting radicality, giving it personality. This is but the beginning of a reflection that is open, stimulating and fundamentally conscious.     What is the inspiration for this collection?   More than an inspiration, it’s a question, the very signi cant one of gender. We’re going beyond the basic idea that a woman gains power by co-opting the masculine wardrobe. What space is there for a category of clothing between feminine and masculine? It’s a growing space and its contours are ever more permeable. We’re de ning a type of clothing that lives in a non-binary zone. It’s fascinating to consider. What is a non-binary garment? Inevitably, it’s the designer’s role to o era point of view.     What’s distinctive about it?   By way of pure demonstration, it could be the structure of a jacket that’s in-between – as feminine as it is masculine. Or for example, the t-shirt dresses in the nal series. They could be dresses, but they could also be exaggerated t-shirts that skaters wear over shorts, or something basketball players might wear. Classic overcoats are nished like oversized sweaters. Phosphorescent fabrics lend the impression of movement, like mercury ‒ the chemical quicksilver ‒ or a changing sky. It’s an interplay of appearance and disappearance. Something chameleon-like.     Is it a new style?   I nd myself back to what I’ve always loved doing, which in the end de nes my work throughout my career as a designer. Stylistic hybrids. Patchworks of di erent materials. How to mix sartorial opposites, bring them together, fuse them. If you take a powerful term like ‘gender- uid’ and apply it to fashion, it’s really the idea of uidity in a garment that moves harmoniously from one to the other, and which is one and the other. That’s all the more important today, when we see how clothing can become the centre of debate about what a man or a woman should wear. How we can call someone into question based on what they wear. I was struck by a news story about English students in uniform who, during a heatwave, were so hot the boys wore the girls’ pleated skirts in protest. Society is evolving faster than protocol. Obviously, those who personify this most are those who de ne themselves as non-binary. But more and more people are totally comfortable with wearing clothes that don’t traditionally align with their gender. It’s an interesting phase, and it opens up lots of creative possibilities in fashion. Before, we always de ned the characteristics of one gender while attributing them to the other. Today, there’s this neutral zone that un-categorises everything.     Can you please describe that neutral zone?   What if being non-aligned were engaging? Being neutral can be radical. There’s nothing bland about it: neutrality can be powerful, extreme and expressive. It's a galvanising exercise. On some styles, prints are made up of words that are like positive injunctions: “Vote”, “Stand”, “Sprint.” I wanted to transliterate an energetic, vigorous, daring collection. We need that right now.     You’re showing in restrictive conditions, in which the majority of the international fashion community is unable to attend. How are you presenting your collection? We are holding a show beneath the glass roof at La Samaritaine, a symbolic place within a prestigious location in Paris – on the top oor where the peacock frescoes are. This gigantic Art Nouveau painting, which was rediscovered and restored during renovations, speaks in a way of resilience, a desire to carry on.... The physical experience of the show is di erent from the digital one. In-person guests will be surrounded by green screens, the kind used in lmmaking for integrating special e ects. While the IRL audience is watching the show, online there will be a di erent, interactive environment for those who were unable to travel. While some guests will be able to direct the camera and interact with the show, creating a personalised perspective, the entire online audience will see a special set that features scenes from the Wim Wenders lm “Wings of Desire,” a story about angels, whom liturgy tells us are sexless, but who choose to experience life thanks to the power of love. Stepping into a territory that is still stylistically vague. A sensitive zone that erases gender and promises exponential creative possibilities. What does an in-between garment look like? What kind of cut can dissolve masculine and feminine? What wardrobe might s/he look good in? A fascinating new exploration for fashion, and the promise of a great journey that Louis Vuitton sets out to discover by abolishing these last boundaries. Finding expression in a landscape that is tenuous and vast, but also neutral: giving it colour, forging its character, inciting radicality, giving it personality. This is but the beginning of a reflection that is open, stimulating and fundamentally conscious.     