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In conversation with Tiffany Hsu
176

In conversation with Tiffany Hsu

Style We had a delight to speak with Tiffany about the coming Spring & Summer trends and her highlights.   What are your top 5 new trends for Spring & Summer 2020?   90´s Clean Lines: A ‘90s mood for clean, monochromatic elegance was a favourite in Milan, particularly from the likes of Jil Sander and Bottega Veneta. Minimalism and streamlined tailoring is still a mainstay trend continuing from last season— this time, in an even more pared-back way. We loved the elegant box blazers from newcomer Low Classic, as well as The Row’s impeccable construction. The simple leather accessories we saw at Loewe—modern staples with simple lines—made the biggest statement.   Neon: A rainbow of neons was seen on the runway, with over-the-top fuchsia, fluorescent orange, bright yellow and lime green making a statement within the collections. Dries Van Noten—with a surprise appearance from fashion legend Christian Lacroix —was the occasion to see a sophisticated spin on neon colours that was more inclined towards eveningwear and dresses. Standout styles for us included Valentino’s pairing of tone-on-tone bags with belts, diamonds-meet-neon jewellery from Melissa Kaye and EÉRA, and Kwaidan Editions’ highlighter-green power suit.   Jungle: Strutting down the runway in the same plunging silk-chiffon jungle dress she infamously wore to the Grammy Awards in 2000, Jennifer Lopez’s appearance at Versace was on everyone’s feeds and lips this September. The dress inspired the creation of Google Images, as well as one of the strongest prints for next season. From Fendi’s and Dolce & Gabbana’s luxuriant green leaves to Marni’s abstract blooms, tropical prints have been flowering during Spring/Summer ’20, with palm trees and vivid colors invading dresses, jackets and footwear.   Leather: Following the wave of leather-on-leather men’s tailoring, new leather looks appeared in the womenswear collections. Even if all-black leather is still a favourite, new and different shapes have emerged, such as power shoulders at Maison Margiela and elegantly oversized dresses at Givenchy. Designers also incorporated new colors, such as Gucci’s slit pencil skirt in butter yellow and Bottega Veneta’s anorak dress in tan.          Bermuda Shorts: Bermuda shorts have been introduced as the new suiting silhouette of the season, as seen from Chloé, Max Mara and Valentino. Our clients not only purchase suits as all-in-one looks, but also as separates—making this trend a key transeasonal look that offers even more options to layer and mix. Another highlight for next season is the sophisticated leather short. Exhibit A: a nappa leather, thigh-length version, brought to you by Daniel Lee’s Bottega Veneta.     How do fashion weeks in different cities and countries differentiate for you?    Generally all cities have a unique aesthetic and approach to their respectable fashion weeks. London for example is quite compact and curated – only talents that have been selected by the British Fashion Council are able to present their latest collection. Therefore you are able to see the best that the city has to offer within a short period of time. Paris on the other hand is well known for its big productions of the major fashion houses: complex backdrops and breath-taking locations are a must. For me personally Paris is always quite busy and hectic since I am not just attending shows but am also  simultaneously buying for Mytheresa. Milan, comparable to Paris, is a fashion mecca and the home of luxury heritage brands. Their creations are about incredible craftsmanship, highest qualities and tailoring. Finally New York is very laid back and the fashion crowd seems to be more experimental – something that I find inspiring.      Name some of your new fashion week highlights.   Peter Do: I am super obsessed with this up and coming US based brand. Peter’s designs are minimal and androgynous, like a 90ies revival of Helmut Lang mixed with #oldceline. What’s not to like about this super cool brand.   Low Classic: A Korean based contemporary brand which offers all the fashion staples you need in your wardrobe without burning a hole in your pocket. High waisted blazers combined with easy culottes – you name it, they have it.   Nodaleto: Julia Toledano is the “new kid on the block” in the shoe world. She offers cool chunky heels with a bit grungy touch, but not too alternative. Her styles are perfect for the fashion savvy cool girls who want something different.     What were a few of your favourite shows for SS2020?   