@
Iris van Herpen presents 'Roots of Rebirth'
1021

Iris van Herpen presents 'Roots of Rebirth'

Fashion Week Iris van Herpen shows her latest collection 'Roots of Rebirth' during Paris Haute Couture Week on January 25th 2021. During such rarefied times, the designer explores a symbiosis of high technology and the artisanal craftsmanship of couture, through a collection that references the intricacy of fungi and the entanglement of life that breathes beneath our feet. Through 'Roots of Rebirth', Van Herpen notions towards the miraculous lacery of interconnectedness from the natural 'wood wide web,' weaving a dialogue between the terrestrial and the underworld.     The work of Iris van Herpen is often described as ethereal and transcendental; a chimeric exposition, radiating shapes that reference the relationship between the human body and the natural world. This season, the Dutch designer explores the rich, yet deeply fragile interconnectedness of an unfamiliar world, the enigmatic fungi empire and the life-bearing fine threads of mycelium. The collection details the extraordinary existence of this winding 'fabric of life,' the marveling world of undergrowth tapestry. In reference to the book penned by scientist Merlin Sheldrake, 'Entangled Life' notes that 'fungi is the ecological connective tissue, the living seam by which much of the world is stitched into relation.'     "Thinking about fungi makes the world look different. These astonishing organisms challenge our animal imaginations and make questions of many of our well-worn concepts, from individuality to intelligence." - Merlin Sheldrake Iris van Herpen shows her latest collection 'Roots of Rebirth' during Paris Haute Couture Week on January 25th 2021. During such rarefied times, the designer explores a symbiosis of high technology and the artisanal craftsmanship of couture, through a collection that references the intricacy of fungi and the entanglement of life that breathes beneath our feet. Through 'Roots of Rebirth', Van Herpen notions towards the miraculous lacery of interconnectedness from the natural 'wood wide web,' weaving a dialogue between the terrestrial and the underworld.     The work of Iris van Herpen is often described as ethereal and transcendental; a chimeric exposition, radiating shapes that reference the relationship between the human body and the natural world. This season, the Dutch designer explores the rich, yet deeply fragile interconnectedness of an unfamiliar world, the enigmatic fungi empire and the life-bearing fine threads of mycelium. The collection details the extraordinary existence of this winding 'fabric of life,' the marveling world of undergrowth tapestry. In reference to the book penned by scientist Merlin Sheldrake, 'Entangled Life' notes that 'fungi is the ecological connective tissue, the living seam by which much of the world is stitched into relation.'     "Thinking about fungi makes the world look different. These astonishing organisms challenge our animal imaginations and make questions of many of our well-worn concepts, from individuality to intelligence." - Merlin Sheldrake

Isabel Marant presents the new men's collection for Fall & Winter 2021
1020

Isabel Marant presents the new men's collection for Fall & Winter 2021

Fashion Week CLASS OF 2021   Another year begins in the Isabel Marant cloakroom. The Fall-Winter 2021 silhouette that mixes comfortable pieces with reinterpreted formal staples reflects an adaptation to a disrupted way of life. Vintage sportswear-inspired garments set the pace for the collection: striped knitted polo shirts, puffer jackets, polar fleece hoodie. Floral patterns blend surprisingly with a technical windbreaker jacket. The contrast between inside and out paves the way for a new kind of uniform where a wool suit jacket meets dazzling sweatpants. A blanket-like scarf sticks out from a tote bag. The almost grunge layering of colors and prints is softened by the presence of neutral fabrics that create an immediate sense of timelessness. Shearling takes the form of either a hooded jacket or a college teddy with an initial letter. This sport spirit conveys a need for dynamism, further enhanced by the omnipresence of sneakers. The Isabel Marant man has dreams of travel and escape that this collection helps fulfill.       MODELS: Alpha Dia, Lucas El Bali, Fernando Lindez, Freek Iven, Leon Dame   IMAGES: Bruno Staub CLASS OF 2021   Another year begins in the Isabel Marant cloakroom. The Fall-Winter 2021 silhouette that mixes comfortable pieces with reinterpreted formal staples reflects an adaptation to a disrupted way of life. Vintage sportswear-inspired garments set the pace for the collection: striped knitted polo shirts, puffer jackets, polar fleece hoodie. Floral patterns blend surprisingly with a technical windbreaker jacket. The contrast between inside and out paves the way for a new kind of uniform where a wool suit jacket meets dazzling sweatpants. A blanket-like scarf sticks out from a tote bag. The almost grunge layering of colors and prints is softened by the presence of neutral fabrics that create an immediate sense of timelessness. Shearling takes the form of either a hooded jacket or a college teddy with an initial letter. This sport spirit conveys a need for dynamism, further enhanced by the omnipresence of sneakers. The Isabel Marant man has dreams of travel and escape that this collection helps fulfill.       MODELS: Alpha Dia, Lucas El Bali, Fernando Lindez, Freek Iven, Leon Dame   IMAGES: Bruno Staub

Hermès presents their new men's AW21 collection
1018

Hermès presents their new men's AW21 collection

Fashion Week A collection that encourages us to renew the movement of the world. Inside-outside, the clothes leave their framework, offering a palette of games of lines and colours: a source of energy. They bridge different worlds: from the inside to the outside and vice-versa.     Hybrid and practical, the garments are both casual and elegant. Voluptuous or compact materials run headlong into each other in audacious associations that blur the line between formal and informal. Graphic signatures, distorted pockets, playfully asymmetrical. Borrowed from saddlery, the piqûres étrivière orpiqûres lantes are discreetly visible. Graphic lines and geometrical variations design optimistic illusions of movement. An invitation to stroll; energy of journeys. One wants comfort. The quest for suppleness and relaxation is expressed by reduced dimensions and pants with drawstring waists. The colours — cumin, glycin, frost blue — are here playfully blended with tones of liquorice, pepper and petroleum blue. A collection that encourages us to renew the movement of the world. Inside-outside, the clothes leave their framework, offering a palette of games of lines and colours: a source of energy. They bridge different worlds: from the inside to the outside and vice-versa.     Hybrid and practical, the garments are both casual and elegant. Voluptuous or compact materials run headlong into each other in audacious associations that blur the line between formal and informal. Graphic signatures, distorted pockets, playfully asymmetrical. Borrowed from saddlery, the piqûres étrivière orpiqûres lantes are discreetly visible. Graphic lines and geometrical variations design optimistic illusions of movement. An invitation to stroll; energy of journeys. One wants comfort. The quest for suppleness and relaxation is expressed by reduced dimensions and pants with drawstring waists. The colours — cumin, glycin, frost blue — are here playfully blended with tones of liquorice, pepper and petroleum blue.

