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HUGO BOSS names Chris Hemsworth first global brand ambassador for BOSS
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HUGO BOSS names Chris Hemsworth first global brand ambassador for BOSS

Men Starting this year, actor Chris Hemsworth, best known for his role as Thor, will be the first Hollywood star to be appointed new global brand ambassador for BOSS. In this role, he will be the international BOSS face of the worldwide fashion campaigns planned for 2021 and 2022. Hemsworth has already been collaborating with HUGO BOSS on the iconic BOSS Bottled scent since 2017. By expanding this partnership, the Group is ensuring a globally consistent BOSS brand image that will bridge various product groups. The generated synergies will also further enhance the brand's appeal.     "I've been a huge BOSS fan for a long time, so I'm really happy to now represent the brand's collections as global ambassador.  Our partnership over the past few years has been absolutely brilliant. I’m very excited to be working more closely with the BOSS team," said Chris Hemsworth.     Yves Müller, Managing Board Spokesman at HUGO BOSS AG, stated, "We are proud that, in Chris, we have been able to secure a world-class star who is a perfect fit for our BOSS brand.  He embodies a contemporary take of success and masculinity. Chris perfectly exemplifies the modern man of today: self-confident, authentic and approachable. His global fame will further augment the BOSS brand's desirability going forward."     With the appointment of Chris Hemsworth – a passionate surfer who epitomizes a well-balanced lifestyle – the Group is taking another step in its casualization process of the BOSS brand. This will also be reflected in the direction the new campaign will take.     In addition to his career as an actor, Chris Hemsworth is a dedicated environmentalist, and strategically leverages his popularity to draw attention to climate change and species protection.  More than 45 million followers on Instagram demonstrate that he has become a role model for younger generations. The first campaign featuring Chris Hemsworth will begin in spring 2021. The partnership will also see the launch of a joint BOSS capsule collection with a sustainability focus.  With this collection, HUGO BOSS underlines its leading role as a sustainable company within the textile industry. Starting this year, actor Chris Hemsworth, best known for his role as Thor, will be the first Hollywood star to be appointed new global brand ambassador for BOSS. In this role, he will be the international BOSS face of the worldwide fashion campaigns planned for 2021 and 2022. Hemsworth has already been collaborating with HUGO BOSS on the iconic BOSS Bottled scent since 2017. By expanding this partnership, the Group is ensuring a globally consistent BOSS brand image that will bridge various product groups. The generated synergies will also further enhance the brand's appeal.     "I've been a huge BOSS fan for a long time, so I'm really happy to now represent the brand's collections as global ambassador.  Our partnership over the past few years has been absolutely brilliant. I’m very excited to be working more closely with the BOSS team," said Chris Hemsworth.     Yves Müller, Managing Board Spokesman at HUGO BOSS AG, stated, "We are proud that, in Chris, we have been able to secure a world-class star who is a perfect fit for our BOSS brand.  He embodies a contemporary take of success and masculinity. Chris perfectly exemplifies the modern man of today: self-confident, authentic and approachable. His global fame will further augment the BOSS brand's desirability going forward."     With the appointment of Chris Hemsworth – a passionate surfer who epitomizes a well-balanced lifestyle – the Group is taking another step in its casualization process of the BOSS brand. This will also be reflected in the direction the new campaign will take.     In addition to his career as an actor, Chris Hemsworth is a dedicated environmentalist, and strategically leverages his popularity to draw attention to climate change and species protection.  More than 45 million followers on Instagram demonstrate that he has become a role model for younger generations. The first campaign featuring Chris Hemsworth will begin in spring 2021. The partnership will also see the launch of a joint BOSS capsule collection with a sustainability focus.  With this collection, HUGO BOSS underlines its leading role as a sustainable company within the textile industry.

 VALENTINE'S DAY, THE BVLGARI WAY
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VALENTINE'S DAY, THE BVLGARI WAY

Accessories Your dreams, brought to life with love. This year, Bvlgari indulges the fantasy and electricity of Valentine's Day with signature Roman style. Inspiring us all to give in to dreams and take a chance on love, the Italian Maison extends its exuberant spirit and daring creativity to the most romantic holiday of the year. It is a natural fit, because true love — like Bvlgari design — breaks all the rules.     Capturing the purest of emotions and coursing with that Roman passion for life, Bvlgari Valentine's Day gifts are as striking as love itself. From breath-taking jewels to iconic timepieces, stunning bags, accessories and other irresistible charms, each creation celebrates love with an unapologetic spirit and audacious touch. These are pieces to fall for, again and again.     The force behind Bvlgari's unbridled passion? A single wish: to create gorgeous, unforgettable, joy-filled moments for you and your love.     Your dreams, brought to life with love. This year, Bvlgari indulges the fantasy and electricity of Valentine's Day with signature Roman style. Inspiring us all to give in to dreams and take a chance on love, the Italian Maison extends its exuberant spirit and daring creativity to the most romantic holiday of the year. It is a natural fit, because true love — like Bvlgari design — breaks all the rules.     Capturing the purest of emotions and coursing with that Roman passion for life, Bvlgari Valentine's Day gifts are as striking as love itself. From breath-taking jewels to iconic timepieces, stunning bags, accessories and other irresistible charms, each creation celebrates love with an unapologetic spirit and audacious touch. These are pieces to fall for, again and again.     The force behind Bvlgari's unbridled passion? A single wish: to create gorgeous, unforgettable, joy-filled moments for you and your love.    

BOSS LAUNCHES SPRING/SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION AND CAMPAIGN
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BOSS LAUNCHES SPRING/SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION AND CAMPAIGN