Bottega Veneta Valentino Loewe Jacquemus Gabriela Hearst   All the amazing pieces from the looks Tiffany is wearing on the images you can now purchase at MyTheresa.com     We had a delight to speak with Tiffany about the coming Spring & Summer trends and her highlights.   What are your top 5 new trends for Spring & Summer 2020?   90´s Clean Lines: A ‘90s mood for clean, monochromatic elegance was a favourite in Milan, particularly from the likes of Jil Sander and Bottega Veneta. Minimalism and streamlined tailoring is still a mainstay trend continuing from last season— this time, in an even more pared-back way. We loved the elegant box blazers from newcomer Low Classic, as well as The Row’s impeccable construction. The simple leather accessories we saw at Loewe—modern staples with simple lines—made the biggest statement.   Neon: A rainbow of neons was seen on the runway, with over-the-top fuchsia, fluorescent orange, bright yellow and lime green making a statement within the collections. Dries Van Noten—with a surprise appearance from fashion legend Christian Lacroix —was the occasion to see a sophisticated spin on neon colours that was more inclined towards eveningwear and dresses. Standout styles for us included Valentino’s pairing of tone-on-tone bags with belts, diamonds-meet-neon jewellery from Melissa Kaye and EÉRA, and Kwaidan Editions’ highlighter-green power suit.   Jungle: Strutting down the runway in the same plunging silk-chiffon jungle dress she infamously wore to the Grammy Awards in 2000, Jennifer Lopez’s appearance at Versace was on everyone’s feeds and lips this September. The dress inspired the creation of Google Images, as well as one of the strongest prints for next season. From Fendi’s and Dolce & Gabbana’s luxuriant green leaves to Marni’s abstract blooms, tropical prints have been flowering during Spring/Summer ’20, with palm trees and vivid colors invading dresses, jackets and footwear.   Leather: Following the wave of leather-on-leather men’s tailoring, new leather looks appeared in the womenswear collections. Even if all-black leather is still a favourite, new and different shapes have emerged, such as power shoulders at Maison Margiela and elegantly oversized dresses at Givenchy. Designers also incorporated new colors, such as Gucci’s slit pencil skirt in butter yellow and Bottega Veneta’s anorak dress in tan.          Bermuda Shorts: Bermuda shorts have been introduced as the new suiting silhouette of the season, as seen from Chloé, Max Mara and Valentino. Our clients not only purchase suits as all-in-one looks, but also as separates—making this trend a key transeasonal look that offers even more options to layer and mix. Another highlight for next season is the sophisticated leather short. Exhibit A: a nappa leather, thigh-length version, brought to you by Daniel Lee’s Bottega Veneta.     How do fashion weeks in different cities and countries differentiate for you?    Generally all cities have a unique aesthetic and approach to their respectable fashion weeks. London for example is quite compact and curated – only talents that have been selected by the British Fashion Council are able to present their latest collection. Therefore you are able to see the best that the city has to offer within a short period of time. Paris on the other hand is well known for its big productions of the major fashion houses: complex backdrops and breath-taking locations are a must. For me personally Paris is always quite busy and hectic since I am not just attending shows but am also  simultaneously buying for Mytheresa. Milan, comparable to Paris, is a fashion mecca and the home of luxury heritage brands. Their creations are about incredible craftsmanship, highest qualities and tailoring. Finally New York is very laid back and the fashion crowd seems to be more experimental – something that I find inspiring.      Name some of your new fashion week highlights.   Peter Do: I am super obsessed with this up and coming US based brand. Peter’s designs are minimal and androgynous, like a 90ies revival of Helmut Lang mixed with #oldceline. What’s not to like about this super cool brand.   Low Classic: A Korean based contemporary brand which offers all the fashion staples you need in your wardrobe without burning a hole in your pocket. High waisted blazers combined with easy culottes – you name it, they have it.   Nodaleto: Julia Toledano is the “new kid on the block” in the shoe world. She offers cool chunky heels with a bit grungy touch, but not too alternative. Her styles are perfect for the fashion savvy cool girls who want something different.     What were a few of your favourite shows for SS2020?   Bottega Veneta Valentino Loewe Jacquemus Gabriela Hearst   All the amazing pieces from the looks Tiffany is wearing on the images you can now purchase at MyTheresa.com    