Advertising
Advertising
DIOR PRESENTS THE WINTER 2021-2022 MEN'S COLLECTION
1017

DIOR PRESENTS THE WINTER 2021-2022 MEN'S COLLECTION

Fashion Week FOR THE WINTER 2021-2022 COLLECTION, KIM JONES CHOSE TO COLLABORATE WITH PETER DOIG, ONE OF THE MOST SINGULAR PAINTERS OF THE LAST THREE DECADES. THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR REINVENTS CEREMONIAL WEAR, A VERITABLE LIVING LINK TO HERITAGE, IN SILHOUETTES INSPIRED BY THE HOUSE’S HAUTE COUTURE SAVOIR-FAIRE AND INFUSED WITH THE BRITISH ARTIST’S BEWITCHING UNIVERSE. HIS PAINTINGS ARE TRANSPOSED ONTO THE PIECES, WHICH MORPH INTO WHITE CANVASES PUNCTUATED WITH VIRTUOSO EMBROIDERY, JACQUARDS AND VIBRANTLY HUED PRINTS. A SERIES OF HATS DESIGNED BY STEPHEN JONES ARE ENHANCED WITH ILLUSTRATIONS PRODUCED BY HAND BY PETER DOIG, EVOKING THE SYMBOLS OF HIS IMAGINATION ALONGSIDE DIOR EMBLEMS. A BOLD CELEBRATION OF THE PASSIONATE, CAPTIVATING DIALOGUE BETWEEN ART AND FASHION. FOR THE WINTER 2021-2022 COLLECTION, KIM JONES CHOSE TO COLLABORATE WITH PETER DOIG, ONE OF THE MOST SINGULAR PAINTERS OF THE LAST THREE DECADES. THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR REINVENTS CEREMONIAL WEAR, A VERITABLE LIVING LINK TO HERITAGE, IN SILHOUETTES INSPIRED BY THE HOUSE’S HAUTE COUTURE SAVOIR-FAIRE AND INFUSED WITH THE BRITISH ARTIST’S BEWITCHING UNIVERSE. HIS PAINTINGS ARE TRANSPOSED ONTO THE PIECES, WHICH MORPH INTO WHITE CANVASES PUNCTUATED WITH VIRTUOSO EMBROIDERY, JACQUARDS AND VIBRANTLY HUED PRINTS. A SERIES OF HATS DESIGNED BY STEPHEN JONES ARE ENHANCED WITH ILLUSTRATIONS PRODUCED BY HAND BY PETER DOIG, EVOKING THE SYMBOLS OF HIS IMAGINATION ALONGSIDE DIOR EMBLEMS. A BOLD CELEBRATION OF THE PASSIONATE, CAPTIVATING DIALOGUE BETWEEN ART AND FASHION.

Dries Van Noten presented his Men's Autumn-Winter 2021-2022 Collection
1016

Dries Van Noten presented his Men's Autumn-Winter 2021-2022 Collection

Fashion Week   Dressing for our days. A fresh, new-fashioned, take on the familiar. Time-honoured and cherished key elements of the Dries Van Noten wardrobe are designed to subtly heighten their essence and purpose. Emphasis is brought to a tender expression of intimate emotion and feel. The values of sportswear and a formal wardrobe interchange. A study of sensation and the reassurance a garment may offer. Quietly sublimated neutral tones and forms. Feel over effect, function over ornamentation. An abstinence from artifice. Reassuring, unassuming, fun. Whispering precision, purity abstracted, subtly lavish, calm and open, spare, informal, unceremonious, substance with little posture, tactile, fundamental, uncontrived, luxurious, current.     A tonal spectrum. Archetypal neutrals. Muted to fresh, subdued to optimistic, soft to vibrant. Acid and alkaline. Flesh, fawn, plum, gold, mint, sage, pinks, petrol, purple, saffron, ochre, camel, russet, sky, khaki, lemon, coffee. indigo, mustard, dusty pink, coral, anthracite, navy, jet black, cement, ecru, chocolate.     Inspired by traditional tie motifs, a take on scarf prints, zodiac signs, checks, pinstripes revisited, classic shirt stripes, printed denim.     Modern comfort. A play on weight, light, aspect, transparency, touch and even sound. Matt and shine, light reflected. Subtly lavish, Traditional modernity. Washed casual to formal. Ultralight nylon brushed and crisp cottons, distorted poplins, satin, nylon, men’s suiting. Modern and traditional. Twin layer T-shirts. Continued support of traditional mills, fabrics from around the globe.     Soft to sharp structures. Elegant slender volumes contrast with the oversize, ample and easy. Sumptuous. Classic tailoring. Layering and wrapping. Familiar and unassuming. Cropped and elongated. Academic, substantial, long, ease, loose. Slits to sides of formal and casual garments. Cropped ankle lengths. Multi layered and padded to fabrics in a single layer. Pleated high waist trousers can be worn low. Oversize car coats. Trousers from easy and wide to a more strict drainpipe.     Dries Van Noten monogramed metal ring as signature decoration and function. The Dries Van Noten Fat Baby bag for boys now with its padded form inspiring soft structured shoes and sandals. A twist to classic shoes, fusing the spirit of the sporty, rustic, and urbane. Elongated elegant forms are exaggerated and refined. Totes and leather pouches in printed leathers, High-tech moccasins. Nylon back packs sport futuristic prints. Bucket hats in padded nylon. Knit legwarmers seem like boots.     Dressing for our days. A fresh, new-fashioned, take on the familiar. Time-honoured and cherished key elements of the Dries Van Noten wardrobe are designed to subtly heighten their essence and purpose. Emphasis is brought to a tender expression of intimate emotion and feel. The values of sportswear and a formal wardrobe interchange. A study of sensation and the reassurance a garment may offer. Quietly sublimated neutral tones and forms. Feel over effect, function over ornamentation. An abstinence from artifice. Reassuring, unassuming, fun. Whispering precision, purity abstracted, subtly lavish, calm and open, spare, informal, unceremonious, substance with little posture, tactile, fundamental, uncontrived, luxurious, current.     A tonal spectrum. Archetypal neutrals. Muted to fresh, subdued to optimistic, soft to vibrant. Acid and alkaline. Flesh, fawn, plum, gold, mint, sage, pinks, petrol, purple, saffron, ochre, camel, russet, sky, khaki, lemon, coffee. indigo, mustard, dusty pink, coral, anthracite, navy, jet black, cement, ecru, chocolate.     Inspired by traditional tie motifs, a take on scarf prints, zodiac signs, checks, pinstripes revisited, classic shirt stripes, printed denim.     Modern comfort. A play on weight, light, aspect, transparency, touch and even sound. Matt and shine, light reflected. Subtly lavish, Traditional modernity. Washed casual to formal. Ultralight nylon brushed and crisp cottons, distorted poplins, satin, nylon, men’s suiting. Modern and traditional. Twin layer T-shirts. Continued support of traditional mills, fabrics from around the globe.     Soft to sharp structures. Elegant slender volumes contrast with the oversize, ample and easy. Sumptuous. Classic tailoring. Layering and wrapping. Familiar and unassuming. Cropped and elongated. Academic, substantial, long, ease, loose. Slits to sides of formal and casual garments. Cropped ankle lengths. Multi layered and padded to fabrics in a single layer. Pleated high waist trousers can be worn low. Oversize car coats. Trousers from easy and wide to a more strict drainpipe.     Dries Van Noten monogramed metal ring as signature decoration and function. The Dries Van Noten Fat Baby bag for boys now with its padded form inspiring soft structured shoes and sandals. A twist to classic shoes, fusing the spirit of the sporty, rustic, and urbane. Elongated elegant forms are exaggerated and refined. Totes and leather pouches in printed leathers, High-tech moccasins. Nylon back packs sport futuristic prints. Bucket hats in padded nylon. Knit legwarmers seem like boots.  