What is the inspiration for this collection?   More than an inspiration, it’s a question, the very signi cant one of gender. We’re going beyond the basic idea that a woman gains power by co-opting the masculine wardrobe. What space is there for a category of clothing between feminine and masculine? It’s a growing space and its contours are ever more permeable. We’re de ning a type of clothing that lives in a non-binary zone. It’s fascinating to consider. What is a non-binary garment? Inevitably, it’s the designer’s role to o era point of view.     What’s distinctive about it?   By way of pure demonstration, it could be the structure of a jacket that’s in-between – as feminine as it is masculine. Or for example, the t-shirt dresses in the nal series. They could be dresses, but they could also be exaggerated t-shirts that skaters wear over shorts, or something basketball players might wear. Classic overcoats are nished like oversized sweaters. Phosphorescent fabrics lend the impression of movement, like mercury ‒ the chemical quicksilver ‒ or a changing sky. It’s an interplay of appearance and disappearance. Something chameleon-like.     Is it a new style?   I nd myself back to what I’ve always loved doing, which in the end de nes my work throughout my career as a designer. Stylistic hybrids. Patchworks of di erent materials. How to mix sartorial opposites, bring them together, fuse them. If you take a powerful term like ‘gender- uid’ and apply it to fashion, it’s really the idea of uidity in a garment that moves harmoniously from one to the other, and which is one and the other. That’s all the more important today, when we see how clothing can become the centre of debate about what a man or a woman should wear. How we can call someone into question based on what they wear. I was struck by a news story about English students in uniform who, during a heatwave, were so hot the boys wore the girls’ pleated skirts in protest. Society is evolving faster than protocol. Obviously, those who personify this most are those who de ne themselves as non-binary. But more and more people are totally comfortable with wearing clothes that don’t traditionally align with their gender. It’s an interesting phase, and it opens up lots of creative possibilities in fashion. Before, we always de ned the characteristics of one gender while attributing them to the other. Today, there’s this neutral zone that un-categorises everything.     Can you please describe that neutral zone?   What if being non-aligned were engaging? Being neutral can be radical. There’s nothing bland about it: neutrality can be powerful, extreme and expressive. It's a galvanising exercise. On some styles, prints are made up of words that are like positive injunctions: “Vote”, “Stand”, “Sprint.” I wanted to transliterate an energetic, vigorous, daring collection. We need that right now.     You’re showing in restrictive conditions, in which the majority of the international fashion community is unable to attend. How are you presenting your collection? We are holding a show beneath the glass roof at La Samaritaine, a symbolic place within a prestigious location in Paris – on the top oor where the peacock frescoes are. This gigantic Art Nouveau painting, which was rediscovered and restored during renovations, speaks in a way of resilience, a desire to carry on.... The physical experience of the show is di erent from the digital one. In-person guests will be surrounded by green screens, the kind used in lmmaking for integrating special e ects. While the IRL audience is watching the show, online there will be a di erent, interactive environment for those who were unable to travel. While some guests will be able to direct the camera and interact with the show, creating a personalised perspective, the entire online audience will see a special set that features scenes from the Wim Wenders lm “Wings of Desire,” a story about angels, whom liturgy tells us are sexless, but who choose to experience life thanks to the power of love.