Sculptural Bodies by Claudio & Tomas.
174

Sculptural Bodies by Claudio & Tomas.

Fashion Exclusive editorial by Claudio and Tomas.   TEAM CREDITS: SHOT BY CLAUDIO AND TOMAS STYLING BY JERMAINE DALEY CASTING BY BRENT CHUA HAIR BY TAICHI SAITO MAKEUP BY AYANA AWATA MODEL: ALEXI CHAPARRO @ NEXT STYLING ASSISTANT: ORE ZACCHEUS PHOTO ASSISTANT: ANDRES JANA Exclusive editorial by Claudio and Tomas.   TEAM CREDITS: SHOT BY CLAUDIO AND TOMAS STYLING BY JERMAINE DALEY CASTING BY BRENT CHUA HAIR BY TAICHI SAITO MAKEUP BY AYANA AWATA MODEL: ALEXI CHAPARRO @ NEXT STYLING ASSISTANT: ORE ZACCHEUS PHOTO ASSISTANT: ANDRES JANA

Patrizia Pepe previews Fall & Winter Collection
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Patrizia Pepe previews Fall & Winter Collection

Fashion A journey through London’s neighbourhoods and its highly stylish, trendy and creative environments. The most vibrant looks ofthe season, distinct yet complementary, inspired by a love for music and the New Wave rhythms of the English capital. For sensual, daring and irreverent femininity. Iridescent and transparent effects form the background to the Dance Studio theme, evoking the Royal Ballet as a metaphor for the gentle, yet feisty spirit of the contemporary woman. Pure shades wrap the delicate, impalpable interseasonal garments, which are embellished with pleats, see-through meshes and rock-style logos. The unstructured, asymmetrical and cut-out jacket is overlaid on a maxi white shirt for a contemporary and non-conformist look.   A punk-chic elegance emerges from the legendary ’90s, celebrating the brand’s DNA and its bold, unconventional style. Shades of Black Rebel, Glam Lips, Optical White and Guitar Red catch the eye. Satin dresses and tailored suits define Patrizia Pepe’s City Ska ‘new look’. The celebration of the brand’s stylistic hallmarks continues with a return to floral motifs on hyper-light créponné and jacquardwoven with lurex. Patrizia Pepe’s signature looks, crafted from stretch fabrics and a perfect fit, include the suit illuminated by metal eyelets and the clubbing dress with prominent shoulders, wraparound draping and a hyper-sexy vertical slit. Contamination between masculine and feminine pervades the Tomboy theme, alternating David Bowie-style shiny acid greensatin suits with portrait prints reinterpreted with a graphic twist as the season’s Rock Icon element. The pinstripe trench coat becomes a metropolitan uniform, characterized by large lapels, shoulder patches and a waist belt with a Fly metal buckle.   In the streets of Shoreditch, the metropolitan nomad starts to draw on Brick Lane’s street art and the hipster vibrations of the EastEnd, alternating utility and sensuality. The result is a new ‘military style’ that rethinks ‘urban contemporary’ with practical shapesand natural shades. Among vintage markets and trendy bars, the ‘officer’ wardrobe shifts towards the passion of Absinth Yellow, Black and Denim.In the Sensual Shoreditch theme, rigid silhouettes give way to versatile denim workwear jumpsuits and flowing satin dresses with soft pleats.   The “Gentle Rebel” journey ends with the sporting atmosphere of Stratford, the symbolic district of West Ham football club. Dynamic silhouettes and athletic details, with a focus on urban mobility, are characterized by extra-comfortable technical materials ranging from nylon to super-stretch Lycra with contrasting colours. The oversized trench coat has a vibrant Orange Alert shade that enhances the large, enveloping design, adapting to the fast pace of the day and the glamour of the evening.     The accessories explore every possible shape and material combination. The bucket bag with a drawstring and rigid clutch bag are lit up with shiny laminated tassels. The iconic Sleepy Fly combines powder shades with punk interpretations featuring large metal sail rings. The multi-coloured lettering explodes on the surface to create a new graphic code, while the sport-style buckles are covered with coloured and logoed fabrics. Inspired by the world of gyms, the technical fabric pouch bag and shoulder bag are decorated with striking metal elements, large zips and neon pullers.   