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DIOR PRESENTS THE WINTER 2021-2022 MEN'S COLLECTION
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DIOR PRESENTS THE WINTER 2021-2022 MEN'S COLLECTION

Fashion Week FOR THE WINTER 2021-2022 COLLECTION, KIM JONES CHOSE TO COLLABORATE WITH PETER DOIG, ONE OF THE MOST SINGULAR PAINTERS OF THE LAST THREE DECADES. THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR REINVENTS CEREMONIAL WEAR, A VERITABLE LIVING LINK TO HERITAGE, IN SILHOUETTES INSPIRED BY THE HOUSE’S HAUTE COUTURE SAVOIR-FAIRE AND INFUSED WITH THE BRITISH ARTIST’S BEWITCHING UNIVERSE. HIS PAINTINGS ARE TRANSPOSED ONTO THE PIECES, WHICH MORPH INTO WHITE CANVASES PUNCTUATED WITH VIRTUOSO EMBROIDERY, JACQUARDS AND VIBRANTLY HUED PRINTS. A SERIES OF HATS DESIGNED BY STEPHEN JONES ARE ENHANCED WITH ILLUSTRATIONS PRODUCED BY HAND BY PETER DOIG, EVOKING THE SYMBOLS OF HIS IMAGINATION ALONGSIDE DIOR EMBLEMS. A BOLD CELEBRATION OF THE PASSIONATE, CAPTIVATING DIALOGUE BETWEEN ART AND FASHION. FOR THE WINTER 2021-2022 COLLECTION, KIM JONES CHOSE TO COLLABORATE WITH PETER DOIG, ONE OF THE MOST SINGULAR PAINTERS OF THE LAST THREE DECADES. THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR REINVENTS CEREMONIAL WEAR, A VERITABLE LIVING LINK TO HERITAGE, IN SILHOUETTES INSPIRED BY THE HOUSE’S HAUTE COUTURE SAVOIR-FAIRE AND INFUSED WITH THE BRITISH ARTIST’S BEWITCHING UNIVERSE. HIS PAINTINGS ARE TRANSPOSED ONTO THE PIECES, WHICH MORPH INTO WHITE CANVASES PUNCTUATED WITH VIRTUOSO EMBROIDERY, JACQUARDS AND VIBRANTLY HUED PRINTS. A SERIES OF HATS DESIGNED BY STEPHEN JONES ARE ENHANCED WITH ILLUSTRATIONS PRODUCED BY HAND BY PETER DOIG, EVOKING THE SYMBOLS OF HIS IMAGINATION ALONGSIDE DIOR EMBLEMS. A BOLD CELEBRATION OF THE PASSIONATE, CAPTIVATING DIALOGUE BETWEEN ART AND FASHION.

Dries Van Noten presented his Men's Autumn-Winter 2021-2022 Collection
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Dries Van Noten presented his Men's Autumn-Winter 2021-2022 Collection

