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Paco Rabanne for Spring & Summer 2020
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Paco Rabanne for Spring & Summer 2020

Fashion Week Whether in the galleries or on the runways, as music or as theatre, avant-garde has always signaled a certain radicality, an impulse for experimentation. This concept is innate to Paco Rabanne, dating back to the designer’s first collection in 1966, Twelve Dresses in Unwearable Materials.    But does avant-garde expression serve a purpose when life itself feels so radically different? What if an everyday wardrobe could be reimagined with an avant-garde attitude? Conceived by Julien Dossena, this Paco Rabanne collection is a garde-robe of looks that are instinctive rather than declarative. Individuality surfaces as an extreme remix of wearable pieces. The statement is visibly less formal but technically precise – an undoing of stylistic archetypes to arrive at a deliberately destabilized allure.    Each look suggests an association of ideas that are as likely to be counterintuitive as complementary. Amidst the season’s sparkling head-to-toe geometric and flowery assemblages, leopard motifs and lingerie or baby-doll dresses with lace incrustations tempt a more louche, beguiling vision. Bustiers and washed denim recur as wardrobe foundation pieces, often layered with elongated tailored jackets or a relaxed, metal mesh robe. Striped ribbed knits stamped with silver create kinetic curves while metal mesh dresses in gold and silver are newly knotted at the bustline, suggesting a gesture of insouciance. Where moulded tops and jewellery plates around the clavicle and navel accentuate the figure outward, exaggerated jewel prints drape and contour the body with trompe l’oeil glitz. Updated for the times, a classic trench is sheathed in clear plastic as a partial barrier.    On foot, boots set within tubular steel frames have been re-edited from the archive. They showcase the artistic side of Paco Rabanne’s avant-garde spirit – a conceptual, sculptural base for silhouettes drawn from real life.  Whether in the galleries or on the runways, as music or as theatre, avant-garde has always signaled a certain radicality, an impulse for experimentation. This concept is innate to Paco Rabanne, dating back to the designer’s first collection in 1966, Twelve Dresses in Unwearable Materials.    But does avant-garde expression serve a purpose when life itself feels so radically different? What if an everyday wardrobe could be reimagined with an avant-garde attitude? Conceived by Julien Dossena, this Paco Rabanne collection is a garde-robe of looks that are instinctive rather than declarative. Individuality surfaces as an extreme remix of wearable pieces. The statement is visibly less formal but technically precise – an undoing of stylistic archetypes to arrive at a deliberately destabilized allure.    Each look suggests an association of ideas that are as likely to be counterintuitive as complementary. Amidst the season’s sparkling head-to-toe geometric and flowery assemblages, leopard motifs and lingerie or baby-doll dresses with lace incrustations tempt a more louche, beguiling vision. Bustiers and washed denim recur as wardrobe foundation pieces, often layered with elongated tailored jackets or a relaxed, metal mesh robe. Striped ribbed knits stamped with silver create kinetic curves while metal mesh dresses in gold and silver are newly knotted at the bustline, suggesting a gesture of insouciance. Where moulded tops and jewellery plates around the clavicle and navel accentuate the figure outward, exaggerated jewel prints drape and contour the body with trompe l’oeil glitz. Updated for the times, a classic trench is sheathed in clear plastic as a partial barrier.    On foot, boots set within tubular steel frames have been re-edited from the archive. They showcase the artistic side of Paco Rabanne’s avant-garde spirit – a conceptual, sculptural base for silhouettes drawn from real life. 

Acne Studios Women’s Spring/Summer 2021
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Acne Studios Women’s Spring/Summer 2021