Fashion Creativity, optimism and energy are the watchwords of Spring/Summer 2021 for BOSS. An international cast of up-and-coming talent, led by South Sudanese supermodel Adut Akech, introduces the new collection in a bold campaign directed by Fabien Baron.     Fusing elegance and ease, the looks are more relaxed than ever before. The work of artist William Farr, who combines flowers with found objects such as wire, is a rich point of reference, inspiring the use of metal eyelets throughout the collection. For men, the new season offers agenda-setting updates of classic BOSS pieces.   Graphic patterns combined with new shapes, such as in the combination of a check jacket with tracksuit-style pants. The result? A relaxed, easy-wear outfit that is every bit as elegant as a suit. The sophisticated use of stripes, camouflage and a bold logo graphic across knitwear, sweaters and outerwear underlines the contemporary mood.     Colours range from conker, a masculine red-brown first seen on the FW20 runway, to fresh blue and yellow tones. A selection of updated neutrals, including a rich camel brown and crisp off-white, round out the palette. Worn in combination, the shades infuse each look with an uplifting and dynamic feel.     For women, the collection has a sense of the playful, yet retains the precision and sharpness that defines the BOSS aesthetic. The relaxed mood is evident here too, with elegantly draped fabrics and loose fits providing a contemporary take on femininity. New combinations, such as sharp outerwear worn with track pants, or tailoring with a logo sweatshirt, are both confident and contemporary.     Colours echo those in the men’s collection, with a particular emphasis on zesty yellow and timeless black. Patterns are a key feature here too, while the use of metal elements references William Farr’s juxtaposition of the natural and industrial, and reveals the power of contrasts.   Creativity, optimism and energy are the watchwords of Spring/Summer 2021 for BOSS. An international cast of up-and-coming talent, led by South Sudanese supermodel Adut Akech, introduces the new collection in a bold campaign directed by Fabien Baron.     Fusing elegance and ease, the looks are more relaxed than ever before. The work of artist William Farr, who combines flowers with found objects such as wire, is a rich point of reference, inspiring the use of metal eyelets throughout the collection. For men, the new season offers agenda-setting updates of classic BOSS pieces.   Graphic patterns combined with new shapes, such as in the combination of a check jacket with tracksuit-style pants. The result? A relaxed, easy-wear outfit that is every bit as elegant as a suit. The sophisticated use of stripes, camouflage and a bold logo graphic across knitwear, sweaters and outerwear underlines the contemporary mood.     Colours range from conker, a masculine red-brown first seen on the FW20 runway, to fresh blue and yellow tones. A selection of updated neutrals, including a rich camel brown and crisp off-white, round out the palette. Worn in combination, the shades infuse each look with an uplifting and dynamic feel.     For women, the collection has a sense of the playful, yet retains the precision and sharpness that defines the BOSS aesthetic. The relaxed mood is evident here too, with elegantly draped fabrics and loose fits providing a contemporary take on femininity. New combinations, such as sharp outerwear worn with track pants, or tailoring with a logo sweatshirt, are both confident and contemporary.     Colours echo those in the men’s collection, with a particular emphasis on zesty yellow and timeless black. Patterns are a key feature here too, while the use of metal elements references William Farr’s juxtaposition of the natural and industrial, and reveals the power of contrasts.  

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TOMMY HILFIGER PRESENTS FASHION FRONTIER CHALLENGE PROGRAM
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TOMMY HILFIGER PRESENTS FASHION FRONTIER CHALLENGE PROGRAM

Fashion Tommy Hilfiger, is accepting applications for the third edition of the Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge from today through March 8. The global program aims to support entrepreneurial start-up and scale-up stage businesses that develop solutions that make a positive social impact on the fashion landscape.     Since its start in 2018, the Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge has awarded 350,000 euros to entrepreneurs. Building upon Hilfiger’s sustainability platform to Waste Nothing and Welcome All, the third edition of the program aims to amplify and support Black, Indigenous and people of color entrepreneurs who are working to advance their communities and foster a more inclusive future of fashion.     For the first time, consumers are also invited to get involved and help judge submissions.     “The Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge puts a spotlight on entrepreneurs putting their heart and soul into making a positive social impact in our industry,” Tommy Hilfiger said. “This year, we want to showcase an even more diverse range of perspectives, ideas and communities by supporting BIPOC entrepreneurs. We have a responsibility to drive change across the fashion landscape, and I am honored to further our commitment to inclusivity and equal representation through the upcoming Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge.”     Interested businesses are invited to submit project proposals that focus on creating a more inclusive fashion value chain. Applicants will be narrowed down to six finalists in the fall, who will be invited to develop their project plans virtually with the support of dedicated Hilfiger and external subject matter experts. Finalists, who will get training from an experienced pitch coach, will present their final concept to a jury panel and associate audience at the global Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge final event to be held in early 2022.     Consumer judges will be asked to narrow down finalists from 200 to 50, with each being sent at least four applications to judge via the brand’s online microsite. Applications to become a consumer judge and to apply can be made through responsibility.pvh.com/tommy/fashion-frontier-challenge.     This year’s program prizes have been increased from previous years. A total of 200,000 euros will be awarded between winners. There is also an opportunity for an additional 15,000 euros prize for winning the “Audience Favorite Vote.” Prizes also include a yearlong mentorship with global Hilfiger internal experts, a place on the INSEAD Social Entrepreneurship Program and a yearlong INSEAD mentorship.     “While the fashion industry has taken positive steps toward becoming more inclusive and diverse, there is still more to be done,” said Martijn Hagman, chief executive officer of Tommy Hilfiger Global. “Through the Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge, we are furthering our commitment toward representation and diversity and helping drive the changes we most want, and need, to see.”     Last February, Hilfiger chose Apon Wellbeing and A Beautiful Mess as winners of the 2019 Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge, as reported. Apon Wellbeing, founded by Saif Rashid, was awarded 75,000 euros. The Bangladesh-based scale-up opens fair-priced shops carrying daily necessities inside factories, with products offered at a 10 percent discount to external prices and a points program that workers collect for free health insurance and health services.     Dutch start-up A Beautiful Mess was also awarded 75,000 euros. The business runs a creative space to assist refugees in helping to achieve social and economic independence by creating sustainable apparel products.     A third start-up, Sudara, was selected as the “Audience Favorite Vote,” and was awarded 10,000 euros. Based in India and the U.S., Sudara is a scale-up pajama and loungewear company that develops professional and sewing skills in women who have escaped from or are at high risk of being sex-trafficked.   Tommy Hilfiger, is accepting applications for the third edition of the Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge from today through March 8. The global program aims to support entrepreneurial start-up and scale-up stage businesses that develop solutions that make a positive social impact on the fashion landscape.     Since its start in 2018, the Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge has awarded 350,000 euros to entrepreneurs. Building upon Hilfiger’s sustainability platform to Waste Nothing and Welcome All, the third edition of the program aims to amplify and support Black, Indigenous and people of color entrepreneurs who are working to advance their communities and foster a more inclusive future of fashion.     For the first time, consumers are also invited to get involved and help judge submissions.     “The Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge puts a spotlight on entrepreneurs putting their heart and soul into making a positive social impact in our industry,” Tommy Hilfiger said. “This year, we want to showcase an even more diverse range of perspectives, ideas and communities by supporting BIPOC entrepreneurs. We have a responsibility to drive change across the fashion landscape, and I am honored to further our commitment to inclusivity and equal representation through the upcoming Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge.”     Interested businesses are invited to submit project proposals that focus on creating a more inclusive fashion value chain. Applicants will be narrowed down to six finalists in the fall, who will be invited to develop their project plans virtually with the support of dedicated Hilfiger and external subject matter experts. Finalists, who will get training from an experienced pitch coach, will present their final concept to a jury panel and associate audience at the global Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge final event to be held in early 2022.     Consumer judges will be asked to narrow down finalists from 200 to 50, with each being sent at least four applications to judge via the brand’s online microsite. Applications to become a consumer judge and to apply can be made through responsibility.pvh.com/tommy/fashion-frontier-challenge.     This year’s program prizes have been increased from previous years. A total of 200,000 euros will be awarded between winners. There is also an opportunity for an additional 15,000 euros prize for winning the “Audience Favorite Vote.” Prizes also include a yearlong mentorship with global Hilfiger internal experts, a place on the INSEAD Social Entrepreneurship Program and a yearlong INSEAD mentorship.     “While the fashion industry has taken positive steps toward becoming more inclusive and diverse, there is still more to be done,” said Martijn Hagman, chief executive officer of Tommy Hilfiger Global. “Through the Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge, we are furthering our commitment toward representation and diversity and helping drive the changes we most want, and need, to see.”     Last February, Hilfiger chose Apon Wellbeing and A Beautiful Mess as winners of the 2019 Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge, as reported. Apon Wellbeing, founded by Saif Rashid, was awarded 75,000 euros. The Bangladesh-based scale-up opens fair-priced shops carrying daily necessities inside factories, with products offered at a 10 percent discount to external prices and a points program that workers collect for free health insurance and health services.     Dutch start-up A Beautiful Mess was also awarded 75,000 euros. The business runs a creative space to assist refugees in helping to achieve social and economic independence by creating sustainable apparel products.     A third start-up, Sudara, was selected as the “Audience Favorite Vote,” and was awarded 10,000 euros. Based in India and the U.S., Sudara is a scale-up pajama and loungewear company that develops professional and sewing skills in women who have escaped from or are at high risk of being sex-trafficked.  