Louis Vuitton Men’s collection by Virgil Abloh Fall-Winter 2021
1012

Louis Vuitton Men’s collection by Virgil Abloh Fall-Winter 2021

Fashion Week “Within my practice, I contribute to a Black canon of culture and art and its preservation. This is why, to preserve my own output, I record it at length.” –Virgil Abloh, A manifesto according to Virgil Abloh, 2020.     What do you want to be when you grow up? As children, our dreamsand aspirations are personi ed by archetypes: the Artist, theSalesman, the Architect, the Drifter. Familiar characters in ev-eryday society, they are inseparably de ned by their uniforms:the dress codes we associate with professions, lifestyles and knowledge. From head to toe, our minds are inherently trained to outline an archetypical wardrobe to help us identify the character of an individual. Often, these characters are tied to societal presumptions of cultural background, gender, and sexuality.     The Louis Vuitton Fall-Winter 2021 Men’s Collection investigates the unconscious biases instilled in our collective psyche by the archaic norms of society. Predetermined perceptions, they imbue our outlooks with manmade myths connected to the genetics of peo- ple, ideas and art. Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh employsfashion as a tool to change those preconceptions: keep the codes,but change the values.     The logic respects Black cultural traditions that use gures of speech (irony, punning, ri ing) to play with or reverse the conno- tations of established codes. These techniques create new meanings and subvert established canons; for example, the way a standardEnglish phrase may have an entirely di erent meaning in Blackvernacular English. Virgil Abloh applies these techniques to his design methodology, imbuing the grammar of recognised archetypeswith di erent genetics.     Informed by James Baldwin’s essay Stranger in the Village from 1953, which deals with the parallels between the author’s experi- ences as an African-American man in a Swiss village and his life in America, the show takes place between locations in Switzerlandand Paris. The frames of the performance revolve around the gu-rative notion of the art heist: the myths spun by society aroundorigin and ownership of art, visual references and those who cre-ate. (See: ‘The Performance Art Piece’.)     The conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner constructs a series of aph-orisms-as-patterns tied to these premises: “YOU CAN TELL A BOOK BYITS COVER”, “THE SAME PLACE AT THE SAME TIME”, “( SOMEWHERE SOME-HOW )”. Throughout garments and accessories, motifs and techniques play on themes of illusion, replicating the familiar through the deceptive lenses of trompe l’oeil and ltrage, and re-appropriat- ing the normal through extreme elevation. It fuels a study of the un-designed: items devoid of artisticownership and exact historical provenance. The physical show in-vitation is embodied by a balsa wood DIY model plane, an eternalsymbol of boyhood devoid of artistic ownership. Who came up with the paper cup? The metal nail? The pencil? It begs the questionof who can claim creation: who gets to make art, and who gets toconsume it. Conceived outside the art sphere, un-designed and es- sentially “normal” items represent a public domain continuously reinvented and claimed by the sector of art.     As a result, normality is accentuated: the slumber we slip intofollowing periods of social unrest. What does normality look like, what does it mean, and who has the optional privilege to embody it? Virgil Abloh brings his established idea of “Tourist vs. Pur-ist” to the forefront: his term for the outsider, who aspirestowards an esoteric domain of knowledge versus the insider, who already occupies it. The collection detects their respective codes in order to defy and unite them.     In a social climate hankering for a new normal that breaks with the archaic structure of society, archetypes become neotypes. Ifan artist doesn’t ful l our predetermined image of an artist, doesit make them any less of an artist? If a reference that originated in the sphere of the Tourist is altered into a new piece of art,can the Purist claim ownership of that reference? If Kente cloth– the fabric of Virgil Abloh’s cultural heritage – is rendered intartan, does that make Kente any less Ghanaian and tartan any less Scottish? Provenance is reality, while ownership is myth: manmadeinventions now ripe for re-invention. “Within my practice, I contribute to a Black canon of culture and art and its preservation. This is why, to preserve my own output, I record it at length.” –Virgil Abloh, A manifesto according to Virgil Abloh, 2020.     What do you want to be when you grow up? As children, our dreamsand aspirations are personi ed by archetypes: the Artist, theSalesman, the Architect, the Drifter. Familiar characters in ev-eryday society, they are inseparably de ned by their uniforms:the dress codes we associate with professions, lifestyles and knowledge. From head to toe, our minds are inherently trained to outline an archetypical wardrobe to help us identify the character of an individual. Often, these characters are tied to societal presumptions of cultural background, gender, and sexuality.     The Louis Vuitton Fall-Winter 2021 Men’s Collection investigates the unconscious biases instilled in our collective psyche by the archaic norms of society. Predetermined perceptions, they imbue our outlooks with manmade myths connected to the genetics of peo- ple, ideas and art. Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh employsfashion as a tool to change those preconceptions: keep the codes,but change the values.     The logic respects Black cultural traditions that use gures of speech (irony, punning, ri ing) to play with or reverse the conno- tations of established codes. These techniques create new meanings and subvert established canons; for example, the way a standardEnglish phrase may have an entirely di erent meaning in Blackvernacular English. Virgil Abloh applies these techniques to his design methodology, imbuing the grammar of recognised archetypeswith di erent genetics.     Informed by James Baldwin’s essay Stranger in the Village from 1953, which deals with the parallels between the author’s experi- ences as an African-American man in a Swiss village and his life in America, the show takes place between locations in Switzerlandand Paris. The frames of the performance revolve around the gu-rative notion of the art heist: the myths spun by society aroundorigin and ownership of art, visual references and those who cre-ate. (See: ‘The Performance Art Piece’.)     The conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner constructs a series of aph-orisms-as-patterns tied to these premises: “YOU CAN TELL A BOOK BYITS COVER”, “THE SAME PLACE AT THE SAME TIME”, “( SOMEWHERE SOME-HOW )”. Throughout garments and accessories, motifs and techniques play on themes of illusion, replicating the familiar through the deceptive lenses of trompe l’oeil and ltrage, and re-appropriat- ing the normal through extreme elevation. It fuels a study of the un-designed: items devoid of artisticownership and exact historical provenance. The physical show in-vitation is embodied by a balsa wood DIY model plane, an eternalsymbol of boyhood devoid of artistic ownership. Who came up with the paper cup? The metal nail? The pencil? It begs the questionof who can claim creation: who gets to make art, and who gets toconsume it. Conceived outside the art sphere, un-designed and es- sentially “normal” items represent a public domain continuously reinvented and claimed by the sector of art.     As a result, normality is accentuated: the slumber we slip intofollowing periods of social unrest. What does normality look like, what does it mean, and who has the optional privilege to embody it? Virgil Abloh brings his established idea of “Tourist vs. Pur-ist” to the forefront: his term for the outsider, who aspirestowards an esoteric domain of knowledge versus the insider, who already occupies it. The collection detects their respective codes in order to defy and unite them.     In a social climate hankering for a new normal that breaks with the archaic structure of society, archetypes become neotypes. Ifan artist doesn’t ful l our predetermined image of an artist, doesit make them any less of an artist? If a reference that originated in the sphere of the Tourist is altered into a new piece of art,can the Purist claim ownership of that reference? If Kente cloth– the fabric of Virgil Abloh’s cultural heritage – is rendered intartan, does that make Kente any less Ghanaian and tartan any less Scottish? Provenance is reality, while ownership is myth: manmadeinventions now ripe for re-invention.