CHANEL for spring & Summer 2021
557

CHANEL for spring & Summer 2021

Fashion Week “I was thinking about actresses at the photocall, on the red carpet, that moment when they’re being called to by the photographers: their faces a little distracted, their attitude a little out of sync with the outfits they’re wearing. And then there are the fans waiting for them behind the barriers, this very lively side to cinema that happens beyond cinema, that’s what I like,” explains Virginie Viard, “This collection is a tribute to the muses of the House. Some of them are far away, it’s been a long time since we saw them. Gabrielle Chanel and Karl Lagerfeld dressed so many actresses in films and in real life. I was thinking about them who make us dream so much. But without wanting to replicate. Without falling into a vintage citation. I wanted it to be very joyful, colourful, and very vibrant too.”     So, alongside the ecru and black tweed suits, are jeans in fluorescent colours, fluid dresses and t-shirts printed with the letters of CHANEL like neon-lights, pale pink capri pants, long dresses printed with little flowers in black and white, or in an ultra-fine tweed, outfits embroidered with sequins, bermuda short suits and layers of asymmetry…     The silhouettes, staged in the collection press kit by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin, are embodied by Rianne Van Rompaey, Mica Argañaraz and Louise de Chevigny, each one of them in four recurring cinematic situations: on the telephone, looking out of the window, sitting on a bed or walking down the street, just like scenes from a film. An evocation of the Nouvelle Vague, of Italian cinema and of Hollywood. “Because the world of Chanel evokes so many images, a whole unconscious that’s linked to cinema,” concludes Virginie Viard.     #CHANELSpringSummer “I was thinking about actresses at the photocall, on the red carpet, that moment when they’re being called to by the photographers: their faces a little distracted, their attitude a little out of sync with the outfits they’re wearing. And then there are the fans waiting for them behind the barriers, this very lively side to cinema that happens beyond cinema, that’s what I like,” explains Virginie Viard, “This collection is a tribute to the muses of the House. Some of them are far away, it’s been a long time since we saw them. Gabrielle Chanel and Karl Lagerfeld dressed so many actresses in films and in real life. I was thinking about them who make us dream so much. But without wanting to replicate. Without falling into a vintage citation. I wanted it to be very joyful, colourful, and very vibrant too.”     So, alongside the ecru and black tweed suits, are jeans in fluorescent colours, fluid dresses and t-shirts printed with the letters of CHANEL like neon-lights, pale pink capri pants, long dresses printed with little flowers in black and white, or in an ultra-fine tweed, outfits embroidered with sequins, bermuda short suits and layers of asymmetry…     The silhouettes, staged in the collection press kit by Inez van Lamsweerde and Vinoodh Matadin, are embodied by Rianne Van Rompaey, Mica Argañaraz and Louise de Chevigny, each one of them in four recurring cinematic situations: on the telephone, looking out of the window, sitting on a bed or walking down the street, just like scenes from a film. An evocation of the Nouvelle Vague, of Italian cinema and of Hollywood. “Because the world of Chanel evokes so many images, a whole unconscious that’s linked to cinema,” concludes Virginie Viard.     #CHANELSpringSummer

Dior for Spring & Summer 2021
554

Dior for Spring & Summer 2021