Fashion Week   Dressing for our days. A fresh, new-fashioned, take on the familiar. Time-honoured and cherished key elements of the Dries Van Noten wardrobe are designed to subtly heighten their essence and purpose. Emphasis is brought to a tender expression of intimate emotion and feel. The values of sportswear and a formal wardrobe interchange. A study of sensation and the reassurance a garment may offer. Quietly sublimated neutral tones and forms. Feel over effect, function over ornamentation. An abstinence from artifice. Reassuring, unassuming, fun. Whispering precision, purity abstracted, subtly lavish, calm and open, spare, informal, unceremonious, substance with little posture, tactile, fundamental, uncontrived, luxurious, current.     A tonal spectrum. Archetypal neutrals. Muted to fresh, subdued to optimistic, soft to vibrant. Acid and alkaline. Flesh, fawn, plum, gold, mint, sage, pinks, petrol, purple, saffron, ochre, camel, russet, sky, khaki, lemon, coffee. indigo, mustard, dusty pink, coral, anthracite, navy, jet black, cement, ecru, chocolate.     Inspired by traditional tie motifs, a take on scarf prints, zodiac signs, checks, pinstripes revisited, classic shirt stripes, printed denim.     Modern comfort. A play on weight, light, aspect, transparency, touch and even sound. Matt and shine, light reflected. Subtly lavish, Traditional modernity. Washed casual to formal. Ultralight nylon brushed and crisp cottons, distorted poplins, satin, nylon, men’s suiting. Modern and traditional. Twin layer T-shirts. Continued support of traditional mills, fabrics from around the globe.     Soft to sharp structures. Elegant slender volumes contrast with the oversize, ample and easy. Sumptuous. Classic tailoring. Layering and wrapping. Familiar and unassuming. Cropped and elongated. Academic, substantial, long, ease, loose. Slits to sides of formal and casual garments. Cropped ankle lengths. Multi layered and padded to fabrics in a single layer. Pleated high waist trousers can be worn low. Oversize car coats. Trousers from easy and wide to a more strict drainpipe.     Dries Van Noten monogramed metal ring as signature decoration and function. The Dries Van Noten Fat Baby bag for boys now with its padded form inspiring soft structured shoes and sandals. A twist to classic shoes, fusing the spirit of the sporty, rustic, and urbane. Elongated elegant forms are exaggerated and refined. Totes and leather pouches in printed leathers, High-tech moccasins. Nylon back packs sport futuristic prints. Bucket hats in padded nylon. Knit legwarmers seem like boots.     Dressing for our days. A fresh, new-fashioned, take on the familiar. Time-honoured and cherished key elements of the Dries Van Noten wardrobe are designed to subtly heighten their essence and purpose. Emphasis is brought to a tender expression of intimate emotion and feel. The values of sportswear and a formal wardrobe interchange. A study of sensation and the reassurance a garment may offer. Quietly sublimated neutral tones and forms. Feel over effect, function over ornamentation. An abstinence from artifice. Reassuring, unassuming, fun. Whispering precision, purity abstracted, subtly lavish, calm and open, spare, informal, unceremonious, substance with little posture, tactile, fundamental, uncontrived, luxurious, current.     A tonal spectrum. Archetypal neutrals. Muted to fresh, subdued to optimistic, soft to vibrant. Acid and alkaline. Flesh, fawn, plum, gold, mint, sage, pinks, petrol, purple, saffron, ochre, camel, russet, sky, khaki, lemon, coffee. indigo, mustard, dusty pink, coral, anthracite, navy, jet black, cement, ecru, chocolate.     Inspired by traditional tie motifs, a take on scarf prints, zodiac signs, checks, pinstripes revisited, classic shirt stripes, printed denim.     Modern comfort. A play on weight, light, aspect, transparency, touch and even sound. Matt and shine, light reflected. Subtly lavish, Traditional modernity. Washed casual to formal. Ultralight nylon brushed and crisp cottons, distorted poplins, satin, nylon, men’s suiting. Modern and traditional. Twin layer T-shirts. Continued support of traditional mills, fabrics from around the globe.     Soft to sharp structures. Elegant slender volumes contrast with the oversize, ample and easy. Sumptuous. Classic tailoring. Layering and wrapping. Familiar and unassuming. Cropped and elongated. Academic, substantial, long, ease, loose. Slits to sides of formal and casual garments. Cropped ankle lengths. Multi layered and padded to fabrics in a single layer. Pleated high waist trousers can be worn low. Oversize car coats. Trousers from easy and wide to a more strict drainpipe.     Dries Van Noten monogramed metal ring as signature decoration and function. The Dries Van Noten Fat Baby bag for boys now with its padded form inspiring soft structured shoes and sandals. A twist to classic shoes, fusing the spirit of the sporty, rustic, and urbane. Elongated elegant forms are exaggerated and refined. Totes and leather pouches in printed leathers, High-tech moccasins. Nylon back packs sport futuristic prints. Bucket hats in padded nylon. Knit legwarmers seem like boots.  

Valentine's Day with Versace
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Valentine's Day with Versace

Accessories Inspired by love and romance, Versace presents a selection of gifting items that will make your loved one swoon over you for Valentine’s Day. Symbolizing eternal love, the gift selection features timeless designs for men and women. Women’s gifting ideas include new, romantic iterations of the Virtus bag – offered in quilted leather in a pastel palette or precious python skin. Known for her power to entrance with her hypnotic gaze, Medusa represents the power of attraction and the sensation of looking into a loved one’s eyes. The iconic symbol is featured on an array of matching jewelry for him and for her. Crafted from supple leather, a selection of men’s presents is enriched with golden Medusa studs. Imagery complements the enamored mood of the gifting selection. Presents are paired with delicate flowers that symbolize love and affection. Sensual couple portraits are adorned with golden gift accents that further the romantic sentiment. Inspired by love and romance, Versace presents a selection of gifting items that will make your loved one swoon over you for Valentine’s Day. Symbolizing eternal love, the gift selection features timeless designs for men and women. Women’s gifting ideas include new, romantic iterations of the Virtus bag – offered in quilted leather in a pastel palette or precious python skin. Known for her power to entrance with her hypnotic gaze, Medusa represents the power of attraction and the sensation of looking into a loved one’s eyes. The iconic symbol is featured on an array of matching jewelry for him and for her. Crafted from supple leather, a selection of men’s presents is enriched with golden Medusa studs. Imagery complements the enamored mood of the gifting selection. Presents are paired with delicate flowers that symbolize love and affection. Sensual couple portraits are adorned with golden gift accents that further the romantic sentiment.

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Louis Vuitton Men’s collection by Virgil Abloh Fall-Winter 2021
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Louis Vuitton Men’s collection by Virgil Abloh Fall-Winter 2021