C.P. COMPANY PRESENTS SS2021: NATURAL MUTATION
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C.P. COMPANY PRESENTS SS2021: NATURAL MUTATION

Fashion In time of global uncertainty, C.P. Company presents a collection that reasserts the fundamental brand principles: years of continuous respect for its customers, achieved through the design language of authenticity, thoughtfulness, and functionality.     Further developing the themes inaugurated with its large-scale THE NEXT LANDSCAPE presentation in January 2020, the SS021 collection, titled NATURAL MUTATIONS, is organized as a series of “exchanges” between natural and synthetic fabrics (and natural and man-made environments), with specific interest in the mutations that arise between these two poles. The designer team uses the full arsenal of C.P. Company sportswear know-how to ask how can a synthetic fabric assume the tactility of a natural fabric whilst retaining its lightweight or hydrophilic qualities? Or how can natural fabrics be adapted to the ultralight versatility of contemporary urban life?     www.cpcompany.com   In time of global uncertainty, C.P. Company presents a collection that reasserts the fundamental brand principles: years of continuous respect for its customers, achieved through the design language of authenticity, thoughtfulness, and functionality.     Further developing the themes inaugurated with its large-scale THE NEXT LANDSCAPE presentation in January 2020, the SS021 collection, titled NATURAL MUTATIONS, is organized as a series of “exchanges” between natural and synthetic fabrics (and natural and man-made environments), with specific interest in the mutations that arise between these two poles. The designer team uses the full arsenal of C.P. Company sportswear know-how to ask how can a synthetic fabric assume the tactility of a natural fabric whilst retaining its lightweight or hydrophilic qualities? Or how can natural fabrics be adapted to the ultralight versatility of contemporary urban life?     www.cpcompany.com  

LOUIS VUITTON MEN’S COLLECTION BY VIRGIL ABLOH ‘LOUIS VUITTON: WALK IN THE PARK’
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LOUIS VUITTON MEN’S COLLECTION BY VIRGIL ABLOH ‘LOUIS VUITTON: WALK IN THE PARK’

Fashion Louis Vuitton announces a series of Men’s fashion events to take place in Paris through January 2021. Dubbed Louis Vuitton: Walk in the Park, the public experiences – physical and digital – expand on existing concepts and icons conceived for the House by Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh. Rooted in the inclusive values at the heart of his work, the happenings are an expression of the mutual connectivity that exists between the designer and his community. A Temporary Residency on Rue du Pont Neuf invites visitors to discover the iconic sneakers and accessories covering Men’s collections from Spring-Summer 2019 to Spring-Summer 2021, coinciding with the latter’s release. The temporary residency offers a rare chance to obtain reissues and new limited-edition takes on collectable sneakers, jewellery and sunglasses. At Louis Vuitton Maison Vendôme, an augmented reality experience developed for the Louis Vuitton app allows guests to interact with Zoooom with friends, the animated mascots envisioned by Virgil Abloh for the Spring-Summer 2021 show. The Paris events conclude with the presentation of the Louis Vuitton Fall-Winter 2021 Men’s collection on which more details will follow.   From 8-31 January 2021, Louis Vuitton hosts a public temporary space erected by its headquarters on Rue du Pont Neuf. The first chapter in Louis Vuitton: Walk in the Park – a month-long series of Menswear events in Paris – the space serves as a limited-edition store dedicated to the most iconic sneakers, jewellery and sunglasses created for the House by Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh. Collector’s items in their own right, the chosen designs are continuously coveted by the global community formed by the artistic director since his arrival at Louis Vuitton. Expanding on the ongoing dialogue with his audience, Virgil Abloh invites visitors to experience House icons up close and immerse themselves in their creative evolution. Throughout the store, designs are colour-coded in the nuances of the rainbow, a nod to the set of Virgil Abloh’s debut show for Louis Vuitton for SpringSummer 2019.   For the first time, clients are given the opportunity to re-discover and obtain the iconic Louis Vuitton Men’s sneakers established under the artistic direction of Virgil Abloh. The temporary residency features a ‘Hall of Fame’ devoted to the five rarest and most exclusive editions of the trademark LV Trainer first introduced for Spring-Summer 2019 as well as broader retrospective of the LV Trainer through the seasons, marking a rare opportunity for collectors. From 8-15 January, the latest LV Trainer Upcycling from the SpringSummer 2021 collection is available to purchase in five new collectible colourways, including an exclusive Paris colourway issued in a total of 95 pairs. True to the Upcycling Ideology conceived by Virgil Abloh as part of the SpringSummer 2021 collection, the new editions created for the Paris temporary residency are crafted entirely from upcycled LV Trainer material. The LV Ollie sneaker from the Spring-Summer 2021 collection will be on display in six colourways along with jewellery and sunglasses from the collection.  Louis Vuitton announces a series of Men’s fashion events to take place in Paris through January 2021. Dubbed Louis Vuitton: Walk in the Park, the public experiences – physical and digital – expand on existing concepts and icons conceived for the House by Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh. Rooted in the inclusive values at the heart of his work, the happenings are an expression of the mutual connectivity that exists between the designer and his community. A Temporary Residency on Rue du Pont Neuf invites visitors to discover the iconic sneakers and accessories covering Men’s collections from Spring-Summer 2019 to Spring-Summer 2021, coinciding with the latter’s release. The temporary residency offers a rare chance to obtain reissues and new limited-edition takes on collectable sneakers, jewellery and sunglasses. At Louis Vuitton Maison Vendôme, an augmented reality experience developed for the Louis Vuitton app allows guests to interact with Zoooom with friends, the animated mascots envisioned by Virgil Abloh for the Spring-Summer 2021 show. The Paris events conclude with the presentation of the Louis Vuitton Fall-Winter 2021 Men’s collection on which more details will follow.   From 8-31 January 2021, Louis Vuitton hosts a public temporary space erected by its headquarters on Rue du Pont Neuf. The first chapter in Louis Vuitton: Walk in the Park – a month-long series of Menswear events in Paris – the space serves as a limited-edition store dedicated to the most iconic sneakers, jewellery and sunglasses created for the House by Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh. Collector’s items in their own right, the chosen designs are continuously coveted by the global community formed by the artistic director since his arrival at Louis Vuitton. Expanding on the ongoing dialogue with his audience, Virgil Abloh invites visitors to experience House icons up close and immerse themselves in their creative evolution. Throughout the store, designs are colour-coded in the nuances of the rainbow, a nod to the set of Virgil Abloh’s debut show for Louis Vuitton for SpringSummer 2019.   For the first time, clients are given the opportunity to re-discover and obtain the iconic Louis Vuitton Men’s sneakers established under the artistic direction of Virgil Abloh. The temporary residency features a ‘Hall of Fame’ devoted to the five rarest and most exclusive editions of the trademark LV Trainer first introduced for Spring-Summer 2019 as well as broader retrospective of the LV Trainer through the seasons, marking a rare opportunity for collectors. From 8-15 January, the latest LV Trainer Upcycling from the SpringSummer 2021 collection is available to purchase in five new collectible colourways, including an exclusive Paris colourway issued in a total of 95 pairs. True to the Upcycling Ideology conceived by Virgil Abloh as part of the SpringSummer 2021 collection, the new editions created for the Paris temporary residency are crafted entirely from upcycled LV Trainer material. The LV Ollie sneaker from the Spring-Summer 2021 collection will be on display in six colourways along with jewellery and sunglasses from the collection. 