  FENDI presents their Men’s Fall/Winter 2021-2022 Collection
900

FENDI presents their Men’s Fall/Winter 2021-2022 Collection

Fashion Week The FENDI Men’s Fall/Winter 2021-22 collection designed by Silvia Venturini Fendi is an optimistic adventure framed within a game of illusions. A cinematic sequence directed by the Italian artist Nico Vascellari sets the scene for ‘What Is Normal Today ft. Silvia’ – an exclusive dance-pop track composed by Not Waving. Appearing inside an immersive 360° mirrored tunnel, models are infinitely multiplied whilst entirely alone, as a maze of suspended doorways is framed in coloured neon beneath the pulsating ceiling of a futuristic music video.      One by one, a broad spectrum of menswear classics is twisted with FENDI playfulness, emerging from darkness into full Technicolour. The result is an unabashed celebration of colour and light, and a universal message of solidarity and connection in Surreal times. A jewel palette sees emerald, vermillion, saffron, orange, fuchsia, cobalt and periwinkle colour-blocked against black, camel and charcoal, as linings, inlays and slashed seams flash with contrasting textures and shades.     Throughout the collection, multifunctionality and form unite in reversible workwear and relaxed outerwear silhouettes. Belted overcoat and trench shapes in cashmere flannel, satin, striped fur and shearling are infused with a cozy peignoir attitude, and piped pyjama hemlines bring the indoors out and the outdoors in. Diagonal quilting inflates all manner of silk jacquard separates from a shawl collar lounge coat to pullovers, shirt jackets and bermuda shorts in a luxuriant expression of cocooning comfort, and ‘inside-out’ tailoring features deconstructed panels that expose padded FF logo linings. The conventions of ribbed and cable knitting are reimagined as long johns, cardigan scarves, mitten cuffs, and a wrapped ‘sleeve’ neck sweater for a weird and wonderful take on the ‘new normal’.     An icon of the London underground scene, the multidisciplinary artist and performer Noel Fielding provides a series of psychedelic artworks for the collection, abstracting the FENDI logo and emphasizing the season’s cosmic spirit through his multicoloured, stream-of-consciousness scribble art. Faces and creatures emerge straight out of Fielding’s dreamscape narrative accenting the collection’s straightforward silhouette with moments of Art Brut insanity. Fielding’s outré pop sensibility is the latest evolution in Silvia Venturini Fendi’s playful selection of artistic collaborators, that has previously included British artists John Booth, @HeyReilly and Sue Tilley, to name a few.     The FENDI Men’s Fall/Winter 2021-22 accessories collection revels in the bright promise of the season’s chromatic palette. The all-over treatment of colour-matched leathers, matte satin and hardware creates dipped-effect Baguette and flatpack shopper shapes, and miniature luggage styles reprise an embossed stripe FF monogram leather as backpacks and crossbody pouches. In fancy leathers, the Baguette is scaled up and down as a roomy satchel or a lanyard card holder, whilst Noel Fielding’s graphic art adorns the Peekaboo and an FF buckle tote in grainy calfskin. In ultra-classic menswear tones, shearling FF slippers and slip-on laced or buckle sabots continue the collection’s indoor-outdoor conceit, joining zip-up quilted ‘spats’ ankle boots and the FENDI Force Light FF lug-sole combat styles. The FENDI Men’s Fall/Winter 2021-22 collection designed by Silvia Venturini Fendi is an optimistic adventure framed within a game of illusions. A cinematic sequence directed by the Italian artist Nico Vascellari sets the scene for ‘What Is Normal Today ft. Silvia’ – an exclusive dance-pop track composed by Not Waving. Appearing inside an immersive 360° mirrored tunnel, models are infinitely multiplied whilst entirely alone, as a maze of suspended doorways is framed in coloured neon beneath the pulsating ceiling of a futuristic music video.      One by one, a broad spectrum of menswear classics is twisted with FENDI playfulness, emerging from darkness into full Technicolour. The result is an unabashed celebration of colour and light, and a universal message of solidarity and connection in Surreal times. A jewel palette sees emerald, vermillion, saffron, orange, fuchsia, cobalt and periwinkle colour-blocked against black, camel and charcoal, as linings, inlays and slashed seams flash with contrasting textures and shades.     Throughout the collection, multifunctionality and form unite in reversible workwear and relaxed outerwear silhouettes. Belted overcoat and trench shapes in cashmere flannel, satin, striped fur and shearling are infused with a cozy peignoir attitude, and piped pyjama hemlines bring the indoors out and the outdoors in. Diagonal quilting inflates all manner of silk jacquard separates from a shawl collar lounge coat to pullovers, shirt jackets and bermuda shorts in a luxuriant expression of cocooning comfort, and ‘inside-out’ tailoring features deconstructed panels that expose padded FF logo linings. The conventions of ribbed and cable knitting are reimagined as long johns, cardigan scarves, mitten cuffs, and a wrapped ‘sleeve’ neck sweater for a weird and wonderful take on the ‘new normal’.     An icon of the London underground scene, the multidisciplinary artist and performer Noel Fielding provides a series of psychedelic artworks for the collection, abstracting the FENDI logo and emphasizing the season’s cosmic spirit through his multicoloured, stream-of-consciousness scribble art. Faces and creatures emerge straight out of Fielding’s dreamscape narrative accenting the collection’s straightforward silhouette with moments of Art Brut insanity. Fielding’s outré pop sensibility is the latest evolution in Silvia Venturini Fendi’s playful selection of artistic collaborators, that has previously included British artists John Booth, @HeyReilly and Sue Tilley, to name a few.     The FENDI Men’s Fall/Winter 2021-22 accessories collection revels in the bright promise of the season’s chromatic palette. The all-over treatment of colour-matched leathers, matte satin and hardware creates dipped-effect Baguette and flatpack shopper shapes, and miniature luggage styles reprise an embossed stripe FF monogram leather as backpacks and crossbody pouches. In fancy leathers, the Baguette is scaled up and down as a roomy satchel or a lanyard card holder, whilst Noel Fielding’s graphic art adorns the Peekaboo and an FF buckle tote in grainy calfskin. In ultra-classic menswear tones, shearling FF slippers and slip-on laced or buckle sabots continue the collection’s indoor-outdoor conceit, joining zip-up quilted ‘spats’ ankle boots and the FENDI Force Light FF lug-sole combat styles.