Contrasts also characterize the shoes, such as the pleated sandals with a ‘dancer’ look, boots with pointed toes and chunky heels, biker boots with branded lug soles and a soft, feminine design with new geometric heels. Contemporary sneakers, the emblem of the Patrizia Pepe woman’s streetwear style, reveal new designs boasting neon touches, all-over logos and technical finishes.   more on: patriziapepe.com A journey through London’s neighbourhoods and its highly stylish, trendy and creative environments. The most vibrant looks ofthe season, distinct yet complementary, inspired by a love for music and the New Wave rhythms of the English capital. For sensual, daring and irreverent femininity. Iridescent and transparent effects form the background to the Dance Studio theme, evoking the Royal Ballet as a metaphor for the gentle, yet feisty spirit of the contemporary woman. Pure shades wrap the delicate, impalpable interseasonal garments, which are embellished with pleats, see-through meshes and rock-style logos. The unstructured, asymmetrical and cut-out jacket is overlaid on a maxi white shirt for a contemporary and non-conformist look.   A punk-chic elegance emerges from the legendary ’90s, celebrating the brand’s DNA and its bold, unconventional style. Shades of Black Rebel, Glam Lips, Optical White and Guitar Red catch the eye. Satin dresses and tailored suits define Patrizia Pepe’s City Ska ‘new look’. The celebration of the brand’s stylistic hallmarks continues with a return to floral motifs on hyper-light créponné and jacquardwoven with lurex. Patrizia Pepe’s signature looks, crafted from stretch fabrics and a perfect fit, include the suit illuminated by metal eyelets and the clubbing dress with prominent shoulders, wraparound draping and a hyper-sexy vertical slit. Contamination between masculine and feminine pervades the Tomboy theme, alternating David Bowie-style shiny acid greensatin suits with portrait prints reinterpreted with a graphic twist as the season’s Rock Icon element. The pinstripe trench coat becomes a metropolitan uniform, characterized by large lapels, shoulder patches and a waist belt with a Fly metal buckle.   In the streets of Shoreditch, the metropolitan nomad starts to draw on Brick Lane’s street art and the hipster vibrations of the EastEnd, alternating utility and sensuality. The result is a new ‘military style’ that rethinks ‘urban contemporary’ with practical shapesand natural shades. Among vintage markets and trendy bars, the ‘officer’ wardrobe shifts towards the passion of Absinth Yellow, Black and Denim.In the Sensual Shoreditch theme, rigid silhouettes give way to versatile denim workwear jumpsuits and flowing satin dresses with soft pleats.   The “Gentle Rebel” journey ends with the sporting atmosphere of Stratford, the symbolic district of West Ham football club. Dynamic silhouettes and athletic details, with a focus on urban mobility, are characterized by extra-comfortable technical materials ranging from nylon to super-stretch Lycra with contrasting colours. The oversized trench coat has a vibrant Orange Alert shade that enhances the large, enveloping design, adapting to the fast pace of the day and the glamour of the evening.     The accessories explore every possible shape and material combination. The bucket bag with a drawstring and rigid clutch bag are lit up with shiny laminated tassels. The iconic Sleepy Fly combines powder shades with punk interpretations featuring large metal sail rings. The multi-coloured lettering explodes on the surface to create a new graphic code, while the sport-style buckles are covered with coloured and logoed fabrics. Inspired by the world of gyms, the technical fabric pouch bag and shoulder bag are decorated with striking metal elements, large zips and neon pullers.   Contrasts also characterize the shoes, such as the pleated sandals with a ‘dancer’ look, boots with pointed toes and chunky heels, biker boots with branded lug soles and a soft, feminine design with new geometric heels. Contemporary sneakers, the emblem of the Patrizia Pepe woman’s streetwear style, reveal new designs boasting neon touches, all-over logos and technical finishes.   more on: patriziapepe.com

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In conversation with Lieselot Elzinga
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In conversation with Lieselot Elzinga