Fashion Week The spring-summer 2021 ready-to-wear show offers a fresh opportunity to bear witness to the pluralistic richness of cultures through the singular and powerful prism of women’s voices.   Starting from that premise, Maria Grazia Chiuricombines, at the heart of her collection, two precious techniques – Indonesian ikat and chiné, which was developed in Europe in the 16th century – both of which consist of coloring the warp threads before weaving, true standard-bearers and the Ariadne’s thread behind these unique silhouettes. Originally created in Asia, these emblematic ancestral fabrics have given life to numerous variations and reinventions that share a common origin.     One of the Creative Director’s favorite materials for its graphic, couture spirit, chiné enhanced a flared coat from 1959 — evoking the Trapeze line created for Dior by the founding couturier’s successor, Yves Saint Laurent. Today, its delicate silk threads constellate reversible coats and jackets, reinterpreting House symbols such as paisley and the signature toile de Jouy. Like a fascinating encounter, the reverse side of these pieces is patterned with traditional ikats made by weavers in Bali, reflecting an infinitely precious savoir-faire. This extremely refined, exceptional craftsmanship is a language in itself, a way of expressing and affirming femininity that resonates more than ever given the committed philosophy upheld by the Creative Director of Dior women’s collections. An approach of solidarity, and a captivating dialogue between Dior and Indonesian craftswomen celebrate excellence and allow this unique heritage to radiate around the world.     By passing down this priceless heritage and its fascinating transformations over time as well as through various encounters and changing lifestyles, this collection pays homage to both the formidable diversity of savoir-faire and the virtuosity of the petites mains that weave it. An inspiring encounter that reiterates Maria Grazia Chiuri’sdesire to highlight world cultures and to juxtapose and assemble words, images and prints: a spellbinding creative odyssey, from text to textile. In order to protect this unique world heritage, and in keeping with initiatives by the Indonesian government, Dior is committed to working hand-in-hand with local experts and artisans to safeguard this cultural asset and ensure that its precious techniques live on. The spring-summer 2021 ready-to-wear show offers a fresh opportunity to bear witness to the pluralistic richness of cultures through the singular and powerful prism of women’s voices.   Starting from that premise, Maria Grazia Chiuricombines, at the heart of her collection, two precious techniques – Indonesian ikat and chiné, which was developed in Europe in the 16th century – both of which consist of coloring the warp threads before weaving, true standard-bearers and the Ariadne’s thread behind these unique silhouettes. Originally created in Asia, these emblematic ancestral fabrics have given life to numerous variations and reinventions that share a common origin.     One of the Creative Director’s favorite materials for its graphic, couture spirit, chiné enhanced a flared coat from 1959 — evoking the Trapeze line created for Dior by the founding couturier’s successor, Yves Saint Laurent. Today, its delicate silk threads constellate reversible coats and jackets, reinterpreting House symbols such as paisley and the signature toile de Jouy. Like a fascinating encounter, the reverse side of these pieces is patterned with traditional ikats made by weavers in Bali, reflecting an infinitely precious savoir-faire. This extremely refined, exceptional craftsmanship is a language in itself, a way of expressing and affirming femininity that resonates more than ever given the committed philosophy upheld by the Creative Director of Dior women’s collections. An approach of solidarity, and a captivating dialogue between Dior and Indonesian craftswomen celebrate excellence and allow this unique heritage to radiate around the world.     By passing down this priceless heritage and its fascinating transformations over time as well as through various encounters and changing lifestyles, this collection pays homage to both the formidable diversity of savoir-faire and the virtuosity of the petites mains that weave it. An inspiring encounter that reiterates Maria Grazia Chiuri’sdesire to highlight world cultures and to juxtapose and assemble words, images and prints: a spellbinding creative odyssey, from text to textile. In order to protect this unique world heritage, and in keeping with initiatives by the Indonesian government, Dior is committed to working hand-in-hand with local experts and artisans to safeguard this cultural asset and ensure that its precious techniques live on.