Fashion Week “Within my practice, I contribute to a Black canon of culture and art and its preservation. This is why, to preserve my own output, I record it at length.” –Virgil Abloh, A manifesto according to Virgil Abloh, 2020.     What do you want to be when you grow up? As children, our dreamsand aspirations are personi ed by archetypes: the Artist, theSalesman, the Architect, the Drifter. Familiar characters in ev-eryday society, they are inseparably de ned by their uniforms:the dress codes we associate with professions, lifestyles and knowledge. From head to toe, our minds are inherently trained to outline an archetypical wardrobe to help us identify the character of an individual. Often, these characters are tied to societal presumptions of cultural background, gender, and sexuality.     The Louis Vuitton Fall-Winter 2021 Men’s Collection investigates the unconscious biases instilled in our collective psyche by the archaic norms of society. Predetermined perceptions, they imbue our outlooks with manmade myths connected to the genetics of peo- ple, ideas and art. Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh employsfashion as a tool to change those preconceptions: keep the codes,but change the values.     The logic respects Black cultural traditions that use gures of speech (irony, punning, ri ing) to play with or reverse the conno- tations of established codes. These techniques create new meanings and subvert established canons; for example, the way a standardEnglish phrase may have an entirely di erent meaning in Blackvernacular English. Virgil Abloh applies these techniques to his design methodology, imbuing the grammar of recognised archetypeswith di erent genetics.     Informed by James Baldwin’s essay Stranger in the Village from 1953, which deals with the parallels between the author’s experi- ences as an African-American man in a Swiss village and his life in America, the show takes place between locations in Switzerlandand Paris. The frames of the performance revolve around the gu-rative notion of the art heist: the myths spun by society aroundorigin and ownership of art, visual references and those who cre-ate. (See: ‘The Performance Art Piece’.)     The conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner constructs a series of aph-orisms-as-patterns tied to these premises: “YOU CAN TELL A BOOK BYITS COVER”, “THE SAME PLACE AT THE SAME TIME”, “( SOMEWHERE SOME-HOW )”. Throughout garments and accessories, motifs and techniques play on themes of illusion, replicating the familiar through the deceptive lenses of trompe l’oeil and ltrage, and re-appropriat- ing the normal through extreme elevation. It fuels a study of the un-designed: items devoid of artisticownership and exact historical provenance. The physical show in-vitation is embodied by a balsa wood DIY model plane, an eternalsymbol of boyhood devoid of artistic ownership. Who came up with the paper cup? The metal nail? The pencil? It begs the questionof who can claim creation: who gets to make art, and who gets toconsume it. Conceived outside the art sphere, un-designed and es- sentially “normal” items represent a public domain continuously reinvented and claimed by the sector of art.     As a result, normality is accentuated: the slumber we slip intofollowing periods of social unrest. What does normality look like, what does it mean, and who has the optional privilege to embody it? Virgil Abloh brings his established idea of “Tourist vs. Pur-ist” to the forefront: his term for the outsider, who aspirestowards an esoteric domain of knowledge versus the insider, who already occupies it. The collection detects their respective codes in order to defy and unite them.     In a social climate hankering for a new normal that breaks with the archaic structure of society, archetypes become neotypes. Ifan artist doesn’t ful l our predetermined image of an artist, doesit make them any less of an artist? If a reference that originated in the sphere of the Tourist is altered into a new piece of art,can the Purist claim ownership of that reference? If Kente cloth– the fabric of Virgil Abloh’s cultural heritage – is rendered intartan, does that make Kente any less Ghanaian and tartan any less Scottish? Provenance is reality, while ownership is myth: manmadeinventions now ripe for re-invention. “Within my practice, I contribute to a Black canon of culture and art and its preservation. This is why, to preserve my own output, I record it at length.” –Virgil Abloh, A manifesto according to Virgil Abloh, 2020.     What do you want to be when you grow up? As children, our dreamsand aspirations are personi ed by archetypes: the Artist, theSalesman, the Architect, the Drifter. Familiar characters in ev-eryday society, they are inseparably de ned by their uniforms:the dress codes we associate with professions, lifestyles and knowledge. From head to toe, our minds are inherently trained to outline an archetypical wardrobe to help us identify the character of an individual. Often, these characters are tied to societal presumptions of cultural background, gender, and sexuality.     The Louis Vuitton Fall-Winter 2021 Men’s Collection investigates the unconscious biases instilled in our collective psyche by the archaic norms of society. Predetermined perceptions, they imbue our outlooks with manmade myths connected to the genetics of peo- ple, ideas and art. Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh employsfashion as a tool to change those preconceptions: keep the codes,but change the values.     The logic respects Black cultural traditions that use gures of speech (irony, punning, ri ing) to play with or reverse the conno- tations of established codes. These techniques create new meanings and subvert established canons; for example, the way a standardEnglish phrase may have an entirely di erent meaning in Blackvernacular English. Virgil Abloh applies these techniques to his design methodology, imbuing the grammar of recognised archetypeswith di erent genetics.     Informed by James Baldwin’s essay Stranger in the Village from 1953, which deals with the parallels between the author’s experi- ences as an African-American man in a Swiss village and his life in America, the show takes place between locations in Switzerlandand Paris. The frames of the performance revolve around the gu-rative notion of the art heist: the myths spun by society aroundorigin and ownership of art, visual references and those who cre-ate. (See: ‘The Performance Art Piece’.)     The conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner constructs a series of aph-orisms-as-patterns tied to these premises: “YOU CAN TELL A BOOK BYITS COVER”, “THE SAME PLACE AT THE SAME TIME”, “( SOMEWHERE SOME-HOW )”. Throughout garments and accessories, motifs and techniques play on themes of illusion, replicating the familiar through the deceptive lenses of trompe l’oeil and ltrage, and re-appropriat- ing the normal through extreme elevation. It fuels a study of the un-designed: items devoid of artisticownership and exact historical provenance. The physical show in-vitation is embodied by a balsa wood DIY model plane, an eternalsymbol of boyhood devoid of artistic ownership. Who came up with the paper cup? The metal nail? The pencil? It begs the questionof who can claim creation: who gets to make art, and who gets toconsume it. Conceived outside the art sphere, un-designed and es- sentially “normal” items represent a public domain continuously reinvented and claimed by the sector of art.     As a result, normality is accentuated: the slumber we slip intofollowing periods of social unrest. What does normality look like, what does it mean, and who has the optional privilege to embody it? Virgil Abloh brings his established idea of “Tourist vs. Pur-ist” to the forefront: his term for the outsider, who aspirestowards an esoteric domain of knowledge versus the insider, who already occupies it. The collection detects their respective codes in order to defy and unite them.     In a social climate hankering for a new normal that breaks with the archaic structure of society, archetypes become neotypes. Ifan artist doesn’t ful l our predetermined image of an artist, doesit make them any less of an artist? If a reference that originated in the sphere of the Tourist is altered into a new piece of art,can the Purist claim ownership of that reference? If Kente cloth– the fabric of Virgil Abloh’s cultural heritage – is rendered intartan, does that make Kente any less Ghanaian and tartan any less Scottish? Provenance is reality, while ownership is myth: manmadeinventions now ripe for re-invention.