When Dancing Stars Align: A Conversation Between Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav
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When Dancing Stars Align: A Conversation Between Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav

Men Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav, two rising stars in the world of contemporary dance, were destined to meet -- both Congolese, queer, Belgium-born artists nee under the sign of Leo in 1993. While astrological, geographical and artistic forces converged to bring these two together professionally, it wasn’t until recently that their paths crossed. Coutsier, who had already collaborated with Beyoncé, reached out to Yav in 2019 to join the “Black Is King” project. Although they didn’t get to work together then, they were each featured in the visual album -- Yav in “SCAR” and Coutsier in “SPIRIT”. After cementing their artistic individuality, they came together to harness the power of Ndeko -- a word that originates from Congo’s Lingala language, which means a strong bond, either blood-related or spiritual, whereby two people are bound by care and respect. We sat down with them to talk about race, identity and the power of movement.      Christian: The first time I heard of Nick was in January 2017. I remember someone telling me that there is a beautiful black dancer that has a very interesting way of moving. At that point, I hadn’t experienced having another black body in the space of contemporary dance. The moment Instagram started to broaden connection possibilities on the platform, that's when I really started to look for people like myself. I remember one day, Nick popped up as a “Suggestion For You”, and that’s really when I saw him for the first time.    Nick: My immediate reaction when I first heard about Christian wasn’t necessarily a defensive one, but more of a question about who that person is and why the comparison is being made. I also didn’t know if the constant comparison was positive or negative, or just a warning about this other guy. In this industry, it’s kind of a privileged place to be the only black guy. So is this other person going to be an ally or is he coming for my spot? All that thinking isn’t conscious hate, it’s just so instilled in how we think and how we are trained to think -- the so-called “There can only be one“ myth. When we physically met, it was kind of like a match made in heaven. For the first time ever, I was like “Okay wow, this is how it actually feels to have another black body in the space.”   Christian: What’s interesting is the way I first started hearing about Nick. I felt this energy as though these people were preparing me for this. I often had white allies, and now I had a black ally, which allowed me to broaden my network of people of colour and black dancers. It was one of the few times where I felt that there were no strings attached.    Nick: I like to be surrounded by people who have that talent and drive. And so when I heard about Christian, I thought “If he’s that good, then let me see how good I can be.” Competition is about pushing the other up -- inspiring and challenging each other to be the best version of ourselves.    Christian: There isn’t always a lot of space to move in contemporary dance when you are the only black person. There are certain opportunities that you can’t get because it’s a project that is told from a certain narrative.    Nick: Both of us being black, queer artists, we had to move through society in a certain way because of structural racism and homophobia. Being black we had to do this, being gay we had to do this, being second-generation immigrants, we had to do this. So it all made us who we are. And I think that the way I moved in society translated into the way I move as a dancer. The body being my main instrument, it does carry its own story. And I remember when I saw Christian move, I thought ”Wow, it is so specific” and it reminded me of the singularity of how I am trying to move. It does take time and maturity to embrace singularity as being an asset.   Christian: There is a logic to movement. It’s very easy for outsiders to say, “Oh yeah, I recognise this from ballet, or this from that.” But something I’ve often noticed with people of colour and black dancers is that the moment they do their own thing, there is something about their movement that doesn’t always appear to be what people normally perceive as logical in dance. But it’s so clear that you take it for what it is. I do think that having your own logic of movement is linked to having a lonely existence. When I started doing gymnastics as a kid, I was the only boy and the only black boy. You’re constantly on an island within a group. The way Nick moves, what happens here in his chest, it’s such a minor detail for others but then I’m like “Ah, I understand this movement.” It’s important to have representation and to see yourself in someone else, but feeling the movement is even more powerful.    Nick: I now kind of understand why we weren’t put together before because we are so powerful together. The colonial system of dividing power to better conquer is still present, including in the dance industry. Now we understand the power that we have together.    Christian: Our star signs are also identical. Over the years, I’ve met a lot of people who are Leo, but rarely someone who is a double Leo, like me. When people are double Leo, it’s so strong. Even if the personalities are different, there is something that is going to work because we’re powered by the same energetical forces within the universe.    Nick: It’s an unapologetic way of being. Something that has allowed us to be so sure and assertive about who we are was to not wait for that external validation.    Christian: In dance, the movements are stronger than myself so I don’t feel the need to adapt to other dance aesthetics. As a black man in society, however, that’s where I adapt my movements. For a very long time, when I would go to the hairdresser, I would speak in a very low voice, walk in a different way, and just adapt very small things. And I still do it because in order to survive, that’s where I really need to adapt my movements. In spaces where you’re underrepresented, people don’t always have the knowledge, desire or awareness of wanting it to be an inclusive place.    Nick: As a gay person, you need to adapt all the time, and so you just become really good at it. It shouldn’t be this way but it’s unfortunately still the case, as being your true, authentic self is still not accepted everywhere. Working with movement, the body and dance in that way allows me to make lemonade out of not-so-tasty lemons, so to speak. From a cathartic point of view, my adaptability in life does translate itself in my dancing, my work and my research around movement.   Christian: Walking in the streets as a queer man with your partner is a very precious part of me and not every place is a place to share that in the way that we would like to share it. Our society is not built on that, and that’s when I started realising that adapting isn’t always a bad thing.    Nick: When I started to create my own work, my artistic spontaneity would be sparked by sonorities and movements that would go back to my African roots. When I met Christian, it was really serendipitous because it was the moment I started to deconstruct a lot of things and give value to that part of myself. You live in this constant duality, which can be a power, but for the longest time it was something that I couldn’t identify with. I questioned my legitimacy as a black man, asking “Am I really the person who can talk about structural racism?” But being a second-generation immigrant is an identity in itself and so I gave power to my Congolese roots.    Christian: It is different when as a black person, you dance with another black person. When Nick and I were dancing during this shoot, it’s as if we were an extension of each other, almost like one body. There is a sense of home that I usually have to find within myself.    Nick: And as movement is such a big part of us, both in life and in dance, it was important for us to work with a photographer who could encapsulate all of that. Julien Vallon was a perfect fit, and we decided to name this photo series “Ndeko”, as it captures the way Christian and I feel about one another -- when you recognise yourself in the other. “I see you Ndeko”.      