Chloé for Spring Summer 2021
552

Chloé for Spring Summer 2021

Fashion Week The perennial Chloé optimism looks ever forward, embracing the possibilities of women and the power unlocked by their vital communion. Reflecting on intimacies and affirmations with oneself and the world around us, the Summer 2021 collection designed by Natacha Ramsay-Levi appears as a series of signposts: silhouettes in constant movement on the streets of Paris that converge on the steps of the Palais de Tokyo. The digital and physical gesture explores the concepts of walking and watching as contemplative exercises, inviting interpretation by both the wearer and her spectators. As female bodies united inthis haven of artistic excellence, each strikes a new chord in the show’sharmonious soundscape.     Mirroring our global context through the female gaze, the graphic silkscreen works of American artist Corita Kent ebb and flow throughout the collection as moments of urgent visual poetry writ large in colour. They epitomise the season’s innately ‘collaged’ spirit, where an accumulation of Chloé symbols becomes a rebellious act of femininity performed. Amongst multi-layered planes of colour— washed neons, bleached neutrals and warm mineral tones — Corita’s artworks are printed, knitted and woven into garments and accessories, epitomising the mixed-media approach to silhouettes and surfaces throughout.     As order in chaos, decoration is tempered by graceful geometries. In effortless statements of Chloé flou, pleated crèpe ‘arsenic’ dresses and camisoles are setwith fine lines of valenciennes lacework, embroidered butterfly collars adorn supple rib knits, and cotton tunics are stenciled with posies or appliqué Art Nouveau blooms. Caught by tooled and topstitched trench belts, sack skirts and tablier dresses in silk and summer wools juxtapose ruffled shoulders, crochet inserts and contrast broderie anglaise. Boyish separates ground the season’sairy silhouettes, from long blazers and camp shirts to full trousers and pleat shorts in stonewash gabardine — each piece a new expression of timeless Chloé attitudes remixed and revisited for today.     Interwoven with gestures and characters of seasons past, the Chloé Spring Summer 2021 accessories collection remains a bold step forward, introducing the sculptural gilded motif of the new Chloé Kiss that scales up and down as hardware on hobo and moulded clutch bags, belts and jewellery pieces. The new Hailey bolster-shaped handbag in smooth calfskin features a brushed gold stirrup frame and supple drawstring sides, whilst the classic Daria and a newsunglasses pouch are stamped with Corita Kent’s silkscreen word art.Femininities amulet jewels return engraved and inlaid, ergonomic cuffs are sheathed in leather and enamel, as the Chloé Kiss becomes drop earrings and a shapely infinity pendant. On foot, laced and keyhole sandal boots create a contoured line in layered leather, canvas and suede. The perennial Chloé optimism looks ever forward, embracing the possibilities of women and the power unlocked by their vital communion. Reflecting on intimacies and affirmations with oneself and the world around us, the Summer 2021 collection designed by Natacha Ramsay-Levi appears as a series of signposts: silhouettes in constant movement on the streets of Paris that converge on the steps of the Palais de Tokyo. The digital and physical gesture explores the concepts of walking and watching as contemplative exercises, inviting interpretation by both the wearer and her spectators. As female bodies united inthis haven of artistic excellence, each strikes a new chord in the show’sharmonious soundscape.     Mirroring our global context through the female gaze, the graphic silkscreen works of American artist Corita Kent ebb and flow throughout the collection as moments of urgent visual poetry writ large in colour. They epitomise the season’s innately ‘collaged’ spirit, where an accumulation of Chloé symbols becomes a rebellious act of femininity performed. Amongst multi-layered planes of colour— washed neons, bleached neutrals and warm mineral tones — Corita’s artworks are printed, knitted and woven into garments and accessories, epitomising the mixed-media approach to silhouettes and surfaces throughout.     As order in chaos, decoration is tempered by graceful geometries. In effortless statements of Chloé flou, pleated crèpe ‘arsenic’ dresses and camisoles are setwith fine lines of valenciennes lacework, embroidered butterfly collars adorn supple rib knits, and cotton tunics are stenciled with posies or appliqué Art Nouveau blooms. Caught by tooled and topstitched trench belts, sack skirts and tablier dresses in silk and summer wools juxtapose ruffled shoulders, crochet inserts and contrast broderie anglaise. Boyish separates ground the season’sairy silhouettes, from long blazers and camp shirts to full trousers and pleat shorts in stonewash gabardine — each piece a new expression of timeless Chloé attitudes remixed and revisited for today.     Interwoven with gestures and characters of seasons past, the Chloé Spring Summer 2021 accessories collection remains a bold step forward, introducing the sculptural gilded motif of the new Chloé Kiss that scales up and down as hardware on hobo and moulded clutch bags, belts and jewellery pieces. The new Hailey bolster-shaped handbag in smooth calfskin features a brushed gold stirrup frame and supple drawstring sides, whilst the classic Daria and a newsunglasses pouch are stamped with Corita Kent’s silkscreen word art.Femininities amulet jewels return engraved and inlaid, ergonomic cuffs are sheathed in leather and enamel, as the Chloé Kiss becomes drop earrings and a shapely infinity pendant. On foot, laced and keyhole sandal boots create a contoured line in layered leather, canvas and suede.

TOMMY HILFIGER ACCELERATES TRANSITION TO A CIRCULAR BUSINESS WITH LAUNCH OF ‘TOMMY FOR LIFE’
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TOMMY HILFIGER ACCELERATES TRANSITION TO A CIRCULAR BUSINESS WITH LAUNCH OF ‘TOMMY FOR LIFE’