C.P. COMPANY CINQUANTA CELEBRATING THE ORIGIN OF SPORTSWEAR
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C.P. COMPANY CINQUANTA CELEBRATING THE ORIGIN OF SPORTSWEAR

Fashion Since its foundation in 1971, C.P. Company has been propelled by the same values and elements that are still integral to the brand today whilst creating a fine balance between craftsmanship and textile technology. Today, 50 years later, C.P. Company is ready to celebrate the origins of sportswear as we know it, through an intense program of authentic collaborations, community driven activities and respectful homages to five decades of human innovation.     Throughout 2021 C.P. Company will release a special item every month, in collaboration with other brands or developed internally. Each product will represent a part of brand's DNA and a step in the development of Italian sportswear, the entirely new genre of clothing, pioneered by the brand. The final result will be a complete wardrobe, an intimate furnishing that will include not only clothing but memories, mementos, toys, books and posters, to frame the narrative of C.P. Company’s 50th anniversary. Symbol of the celebration is a flag made of C.P. Company iconic fabrics all sewn together and garment dyed as a unique piece of cloth. The flag holds the brand's main pillars: the expertise in fabric technical research and the dyeing techniques development.     https://50.cpcompany.com/en/ Since its foundation in 1971, C.P. Company has been propelled by the same values and elements that are still integral to the brand today whilst creating a fine balance between craftsmanship and textile technology. Today, 50 years later, C.P. Company is ready to celebrate the origins of sportswear as we know it, through an intense program of authentic collaborations, community driven activities and respectful homages to five decades of human innovation.     Throughout 2021 C.P. Company will release a special item every month, in collaboration with other brands or developed internally. Each product will represent a part of brand's DNA and a step in the development of Italian sportswear, the entirely new genre of clothing, pioneered by the brand. The final result will be a complete wardrobe, an intimate furnishing that will include not only clothing but memories, mementos, toys, books and posters, to frame the narrative of C.P. Company’s 50th anniversary. Symbol of the celebration is a flag made of C.P. Company iconic fabrics all sewn together and garment dyed as a unique piece of cloth. The flag holds the brand's main pillars: the expertise in fabric technical research and the dyeing techniques development.     https://50.cpcompany.com/en/

 ETRO LAUNCHES #ETROBYYOU: THE EXCLUSIVE CUSTOMIZATION SERVICE TOLD TRHOUGH THE #CARAVANOFLOVE CAMPAIGN
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ETRO LAUNCHES #ETROBYYOU: THE EXCLUSIVE CUSTOMIZATION SERVICE TOLD TRHOUGH THE #CARAVANOFLOVE CAMPAIGN

Fashion In occasion of Valentine's Day, ETRO launches a new customization service, available in store and online, dedicated to a selection of its signature Paisley accessories.     A unique gift, to be embroidered with one's initials in eight different colors: the selection, crafted in the iconic Paisley jacquard canvas, includes bags, backpacks, RSVP clutches, beauty cases, toiletry and travel bags. The #EtroByYou customizable products enhance the free and relaxed journey of the new #CaravanOfLove campaign, carried out on a Paisley printed van by an extended family symbolizing the haute-hippy aesthetic and the eclectic spirit of the brand. The three young couples starring in the video follow the path of color, creativity and sharing, becoming symbol of a pure and universal Love, which for ETRO represents the true great beauty of the world.     The new customization service is now available at ETRO boutiques and on etro.com. In occasion of Valentine's Day, ETRO launches a new customization service, available in store and online, dedicated to a selection of its signature Paisley accessories.     A unique gift, to be embroidered with one's initials in eight different colors: the selection, crafted in the iconic Paisley jacquard canvas, includes bags, backpacks, RSVP clutches, beauty cases, toiletry and travel bags. The #EtroByYou customizable products enhance the free and relaxed journey of the new #CaravanOfLove campaign, carried out on a Paisley printed van by an extended family symbolizing the haute-hippy aesthetic and the eclectic spirit of the brand. The three young couples starring in the video follow the path of color, creativity and sharing, becoming symbol of a pure and universal Love, which for ETRO represents the true great beauty of the world.     The new customization service is now available at ETRO boutiques and on etro.com.