 THE (RE)SET (RE)TAILORING THE MODERN MAN BY ZEGNA
896

THE (RE)SET (RE)TAILORING THE MODERN MAN BY ZEGNA

Fashion Week The fabric of human life is woven by adaptability. What makes humans evolve and progress is the ability to hit the button, when necessary, and do it all over again, in a different way, with a diverse mindset yet keeping a memory, an awareness and progressing. This is one of these moments: a leap forward and outwards that is also a leaning inward, doing away with the barriers, separations and distinctions that were there before.      A definition of new categories, mirroring the relentless evolving of times, has characterized from day one the path of Artistic Director Alessandro Sartori within the Zegna world: a move away from utter formality, but not from a thoughtful sartorial approach, for another definition of style.      THE (RE)SET that is now being pushed activates a fluid movement that blends the public and the private, the personal space and the public space, and with that one’s clothed persona, indoors and out, as lounging, living and working collide often in one single activity. In this seamless world that keeps taking shape, new style possibilities arise as Zegna (Re)tailors the modern man.      “We all are experiencing a new reality concerned with new needs, which lead us to previously unseen lifestyles and attitudes. It is precisely at a time like this, when everything is under discussion, that we, at Zegna, have decided to (Re)set. We have looked at our roots to (Re)interpret our style codes and (Re)tailor the modern man. Outdoor and indoor come together and a new way of dressing takes hold, where comfort and style blend to create a new aesthetic”, says Alessandro Sartori.     The collection follows a seamless pace.A new and varied generation of jersey fabrics take center stage at Zegna. Shapes are fluid, comfortable and adaptable. In sync with lifestyles that blend indoors and outdoors, the tropes of stay-at-home dressing - the shawl collars and belted generosity of a robe de chambre, the ease of track pants and the coziness of hand cut jersey slippers - reshape the very idea of formality. Archetypal items get new functions in a switch of forms, weights and materials. Chore coats in cashmere, wrapped as a robe, take up the role of habitual sport codes, hybrid suits are in double cashmere, unreleased groups of knitwear replace shirts, new sweaters made of felted cashmere and knit, or knitted out of leather, are meant as outerwear; trousers and jackets are cut in shearling. Even briefcases, the very epitome of business, are deconstructed.     Ease and personality are the by words: the reimagined suit, either loose or with a blazer tailored close to the body, is not a uniform, but a way of being oneself. It can be as supple as being cut entirely in knitted cashmere or jacquard, and is worn with loose turtlenecks or zip-up tops in place of a shirt. Volumes are relaxed for the dropped shouldered jackets and the shirt jackets matched with full trousers, for the belted coats, the blousons and the double front jumpers.     The seamlessness between inside and outside, thereafter, is already in the garments where the #UseTheExsting mindset continues to be imperative.     The progression is sealed by a chromatic flow that starts with notes of Alpine star white, Autumn foliage beige, Felce green, smoky grey, dense black, forest mud with sudden accents of orange. The overall chromatic solidity is broken by the glitched pied de poule that swarm in optical jacquards, by the diagonal stripes that rhythm full outfits. The collection is presented in the form of a film. Fluid camera movements and uncontrived passages from inside to outside offer a visual narrative full of sudden surprises and ruptures from one situation to the other. Glimpses of a metropolis and the insides of an ideal building flow smoothly as models cross rooms, paths and ambiances until THE (RE)SET finally unveils its meta meaning, the set being in fact the theatrical place where the filming happens.  Life follows fiction as fiction follows life, in an endless (Re)Set.            Credits:   Artistic Direction, Alessandro Sartori   Video Production,4Friends Film   Music, Wladimir Schall   Hair and Make-up, Beppe D’Elia for BEAUTICK  The fabric of human life is woven by adaptability. What makes humans evolve and progress is the ability to hit the button, when necessary, and do it all over again, in a different way, with a diverse mindset yet keeping a memory, an awareness and progressing. This is one of these moments: a leap forward and outwards that is also a leaning inward, doing away with the barriers, separations and distinctions that were there before.      A definition of new categories, mirroring the relentless evolving of times, has characterized from day one the path of Artistic Director Alessandro Sartori within the Zegna world: a move away from utter formality, but not from a thoughtful sartorial approach, for another definition of style.      THE (RE)SET that is now being pushed activates a fluid movement that blends the public and the private, the personal space and the public space, and with that one’s clothed persona, indoors and out, as lounging, living and working collide often in one single activity. In this seamless world that keeps taking shape, new style possibilities arise as Zegna (Re)tailors the modern man.      “We all are experiencing a new reality concerned with new needs, which lead us to previously unseen lifestyles and attitudes. It is precisely at a time like this, when everything is under discussion, that we, at Zegna, have decided to (Re)set. We have looked at our roots to (Re)interpret our style codes and (Re)tailor the modern man. Outdoor and indoor come together and a new way of dressing takes hold, where comfort and style blend to create a new aesthetic”, says Alessandro Sartori.     The collection follows a seamless pace.A new and varied generation of jersey fabrics take center stage at Zegna. Shapes are fluid, comfortable and adaptable. In sync with lifestyles that blend indoors and outdoors, the tropes of stay-at-home dressing - the shawl collars and belted generosity of a robe de chambre, the ease of track pants and the coziness of hand cut jersey slippers - reshape the very idea of formality. Archetypal items get new functions in a switch of forms, weights and materials. Chore coats in cashmere, wrapped as a robe, take up the role of habitual sport codes, hybrid suits are in double cashmere, unreleased groups of knitwear replace shirts, new sweaters made of felted cashmere and knit, or knitted out of leather, are meant as outerwear; trousers and jackets are cut in shearling. Even briefcases, the very epitome of business, are deconstructed.     Ease and personality are the by words: the reimagined suit, either loose or with a blazer tailored close to the body, is not a uniform, but a way of being oneself. It can be as supple as being cut entirely in knitted cashmere or jacquard, and is worn with loose turtlenecks or zip-up tops in place of a shirt. Volumes are relaxed for the dropped shouldered jackets and the shirt jackets matched with full trousers, for the belted coats, the blousons and the double front jumpers.     The seamlessness between inside and outside, thereafter, is already in the garments where the #UseTheExsting mindset continues to be imperative.     The progression is sealed by a chromatic flow that starts with notes of Alpine star white, Autumn foliage beige, Felce green, smoky grey, dense black, forest mud with sudden accents of orange. The overall chromatic solidity is broken by the glitched pied de poule that swarm in optical jacquards, by the diagonal stripes that rhythm full outfits. The collection is presented in the form of a film. Fluid camera movements and uncontrived passages from inside to outside offer a visual narrative full of sudden surprises and ruptures from one situation to the other. Glimpses of a metropolis and the insides of an ideal building flow smoothly as models cross rooms, paths and ambiances until THE (RE)SET finally unveils its meta meaning, the set being in fact the theatrical place where the filming happens.  Life follows fiction as fiction follows life, in an endless (Re)Set.            Credits:   Artistic Direction, Alessandro Sartori   Video Production,4Friends Film   Music, Wladimir Schall   Hair and Make-up, Beppe D’Elia for BEAUTICK 