TEAM CREDITS:   Photographer Julien Vallon Fashion by Gabriella Norberg Talents Nick Coutsier & Christian Yav Words and edit by Berenice Magistretti editor: Timotej Letonja Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav, two rising stars in the world of contemporary dance, were destined to meet -- both Congolese, queer, Belgium-born artists nee under the sign of Leo in 1993. While astrological, geographical and artistic forces converged to bring these two together professionally, it wasn’t until recently that their paths crossed. Coutsier, who had already collaborated with Beyoncé, reached out to Yav in 2019 to join the “Black Is King” project. Although they didn’t get to work together then, they were each featured in the visual album -- Yav in “SCAR” and Coutsier in “SPIRIT”. After cementing their artistic individuality, they came together to harness the power of Ndeko -- a word that originates from Congo’s Lingala language, which means a strong bond, either blood-related or spiritual, whereby two people are bound by care and respect. We sat down with them to talk about race, identity and the power of movement.      Christian: The first time I heard of Nick was in January 2017. I remember someone telling me that there is a beautiful black dancer that has a very interesting way of moving. At that point, I hadn’t experienced having another black body in the space of contemporary dance. The moment Instagram started to broaden connection possibilities on the platform, that's when I really started to look for people like myself. I remember one day, Nick popped up as a “Suggestion For You”, and that’s really when I saw him for the first time.    Nick: My immediate reaction when I first heard about Christian wasn’t necessarily a defensive one, but more of a question about who that person is and why the comparison is being made. I also didn’t know if the constant comparison was positive or negative, or just a warning about this other guy. In this industry, it’s kind of a privileged place to be the only black guy. So is this other person going to be an ally or is he coming for my spot? All that thinking isn’t conscious hate, it’s just so instilled in how we think and how we are trained to think -- the so-called “There can only be one“ myth. When we physically met, it was kind of like a match made in heaven. For the first time ever, I was like “Okay wow, this is how it actually feels to have another black body in the space.”   Christian: What’s interesting is the way I first started hearing about Nick. I felt this energy as though these people were preparing me for this. I often had white allies, and now I had a black ally, which allowed me to broaden my network of people of colour and black dancers. It was one of the few times where I felt that there were no strings attached.    Nick: I like to be surrounded by people who have that talent and drive. And so when I heard about Christian, I thought “If he’s that good, then let me see how good I can be.” Competition is about pushing the other up -- inspiring and challenging each other to be the best version of ourselves.    Christian: There isn’t always a lot of space to move in contemporary dance when you are the only black person. There are certain opportunities that you can’t get because it’s a project that is told from a certain narrative.    Nick: Both of us being black, queer artists, we had to move through society in a certain way because of structural racism and homophobia. Being black we had to do this, being gay we had to do this, being second-generation immigrants, we had to do this. So it all made us who we are. And I think that the way I moved in society translated into the way I move as a dancer. The body being my main instrument, it does carry its own story. And I remember when I saw Christian move, I thought ”Wow, it is so specific” and it reminded me of the singularity of how I am trying to move. It does take time and maturity to embrace singularity as being an asset.   Christian: There is a logic to movement. It’s very easy for outsiders to say, “Oh yeah, I recognise this from ballet, or this from that.” But something I’ve often noticed with people of colour and black dancers is that the moment they do their own thing, there is something about their movement that doesn’t always appear to be what people normally perceive as logical in dance. But it’s so clear that you take it for what it is. I do think that having your own logic of movement is linked to having a lonely existence. When I started doing gymnastics as a kid, I was the only boy and the only black boy. You’re constantly on an island within a group. The way Nick moves, what happens here in his chest, it’s such a minor detail for others but then I’m like “Ah, I understand this movement.” It’s important to have representation and to see yourself in someone else, but feeling the movement is even more powerful.    Nick: I now kind of understand why we weren’t put together before because we are so powerful together. The colonial system of dividing power to better conquer is still present, including in the dance industry. Now we understand the power that we have together.    Christian: Our star signs are also identical. Over the years, I’ve met a lot of people who are Leo, but rarely someone who is a double Leo, like me. When people are double Leo, it’s so strong. Even if the personalities are different, there is something that is going to work because we’re powered by the same energetical forces within the universe.    Nick: It’s an unapologetic way of being. Something that has allowed us to be so sure and assertive about who we are was to not wait for that external validation.    Christian: In dance, the movements are stronger than myself so I don’t feel the need to adapt to other dance aesthetics. As a black man in society, however, that’s where I adapt my movements. For a very long time, when I would go to the hairdresser, I would speak in a very low voice, walk in a different way, and just adapt very small things. And I still do it because in order to survive, that’s where I really need to adapt my movements. In spaces where you’re underrepresented, people don’t always have the knowledge, desire or awareness of wanting it to be an inclusive place.    Nick: As a gay person, you need to adapt all the time, and so you just become really good at it. It shouldn’t be this way but it’s unfortunately still the case, as being your true, authentic self is still not accepted everywhere. Working with movement, the body and dance in that way allows me to make lemonade out of not-so-tasty lemons, so to speak. From a cathartic point of view, my adaptability in life does translate itself in my dancing, my work and my research around movement.   Christian: Walking in the streets as a queer man with your partner is a very precious part of me and not every place is a place to share that in the way that we would like to share it. Our society is not built on that, and that’s when I started realising that adapting isn’t always a bad thing.    Nick: When I started to create my own work, my artistic spontaneity would be sparked by sonorities and movements that would go back to my African roots. When I met Christian, it was really serendipitous because it was the moment I started to deconstruct a lot of things and give value to that part of myself. You live in this constant duality, which can be a power, but for the longest time it was something that I couldn’t identify with. I questioned my legitimacy as a black man, asking “Am I really the person who can talk about structural racism?” But being a second-generation immigrant is an identity in itself and so I gave power to my Congolese roots.    Christian: It is different when as a black person, you dance with another black person. When Nick and I were dancing during this shoot, it’s as if we were an extension of each other, almost like one body. There is a sense of home that I usually have to find within myself.    Nick: And as movement is such a big part of us, both in life and in dance, it was important for us to work with a photographer who could encapsulate all of that. Julien Vallon was a perfect fit, and we decided to name this photo series “Ndeko”, as it captures the way Christian and I feel about one another -- when you recognise yourself in the other. “I see you Ndeko”.      TEAM CREDITS:   Photographer Julien Vallon Fashion by Gabriella Norberg Talents Nick Coutsier & Christian Yav Words and edit by Berenice Magistretti editor: Timotej Letonja