Daily Paper Presents Spring/Summer 2021 Collection: Future Roots
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Daily Paper Presents Spring/Summer 2021 Collection: Future Roots

Fashion Daily Paper presents their Spring/Summer 2021 collection Future Roots as they release their second drop of Spring ready silhouettes and colorways. This season Daily Paper explores ancient wisdom and traditions of pre-colonial civilisations alongside the creativity and innovation of post-colonial activist movements. Looking at the past with reverence and humility; to the present with critical wit; and to the future with an empowered optimism, Daily Paper hopes to inspire and educate the current generation to realise their potential to create diverse new identities for tomorrow.     Custom Branded Lace:   The foundation of the collection is the revival of histories and the memories of the past through a modern lens which is particularly well demonstrated in the choice of fabrics for this season. Extensive research into the origin stories of various African textiles is reinterpreted through satin scarf attachments, tailored staples, dart-waisted dresses and voluminous shirting that is cut from a custom branded white cotton broderie anglaise. The lace is embroidered with empty portrait frames, acknowledging the heroes of the past for your own interpretation that paved the way for the future to come. This season's colors include pastel turquoise, lilac and yellow, soft beige and brown, bright green and different shades of whites for an elevated Spring/Summer wardrobe.       Credits : Photography: David Nana Opoku Ansah  Creative and Art Direction: Florian Joahn  Styling: Edem Dossou Styling Assistant: Mohammed Blakk  Make Up: Elizabeth Boateng  Talents (left to right): Seth Bedzo and  Erza Tamaa     Brown Jacquard and Nostalgic Elements:   A further sense of heritage is conveyed in a newly- introduced monogram print of the Daily Paper shield, which is used on brown satin jacquard two-pieces. Elsewhere, blazers, flared trousers and pleated skirts in school- uniform-inspired checks is a nod to the student style and classrooms of the 60s and 70s where the activist mindsets were developed. With it’s nostalgic elements and historical references, the collection’s message rings clear: our future roots will always draw their power from the past.      Daily Paper presents their Spring/Summer 2021 collection Future Roots as they release their second drop of Spring ready silhouettes and colorways. This season Daily Paper explores ancient wisdom and traditions of pre-colonial civilisations alongside the creativity and innovation of post-colonial activist movements. Looking at the past with reverence and humility; to the present with critical wit; and to the future with an empowered optimism, Daily Paper hopes to inspire and educate the current generation to realise their potential to create diverse new identities for tomorrow.     Custom Branded Lace:   The foundation of the collection is the revival of histories and the memories of the past through a modern lens which is particularly well demonstrated in the choice of fabrics for this season. Extensive research into the origin stories of various African textiles is reinterpreted through satin scarf attachments, tailored staples, dart-waisted dresses and voluminous shirting that is cut from a custom branded white cotton broderie anglaise. The lace is embroidered with empty portrait frames, acknowledging the heroes of the past for your own interpretation that paved the way for the future to come. This season's colors include pastel turquoise, lilac and yellow, soft beige and brown, bright green and different shades of whites for an elevated Spring/Summer wardrobe.       Credits : Photography: David Nana Opoku Ansah  Creative and Art Direction: Florian Joahn  Styling: Edem Dossou Styling Assistant: Mohammed Blakk  Make Up: Elizabeth Boateng  Talents (left to right): Seth Bedzo and  Erza Tamaa     Brown Jacquard and Nostalgic Elements:   A further sense of heritage is conveyed in a newly- introduced monogram print of the Daily Paper shield, which is used on brown satin jacquard two-pieces. Elsewhere, blazers, flared trousers and pleated skirts in school- uniform-inspired checks is a nod to the student style and classrooms of the 60s and 70s where the activist mindsets were developed. With it’s nostalgic elements and historical references, the collection’s message rings clear: our future roots will always draw their power from the past.     

Sakeema In “The Candidate” - A Story By Betsy Johnson
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Sakeema In “The Candidate” - A Story By Betsy Johnson