Fashion Week In March 2020, avant-garde fashion label and newcomer Elzinga will launch its FW20 collection, ‘POST POP BLOW OUT’, at the intimate and atmospheric blues café, Maloe Melo.  The FW20 collection is an ode to power dressing. Picking up from the sharp sartorial trends emulated by the 1950s teddy girls and the machismo of punk icon Blondie, Elzinga channels masculinity and femininity in equal measure. Silk organza dresses, neck ties and poppy and houndstooth prints are soaked in hot pinks, blacks and lime greens with pastel accents.  Aside from the launch of the collection itself, the label’s co-founders have hinted there might be further surprises in store for their audience, with rumors of a piñata amongst other festivities.  “It’s all about conveying the same feeling as a live performance; something direct, expressive and rough around the edges. Simple in shape with an extravagant touch,” say Elzinga.  The rst collection, a striking amalgamation of neon animal prints, silk blouses, PVC two-pieces and dramatic silhouettes, was stocked in October 2019 at matchesfashion.com. ‘POST POP BLOW OUT’ will be stocked in June 2020.  Elzinga was founded in 2018 by friends Lieselot Elzinga and Miro Hämäläinen, both graduates of The Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam. Expanding on Lieselot’s graduation collection, ‘Baby’s Berserk’, the duo began working together on a new fashion line drawing from Lieselot’s experience as a singer and bassist in rock n’ roll groups since the early age of twelve.   We had a deligtful conversation with Liesselot about her latest collection.   What is the story behind the new collection “POST POP BLOW OUT” and what is the inspiration behind the beautiful collection? The FW20 collection is an ode to power dressing. Picking up from the sharp sartorial trends emulated by the 1950s teddy girls and the machismo of punk icon Blondie, we wanted to channel masculinity and femininity in equal measure. A very big inspiration for this collection was Blondie, when we started the collection, I just finished reading her autobiography where she explains how she used her highly feminine image to become one of the biggest female front women of the 20th century. She explains how she used her femininity to set herself apart, but how she felt like a boy performing. That was really inspiring to me because I recognized that feeling from being on stage myself.        What exciting thing do you have coming up besides the launch of the newest collection? Our FW 20 collection will be launching in July so that’s going to be very exciting!! We can’t say too much about what else is coming up butttt we have some very exciting collaborations in store this coming year...      Tell me more about the launch of your label back in 2018 with your co-founder Miro?  Right after my graduation from the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam I got approached by Bart Ramakers from Parrot Agency. Together with their guidance Miro and I started working on our first collection that was suitable for production but still had the same aesthetic and excitement as my graduation collection Baby’s Berserk. Miro and I started working together already during our studies at the Rietveld and we noticed that we compliment each other very well. I have a lot of ideas but I have no patience to see it through to the end, where Miro is really patient and much more precise. And we have A LOT of fun together which also really shows in our work.     How important are your experiences with singing and bass playing from your childhood, in your current work? Really important! It’s basically the core of the brand. With my teenage girl band Fuz I used to play a lot around the Netherlands from a very early age. We really figured out as a girl group how to use fashion as a tool to gain more confidence and power on stage. If you are on stage you want to convey a very direct and clear message, you want the moment you walk on stage to be powerful and you want the audience to react. And this is basically what Elzinga wants to convey and evoke. We want our designs to be simple and direct in shape, but still extravagant and a little rough around the edges.     What is your brand identity built on and what is your design long-term desire? Our brand identity is mostly build around my experiences on stage, it’s about creating something simple but effective. There is also a big DIY element in our brand that cannot be denied. We really want to create an extravagant atmosphere where everyone feels included. We have a lot of dreams for the brand of course but for us doing the Valentine’s event at 5 Carlos Place during London Fashion Week was already a dream come true. Working together with an artist like Anna Calvi and showcasing our collection in such a beautiful place was something beyond our wildest dreams. Now on to the next one! In March 2020, avant-garde fashion label and newcomer Elzinga will launch its FW20 collection, ‘POST POP BLOW OUT’, at the intimate and atmospheric blues café, Maloe Melo.  