Fashion Week “I am excited by transitional moments, in-between times that are alive with possibility. This collection is about the elevation of an elemental life, about positivity, optimism and light,” says Jonny Johansson, creative director of Acne Studios.   A collection about liberation, transformation and personal rebirth. Gatherings for a spiritual moonrise, the energy of twilight, the darkness before the dawn and the impossible light of a full moon rising.   It’s about the blurring of time, the unceasing cycle of day turning to night, and vice versa; the experimentation it inspires, with clashes and contrasts, and pieces that have both a versatile presence and ease. Materials are a particular focus, with fabrics that interact and change with the light; cracked leather, pearlized cotton, metallic thread organza, iridescent paper. What may appear matt when the sun has set takes a luminescent shine after the moon rises.   Acne Studios has collaborated with the LA artist Ben Quinn, whose work is rooted in his experiences with the supernatural. His painting of a pulsating star is printed on an oversized metallic thread organza tunic, a washed linen top and wrap skirt, and tops in cotton voile or embroidered paillette top. Quinn’s image is also turned into a patchwork for sheer dresses and skirts.   Fabrics of di erent weights, weaves and textures are worn together to evoke a poetic silhouette. Crochet knits are like shing nets for bandeau tops, knickers or skirts, worn as layering pieces.Often, it’s under a translucent layer, while other times the crochet gives contrast, like under a raw-cut leather sleeveless dress.   Slouchy tailored jackets are as soft as can be, with no internal construction, even made from suit lining. Raw cut leather and suede provide moments of structure.   Luminescence is everywhere. A dip-dyed trench is in pearlescent organza, cut wide and loose. Cracked leather raw cut apron tops throw back the light, while a metallic shift dress is in crinklediridescent paper. Metallic cu s and earrings are re ective and delicate, as if hand-stamped, decoratedwith shells and stones. Transparent framed glasses let the light pass through them and are oversized enough to take in the whole of the moon.   Leather and suede bags have a weight to them with extreme oversized straps, mimicked in scale bythe garment dyed du el bags which can transition easily from day to evening to day. Flip ops havestraps of tightly braided leather, contrasting with kitten heels in raw cut fringed hemp. Spiked heels have their own attitude.   The collection represents a place that obeys its own logic and is centred around free gathering and the transition of time. “I am excited by transitional moments, in-between times that are alive with possibility. This collection is about the elevation of an elemental life, about positivity, optimism and light,” says Jonny Johansson, creative director of Acne Studios.   A collection about liberation, transformation and personal rebirth. Gatherings for a spiritual moonrise, the energy of twilight, the darkness before the dawn and the impossible light of a full moon rising.   It’s about the blurring of time, the unceasing cycle of day turning to night, and vice versa; the experimentation it inspires, with clashes and contrasts, and pieces that have both a versatile presence and ease. Materials are a particular focus, with fabrics that interact and change with the light; cracked leather, pearlized cotton, metallic thread organza, iridescent paper. What may appear matt when the sun has set takes a luminescent shine after the moon rises.   Acne Studios has collaborated with the LA artist Ben Quinn, whose work is rooted in his experiences with the supernatural. His painting of a pulsating star is printed on an oversized metallic thread organza tunic, a washed linen top and wrap skirt, and tops in cotton voile or embroidered paillette top. Quinn’s image is also turned into a patchwork for sheer dresses and skirts.   Fabrics of di erent weights, weaves and textures are worn together to evoke a poetic silhouette. Crochet knits are like shing nets for bandeau tops, knickers or skirts, worn as layering pieces.Often, it’s under a translucent layer, while other times the crochet gives contrast, like under a raw-cut leather sleeveless dress.   Slouchy tailored jackets are as soft as can be, with no internal construction, even made from suit lining. Raw cut leather and suede provide moments of structure.   Luminescence is everywhere. A dip-dyed trench is in pearlescent organza, cut wide and loose. Cracked leather raw cut apron tops throw back the light, while a metallic shift dress is in crinklediridescent paper. Metallic cu s and earrings are re ective and delicate, as if hand-stamped, decoratedwith shells and stones. Transparent framed glasses let the light pass through them and are oversized enough to take in the whole of the moon.   Leather and suede bags have a weight to them with extreme oversized straps, mimicked in scale bythe garment dyed du el bags which can transition easily from day to evening to day. Flip ops havestraps of tightly braided leather, contrasting with kitten heels in raw cut fringed hemp. Spiked heels have their own attitude.   The collection represents a place that obeys its own logic and is centred around free gathering and the transition of time.

Welcome to Loubi World!
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Welcome to Loubi World!

Fashion Week To unveil his Women’s & Men’s Spring-Summer 2021 collections, Christian Louboutin will host a virtual event on October 2, 2020 on the Korea-based gaming application Zepeto. Passionate about physical travels since his teenage years, Christian Louboutin - eager to explore new territories and an avid fan of new technologies - invites the international press, his friends and fans to join him for an immersive digital creative experience: Loubi World.   Modelled as a techno-kawaï version of the designer’s eternal muse - Paris - Loubi World recreates places and moments dear to him, from a terrace with an imaginary view of the City of Lights, to the Galerie Véro-Dodat where he opened his first store back in 1991, to a paved round square replete with a classic Parisian bistro, creperie, carrousel, the Morris columns, the new flagship store and the Loubi Disco.   Forever an advocate of self-expression and boundless creativity, Christian Louboutin has ensured that users have free range to be exactly who they’d like in Loubi World without any consideration of gender or style. Users are invited to create their own avatar using either facial recognition and by self-selecting their skin tone, hairstyle and outfit, as well as choose shoes and accessories from the new SS21 collection.   After entering the game, users are teleported into the Loubi Boutique, a virtual version of the newly opened store on rue Saint-Honoré in Paris, where they can try on and play with emblematic styles from the SS21 collection, before adding the final touch to their avatars’ looks: a new leather goods style from the new season.   A tribute to Christian Louboutin’s love of social interactions and his curiosity and excitement for meeting new people, avatars can interact with their friends on the Loubi Terrasse, take selfies with the designer, and shoot, through virtual reality, photos and videos that can easily be shared on Instagram, Facebook, Tik Tok, Weibo & WeChat.   The debut of a new collection calls for celebration. French DJ Zimmer will invite avatars to fire up the dance floor of the Loubi Disco, a nod to the designer’s teenage years at Le Palace. The true highlight of the night will be a special performance by US pop singer King Princess’ avatar.   Get your headphones ready to make sure you will fully experience the music in 8D audio, an innovative recording technology allowing a more immersive listening.   The event will welcome international guests & friends such as AmiAya, Eunse Ki, Julien Granel, King Princess, Koffe (CJI Model), Larsen Thompson, Miss Paris, Nicky Doll, Quincy Brown, Rina Sawayama, Shudu (CJI Model), TK Quann, Yu Yamada and many more, ... To unveil his Women’s & Men’s Spring-Summer 2021 collections, Christian Louboutin will host a virtual event on October 2, 2020 on the Korea-based gaming application Zepeto. Passionate about physical travels since his teenage years, Christian Louboutin - eager to explore new territories and an avid fan of new technologies - invites the international press, his friends and fans to join him for an immersive digital creative experience: Loubi World.   Modelled as a techno-kawaï version of the designer’s eternal muse - Paris - Loubi World recreates places and moments dear to him, from a terrace with an imaginary view of the City of Lights, to the Galerie Véro-Dodat where he opened his first store back in 1991, to a paved round square replete with a classic Parisian bistro, creperie, carrousel, the Morris columns, the new flagship store and the Loubi Disco.   Forever an advocate of self-expression and boundless creativity, Christian Louboutin has ensured that users have free range to be exactly who they’d like in Loubi World without any consideration of gender or style. Users are invited to create their own avatar using either facial recognition and by self-selecting their skin tone, hairstyle and outfit, as well as choose shoes and accessories from the new SS21 collection.   After entering the game, users are teleported into the Loubi Boutique, a virtual version of the newly opened store on rue Saint-Honoré in Paris, where they can try on and play with emblematic styles from the SS21 collection, before adding the final touch to their avatars’ looks: a new leather goods style from the new season.   A tribute to Christian Louboutin’s love of social interactions and his curiosity and excitement for meeting new people, avatars can interact with their friends on the Loubi Terrasse, take selfies with the designer, and shoot, through virtual reality, photos and videos that can easily be shared on Instagram, Facebook, Tik Tok, Weibo & WeChat.   The debut of a new collection calls for celebration. French DJ Zimmer will invite avatars to fire up the dance floor of the Loubi Disco, a nod to the designer’s teenage years at Le Palace. The true highlight of the night will be a special performance by US pop singer King Princess’ avatar.   Get your headphones ready to make sure you will fully experience the music in 8D audio, an innovative recording technology allowing a more immersive listening.   The event will welcome international guests & friends such as AmiAya, Eunse Ki, Julien Granel, King Princess, Koffe (CJI Model), Larsen Thompson, Miss Paris, Nicky Doll, Quincy Brown, Rina Sawayama, Shudu (CJI Model), TK Quann, Yu Yamada and many more, ...