SAINT LAURENT: THE CLASSIC TRENCH COAT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO
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SAINT LAURENT: THE CLASSIC TRENCH COAT BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO

Fashion     Art Direction : Anthony Vaccarello Director : David Sims Talent : Catherine Deneuve   #YSL #SaintLaurent #YvesSaintLaurent @anthonyvaccarello @davidsimsofficial     Art Direction : Anthony Vaccarello Director : David Sims Talent : Catherine Deneuve   #YSL #SaintLaurent #YvesSaintLaurent @anthonyvaccarello @davidsimsofficial

DIOR PRESENTS THE LAUNCH OF THE DIOR CARO BAG
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DIOR PRESENTS THE LAUNCH OF THE DIOR CARO BAG

Accessories An original expression of Dior codes, the Dior Caro bag is made in the House’s ateliers in Italy, with virtuoso craftsmanship that combines the beauty of the gesture with exceptional materials. After its pieces are meticulously cut from calf leather, the essential quilting stage alone requires 18,000 stitches to reproduce the subtle geometric weave of cannage. A delicate “Christian Dior” gold seal is affixed before the bag, which is mounted inside-out, is at last turned right-side out. Next, metal accessories adorned with the precious “CD” signature are affixed, from the chain links to the clasp.     Available in two sizes, in timeless shades such as black, gray, beige and ivory, this essential bag also comes in enchanting hues, borrowing intensity from red and softness from sky blue, mint green and compass rose. The small version is also available in three exclusive variations enhanced with shearling and raw denim, or punctuated with the hypnotic Tie & Dior as seen in the 2021 cruise show. These objects of desire lend themselves to a game of mix-and-match thanks to interchangeable shoulder straps for a daring look. A new emblem of Dior style. An original expression of Dior codes, the Dior Caro bag is made in the House’s ateliers in Italy, with virtuoso craftsmanship that combines the beauty of the gesture with exceptional materials. After its pieces are meticulously cut from calf leather, the essential quilting stage alone requires 18,000 stitches to reproduce the subtle geometric weave of cannage. A delicate “Christian Dior” gold seal is affixed before the bag, which is mounted inside-out, is at last turned right-side out. Next, metal accessories adorned with the precious “CD” signature are affixed, from the chain links to the clasp.     Available in two sizes, in timeless shades such as black, gray, beige and ivory, this essential bag also comes in enchanting hues, borrowing intensity from red and softness from sky blue, mint green and compass rose. The small version is also available in three exclusive variations enhanced with shearling and raw denim, or punctuated with the hypnotic Tie & Dior as seen in the 2021 cruise show. These objects of desire lend themselves to a game of mix-and-match thanks to interchangeable shoulder straps for a daring look. A new emblem of Dior style.

Louis Vuitton to launch an all-encompassing, collaborative collection with celebrated contemporary artist Urs Fischer
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Louis Vuitton to launch an all-encompassing, collaborative collection with celebrated contemporary artist Urs Fischer

Design Louis Vuitton has teamed up with acclaimed Swiss contemporary artist Urs Fischer on a multifaceted collaboration that highlights his playfully audacious creative vision across a wide range of leather goods, ready-to-wear, shoes and accessories.     Entitled “Louis Vuitton x Urs Fischer”, Urs Fischer’s exuberant and textured reworking of Louis Vuitton’s signature Monogram is the starting point of this collection which features the Monogram’s owers and LV initials in new hand-drawn versions that he calls “memory sketches”. The resulting dream-like motifs have been meticulously adapted to suit each speci c product across this comprehensive collection, changing in size, perspective, colour and application technique.     Available in two colourways, black and red and black and white, this new Monogram is the collaboration’s key decorative motif, and features throughout the collection’s designs. In addition to ready-to-wear, accessories and shoes, seven special-edition bags – a Keepall, Cabas, Onthego, two Neverfulls, Speedys, Pochettes Accessoires, and a charming, hard-sided beauty case – use the Urs Fischer Monogram to particularly impressive e ect thanks to an exquisite tu etage treatment that uses velvet-like material to create extra texture and tactile relief.     The collaboration also features a series of whimsical characters created by Urs Fischer. The enchanting animals and objects are united in a playful print that lls a colourful silk square.     “Louis Vuitton x Urs Fischer” is both a perfect, large-scale showcase for Urs Fischer’s creative world and the latest exciting chapter in Louis Vuitton’s longstanding commitment to the arts. The collection will launch in Louis Vuitton stores worldwide in January 2021. Louis Vuitton has teamed up with acclaimed Swiss contemporary artist Urs Fischer on a multifaceted collaboration that highlights his playfully audacious creative vision across a wide range of leather goods, ready-to-wear, shoes and accessories.     Entitled “Louis Vuitton x Urs Fischer”, Urs Fischer’s exuberant and textured reworking of Louis Vuitton’s signature Monogram is the starting point of this collection which features the Monogram’s owers and LV initials in new hand-drawn versions that he calls “memory sketches”. The resulting dream-like motifs have been meticulously adapted to suit each speci c product across this comprehensive collection, changing in size, perspective, colour and application technique.     Available in two colourways, black and red and black and white, this new Monogram is the collaboration’s key decorative motif, and features throughout the collection’s designs. In addition to ready-to-wear, accessories and shoes, seven special-edition bags – a Keepall, Cabas, Onthego, two Neverfulls, Speedys, Pochettes Accessoires, and a charming, hard-sided beauty case – use the Urs Fischer Monogram to particularly impressive e ect thanks to an exquisite tu etage treatment that uses velvet-like material to create extra texture and tactile relief.     The collaboration also features a series of whimsical characters created by Urs Fischer. The enchanting animals and objects are united in a playful print that lls a colourful silk square.     “Louis Vuitton x Urs Fischer” is both a perfect, large-scale showcase for Urs Fischer’s creative world and the latest exciting chapter in Louis Vuitton’s longstanding commitment to the arts. The collection will launch in Louis Vuitton stores worldwide in January 2021.