Fashion "I wanted to portray Sakeema through a political lens to push people's spectrum of people they view in politics and release on the US election inauguration; a highly political time, regardless of result to get people thinking and hear Sakeema's words alongside the images. It is titled “SAKEEMA in "THE CANDIDATE”  the shoot references mostly to UK Thatcher era political imagery we see her through a fashion lens; a commentary on an ideal political landscape. Are we moving fast enough as a society? The political field and experience is much a sphere for upper class career politicians and business moguls and often excludes the people who really experience the policies discussed. One of the most inspiring things Sakeema ever said to me was as Women it is so important to occupy space especially in moments when the world would like otherwise. This shoot is a visual manifestation of that."  - Betsy Johnson       CREDITS:   Sakeema In “The Candidate” - A Story By Betsy Johnson @Sakeemathecrook   Director, Fashion Stylist - Betsy Johnson @Betsyjohnson_ Photography - Luke Abby @Lukeabby Post Production And Graphic Design Betsy Johnson_ Hair Direction - Charlie Le Mindu @Charlielemindu Makeup - Mona Leanne @Monaleannemakeup Hair Stylist - Alastair Jubbs @Mrjubbs Creative Assistant - Billie O’Neill Queenan @Billieoneillqueenan Fashion Assistant - Jadzia Scott @Jadziascott_ "I wanted to portray Sakeema through a political lens to push people's spectrum of people they view in politics and release on the US election inauguration; a highly political time, regardless of result to get people thinking and hear Sakeema's words alongside the images. It is titled “SAKEEMA in "THE CANDIDATE”  the shoot references mostly to UK Thatcher era political imagery we see her through a fashion lens; a commentary on an ideal political landscape. Are we moving fast enough as a society? The political field and experience is much a sphere for upper class career politicians and business moguls and often excludes the people who really experience the policies discussed. One of the most inspiring things Sakeema ever said to me was as Women it is so important to occupy space especially in moments when the world would like otherwise. This shoot is a visual manifestation of that."  - Betsy Johnson       CREDITS:   Sakeema In “The Candidate” - A Story By Betsy Johnson @Sakeemathecrook   Director, Fashion Stylist - Betsy Johnson @Betsyjohnson_ Photography - Luke Abby @Lukeabby Post Production And Graphic Design Betsy Johnson_ Hair Direction - Charlie Le Mindu @Charlielemindu Makeup - Mona Leanne @Monaleannemakeup Hair Stylist - Alastair Jubbs @Mrjubbs Creative Assistant - Billie O’Neill Queenan @Billieoneillqueenan Fashion Assistant - Jadzia Scott @Jadziascott_

Louis Vuitton presents XS Handbags
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Louis Vuitton presents XS Handbags

Men   This season’s new pattern, the Damier motif is revamped, stretched, mirrored within the black and white checks inspired by Ska, a musical movement that originated in Jamaica in the 50s before becoming all the rage in England. Against a black and white background, the LV logo proudly displays its sa ron shade, like a nod to the brand’s distinctive colours.     As a final touch, the little animals created by Virgil Abloh and his team are tied here and there to the models: Zoooom and its friends – optimistic, mischievous creatures – show up on these miniature versions of the Keepall or Steamer, in a three-dimension knitted version or as embroidered badges on the canvas, making every handbag a unique piece with a distinctive character.   This season’s new pattern, the Damier motif is revamped, stretched, mirrored within the black and white checks inspired by Ska, a musical movement that originated in Jamaica in the 50s before becoming all the rage in England. Against a black and white background, the LV logo proudly displays its sa ron shade, like a nod to the brand’s distinctive colours.     As a final touch, the little animals created by Virgil Abloh and his team are tied here and there to the models: Zoooom and its friends – optimistic, mischievous creatures – show up on these miniature versions of the Keepall or Steamer, in a three-dimension knitted version or as embroidered badges on the canvas, making every handbag a unique piece with a distinctive character.

SAINT LAURENT PRESENTS THEIR NEW MEN'S CAMPAIGN FOR SPRING & SUMMER
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SAINT LAURENT PRESENTS THEIR NEW MEN'S CAMPAIGN FOR SPRING & SUMMER

Men SAINT LAURENT MEN’S SPRING SUMMER 21 #YSL37 BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO Art Direction : Anthony Vaccarello Director : David Sims   #YSL #SaintLaurent #YvesSaintLaurent @anthonyvaccarello @davidsimsofficial SAINT LAURENT MEN’S SPRING SUMMER 21 #YSL37 BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO Art Direction : Anthony Vaccarello Director : David Sims   #YSL #SaintLaurent #YvesSaintLaurent @anthonyvaccarello @davidsimsofficial

VIC MENSA IS OUR NEXT DIGITAL COVER STAR
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VIC MENSA IS OUR NEXT DIGITAL COVER STAR