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LOEWE WOMEN’S SPRING SUMMER 2021 SHOW-ON-THE-WALL
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LOEWE WOMEN’S SPRING SUMMER 2021 SHOW-ON-THE-WALL

Fashion Week The LOEWE SS21 Show-on-the-Wall will feature a series of online content to expand and enrich the personal experience of putting together and enjoying a paper show. The events will be aired throughout the day on the LOEWE social media channels. The idea is to offer deeper knowledge about the collection, the show concept and the artists involved, as well as entertainment, creating an experience that further enhances the identity of LOEWE as a cultural brand. The content will follow a xed agenda, with additional elements being added throughout the day.   Anthea Hamilton’s Collaboration British artist Anthea Hamilton (b. 1978) has created a unique wallpaper for this collection. Hamilton works in sculpture, installation and performance and is fascinated by the multiple meanings and resonances an image can provoke. Unexpected juxtapositions and surreal collisions of form and material abound in her work, with detours through the worlds of art, music, fashion and popular culture: from postmodern architecture or Japanese Noh and Kabuki theatre. Hamilton’s wallpaper Sr Jeanne Wavy Boots w. Gazanias and Snails (2020) is a collage of a boot and flower motif which frequently reoccur in her work. The wallpaper was designed as the backdrop for the SS21 collection and has been transformed into a textile as part of the collection. Hamilton has collaborated with LOEWE on several occasions, including for her major installation The Squash at Tate Britain in 2018. Her monumental Vulcano Table (2014) is part of the Loewe Foundation Art Collection and is currently installed in the Casa Loewe store on London’s Bond Street. The LOEWE SS21 Show-on-the-Wall will feature a series of online content to expand and enrich the personal experience of putting together and enjoying a paper show. The events will be aired throughout the day on the LOEWE social media channels. The idea is to offer deeper knowledge about the collection, the show concept and the artists involved, as well as entertainment, creating an experience that further enhances the identity of LOEWE as a cultural brand. The content will follow a xed agenda, with additional elements being added throughout the day.   Anthea Hamilton’s Collaboration British artist Anthea Hamilton (b. 1978) has created a unique wallpaper for this collection. Hamilton works in sculpture, installation and performance and is fascinated by the multiple meanings and resonances an image can provoke. Unexpected juxtapositions and surreal collisions of form and material abound in her work, with detours through the worlds of art, music, fashion and popular culture: from postmodern architecture or Japanese Noh and Kabuki theatre. Hamilton’s wallpaper Sr Jeanne Wavy Boots w. Gazanias and Snails (2020) is a collage of a boot and flower motif which frequently reoccur in her work. The wallpaper was designed as the backdrop for the SS21 collection and has been transformed into a textile as part of the collection. Hamilton has collaborated with LOEWE on several occasions, including for her major installation The Squash at Tate Britain in 2018. Her monumental Vulcano Table (2014) is part of the Loewe Foundation Art Collection and is currently installed in the Casa Loewe store on London’s Bond Street.