The FW20 collection is an ode to power dressing. Picking up from the sharp sartorial trends emulated by the 1950s teddy girls and the machismo of punk icon Blondie, Elzinga channels masculinity and femininity in equal measure. Silk organza dresses, neck ties and poppy and houndstooth prints are soaked in hot pinks, blacks and lime greens with pastel accents.  Aside from the launch of the collection itself, the label’s co-founders have hinted there might be further surprises in store for their audience, with rumors of a piñata amongst other festivities.  “It’s all about conveying the same feeling as a live performance; something direct, expressive and rough around the edges. Simple in shape with an extravagant touch,” say Elzinga.  The rst collection, a striking amalgamation of neon animal prints, silk blouses, PVC two-pieces and dramatic silhouettes, was stocked in October 2019 at matchesfashion.com. ‘POST POP BLOW OUT’ will be stocked in June 2020.  Elzinga was founded in 2018 by friends Lieselot Elzinga and Miro Hämäläinen, both graduates of The Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam. Expanding on Lieselot’s graduation collection, ‘Baby’s Berserk’, the duo began working together on a new fashion line drawing from Lieselot’s experience as a singer and bassist in rock n’ roll groups since the early age of twelve.   We had a deligtful conversation with Liesselot about her latest collection.   What is the story behind the new collection “POST POP BLOW OUT” and what is the inspiration behind the beautiful collection? The FW20 collection is an ode to power dressing. Picking up from the sharp sartorial trends emulated by the 1950s teddy girls and the machismo of punk icon Blondie, we wanted to channel masculinity and femininity in equal measure. A very big inspiration for this collection was Blondie, when we started the collection, I just finished reading her autobiography where she explains how she used her highly feminine image to become one of the biggest female front women of the 20th century. She explains how she used her femininity to set herself apart, but how she felt like a boy performing. That was really inspiring to me because I recognized that feeling from being on stage myself.        What exciting thing do you have coming up besides the launch of the newest collection? Our FW 20 collection will be launching in July so that’s going to be very exciting!! We can’t say too much about what else is coming up butttt we have some very exciting collaborations in store this coming year...      Tell me more about the launch of your label back in 2018 with your co-founder Miro?  Right after my graduation from the Gerrit Rietveld Academie in Amsterdam I got approached by Bart Ramakers from Parrot Agency. Together with their guidance Miro and I started working on our first collection that was suitable for production but still had the same aesthetic and excitement as my graduation collection Baby’s Berserk. Miro and I started working together already during our studies at the Rietveld and we noticed that we compliment each other very well. I have a lot of ideas but I have no patience to see it through to the end, where Miro is really patient and much more precise. And we have A LOT of fun together which also really shows in our work.     How important are your experiences with singing and bass playing from your childhood, in your current work? Really important! It’s basically the core of the brand. With my teenage girl band Fuz I used to play a lot around the Netherlands from a very early age. We really figured out as a girl group how to use fashion as a tool to gain more confidence and power on stage. If you are on stage you want to convey a very direct and clear message, you want the moment you walk on stage to be powerful and you want the audience to react. And this is basically what Elzinga wants to convey and evoke. We want our designs to be simple and direct in shape, but still extravagant and a little rough around the edges.     What is your brand identity built on and what is your design long-term desire? Our brand identity is mostly build around my experiences on stage, it’s about creating something simple but effective. There is also a big DIY element in our brand that cannot be denied. We really want to create an extravagant atmosphere where everyone feels included. We have a lot of dreams for the brand of course but for us doing the Valentine’s event at 5 Carlos Place during London Fashion Week was already a dream come true. Working together with an artist like Anna Calvi and showcasing our collection in such a beautiful place was something beyond our wildest dreams. Now on to the next one!