PRADA FALL/WINTER 2021 MENSWEAR SHOW: POSSIBLE FEELINGS
897

PRADA FALL/WINTER 2021 MENSWEAR SHOW: POSSIBLE FEELINGS

Fashion Week The Prada Fall/Winter 2021 Menswear collection by Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons takes as its basis an intimate and personal wish for contact, our urge to exchange and relate. The foundation of all is the individual: the human body, and its freedom.     The need to feel, the pleasure of tactility, results in a panoply of surface texture and textile. Echoing the notion of sensory stimulation, geometric-patterned jacquard knits and leathers are combined with re-nylon, bouclé tweeds and classic pinstripe wool suiting, in both traditional and unanticipated colors. The interplay is projected outwards, to the sequence of rooms the models navigate through the show. Each excites the senses: backdrops brilliantly-hued, the models’ isolated passages underscoredby an original electronic soundtrack by Plastikman aka Richie Hawtin. Devised by Rem Koolhaas andAMO, the show’s ‘non-spaces’ are defined by panes of marble, resin, plaster and faux fur. Inviting andseductive, they can pretend to be both interior and exterior, hard and soft, warm and cold: simultaneously both and neither, they allow absolute freedom of interpretation and expression.     A similar doublespeak is reflected in the depiction of the body itself - via clothes reduced, minimalized in structure. The logical conclusion is to return to the body: jacquard-knit bodysuitscreate a streamlined “second skin”, serving to delineate the figure in dynamic movement. Abstractionof feeling becomes abstraction of freedom. These bodysuits paradoxically reveal while concealing, placing an emphasis on physicality, but also covering the form. Some are proposed alone: in other outfits, they are used to create a base layer under tailoring and outerwear. They denote both protection and exposure, with synchronous connotations of the naive and knowing, intimate and removed, youthful and mature. In the latter, they reflect a passage of time, of life.     To opposite ends, emphasizing the body through a process of reduction results in silhouettes that stand away from the frame, a reduction of shape in the garment. Single and double-breasted coats are constructed on rectilinear lines; bomber jackets are generous. Executed in leather and bouclé, lined in geometric jacquards, garments are sensual - crafting a topography of feeling, enjoyed by the wearer alone. Color and pattern excites the eye; surfaces entice touch.     A NOTE ON THE SET   With the ambition of repurposing furnishing used for the Prada Group’s shows, the materials utilizedin the set of the Prada Fall/Winter 2021 Menswear digital show will be upcycled, finding a new life after the event through special product installations and pop-ups around the world. Finally, these materials will be donated to Meta, a circular economy project based in Milan, which offers sustainable solutions to waste disposal within ephemeral events by collecting and recovering materials for selling and rentals. Meta works in collaboration with La Réserve des arts, an association offering a service of collection and recovery of raw materials and decoration waste from fashion shows, making them available to professionals and students in the cultural sector. The Prada Fall/Winter 2021 Menswear collection by Miuccia Prada and Raf Simons takes as its basis an intimate and personal wish for contact, our urge to exchange and relate. The foundation of all is the individual: the human body, and its freedom.     The need to feel, the pleasure of tactility, results in a panoply of surface texture and textile. Echoing the notion of sensory stimulation, geometric-patterned jacquard knits and leathers are combined with re-nylon, bouclé tweeds and classic pinstripe wool suiting, in both traditional and unanticipated colors. The interplay is projected outwards, to the sequence of rooms the models navigate through the show. Each excites the senses: backdrops brilliantly-hued, the models’ isolated passages underscoredby an original electronic soundtrack by Plastikman aka Richie Hawtin. Devised by Rem Koolhaas andAMO, the show’s ‘non-spaces’ are defined by panes of marble, resin, plaster and faux fur. Inviting andseductive, they can pretend to be both interior and exterior, hard and soft, warm and cold: simultaneously both and neither, they allow absolute freedom of interpretation and expression.     A similar doublespeak is reflected in the depiction of the body itself - via clothes reduced, minimalized in structure. The logical conclusion is to return to the body: jacquard-knit bodysuitscreate a streamlined “second skin”, serving to delineate the figure in dynamic movement. Abstractionof feeling becomes abstraction of freedom. These bodysuits paradoxically reveal while concealing, placing an emphasis on physicality, but also covering the form. Some are proposed alone: in other outfits, they are used to create a base layer under tailoring and outerwear. They denote both protection and exposure, with synchronous connotations of the naive and knowing, intimate and removed, youthful and mature. In the latter, they reflect a passage of time, of life.     To opposite ends, emphasizing the body through a process of reduction results in silhouettes that stand away from the frame, a reduction of shape in the garment. Single and double-breasted coats are constructed on rectilinear lines; bomber jackets are generous. Executed in leather and bouclé, lined in geometric jacquards, garments are sensual - crafting a topography of feeling, enjoyed by the wearer alone. Color and pattern excites the eye; surfaces entice touch.     A NOTE ON THE SET   With the ambition of repurposing furnishing used for the Prada Group’s shows, the materials utilizedin the set of the Prada Fall/Winter 2021 Menswear digital show will be upcycled, finding a new life after the event through special product installations and pop-ups around the world. Finally, these materials will be donated to Meta, a circular economy project based in Milan, which offers sustainable solutions to waste disposal within ephemeral events by collecting and recovering materials for selling and rentals. Meta works in collaboration with La Réserve des arts, an association offering a service of collection and recovery of raw materials and decoration waste from fashion shows, making them available to professionals and students in the cultural sector.