Dries Van Noten The collections for Women & Men S/S 2021
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Dries Van Noten The collections for Women & Men S/S 2021

Fashion Week Bold, optimistic, colourful, light, pure, fun, sculpted, easy, kinetic, frank, joyous, vivid, warm and stark, jubilant, powerful. A minimum od artifice. The visionary films of New Zealand artist Len Lye. He pioneered harnessing motion in art. Filmed in the 1920s–1940s, with colour painted and motives scratched on the celluloid, they were precursors of the psychedelia that would follow only forty years later. A fashion shoot by Viviane Sassen. An homage to the powerful role fashion editorial and imagery has played in fashion. The uplifting joy of a perfect moment. A bright windy, sunny day on the beach. Billowing pure white clouds race across a clear blue sky. Energy is high. The narrative of folklore is evoked with traditional embroidery techniques. A point of view shared for our collections for Women and Men.     FORM: The challenge was to capture movement and optimism in dress. Pure lines that span many attitudes of dress from the sublimation of couture to utility in workwear. From constructed balloon sleeves to a simple patch pocket chino. Many looks for women and men have shorts as a foundation. The lines between traditions of garment structure for men and women are blurred. High waisted skirts and pants. Exaggerated wide scooped necklines on constructed garments are mirrored in shirting. Vivid one-piece bathing suits for women for the first-ever time. Light caftans for the beach. Ties draw scalloped forms on backs.     FABRICS: The crisp and comforting simplicity of cottons. The airy light movement of organza. Contrasts in opacity and hand. Summer suiting and shirting, Large mesh, Silk organza bonded to linen, Casual sweats, chinos, silk cloque.   PRINT & EMBELLISHMENT: All printed motifs are derived from frames captured from the films of Len Lye. A new take on print and embroidery. A graphic play with light and shadow. The reality and illusion of dancing in a projection. Motifs from one printed garment invade another – prints from a skirt move onto the lapel of a jacket. What appear as simple stripes are shards of light cast through a louver shutter captured and printed. Stripes undulating across garments almost bring optical interference. The word ‘You’ is printed orembroidered on tops to encourage an end to the era of ‘Me’. The largecircle of a spotlight in vivid colours seems projected on the wearer. The romance of verdant green palm trees. The traditional craft of needlework in optic white. Laser cuts in leather seem as ‘Broderie Anglaise’ or lace. The exuberance of ruffles. Len Lye’s essay on movement in art is printed in its entirety on garments that will ‘drop’ later in the season.   ACCESSORIES:  Clutches seem caught in a vivid projection of colour and stripes. Shoes and open-toe sandals in Nappa leather mounted on our signature banana heel. Eyewear is colour coordinated with earrings and necklaces in micro beads.   PHOTOGRAPHY: Viviane Sassen   Bold, optimistic, colourful, light, pure, fun, sculpted, easy, kinetic, frank, joyous, vivid, warm and stark, jubilant, powerful. A minimum od artifice. The visionary films of New Zealand artist Len Lye. He pioneered harnessing motion in art. Filmed in the 1920s–1940s, with colour painted and motives scratched on the celluloid, they were precursors of the psychedelia that would follow only forty years later. A fashion shoot by Viviane Sassen. An homage to the powerful role fashion editorial and imagery has played in fashion. The uplifting joy of a perfect moment. A bright windy, sunny day on the beach. Billowing pure white clouds race across a clear blue sky. Energy is high. The narrative of folklore is evoked with traditional embroidery techniques. A point of view shared for our collections for Women and Men.     FORM: The challenge was to capture movement and optimism in dress. Pure lines that span many attitudes of dress from the sublimation of couture to utility in workwear. From constructed balloon sleeves to a simple patch pocket chino. Many looks for women and men have shorts as a foundation. The lines between traditions of garment structure for men and women are blurred. High waisted skirts and pants. Exaggerated wide scooped necklines on constructed garments are mirrored in shirting. Vivid one-piece bathing suits for women for the first-ever time. Light caftans for the beach. Ties draw scalloped forms on backs.     FABRICS: The crisp and comforting simplicity of cottons. The airy light movement of organza. Contrasts in opacity and hand. Summer suiting and shirting, Large mesh, Silk organza bonded to linen, Casual sweats, chinos, silk cloque.   PRINT & EMBELLISHMENT: All printed motifs are derived from frames captured from the films of Len Lye. A new take on print and embroidery. A graphic play with light and shadow. The reality and illusion of dancing in a projection. Motifs from one printed garment invade another – prints from a skirt move onto the lapel of a jacket. What appear as simple stripes are shards of light cast through a louver shutter captured and printed. Stripes undulating across garments almost bring optical interference. The word ‘You’ is printed orembroidered on tops to encourage an end to the era of ‘Me’. The largecircle of a spotlight in vivid colours seems projected on the wearer. The romance of verdant green palm trees. The traditional craft of needlework in optic white. Laser cuts in leather seem as ‘Broderie Anglaise’ or lace. The exuberance of ruffles. Len Lye’s essay on movement in art is printed in its entirety on garments that will ‘drop’ later in the season.   ACCESSORIES:  Clutches seem caught in a vivid projection of colour and stripes. Shoes and open-toe sandals in Nappa leather mounted on our signature banana heel. Eyewear is colour coordinated with earrings and necklaces in micro beads.   PHOTOGRAPHY: Viviane Sassen  

Giorgio Armani Men's and women's collections Spring/Summer 2021
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Giorgio Armani Men's and women's collections Spring/Summer 2021