In conversation with Connor Jessup
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In conversation with Connor Jessup

Men We had a pleasure speaking with Connor Jessup, our digital cover star.     In the past you did film photography, do you still do anything in that direction?   A little. I'd like to do more. I take pics on-set with my little Olympus point-and-shoot, but otherwise my cameras are dusty. I struggle here at home, for some reason. I'm better in other places. Photography is good for me. I have a bad habit of drifting and it makes me pay attention. It makes my memory click on and record. And worrying about a single moment, a single idea, instead of a whole string of them, is a happy change of pace.     We heard you are a movie buff. Have you watched any cool new movies recently during quarantine and which would you recommend?   So many. My best friend and I quarantined together from March to July and we watched a movie every night. I fell mad for Jane Campion's Bright Star. She found the exact center between sensuality and wordiness. Ben Whishaw fuck! I watched it 3x in two days. A friend recommended Truffaut's Small Change. So wise and wonderful. Ang Lee's Sense and Sensibility, which we somehow hadn't seen. It's an absolute masterclass in how to move talking people around rooms. Jafar Panahi's The White Balloon, Mia Hansen-Løve's Father of My Children, William Wyler's The Heiress (Olivia de Havilland!), a herd of surprising François Ozon movies: In the House, Swimming Pool, Summer of 85. James L. Brooks' Broadcast News, Kelly Reichardt's First Cow, Kirsten Johnson's Dick Johnson is Dead. We did a Carol Ballard marathon. Fly Away Home and Duma are beautiful movies.     We have seen Locke & Key, a Netflix hit series where you star as one of the lead characters. Is there a season two in the works and what are some of your favorite moments from the first season?   We're shooting season two now! It should come out sometime next year. It'll sound cheap, but my memories of the first season are mostly tangled up with people, not work. One of the pleasures of TV is that you get to build relationships over time. There's a deepening that happens. You share so many long, cold nights and early mornings and sleepy lunches and casual bitchings. You see each other's vulnerabilities and frustrations and capacities. There's a sort of beautiful, collective delirium that moves in. A lot of cry-laughing. I remember getting caught in a 3am thunderstorm with Emilia and Griffin and laughing so hard I literally couldn't walk.     Have you been able to be creative during these weird current times and have you learnt anything new?   In waves. I got a lot of writing done between April and July, but I've been stuck since. My brain is not very schematic, so the transition from gathering to ordering is hard for me. I can be really unkind to myself. None of the struggle is original, so I won’t bore you. But there were a few productive months! I realized I had always thought of writing as a technical process, and that I needed to start thinking of it as an emotional one....as basic as that sounds. I learned that I can't write drunk.     What is your daily beauty routine like? And what beauty products you cannot go without?   My beauty routine is so quick it's almost homophobic. I won't embarress myself by saying more.     Tell us something about yourself that isn't on your resume.   When I was in fifth grade, I performed "It's Raining Men" in drag for a school lip sync competition.      Are there any other exciting new projects you are working on?   I'll be shooting Locke & Key for a while, but there's a short film I'm hoping to make in Japan whenever I can. Beyond that, I'm trying to focus on writing my first feature. It's a grief adventure movie about a boy and a god.     PHOTO CREDITS: talent and photography: CONNOR JESSUP editor: TIMOTEJ LETONJA stylist: DONTE MCGUINE make-up: BRENDA THURSTON We had a pleasure speaking with Connor Jessup, our digital cover star.     In the past you did film photography, do you still do anything in that direction?   A little. I'd like to do more. I take pics on-set with my little Olympus point-and-shoot, but otherwise my cameras are dusty. I struggle here at home, for some reason. I'm better in other places. Photography is good for me. I have a bad habit of drifting and it makes me pay attention. It makes my memory click on and record. And worrying about a single moment, a single idea, instead of a whole string of them, is a happy change of pace.     We heard you are a movie buff. Have you watched any cool new movies recently during quarantine and which would you recommend?   So many. My best friend and I quarantined together from March to July and we watched a movie every night. I fell mad for Jane Campion's Bright Star. She found the exact center between sensuality and wordiness. Ben Whishaw fuck! I watched it 3x in two days. A friend recommended Truffaut's Small Change. So wise and wonderful. Ang Lee's Sense and Sensibility, which we somehow hadn't seen. It's an absolute masterclass in how to move talking people around rooms. Jafar Panahi's The White Balloon, Mia Hansen-Løve's Father of My Children, William Wyler's The Heiress (Olivia de Havilland!), a herd of surprising François Ozon movies: In the House, Swimming Pool, Summer of 85. James L. Brooks' Broadcast News, Kelly Reichardt's First Cow, Kirsten Johnson's Dick Johnson is Dead. We did a Carol Ballard marathon. Fly Away Home and Duma are beautiful movies.     We have seen Locke & Key, a Netflix hit series where you star as one of the lead characters. Is there a season two in the works and what are some of your favorite moments from the first season?   We're shooting season two now! It should come out sometime next year. It'll sound cheap, but my memories of the first season are mostly tangled up with people, not work. One of the pleasures of TV is that you get to build relationships over time. There's a deepening that happens. You share so many long, cold nights and early mornings and sleepy lunches and casual bitchings. You see each other's vulnerabilities and frustrations and capacities. There's a sort of beautiful, collective delirium that moves in. A lot of cry-laughing. I remember getting caught in a 3am thunderstorm with Emilia and Griffin and laughing so hard I literally couldn't walk.     Have you been able to be creative during these weird current times and have you learnt anything new?   In waves. I got a lot of writing done between April and July, but I've been stuck since. My brain is not very schematic, so the transition from gathering to ordering is hard for me. I can be really unkind to myself. None of the struggle is original, so I won’t bore you. But there were a few productive months! I realized I had always thought of writing as a technical process, and that I needed to start thinking of it as an emotional one....as basic as that sounds. I learned that I can't write drunk.     What is your daily beauty routine like? And what beauty products you cannot go without?   My beauty routine is so quick it's almost homophobic. I won't embarress myself by saying more.     Tell us something about yourself that isn't on your resume.   When I was in fifth grade, I performed "It's Raining Men" in drag for a school lip sync competition.      Are there any other exciting new projects you are working on?   I'll be shooting Locke & Key for a while, but there's a short film I'm hoping to make in Japan whenever I can. Beyond that, I'm trying to focus on writing my first feature. It's a grief adventure movie about a boy and a god.     PHOTO CREDITS: talent and photography: CONNOR JESSUP editor: TIMOTEJ LETONJA stylist: DONTE MCGUINE make-up: BRENDA THURSTON