Music The African in America is an over the shoulder watcher   a look 4-ways before he cross the street-er   She is a barked command curver   curvy unapologetic hip switcher   He is a long-lost homeland forgetter    amnesiac pain burying law breaker    She is a louisiana gumbo cooker    houseless street walking home maker   The African in America is a stolen jewel, a grave robbed masterwork    beckoning to a past unknown   As we spill our blood in attempts to wash our hands clean of the scars and calluses accumulated from carrying America’s secrets, generation after generation of displaced Africans have radically envisioned Exodus. From Marcus Garvey to Sun Ra to Bob Marley, the innate longing to return has magnetically pulled Black people away from the tainted soil of our Lands of the free, often through the medium of artistic imagination. In our brush strokes, our rhythms and our silhouettes we have retained a cultural identity so intrinsically unbreakable that even we, at times, have been ignorant to its origins. I placed myself in a street scene in Ghana wearing Telfar beneath a sign reading Dignity & Respect as cultural acknowledgement of the synergy between the brand, my identity and the birthplace of my father. Telfar’s impact on the zeitgeist is undeniably African (unsurprising given his Liberian heritage), as well as unapologetically Black, Queer and non-conformist. It is worth noting that a utopian view of Africa eschews reality, and many of the oppressive constructs of American society are also deeply entrenched in the continent; homophobia, misogyny & neocolonialism to name a few. Yet, I believe, visualizing ourselves and our art within the context of our native heritage enables us to inject our ideals and our dreams of freedom into the imperfect present day iteration of the closest thing we know to liberation.    This summer as 47th Street bellowed in flames and Chicago’s Black Belt was once again engulfed in the rage of a caged people, images of Bronzeville’s historic past flashed through my mind like fuzzy white lightning, a beautiful illustration across a tormented sky. Desperation from a world-stopping pandemic, multiplied by traumatizing images of white supremacist terrorism created the conditions of a perfect storm, and widespread looting and rioting ravaged the South Side, where 95% of the population is Black but less than 10% of the business are Black owned. The historical precedent is there, and many of the remnants of the 1968 riots in the wake of Dr. King’s assassination still litter the streets; boarded up, decrepit buildings that look more like a war-torn third world country than America’s third largest city. And yet, things were not always this way. I’ve always marveled over the images of the bustling corners of 47th street, once the epicenter of a community known as the Black Metropolis. One of the most famous images is a black and white photograph of a group of young boys perched on the hood of a 1940’s automobile, dressed impeccably in their Easter best and poised with a regal confidence, if not a haunting dissociation in their eyes, as if they could foresee the troubled times to come. I placed myself at their helm, imagining myself leading a reversed funeral procession to a future where the streets of the Low End clamored not with gunshots and homelessness, but with enterprise and ownership.    Separate but equal; one of America’s many last ditch attempts to maintain her legal stranglehold on the so-called sons of Job in the aftermath of her bitter loss of traditional chattel slavery. Of course we are aware that slavery was never truly abolished, but rather redirected into mass incarceration through the final sentence of the 13th Amendment, however, in the first half of the 20th century the societal chains were far more blatantly visible than they may be now, at least to the naked eye. It is within the very shackles of this social bondage that the predecessors of our current movements learned to thrive, to innovate and to resist. One such figure is Sister Rosetta Tharpe, the lesser known Black musician often credited as the “Godmother of Rock & Roll”, and one of the primary inspirations for my friend Kerby Jean Raymond’s Pyer Moss Collection 3. We imposed an image of me wearing Pyer Moss while drinking from a White Only water fountain to represent both the adversities our forebears overcame to shape the world as we know it, as well as the radical significance of our existence as artists on the highest levels of hierarchies not intended for us.  - VIC MENSA     Team credits: talent: Vic Mensa photography: Ray's Corrupted Mind stylist: Donte Mcguine editor: Timotej Letonja   The African in America is an over the shoulder watcher   a look 4-ways before he cross the street-er   She is a barked command curver   curvy unapologetic hip switcher   He is a long-lost homeland forgetter    amnesiac pain burying law breaker    She is a louisiana gumbo cooker    houseless street walking home maker   The African in America is a stolen jewel, a grave robbed masterwork    beckoning to a past unknown   As we spill our blood in attempts to wash our hands clean of the scars and calluses accumulated from carrying America’s secrets, generation after generation of displaced Africans have radically envisioned Exodus. From Marcus Garvey to Sun Ra to Bob Marley, the innate longing to return has magnetically pulled Black people away from the tainted soil of our Lands of the free, often through the medium of artistic imagination. In our brush strokes, our rhythms and our silhouettes we have retained a cultural identity so intrinsically unbreakable that even we, at times, have been ignorant to its origins. I placed myself in a street scene in Ghana wearing Telfar beneath a sign reading Dignity & Respect as cultural acknowledgement of the synergy between the brand, my identity and the birthplace of my father. Telfar’s impact on the zeitgeist is undeniably African (unsurprising given his Liberian heritage), as well as unapologetically Black, Queer and non-conformist. It is worth noting that a utopian view of Africa eschews reality, and many of the oppressive constructs of American society are also deeply entrenched in the continent; homophobia, misogyny & neocolonialism to name a few. Yet, I believe, visualizing ourselves and our art within the context of our native heritage enables us to inject our ideals and our dreams of freedom into the imperfect present day iteration of the closest thing we know to liberation.    This summer as 47th Street bellowed in flames and Chicago’s Black Belt was once again engulfed in the rage of a caged people, images of Bronzeville’s historic past flashed through my mind like fuzzy white lightning, a beautiful illustration across a tormented sky. Desperation from a world-stopping pandemic, multiplied by traumatizing images of white supremacist terrorism created the conditions of a perfect storm, and widespread looting and rioting ravaged the South Side, where 95% of the population is Black but less than 10% of the business are Black owned. The historical precedent is there, and many of the remnants of the 1968 riots in the wake of Dr. King’s assassination still litter the streets; boarded up, decrepit buildings that look more like a war-torn third world country than America’s third largest city. And yet, things were not always this way. I’ve always marveled over the images of the bustling corners of 47th street, once the epicenter of a community known as the Black Metropolis. One of the most famous images is a black and white photograph of a group of young boys perched on the hood of a 1940’s automobile, dressed impeccably in their Easter best and poised with a regal confidence, if not a haunting dissociation in their eyes, as if they could foresee the troubled times to come. I placed myself at their helm, imagining myself leading a reversed funeral procession to a future where the streets of the Low End clamored not with gunshots and homelessness, but with enterprise and ownership.    Separate but equal; one of America’s many last ditch attempts to maintain her legal stranglehold on the so-called sons of Job in the aftermath of her bitter loss of traditional chattel slavery. Of course we are aware that slavery was never truly abolished, but rather redirected into mass incarceration through the final sentence of the 13th Amendment, however, in the first half of the 20th century the societal chains were far more blatantly visible than they may be now, at least to the naked eye. It is within the very shackles of this social bondage that the predecessors of our current movements learned to thrive, to innovate and to resist. One such figure is Sister Rosetta Tharpe, the lesser known Black musician often credited as the “Godmother of Rock & Roll”, and one of the primary inspirations for my friend Kerby Jean Raymond’s Pyer Moss Collection 3. We imposed an image of me wearing Pyer Moss while drinking from a White Only water fountain to represent both the adversities our forebears overcame to shape the world as we know it, as well as the radical significance of our existence as artists on the highest levels of hierarchies not intended for us.  - VIC MENSA     Team credits: talent: Vic Mensa photography: Ray's Corrupted Mind stylist: Donte Mcguine editor: Timotej Letonja  