Design Tommy Hilfiger, announces the launch of ‘Tommyfor Life,’ a pioneering circular business model that will take pre-owned TOMMY HILFIGER and TOMMY JEANS pieces as well as damaged items from retail operations, to make them good as new or remix them into completely new styles. ‘Tommyfor Life’ products will go through a renewal process that includes professional cleaning, repairing, restoring and a strict quality assurance and control. ‘Tommy for Life’ will be piloted in the Netherlands starting today, before expanding to other European markets in 2021. ‘Tommyfor Life’ products will be available for purchase online exclusively at tommyforlife.com.      “The time to drive real, impactful change in the fashion industry is here and now, so we are committed to identifying ways to innovate our business models, practices and the way we interact with our consumers,” said Martijn Hagman, CEO, Tommy Hilfiger Global and PVH Europe. “‘Tommyfor Life’ provides solutions to one of our industry’s greatest challenges: switching from a “take-make-waste” approach to a model in which we keep products and materials in use as long as possible. Our investments in a business model that pioneers this at this scale and complexity will have true impact – not only on our brand, but on the future of the industry as a whole.”     The ‘Tommyfor Life’ program has developed three key product lines to extend the life of garments taken in:   Reloved: Previously owned products traded-in by consumers. Refreshed: Restored items from store and e-commerce returns. For example, items from the retail inventories that become unsaleable or proved defective, such as becoming stained as a result of handling, broken seams, lost buttons, etc. Remixed: Beginning in 2021, products that cannot be cleaned in full or repaired will be taken apart, with their materials used to create new, unique designs.     ‘Tommyfor Life’ is one of the initiatives tied to Tommy Hilfiger’sMake it Possible program, a bold approach to environmental and social sustainability that reinforces the organization’s commitment to create fashion that ‘Wastes Nothing and Welcomes All’. The new business model is in line with Tommy Hilfiger’s vision to make products that are fully circular and that can be part of a sustainable loop by 2030.     To participate in ‘Tommyfor Life’, consumers are invited to trade-in their pre-loved TOMMY HILFIGER and TOMMY JEANS items at TOMMY HILFIGER stores or send them via mail in exchange for discount vouchers. The value of the vouchers will depend on the type and number of items traded, regardless of their condition. In partnership with The Renewal Workshop – the leading provider of a circular solutions for apparel and textile brands – Tommy Hilfiger will sort, clean and repair donated items, restoring them to a newfound glory. What cannot be restored will be remixed into a new line of unique designs. Those that cannot be remixed will be recycled into yarns or repurposed, for instance into insulation. Nothing will go to waste.      To purchase product, trade in TOMMY HILFIGER products and learn more about the program, visit tommyforlife.com. Tommy Hilfiger, announces the launch of ‘Tommyfor Life,’ a pioneering circular business model that will take pre-owned TOMMY HILFIGER and TOMMY JEANS pieces as well as damaged items from retail operations, to make them good as new or remix them into completely new styles. ‘Tommyfor Life’ products will go through a renewal process that includes professional cleaning, repairing, restoring and a strict quality assurance and control. ‘Tommy for Life’ will be piloted in the Netherlands starting today, before expanding to other European markets in 2021. ‘Tommyfor Life’ products will be available for purchase online exclusively at tommyforlife.com.      “The time to drive real, impactful change in the fashion industry is here and now, so we are committed to identifying ways to innovate our business models, practices and the way we interact with our consumers,” said Martijn Hagman, CEO, Tommy Hilfiger Global and PVH Europe. “‘Tommyfor Life’ provides solutions to one of our industry’s greatest challenges: switching from a “take-make-waste” approach to a model in which we keep products and materials in use as long as possible. Our investments in a business model that pioneers this at this scale and complexity will have true impact – not only on our brand, but on the future of the industry as a whole.”     The ‘Tommyfor Life’ program has developed three key product lines to extend the life of garments taken in:   Reloved: Previously owned products traded-in by consumers. Refreshed: Restored items from store and e-commerce returns. For example, items from the retail inventories that become unsaleable or proved defective, such as becoming stained as a result of handling, broken seams, lost buttons, etc. Remixed: Beginning in 2021, products that cannot be cleaned in full or repaired will be taken apart, with their materials used to create new, unique designs.     ‘Tommyfor Life’ is one of the initiatives tied to Tommy Hilfiger’sMake it Possible program, a bold approach to environmental and social sustainability that reinforces the organization’s commitment to create fashion that ‘Wastes Nothing and Welcomes All’. The new business model is in line with Tommy Hilfiger’s vision to make products that are fully circular and that can be part of a sustainable loop by 2030.     To participate in ‘Tommyfor Life’, consumers are invited to trade-in their pre-loved TOMMY HILFIGER and TOMMY JEANS items at TOMMY HILFIGER stores or send them via mail in exchange for discount vouchers. The value of the vouchers will depend on the type and number of items traded, regardless of their condition. In partnership with The Renewal Workshop – the leading provider of a circular solutions for apparel and textile brands – Tommy Hilfiger will sort, clean and repair donated items, restoring them to a newfound glory. What cannot be restored will be remixed into a new line of unique designs. Those that cannot be remixed will be recycled into yarns or repurposed, for instance into insulation. Nothing will go to waste.      To purchase product, trade in TOMMY HILFIGER products and learn more about the program, visit tommyforlife.com.