Fashion Week These are timeless thoughts, as narrated by the voice of renowned and multi-awarded Italian actor Pierfrancesco Favino in the 20-minutes video-documentary that precedes and introduces the Giorgio Armani Spring/Summer 2021 show, and that, through an emotional edit of images, memories and archive interviews spans decades of Armani's dazzlingly consistent style, before making way to the new collection, broadcasted for the first time on television.   In the video-documentary, Giorgio Armani's language evolves relentlessly, whilst staying firm in its roots. It swings in subtle balances between rigour and sensuality, city and exoticism, purity and slight concessions to eccentricity. It is the result of a process of subtraction, which captures time and sublimates it, creating fashion that goes beyond fashion. Each new collection adds headwords to an expanding vocabulary, while reiterating a sense of elegance which puts the person at the centre.   For the Spring/Summer 2021 collection, silhouettes, for both men and women, are essential, soft, fluid: a blend of pure lines and neutral colours —grey, beige, black, blue— that light up with occasional geometries, swarming with rhythmic patterns, following an idea of ton sur ton that is real but also metaphorical, but never prevails over the rest. What emerges is the personality of a woman and a man who are free from aesthetic constraints, careful instead to express themselves through what they wear. Whether everything is matte or shimmering, it is the sense of measure that keeps asserting itself, overcoming time. These are timeless thoughts, as narrated by the voice of renowned and multi-awarded Italian actor Pierfrancesco Favino in the 20-minutes video-documentary that precedes and introduces the Giorgio Armani Spring/Summer 2021 show, and that, through an emotional edit of images, memories and archive interviews spans decades of Armani's dazzlingly consistent style, before making way to the new collection, broadcasted for the first time on television.   In the video-documentary, Giorgio Armani's language evolves relentlessly, whilst staying firm in its roots. It swings in subtle balances between rigour and sensuality, city and exoticism, purity and slight concessions to eccentricity. It is the result of a process of subtraction, which captures time and sublimates it, creating fashion that goes beyond fashion. Each new collection adds headwords to an expanding vocabulary, while reiterating a sense of elegance which puts the person at the centre.   For the Spring/Summer 2021 collection, silhouettes, for both men and women, are essential, soft, fluid: a blend of pure lines and neutral colours —grey, beige, black, blue— that light up with occasional geometries, swarming with rhythmic patterns, following an idea of ton sur ton that is real but also metaphorical, but never prevails over the rest. What emerges is the personality of a woman and a man who are free from aesthetic constraints, careful instead to express themselves through what they wear. Whether everything is matte or shimmering, it is the sense of measure that keeps asserting itself, overcoming time.

DIOR for Spring & Summer 2021
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DIOR for Spring & Summer 2021

Fashion Week For the Dior spring-summer 2021 ready-to-wear show, Maria Grazia Chiuri continues her committed reflection on the origins of fashion, and the meaning of cut and creation, as artistic lexicons in perpetual movement. Inspired by the work of Lucia Marcucci - an emblematic figure of the Italian avant-garde who designed the show's scenography - she chose the aesthetics of collage and visual poetry as a new space for expression. Patchworks of scarves in a mix of paisley and floral motifs, punctuated with lace fragments, accessorize a series of dresses and pants, opening up infinite possibilities for the imagination. Fascinated by the power of thought embodied by authors such as Virginia Woolf and Susan Sontag, the Creative Director of Dior women’s collections revisits the concept of clothing in its essence, from men’s shirts to sleek coats, celebrating the skills of cultures around the world, from Japan to Indonesia. A striking and magnetic choral work transcended by the female voices of the Sequenza 9.3 ensemble - directed by Catherine Simonpietri - (re)interpreting Lucia Ronchetti's Sangu di rosa and the Voceri tradition, like an ode to beauty in all its plurality. The ultimate surprise of this collective odyssey comes in the form of a unique visual work bridging reality and fiction by the filmmaker Alina Marazzi, a tribute to Lucia Marcucci mixing texts and textiles, voices and images. For the Dior spring-summer 2021 ready-to-wear show, Maria Grazia Chiuri continues her committed reflection on the origins of fashion, and the meaning of cut and creation, as artistic lexicons in perpetual movement. Inspired by the work of Lucia Marcucci - an emblematic figure of the Italian avant-garde who designed the show's scenography - she chose the aesthetics of collage and visual poetry as a new space for expression. Patchworks of scarves in a mix of paisley and floral motifs, punctuated with lace fragments, accessorize a series of dresses and pants, opening up infinite possibilities for the imagination. Fascinated by the power of thought embodied by authors such as Virginia Woolf and Susan Sontag, the Creative Director of Dior women’s collections revisits the concept of clothing in its essence, from men’s shirts to sleek coats, celebrating the skills of cultures around the world, from Japan to Indonesia. A striking and magnetic choral work transcended by the female voices of the Sequenza 9.3 ensemble - directed by Catherine Simonpietri - (re)interpreting Lucia Ronchetti's Sangu di rosa and the Voceri tradition, like an ode to beauty in all its plurality. The ultimate surprise of this collective odyssey comes in the form of a unique visual work bridging reality and fiction by the filmmaker Alina Marazzi, a tribute to Lucia Marcucci mixing texts and textiles, voices and images.