Valentine’s Day campaign Savage X Fenty features Rihanna, Miguel, Nazanin Mandi, Alek Wek, Chinqpink and Lulu Bonfils
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Valentine’s Day campaign Savage X Fenty features Rihanna, Miguel, Nazanin Mandi, Alek Wek, Chinqpink and Lulu Bonfils

Fashion Savage X Fenty is excited to announce the launch of the Valentine’s Day collection. The highly anticipated drop features 4 playful collections – Candy Hearts, Seamless Fishnet, Linking Hearts and the latest additions to men’s underwear and sleepwear styles – so whether this Valentine’s Day is for you, for bae or for play, Savage X has something for every mood.     With sheer dotted mesh, ruby red lace, satin lace-up ties & open-back styles, the new Candy Hearts collection is red hot. Cheeky candy heart-shaped messages bring a playful and sassy attitude a collection that is a naughty as it is sweet. Dare to bare in the curve hugging Valentine’s Seamless Fishnet mock neck slip in black caviar and goji berry red. No matter what V-Day looks you pair them with, the Linking Hearts Embroidery styles are the perfect match with an unlined balconette bra, garter belt and g-string.     Building on the launch of men’s underwear and sleepwear styles last year, this newest assortment of styles continues to push the boundaries of individuality with versatile pieces that can be worn by every-BODY. Designed to be layered or worn as separates, the latest additions include an oversized satin sleep smoking jacket and matching boxer in the iconic Savage X lavender color, a satin sleep smoking jacket in solid black caviar, satin boxer in solid goji berry red, and woven boxers in monogram prints.     Shot by Dennis Leupold, the Valentine’s Day campaign features Miguel, Nazanin Mandi, Alek Wek, Chinqpink and Lulu Bonfils.     With sizes from 32A – 42DD and XS – 3X, customers can shop the collection at Savage X Fenty Prices for the Valentine’s Day collection range from $12.95 - $79.95.     #SAVAGEXFENTY #XXSAVAGEX   Savage X Fenty is excited to announce the launch of the Valentine’s Day collection. The highly anticipated drop features 4 playful collections – Candy Hearts, Seamless Fishnet, Linking Hearts and the latest additions to men’s underwear and sleepwear styles – so whether this Valentine’s Day is for you, for bae or for play, Savage X has something for every mood.     With sheer dotted mesh, ruby red lace, satin lace-up ties & open-back styles, the new Candy Hearts collection is red hot. Cheeky candy heart-shaped messages bring a playful and sassy attitude a collection that is a naughty as it is sweet. Dare to bare in the curve hugging Valentine’s Seamless Fishnet mock neck slip in black caviar and goji berry red. No matter what V-Day looks you pair them with, the Linking Hearts Embroidery styles are the perfect match with an unlined balconette bra, garter belt and g-string.     Building on the launch of men’s underwear and sleepwear styles last year, this newest assortment of styles continues to push the boundaries of individuality with versatile pieces that can be worn by every-BODY. Designed to be layered or worn as separates, the latest additions include an oversized satin sleep smoking jacket and matching boxer in the iconic Savage X lavender color, a satin sleep smoking jacket in solid black caviar, satin boxer in solid goji berry red, and woven boxers in monogram prints.     Shot by Dennis Leupold, the Valentine’s Day campaign features Miguel, Nazanin Mandi, Alek Wek, Chinqpink and Lulu Bonfils.     With sizes from 32A – 42DD and XS – 3X, customers can shop the collection at Savage X Fenty Prices for the Valentine’s Day collection range from $12.95 - $79.95.     #SAVAGEXFENTY #XXSAVAGEX  

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