Colmar Originals Research
557

Colmar Originals Research

Fashion The Research collection for men and women is made of shiny fabrics with special ultrasound quilting and padded with down. The personalised and removable maxi label on the back, distinguishes this exclusive line. The black leather logo is synonymous with innovation and style for a cutting-edge look.      Specifications of the jackets in the Research line: - Natural feather padding - Water-repellent treatment - Black leather Colmar Originals logo applied on the left sleeve   read more about it on Colmar.it   The Research collection for men and women is made of shiny fabrics with special ultrasound quilting and padded with down. The personalised and removable maxi label on the back, distinguishes this exclusive line. The black leather logo is synonymous with innovation and style for a cutting-edge look.      Specifications of the jackets in the Research line: - Natural feather padding - Water-repellent treatment - Black leather Colmar Originals logo applied on the left sleeve   read more about it on Colmar.it  

Hermès for  SS21
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Hermès for SS21

Fashion Week Hermès presented the new WRTW for SS21 during Paris Fashion Week.       The growing pleasure of reconnection with the world, the infinite pleasure of beginning again. How sweet it is to live again. How urgent it is to go further. The body wraps itself in emotions, Not shying away, but playing a balancing act. A body once glimpsed through a keyhole, now fully there. Beautiful and whole. Sensuality found again. Why mask our vulnerabilities? We have uncovered our hidden flaws. We embraced our doubts with open arms, We have fashioned them. Once calm and confidence are found again, she knows everything will accelerate. Each era is its own beginning. Each afternoon a resurrection. Hermès presented the new WRTW for SS21 during Paris Fashion Week.       The growing pleasure of reconnection with the world, the infinite pleasure of beginning again. How sweet it is to live again. How urgent it is to go further. The body wraps itself in emotions, Not shying away, but playing a balancing act. A body once glimpsed through a keyhole, now fully there. Beautiful and whole. Sensuality found again. Why mask our vulnerabilities? We have uncovered our hidden flaws. We embraced our doubts with open arms, We have fashioned them. Once calm and confidence are found again, she knows everything will accelerate. Each era is its own beginning. Each afternoon a resurrection.

Givenchy for Spring & Summer 2021
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Givenchy for Spring & Summer 2021