In conversation with Danny Griffin
856

In conversation with Danny Griffin

Men We had a delight starting the year and having a fun conversation with actor Danny Griffin.     Tell us something that is not on your resume.   This is probably a little odd, but since I was about 10, I have had a love for horses. I started horseback riding when I was about 11 years old. Throughout the years, I have not been able to do it as much as I would like to; however, I've got back into it recently.      What has been the biggest lesson learnt this year for you?   Well, it's been a really weird year, not just for me but for the world. I can be quite an impatient person; it's something I need to work on. However, I have gotten to work on my patience with all the downtime there has been.        Have you learnt or explored any other new passions during this year?   I actually got into gaming this year; for about 3months straight, I was very hooked on a particular game. I played it with my friends, which was just great fun, basically hanging out virtually with your mates and catching up.         When did you start acting and when did you know it was what you wanted to do as a career?    I was 15, and  I discovered I could make acting my career.  I  just finished watching an episode of Doctor Who, and I loved the main actor Matt Smith.  Upon googling him, I found out that he was an Actor who studied acting at the National Youth Theatre. I had no idea you could study acting, let alone make a career out of it. That's when I decided I wanted to pursue the craft and I moved to London to study it.      Do you have any other hobbies/ interests growing up that you enjoyed doing?    Well, I was lucky enough to grow up In Cornwall. I had the beach down the road, where I enjoyed surfing and sailing a bit. I also enjoyed climbing and had a free climbing wall in my back garden (a Tree) ha. I love horseback riding. I used to go every Saturday, and I  was the only guy who did it!  I didn't care; I was 12. I was also really into swimming, Hockey and Rock Climbing.        What was it like playing 'Sky' on Netflix Fate of Winx Saga? Are you similar to your character?   I enjoyed playing 'Sky'. What is so interesting about 'Sky' is that he is a little like an Iceberg. He seems kinda normal on top, but underneath there's so much going on. That is true for many of the show's characters and was something I found very relatable. We all have something going on beneath the surface. We may seem polished on the outside, but it can be a different story on the inside.        You have some pretty intense fight scenes. What was it like working with a sword?    I wish I could tell you that the swords were real! I wanted one so badly. When John, our swordsmith, came to give me my sword, I felt so excited. The little kid who used to watch 'Aragorn' from Lord of the Rings was about to be given his first sword, only to pick it up and find out it was plastic.... My first response was, "Where is the real one? "   The fight scenes were so much fun, and my co-star Freddy only made it easier. We had an amazing stunt team, who came up with some outstanding choreography, which Freddy and I trained a great deal to get down as smooth and as fast as possible.      What are some of your favorite memories from working on set?   I have so many. Every day on set was memorable. The whole cast is such down to earth lovely people, and it just became like going to work with your friends. I have a lot of scenes with Rob Collier, who is probably one of the funniest people I've ever met. He would come to set, and as a warm-up he would start rapping or "spitting bars," as he calls it.      How have you been keeping busy during quarantine? Any tips or suggestions for readers struggling?   It is an incredibly hard time for everyone. And one suggestion that would work for someone wouldn't work for someone else. All I can say is try and have a routine, even if it's just getting up at a reasonable time and making your bed.       Anything you would like to say to your fans?   I am so grateful to anyone who supports me.  Thank you for all your kindness and lovely comments about the show. I hope you enjoy our take on Fate the Winx Saga. Follow me on Instagram @Danny_Griffin_ to keep up with my future projects and Fate the Winx Saga news.       TEAM CREDITS: Photographer: Joseph Sinclair using Hasselblad.     Styling: Ella Gaskell   Grooming: Charli Avery   We had a delight starting the year and having a fun conversation with actor Danny Griffin.     Tell us something that is not on your resume.   This is probably a little odd, but since I was about 10, I have had a love for horses. I started horseback riding when I was about 11 years old. Throughout the years, I have not been able to do it as much as I would like to; however, I've got back into it recently.      What has been the biggest lesson learnt this year for you?   Well, it's been a really weird year, not just for me but for the world. I can be quite an impatient person; it's something I need to work on. However, I have gotten to work on my patience with all the downtime there has been.        Have you learnt or explored any other new passions during this year?   I actually got into gaming this year; for about 3months straight, I was very hooked on a particular game. I played it with my friends, which was just great fun, basically hanging out virtually with your mates and catching up.         When did you start acting and when did you know it was what you wanted to do as a career?    I was 15, and  I discovered I could make acting my career.  I  just finished watching an episode of Doctor Who, and I loved the main actor Matt Smith.  Upon googling him, I found out that he was an Actor who studied acting at the National Youth Theatre. I had no idea you could study acting, let alone make a career out of it. That's when I decided I wanted to pursue the craft and I moved to London to study it.      Do you have any other hobbies/ interests growing up that you enjoyed doing?    Well, I was lucky enough to grow up In Cornwall. I had the beach down the road, where I enjoyed surfing and sailing a bit. I also enjoyed climbing and had a free climbing wall in my back garden (a Tree) ha. I love horseback riding. I used to go every Saturday, and I  was the only guy who did it!  I didn't care; I was 12. I was also really into swimming, Hockey and Rock Climbing.        What was it like playing 'Sky' on Netflix Fate of Winx Saga? Are you similar to your character?   I enjoyed playing 'Sky'. What is so interesting about 'Sky' is that he is a little like an Iceberg. He seems kinda normal on top, but underneath there's so much going on. That is true for many of the show's characters and was something I found very relatable. We all have something going on beneath the surface. We may seem polished on the outside, but it can be a different story on the inside.        You have some pretty intense fight scenes. What was it like working with a sword?    I wish I could tell you that the swords were real! I wanted one so badly. When John, our swordsmith, came to give me my sword, I felt so excited. The little kid who used to watch 'Aragorn' from Lord of the Rings was about to be given his first sword, only to pick it up and find out it was plastic.... My first response was, "Where is the real one? "   The fight scenes were so much fun, and my co-star Freddy only made it easier. We had an amazing stunt team, who came up with some outstanding choreography, which Freddy and I trained a great deal to get down as smooth and as fast as possible.      What are some of your favorite memories from working on set?   I have so many. Every day on set was memorable. The whole cast is such down to earth lovely people, and it just became like going to work with your friends. I have a lot of scenes with Rob Collier, who is probably one of the funniest people I've ever met. He would come to set, and as a warm-up he would start rapping or "spitting bars," as he calls it.      How have you been keeping busy during quarantine? Any tips or suggestions for readers struggling?   It is an incredibly hard time for everyone. And one suggestion that would work for someone wouldn't work for someone else. All I can say is try and have a routine, even if it's just getting up at a reasonable time and making your bed.       Anything you would like to say to your fans?   I am so grateful to anyone who supports me.  Thank you for all your kindness and lovely comments about the show. I hope you enjoy our take on Fate the Winx Saga. Follow me on Instagram @Danny_Griffin_ to keep up with my future projects and Fate the Winx Saga news.       TEAM CREDITS: Photographer: Joseph Sinclair using Hasselblad.     Styling: Ella Gaskell   Grooming: Charli Avery  

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