ETRO PRESENTS THEIR MEN’S FALL WINTER 2021/22 COLLECTION
998

ETRO PRESENTS THEIR MEN’S FALL WINTER 2021/22 COLLECTION

Fashion Week Iconoclastic, unconventional, personal. A message of hope and faith. Since the sun always shines after the storm. Menswear Creative Director, Kean Etro, embraces an optimistic, uplifting mood for his Fall Winter 2021/22 collection, which kicks off a new chapter for the brand.     A new attitude takes center stage, with ETRO engaged in a conversation about what makes the fashion house relevant for today’s consumers. A sense of freedom runs through the lineup, where established rules are broken to create a fresh, immediate and appealing vocabulary of iconic pieces to mix and match with a frisky approach. The boundaries between daywear and evening wear blur. Function and aesthetics blend. After the long days of confinement, it is time to take the street with a fierce, bold attitude.     The playful and the ironic meet the elegant and the sumptuous in a mix of high and low, casual and elegant. Impeccable blazers with cadet details and robe coats in rich fabrications are layered on color- blocked sporty anoraks decorated with discreet Paisley patterns. Recycled wool maxi sweaters find place next to shirts featuring collars made of archival silk linings, while the Pegaso logo pops up on bomber jackets and oversized hoodies. The street cool appeal of baggy utility denim pants splashed with cashmere motifs is counterbalanced by the impeccable sartorial sophistication of camel coats and double-breasted suits featuring deconstructed fluid silhouettes. Pajama-inspired piping details enrich shirts. Quilted jackets are crafted from ETRO’s vintage upholstery textiles. Retro sport-inspired logo bands run down the legs of nylon track pants. Clashing contrasts also define the footwear selection, with beautifully constructed brogues and loafers, punctuated by studs, juxtaposed to patchwork sneakers with neon laces. Mandalas and Paisley patterns stand out on highly functional backpacks, pouches and cross body bags with multiple pockets on the straps to carry everyday essentials.     Cherry on top, a range of vests coming in a blend of wool and mohair are part of a see now-buy now genderless capsule collection immediately available, in the neon tones of blue, yellow and pink, on etro.com. Iconoclastic, unconventional, personal. A message of hope and faith. Since the sun always shines after the storm. Menswear Creative Director, Kean Etro, embraces an optimistic, uplifting mood for his Fall Winter 2021/22 collection, which kicks off a new chapter for the brand.     A new attitude takes center stage, with ETRO engaged in a conversation about what makes the fashion house relevant for today’s consumers. A sense of freedom runs through the lineup, where established rules are broken to create a fresh, immediate and appealing vocabulary of iconic pieces to mix and match with a frisky approach. The boundaries between daywear and evening wear blur. Function and aesthetics blend. After the long days of confinement, it is time to take the street with a fierce, bold attitude.     The playful and the ironic meet the elegant and the sumptuous in a mix of high and low, casual and elegant. Impeccable blazers with cadet details and robe coats in rich fabrications are layered on color- blocked sporty anoraks decorated with discreet Paisley patterns. Recycled wool maxi sweaters find place next to shirts featuring collars made of archival silk linings, while the Pegaso logo pops up on bomber jackets and oversized hoodies. The street cool appeal of baggy utility denim pants splashed with cashmere motifs is counterbalanced by the impeccable sartorial sophistication of camel coats and double-breasted suits featuring deconstructed fluid silhouettes. Pajama-inspired piping details enrich shirts. Quilted jackets are crafted from ETRO’s vintage upholstery textiles. Retro sport-inspired logo bands run down the legs of nylon track pants. Clashing contrasts also define the footwear selection, with beautifully constructed brogues and loafers, punctuated by studs, juxtaposed to patchwork sneakers with neon laces. Mandalas and Paisley patterns stand out on highly functional backpacks, pouches and cross body bags with multiple pockets on the straps to carry everyday essentials.     Cherry on top, a range of vests coming in a blend of wool and mohair are part of a see now-buy now genderless capsule collection immediately available, in the neon tones of blue, yellow and pink, on etro.com.

Louis Vuitton Men’s collection by Virgil Abloh Spring-Summer 2021
991

Louis Vuitton Men’s collection by Virgil Abloh Spring-Summer 2021

Men Louis Vuitton Men’s collection by Virgil Abloh Spring-Summer 2021 ‘Myth vs. Reality: The Full Story’ Chicago, IL, September 2020.     “The more mundane the xed text, the more dramatic is the Signifyin(g) revision. It is this principle of repetition and difference, this practice of intertextuality, which has been so crucial to black vernacular forms of Signifyin(g), jazz and its antecedents, the blues, spirituals, and ragtime. Signifyin(g) is so fundamentally black...so shared in [our] culture as to have long ago become second nature to its users.” – Henry Louis Gates, The Signifying Monkey: A Theory of African- American Literary Criticism, 1988.     “The narrative of direct cause and effect, the lapsarian before and after, of heroic origin and farcical repetition, will no longer do. Many of us recite this narrative without much thought – but with great condescension toward the very possibility of contemporary art. “ – Hal Foster, Who’s Afraid of the Neo-Avant-Garde?, 1994.     In the fall of 2019, on a life-related hiatus, Virgil Abloh found himself introspective at home for an extended period of time after several years of non-stop travel and continuous work. He spent this time around his mother and father saturated in his Ghanaian heritage and childhood memories. He decided that moving forward, the creative premises of his work at Louis Vuitton would spring directly from his cultural heritage. His work would visualise unapologetic Black Imagination in an autobiographical and deeply personal voice. A second-gener-ation African-American, Abloh’s Ghanaian-born parents draped his childhood in a cultural tapestry of Kente cloth, hand-carvedgurines, wooden masks, and the iconography of spirituality. That winter, he approached his mother Eunice with an idea. Soon, Mrs Abloh commissioned a series of traditional wooden sculptures from family artisans in the Arts Centre market in Accra, Ghana. Imagined by her son, the artefacts fused the properties of West African art with the characteristics of Louis Vuitton. These works of art created the foundation for his Spring-Summer 2021 collection.     Now, Abloh’s every point of inspiration came to life through the lens of his childhood. Slender suiting, broad shoulders, and surreal accessories and motifs reminded him of the way Ghanaian men – his father in- cluded – dressed in the 1970s. These men came of age in the early years of Ghanaian independence from colonial rule and used the symbolic power of style and tailoring to express newfound power and freedom. Abloh drew parallels to ska, two tone and the African diaspora’s manifestation in the Jamaican elements adopted by British subculture, as well as the patterns and silhouettes of La Sape, the dandies of Kinshasaand Brazzaville. In the red, yellow and green of the Ghanaian and Ethiopian ags, Abloh recognisedthe wardrobes associated with Rasta and reggae.     Shopping for his children in a toy store in Paris in January 2020, he caught a glimpse of him-self in a mirror, his pockets stuffed with puppets of all shapes and colours. They made him think of the carved masks, gurines and dollshe knew from Ghana, and references he recognised from the Louis Vuitton genetics: a teddy bear designed by Marc Jacobs for the Spring-Summer 2005 Men’s collection, and the Maroquinaris. Zoologicae series of small leather goods created for the house by Billie Achilleos in 2011.     Organically, the colourful characters of ‘Zoooom with friends’came to life, animating garments and accessories throughout his collection. Abloh based each character on real people in his life who accompanied him on his journey since his first days in the Louis Vuitton offices. The symbiosis of inspirations that informed the puppets made Abloh contemplate the cultural and sub-cultural belonging we ascribe to the things that inspire us: the territorialism of inspirations, and the myths of derivation wecreate around objects, references and people. In the tradition of Thomas Mann, myths are stories spun from collective memory. They are tools for authors and artists, which transcend the existing and allow for the creation of something new. “I have never tried to produce the illusion that I am the source of the history of Joseph,” Mann said of his bildungsroman Joseph and His Brothers published 1933-43. “Before it could be told, it happened, it sprang from the source from which all history springs, and tells itself as it goes.”     A suit painted in clouds reminds some of Magritte and others of Raphael, but in the eyes of a child, does it not belong to a skygazed upon mutuallyacross the globe? In his essay The Myth of Originality in Contemporary Art from 1964, the sculptor David Hare re ects on theoriginality of familiar and age-old imagery in art. “A Rembrandt cow has little resemblance to a Dubu etcow and neither of them are art because of the cow, who [...] is hermetically original. More simply, man’s originality is comparative, whereas God’s may notbe.” He further argues: “Once an artist begins to use originali- ty as an attribute which is his, once the public begins to go out of their way to look for it, its meaning is lost.” Louis Vuitton Men’s collection by Virgil Abloh Spring-Summer 2021 ‘Myth vs. Reality: The Full Story’ Chicago, IL, September 2020.     “The more mundane the xed text, the more dramatic is the Signifyin(g) revision. It is this principle of repetition and difference, this practice of intertextuality, which has been so crucial to black vernacular forms of Signifyin(g), jazz and its antecedents, the blues, spirituals, and ragtime. Signifyin(g) is so fundamentally black...so shared in [our] culture as to have long ago become second nature to its users.” – Henry Louis Gates, The Signifying Monkey: A Theory of African- American Literary Criticism, 1988.     “The narrative of direct cause and effect, the lapsarian before and after, of heroic origin and farcical repetition, will no longer do. Many of us recite this narrative without much thought – but with great condescension toward the very possibility of contemporary art. “ – Hal Foster, Who’s Afraid of the Neo-Avant-Garde?, 1994.     In the fall of 2019, on a life-related hiatus, Virgil Abloh found himself introspective at home for an extended period of time after several years of non-stop travel and continuous work. He spent this time around his mother and father saturated in his Ghanaian heritage and childhood memories. He decided that moving forward, the creative premises of his work at Louis Vuitton would spring directly from his cultural heritage. His work would visualise unapologetic Black Imagination in an autobiographical and deeply personal voice. A second-gener-ation African-American, Abloh’s Ghanaian-born parents draped his childhood in a cultural tapestry of Kente cloth, hand-carvedgurines, wooden masks, and the iconography of spirituality. That winter, he approached his mother Eunice with an idea. Soon, Mrs Abloh commissioned a series of traditional wooden sculptures from family artisans in the Arts Centre market in Accra, Ghana. Imagined by her son, the artefacts fused the properties of West African art with the characteristics of Louis Vuitton. These works of art created the foundation for his Spring-Summer 2021 collection.     Now, Abloh’s every point of inspiration came to life through the lens of his childhood. Slender suiting, broad shoulders, and surreal accessories and motifs reminded him of the way Ghanaian men – his father in- cluded – dressed in the 1970s. These men came of age in the early years of Ghanaian independence from colonial rule and used the symbolic power of style and tailoring to express newfound power and freedom. Abloh drew parallels to ska, two tone and the African diaspora’s manifestation in the Jamaican elements adopted by British subculture, as well as the patterns and silhouettes of La Sape, the dandies of Kinshasaand Brazzaville. In the red, yellow and green of the Ghanaian and Ethiopian ags, Abloh recognisedthe wardrobes associated with Rasta and reggae.     Shopping for his children in a toy store in Paris in January 2020, he caught a glimpse of him-self in a mirror, his pockets stuffed with puppets of all shapes and colours. They made him think of the carved masks, gurines and dollshe knew from Ghana, and references he recognised from the Louis Vuitton genetics: a teddy bear designed by Marc Jacobs for the Spring-Summer 2005 Men’s collection, and the Maroquinaris. Zoologicae series of small leather goods created for the house by Billie Achilleos in 2011.     Organically, the colourful characters of ‘Zoooom with friends’came to life, animating garments and accessories throughout his collection. Abloh based each character on real people in his life who accompanied him on his journey since his first days in the Louis Vuitton offices. The symbiosis of inspirations that informed the puppets made Abloh contemplate the cultural and sub-cultural belonging we ascribe to the things that inspire us: the territorialism of inspirations, and the myths of derivation wecreate around objects, references and people. In the tradition of Thomas Mann, myths are stories spun from collective memory. They are tools for authors and artists, which transcend the existing and allow for the creation of something new. “I have never tried to produce the illusion that I am the source of the history of Joseph,” Mann said of his bildungsroman Joseph and His Brothers published 1933-43. “Before it could be told, it happened, it sprang from the source from which all history springs, and tells itself as it goes.”     A suit painted in clouds reminds some of Magritte and others of Raphael, but in the eyes of a child, does it not belong to a skygazed upon mutuallyacross the globe? In his essay The Myth of Originality in Contemporary Art from 1964, the sculptor David Hare re ects on theoriginality of familiar and age-old imagery in art. “A Rembrandt cow has little resemblance to a Dubu etcow and neither of them are art because of the cow, who [...] is hermetically original. More simply, man’s originality is comparative, whereas God’s may notbe.” He further argues: “Once an artist begins to use originali- ty as an attribute which is his, once the public begins to go out of their way to look for it, its meaning is lost.”