Elisabetta Franchi for SS21
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Elisabetta Franchi for SS21

Fashion Week The power of nature as a rebirth and a real fresh start is the common thread of the Spring/Summer 2021 collection by Elisabetta Franchi. The colours of spring dress the class and delicacy of an aristocratic woman, a refined and seductive but aware woman: a woman who chooses.   Elegant dresses, being the reflection of homes of yesteryear, cross the border of reality exploring shapes and colours that create a modern wardrobe with super classic details, which is capable of transmitting visions and memories, new desires and timeless values inherited. The woman by Elisabetta Franchi in this new collection walks the runway with iconic garments that embody the style codes of the Maison in the unmistakable model-making and in the scrupulous attention to quality through continuous research. The dialogue with nature inspires the colour palette, where lavender, the flagship colour and emblem of a dreamy and irrefutably feminine woman, is combined with neutral shades such as butter, lime, powder and rose gold, with some touches of amaranth. Floral patterns reveal harmonious garments capable of bewitching with their polite and luminous charm, ranging from lace and tulle dresses with silhouettes defined by more structured volumes, rhythmic flounces and ruffles, which remind of the light petals of a flower. The finest workmanship gives the sleeves the effect of a three- dimensional flower, which also materialises on dresses and tops featuring soft and never impudent lines. Evening dresses on chiffon bases, all-over embroidery of iridescent sequins and tulle express the Maison's mastery. Precious yarns interweave to create couture textures and volumes, while clouds of impalpably light ottoman wrap an iconic and timeless woman. The grand finale is an explosion of maxi skirts and snow-white shirts: the rigour of aristocracy, refinement and modesty is revisited and shattered by the energetic beauty and enchantment of a carousel of young girls in bloom. The power of nature as a rebirth and a real fresh start is the common thread of the Spring/Summer 2021 collection by Elisabetta Franchi. The colours of spring dress the class and delicacy of an aristocratic woman, a refined and seductive but aware woman: a woman who chooses.   Elegant dresses, being the reflection of homes of yesteryear, cross the border of reality exploring shapes and colours that create a modern wardrobe with super classic details, which is capable of transmitting visions and memories, new desires and timeless values inherited. The woman by Elisabetta Franchi in this new collection walks the runway with iconic garments that embody the style codes of the Maison in the unmistakable model-making and in the scrupulous attention to quality through continuous research. The dialogue with nature inspires the colour palette, where lavender, the flagship colour and emblem of a dreamy and irrefutably feminine woman, is combined with neutral shades such as butter, lime, powder and rose gold, with some touches of amaranth. Floral patterns reveal harmonious garments capable of bewitching with their polite and luminous charm, ranging from lace and tulle dresses with silhouettes defined by more structured volumes, rhythmic flounces and ruffles, which remind of the light petals of a flower. The finest workmanship gives the sleeves the effect of a three- dimensional flower, which also materialises on dresses and tops featuring soft and never impudent lines. Evening dresses on chiffon bases, all-over embroidery of iridescent sequins and tulle express the Maison's mastery. Precious yarns interweave to create couture textures and volumes, while clouds of impalpably light ottoman wrap an iconic and timeless woman. The grand finale is an explosion of maxi skirts and snow-white shirts: the rigour of aristocracy, refinement and modesty is revisited and shattered by the energetic beauty and enchantment of a carousel of young girls in bloom.

The House of Givenchy is pleased to present the first advertising campaign by its new Creative Director, Matthew M. Williams
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The House of Givenchy is pleased to present the first advertising campaign by its new Creative Director, Matthew M. Williams

Fashion The House of Givenchy is pleased to present the first advertising campaign by its new Creative Director, Matthew M. Williams.   In a series of images shot by the photographer Nick Knight, a longtime friend and collaborator, the designer lifts the veil on his aesthetic for Givenchy, revealing key hardware symbols that he will bring to the fore in collections for both women and men. Since his appointment as Creative Director of Givenchy in June 2020, Williams has been quietly honing a fresh, modern attitude for the Parisian fashion house. He began by drawing inspiration from his new life in Paris, incorporating beloved places and emblems into his designs. In particular, a picture he took of the celebrated ‘love locks’ adorning the bridges of Paris was the starting point for an original take on Givenchy signatures. Metallic symbols floating against gradated pastel grounds, creating a distinctive, street-edged tone. Williams infuses classic chains with his personal vision: flat and angular links are stylized into a “G” shape— a subtle yet immediately recognizable visual code denoting unity and interconnectedness.   Sophisticated unisex accessories express a symbiosis between the Givenchy universe and the designer’sflair with hardware. Gold-finish “Givenchy” locks nod to the U-lock design or come with a spare, narrow body and elongated shackle that closes with a textured screw. A padlock embossed with an exotic skin motif sports two asymmetrical piercings at its base so that its sibling locks can hook up, or not — an open invitation to make this iconic new symbol one’s own. For digital platforms, Williams oversaw a video, also shot by Knight, featuring custom vocals by another of his close friends, the rapper and songwriter Playboi Carti. Behind the scenes, the “work in progress”currently underway at Givenchy takes shape as images of the new House symbols cascade from a high- res printer and Carti riffs on right versus wrong pronunciations of the House’s name. In a daring choice for a debut campaign, Williams highlights Givenchy’s new symbols in still-lifes accentuated by scaled-down “Givenchy” and “4G” signatures, an assertion of discretion, worldliness and refinement.     The debut campaign by Matthew M. Williams for the House of Givenchy will break on September 26th, 2020. The House of Givenchy is pleased to present the first advertising campaign by its new Creative Director, Matthew M. Williams.   In a series of images shot by the photographer Nick Knight, a longtime friend and collaborator, the designer lifts the veil on his aesthetic for Givenchy, revealing key hardware symbols that he will bring to the fore in collections for both women and men. Since his appointment as Creative Director of Givenchy in June 2020, Williams has been quietly honing a fresh, modern attitude for the Parisian fashion house. He began by drawing inspiration from his new life in Paris, incorporating beloved places and emblems into his designs. In particular, a picture he took of the celebrated ‘love locks’ adorning the bridges of Paris was the starting point for an original take on Givenchy signatures. Metallic symbols floating against gradated pastel grounds, creating a distinctive, street-edged tone. Williams infuses classic chains with his personal vision: flat and angular links are stylized into a “G” shape— a subtle yet immediately recognizable visual code denoting unity and interconnectedness.   Sophisticated unisex accessories express a symbiosis between the Givenchy universe and the designer’sflair with hardware. Gold-finish “Givenchy” locks nod to the U-lock design or come with a spare, narrow body and elongated shackle that closes with a textured screw. A padlock embossed with an exotic skin motif sports two asymmetrical piercings at its base so that its sibling locks can hook up, or not — an open invitation to make this iconic new symbol one’s own. For digital platforms, Williams oversaw a video, also shot by Knight, featuring custom vocals by another of his close friends, the rapper and songwriter Playboi Carti. Behind the scenes, the “work in progress”currently underway at Givenchy takes shape as images of the new House symbols cascade from a high- res printer and Carti riffs on right versus wrong pronunciations of the House’s name. In a daring choice for a debut campaign, Williams highlights Givenchy’s new symbols in still-lifes accentuated by scaled-down “Givenchy” and “4G” signatures, an assertion of discretion, worldliness and refinement.     The debut campaign by Matthew M. Williams for the House of Givenchy will break on September 26th, 2020.