Fashion Week “You find the pieces of the puzzle for a collection, building it from symbols and signs, but never forgetting the reality of the person who will wear it and bring it to life. The women and men should be powerful and effortless, equal and joyful, a reflection of who they really are – only more so. It’s about finding the humanity in luxury.” Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     At Matthew M. Williams’ Givenchy, ‘Hardware’ is key. Eschewing, gendered notions of jewellery and accessories, rather it is hardware that unites the women and men of Givenchy, a symbolic nexus of utility and luxury and the place where this collection began. The Lover’s Lock is a unisex object of utility, decoration, commitment and emotion; a sincere yet playful symbol of Paris – it nods to the lost locks of Le Pont des Arts – it is an object punctuated throughout this initial collection as both decoration and fastenings. It also points to Williams’ commitment to the world of Givenchy in this first proposal as thehouse’s Creative Director.     The Spring-Summer ‘21 collection explores Givenchy in the form of a stream of consciousness for Williams and is a ‘sampler’ of what is to come. Begun in the midst of a pandemic and completed within two months, this is a new beginning, yet is intermingled with elements of the archive and is a utilisation of Givenchy’s distinct lineage, pointing to the past, present and future. Above all, there is a sense of celebration, of the people who have led Williams here and those he wants to wear the clothes. This is expressed in the images that reveals the collection, a photographic study by the creative director together with the artist Heji Shin – a photographer who also gets to the heart of who a person is as much as to the clothes they wear.     From Hubert de Givenchy’s swathes of looped drapery, lighter-than-air transparencies, linear necklines and ‘Jour’ open backs, to the McQueen horn, reborn; both the classical and radical contrasts of Givenchy are embraced and shown to have always been part of the house’s history in the collection. Ultimately, it is a feeling of elegance, playfulness and pragmatism that is key to Matthew M. Williams’ vision for the house.     There is a notion of evolution, both lighthearted and serious, in this play of elements past and present. From the Tryp-toe shoe and stockings, the Horn-heel and hat together with a further examination of the Antigona bag, each is a play on and development of existing objects in the archive. They are joined by the new unisex Cut-out bag in its many iterations, as well as the G chains, objects that are destined to add to the history of the house and are interspersed throughout. Williams’ signature technical material experimentation is balanced by the traditional, natural and opulent. From the use of a cotton Ottoman for both genders in outerwear, technical taffeta in tailoring and structured Punto di Milano jersey to evoke more pure forms in dressmaking, tradition is respected yet refined and re-contextualised. At the same time, an experiment in different densities of injected foam leads to an evolution of the slide, the ultra-comfortable Marshmallow Slide is the footwear that underpins much of the collection, quite literally providing a casual, insouciant foundation for many of the more formal looks. The study of casual archetypes continues throughout the collection, including new technical coatings of denim in both paint and resin, work that is as labour intensive as the collection’s more traditional embroideries. It is a sign ofWilliams’ Californian sensibility transplanted to Europe that he approaches the two sides with equal aplomb and rigour, both classicism and subversion, with a sense of ease and respect for the humanity of the wearer infusing all. “You find the pieces of the puzzle for a collection, building it from symbols and signs, but never forgetting the reality of the person who will wear it and bring it to life. The women and men should be powerful and effortless, equal and joyful, a reflection of who they really are – only more so. It’s about finding the humanity in luxury.” Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     At Matthew M. Williams’ Givenchy, ‘Hardware’ is key. Eschewing, gendered notions of jewellery and accessories, rather it is hardware that unites the women and men of Givenchy, a symbolic nexus of utility and luxury and the place where this collection began. The Lover’s Lock is a unisex object of utility, decoration, commitment and emotion; a sincere yet playful symbol of Paris – it nods to the lost locks of Le Pont des Arts – it is an object punctuated throughout this initial collection as both decoration and fastenings. It also points to Williams’ commitment to the world of Givenchy in this first proposal as thehouse’s Creative Director.     The Spring-Summer ‘21 collection explores Givenchy in the form of a stream of consciousness for Williams and is a ‘sampler’ of what is to come. Begun in the midst of a pandemic and completed within two months, this is a new beginning, yet is intermingled with elements of the archive and is a utilisation of Givenchy’s distinct lineage, pointing to the past, present and future. Above all, there is a sense of celebration, of the people who have led Williams here and those he wants to wear the clothes. This is expressed in the images that reveals the collection, a photographic study by the creative director together with the artist Heji Shin – a photographer who also gets to the heart of who a person is as much as to the clothes they wear.     From Hubert de Givenchy’s swathes of looped drapery, lighter-than-air transparencies, linear necklines and ‘Jour’ open backs, to the McQueen horn, reborn; both the classical and radical contrasts of Givenchy are embraced and shown to have always been part of the house’s history in the collection. Ultimately, it is a feeling of elegance, playfulness and pragmatism that is key to Matthew M. Williams’ vision for the house.     There is a notion of evolution, both lighthearted and serious, in this play of elements past and present. From the Tryp-toe shoe and stockings, the Horn-heel and hat together with a further examination of the Antigona bag, each is a play on and development of existing objects in the archive. They are joined by the new unisex Cut-out bag in its many iterations, as well as the G chains, objects that are destined to add to the history of the house and are interspersed throughout. Williams’ signature technical material experimentation is balanced by the traditional, natural and opulent. From the use of a cotton Ottoman for both genders in outerwear, technical taffeta in tailoring and structured Punto di Milano jersey to evoke more pure forms in dressmaking, tradition is respected yet refined and re-contextualised. At the same time, an experiment in different densities of injected foam leads to an evolution of the slide, the ultra-comfortable Marshmallow Slide is the footwear that underpins much of the collection, quite literally providing a casual, insouciant foundation for many of the more formal looks. The study of casual archetypes continues throughout the collection, including new technical coatings of denim in both paint and resin, work that is as labour intensive as the collection’s more traditional embroideries. It is a sign ofWilliams’ Californian sensibility transplanted to Europe that he approaches the two sides with equal aplomb and rigour, both classicism and subversion, with a sense of ease and respect for the humanity of the wearer infusing all.

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