SAINT LAURENT SUMMER 21 BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO
818

SAINT LAURENT SUMMER 21 BY ANTHONY VACCARELLO

Fashion Finding the essence of things. Pure and soft shapes, a thick jersey uncovered from the late Sixties archives. Uncertain times, just like today. And as a response to that turmoil mixed with worry, but also hope and new passions, the same desire to dress just for yourself, a yearning for comfort and confidence. Outlining the body without constricting it. Going out after slipping on a tunic and trousers, a vareuse with spacious pockets, a long jacket with tidy shoulders, all like new versions of Le Smoking. A silk blouse worn with rider shorts, or a fluid, pseudo austere jumpsuit, emphasizing a lean silhouette. For the “inside” life, we have all come to know, a floral explosion of chiffon with fluffy marabout fringes, a subtly sheer Liseuse, a not so quaint charm, somewhere between fantasy and fancy. The Jewelry is illuminating the muted and enveloping colors of a collection dedicated to the freedom of movement.     « I wanted to focus on the essence of things. I think it’s a sign of the times. But I didn’t want anything bleak or heavy. The desert, to me, symbolizes that yearn for serenity, open space, a slower rhythm. The clothes are also softer, the spirit of the collection is more gentle, stripped back » Anthony Vaccarello     Credits : Video @ncanguilhem Soundtrack @sebastian_edbgr A selection of jewelry featured in the collection are designed by Claude Lalanne ysl.com #YSL #SaintLaurent #YvesSaintLaurent @Anthonyvaccarello Finding the essence of things. Pure and soft shapes, a thick jersey uncovered from the late Sixties archives. Uncertain times, just like today. And as a response to that turmoil mixed with worry, but also hope and new passions, the same desire to dress just for yourself, a yearning for comfort and confidence. Outlining the body without constricting it. Going out after slipping on a tunic and trousers, a vareuse with spacious pockets, a long jacket with tidy shoulders, all like new versions of Le Smoking. A silk blouse worn with rider shorts, or a fluid, pseudo austere jumpsuit, emphasizing a lean silhouette. For the “inside” life, we have all come to know, a floral explosion of chiffon with fluffy marabout fringes, a subtly sheer Liseuse, a not so quaint charm, somewhere between fantasy and fancy. The Jewelry is illuminating the muted and enveloping colors of a collection dedicated to the freedom of movement.     « I wanted to focus on the essence of things. I think it’s a sign of the times. But I didn’t want anything bleak or heavy. The desert, to me, symbolizes that yearn for serenity, open space, a slower rhythm. The clothes are also softer, the spirit of the collection is more gentle, stripped back » Anthony Vaccarello     Credits : Video @ncanguilhem Soundtrack @sebastian_edbgr A selection of jewelry featured in the collection are designed by Claude Lalanne ysl.com #YSL #SaintLaurent #YvesSaintLaurent @Anthonyvaccarello

loading
More articles