BOSS revealed their new Spring 2021 collection
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BOSS revealed their new Spring 2021 collection

Fashion Week BOSS revealed an uplifting, colorful and relaxed Spring 21 collection with an outdoor show at the Palazzo del Senato in Milan. Staged before a limited number of guests, the runway show was augmented by a multi-platform global livestream, and a simultaneous live event in China.   The Palazzo del Senato holds particular significance for the brand, as the first-ever BOSS Womenswear show was held here exactly 20 years ago. This return, two decades on, was an opportunity to celebrate the enduring confidence, elegance, and strength of the BOSS woman, as she moves together with the BOSS man into a whole new era.   The tree-lined Spring 21 runway, set amid the columns of the open-air courtyard, brought architecture and nature into perfect alignment. Every tree from the show space will now be donated to the city of Milan, and cared for by BOSS for two years.   Guests including Suki Waterhouse, Olivia Palermo and Johannes Huebl, Maria Pedraza (Élite), Caro Daur and Louis Hofmann (Dark)attended the show in person, while TikTok stars Bryanboy and Nic Kaufmann created content to support the TikTok livestream – a first for a German fashion brand. Walking the runway this season, models included Irina Shayk, Adut Akech, Felice Norordhoff, Mica Arganaraz, Nico Potur, Alpha Dia, Leon Dame and Jonas Gloer. BOSS revealed an uplifting, colorful and relaxed Spring 21 collection with an outdoor show at the Palazzo del Senato in Milan. Staged before a limited number of guests, the runway show was augmented by a multi-platform global livestream, and a simultaneous live event in China.   The Palazzo del Senato holds particular significance for the brand, as the first-ever BOSS Womenswear show was held here exactly 20 years ago. This return, two decades on, was an opportunity to celebrate the enduring confidence, elegance, and strength of the BOSS woman, as she moves together with the BOSS man into a whole new era.   The tree-lined Spring 21 runway, set amid the columns of the open-air courtyard, brought architecture and nature into perfect alignment. Every tree from the show space will now be donated to the city of Milan, and cared for by BOSS for two years.   Guests including Suki Waterhouse, Olivia Palermo and Johannes Huebl, Maria Pedraza (Élite), Caro Daur and Louis Hofmann (Dark)attended the show in person, while TikTok stars Bryanboy and Nic Kaufmann created content to support the TikTok livestream – a first for a German fashion brand. Walking the runway this season, models included Irina Shayk, Adut Akech, Felice Norordhoff, Mica Arganaraz, Nico Potur, Alpha Dia, Leon Dame and Jonas Gloer.

PRADA SPRING/SUMMER 2021 WOMENSWEAR SHOW DIALOGUES
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PRADA SPRING/SUMMER 2021 WOMENSWEAR SHOW DIALOGUES

Fashion Week The Spring/Summer 2021 Prada womenswear show is, by its nature, a dialogue - the debut collection by co-creative directors Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons, a creative conversation in progress. An initial proposal, the first example of myriad possibilities, it propounds Prada as part of a dialogue between the different viewpoints of two collaborators. A definition, and then a redefinition, of values and ideology, a fundamental examination of the meaning of Prada.   This season, in a period where the mediation between technology and humanity has become vital - bringing us together, even as we are apart - inspiration is drawn from this inherently contemporary and inevitable fusion. The process behind the collection was, inevitably, shaped by these necessary restrictions: fashion as both reflection of and reaction to the time in which it is invented. On a deeper level, technology’s indispensablepresence within not only life but daily action has led to a different dialogue between ourselves and information: today, technology is a part of humanity itself. The collection explores the notion of uniform, touching on multiple different interpretations of that concept - a uniform of Prada, of a community, a visual representation of identity, of shared and embraced values, a way of thinking. Clothes are pared-back, refined, focussed, without superfluous decoration: shell tops, straight pants, overcoats in industrial re-nylon, constructed using couture techniques, suits executed in fleece.   Garments are drawn around the body, held by the hand. It is an innately human gesture that can be transformative, translated into the architecture of pieces, to cut and form language. Artworks created by Peter de Potter, a long-term collaborator of Raf Simons, explore ideas of thought and process - returning, again, to the relationship between information, technology and humankind, but also, wider, of thought itself as first an inner monologue, then an outer dialogue, another exchange of ideas. They are used to interrupt and disrupt the uniform surfaces of clothes - as graphic tools of contrast, sometimes laid over archival Prada print, emblematic of a meeting of worlds and aesthetic discourses.   A requisite component of uniform is simplicity: recognition, reducing clothing to an essence, to the essential. The wrap, a precise rectangle of fabric, is a logical outcome of thismode of exploration of reduction, a symbol representative of the collection’s overallconsiderations. Proposed in the different fabrications that comprise the collection - t-shirt jersey, fleece, re-nylon, embroidered duchesse satin, chiné taffeta - its intention can transform, speaking of protection or decoration, utility or adornment. Simple acts have deeper meaning: the translation of garments into different materials change our reading, transforming the pragmatic to the sophisticated, and vice-versa. The addition of pockets to pieces is a practical act - but in that practicality, it speaks of living and life, of the usefulness of clothes in a dialogue with the human body.   Duality and plurality has always been inherent in the language of Prada: juxtaposing different elements, approaches and disciplines to find a paradoxical harmony in dichotomy. The physical environment of this virtual fashion show – conceived by OMA/AMO - is a personal, intimate space, tactile. Technology appears as chandeliers of monitors and cameras - decoration and use combined - animated in a dynamic ballet with figures that pass through. The soundtrack, composed for the show by Plastikman, British-Canadian electronic musician Richie Hawtin, includes the names of every woman modelling in the show: an entirely new cast who have never walked a runway show previously. For all of them, this marks a debut.   Examining a dialogue between mankind and machine, the notion of instinct and logic emerges: diametric opposites, the two nevertheless form a foundational dialogue to creativity. Both are quintessentially Prada - a consideration of the world, and a natural reaction to that stimulus. Another paradoxical dialogue, reflecting reality.   Discover more on: prada.com The Spring/Summer 2021 Prada womenswear show is, by its nature, a dialogue - the debut collection by co-creative directors Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons, a creative conversation in progress. An initial proposal, the first example of myriad possibilities, it propounds Prada as part of a dialogue between the different viewpoints of two collaborators. A definition, and then a redefinition, of values and ideology, a fundamental examination of the meaning of Prada.   This season, in a period where the mediation between technology and humanity has become vital - bringing us together, even as we are apart - inspiration is drawn from this inherently contemporary and inevitable fusion. The process behind the collection was, inevitably, shaped by these necessary restrictions: fashion as both reflection of and reaction to the time in which it is invented. On a deeper level, technology’s indispensablepresence within not only life but daily action has led to a different dialogue between ourselves and information: today, technology is a part of humanity itself. The collection explores the notion of uniform, touching on multiple different interpretations of that concept - a uniform of Prada, of a community, a visual representation of identity, of shared and embraced values, a way of thinking. Clothes are pared-back, refined, focussed, without superfluous decoration: shell tops, straight pants, overcoats in industrial re-nylon, constructed using couture techniques, suits executed in fleece.   Garments are drawn around the body, held by the hand. It is an innately human gesture that can be transformative, translated into the architecture of pieces, to cut and form language. Artworks created by Peter de Potter, a long-term collaborator of Raf Simons, explore ideas of thought and process - returning, again, to the relationship between information, technology and humankind, but also, wider, of thought itself as first an inner monologue, then an outer dialogue, another exchange of ideas. They are used to interrupt and disrupt the uniform surfaces of clothes - as graphic tools of contrast, sometimes laid over archival Prada print, emblematic of a meeting of worlds and aesthetic discourses.   A requisite component of uniform is simplicity: recognition, reducing clothing to an essence, to the essential. The wrap, a precise rectangle of fabric, is a logical outcome of thismode of exploration of reduction, a symbol representative of the collection’s overallconsiderations. Proposed in the different fabrications that comprise the collection - t-shirt jersey, fleece, re-nylon, embroidered duchesse satin, chiné taffeta - its intention can transform, speaking of protection or decoration, utility or adornment. Simple acts have deeper meaning: the translation of garments into different materials change our reading, transforming the pragmatic to the sophisticated, and vice-versa. The addition of pockets to pieces is a practical act - but in that practicality, it speaks of living and life, of the usefulness of clothes in a dialogue with the human body.   Duality and plurality has always been inherent in the language of Prada: juxtaposing different elements, approaches and disciplines to find a paradoxical harmony in dichotomy. The physical environment of this virtual fashion show – conceived by OMA/AMO - is a personal, intimate space, tactile. Technology appears as chandeliers of monitors and cameras - decoration and use combined - animated in a dynamic ballet with figures that pass through. The soundtrack, composed for the show by Plastikman, British-Canadian electronic musician Richie Hawtin, includes the names of every woman modelling in the show: an entirely new cast who have never walked a runway show previously. For all of them, this marks a debut.   Examining a dialogue between mankind and machine, the notion of instinct and logic emerges: diametric opposites, the two nevertheless form a foundational dialogue to creativity. Both are quintessentially Prada - a consideration of the world, and a natural reaction to that stimulus. Another paradoxical dialogue, reflecting reality.   Discover more on: prada.com

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