Prada Exclusive Editorial
139

Prada Exclusive Editorial

Fashion photographed by: Jorre Janssens styled by: Victor Vergara grooming and hair by: Wout Philippo model: Pim at Philipp Riches Management casting: Timotej Letonja production assistant: Michael Geertzen   all clothing and accessories are PRADA Spring & Summer 2020 photographed by: Jorre Janssens styled by: Victor Vergara grooming and hair by: Wout Philippo model: Pim at Philipp Riches Management casting: Timotej Letonja production assistant: Michael Geertzen   all clothing and accessories are PRADA Spring & Summer 2020

SAMSØE SAMSØE Spring & Summer 2020 Mid-Century's Modern collection
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SAMSØE SAMSØE Spring & Summer 2020 Mid-Century's Modern collection

Fashion Week Building further on pre-Spring’s humancentric approach to fashion, where clean lines, high quality materials and the consideration of function converge, Spring/Summer 2020 sends a nostalgic nod to the Danish Modern design movement, characterised by these same guiding principles. As relevant today as ever, the soft modernism of Scandinavia plays out on a collection where cuts become looser for the warmer months, and elements of sportwear and workwear and their way into the everyday wardrobe. Looking to the era that gave us many of our modern wardrobe staples, the collection is lled with versatile pieces that remain sartorial building blocks: structured transitional jackets cut for aboxy  from tweedy fabrics or tactile velvet areminimally detailed with practical pockets; new renditions of the ubiquitous polo shirt are imbued with nostalgic details and cut for a closet from crisp blends; and oversized sweaters in thick ribbed knits with half-zip fastenings underpin the importance of well made clothing. Just like the design movement, new materials shape the collection’s styles: Samsøe Samsøe’s longstanding tradition of crafting garments from natural fabrics results in pieces that are celebrated as much for their quality as for their simple yet modern shapes. A trench coat for her is cut from structured linen blend and pared back to its purest form with gently rounded shoulders and raglan sleeves. Fusing workwear with streetwear, classic menswear is given utilitarian edge on cotton twill trousers, cut in a new, relaxed shape. Sustainable fabrics and blends also celebrate the shapes of the classics: the bowling shirt has an updated t so it feels in nitelymore modern, cut from soft tencel that falls ina liquid-like drape. Palazzo-style pants designedwith the working woman in mind are crafted inheavy crepe with a lustrous nish. And softlytailored shirts and blouses juxtapose sleek lines with organic shapes, using these new and natural blends to reimagine traditional styles. Purposely devoid of pattern, the collection’s singular standout is a lively bird print found in our archives and inspired by furniture designer Kay Bojesen’s iconic wooden decorations, printed on an ankle-grazing silk dress with shirred cuts. Stripes move away from varsity sensibilities to take on a more nostalgic feel, and an abundance of heritage checks reference the upholstery fabrics of the mid-century movement. Touched with the era’s signature coloursand rooted in nature, monk’s robe, midnight blue and desert sand are enlivened with misty rose and seaweed green. Blurring the lines between how pieces are worn, shirts become jackets, knits become teesand trousers and shorts resemble skirts at rstglance. It’s all about function — and wearing them with an air of studied nonchalance thatbe ts the modern urbanite. more on samsoesamsoe.com Building further on pre-Spring’s humancentric approach to fashion, where clean lines, high quality materials and the consideration of function converge, Spring/Summer 2020 sends a nostalgic nod to the Danish Modern design movement, characterised by these same guiding principles. As relevant today as ever, the soft modernism of Scandinavia plays out on a collection where cuts become looser for the warmer months, and elements of sportwear and workwear and their way into the everyday wardrobe. Looking to the era that gave us many of our modern wardrobe staples, the collection is lled with versatile pieces that remain sartorial building blocks: structured transitional jackets cut for aboxy  from tweedy fabrics or tactile velvet areminimally detailed with practical pockets; new renditions of the ubiquitous polo shirt are imbued with nostalgic details and cut for a closet from crisp blends; and oversized sweaters in thick ribbed knits with half-zip fastenings underpin the importance of well made clothing. Just like the design movement, new materials shape the collection’s styles: Samsøe Samsøe’s longstanding tradition of crafting garments from natural fabrics results in pieces that are celebrated as much for their quality as for their simple yet modern shapes. A trench coat for her is cut from structured linen blend and pared back to its purest form with gently rounded shoulders and raglan sleeves. Fusing workwear with streetwear, classic menswear is given utilitarian edge on cotton twill trousers, cut in a new, relaxed shape. Sustainable fabrics and blends also celebrate the shapes of the classics: the bowling shirt has an updated t so it feels in nitelymore modern, cut from soft tencel that falls ina liquid-like drape. Palazzo-style pants designedwith the working woman in mind are crafted inheavy crepe with a lustrous nish. And softlytailored shirts and blouses juxtapose sleek lines with organic shapes, using these new and natural blends to reimagine traditional styles. Purposely devoid of pattern, the collection’s singular standout is a lively bird print found in our archives and inspired by furniture designer Kay Bojesen’s iconic wooden decorations, printed on an ankle-grazing silk dress with shirred cuts. Stripes move away from varsity sensibilities to take on a more nostalgic feel, and an abundance of heritage checks reference the upholstery fabrics of the mid-century movement. Touched with the era’s signature coloursand rooted in nature, monk’s robe, midnight blue and desert sand are enlivened with misty rose and seaweed green. Blurring the lines between how pieces are worn, shirts become jackets, knits become teesand trousers and shorts resemble skirts at rstglance. It’s all about function — and wearing them with an air of studied nonchalance thatbe ts the modern urbanite. more on samsoesamsoe.com

Exclusive Editorial with GUCCI starring Nella Roz
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Exclusive Editorial with GUCCI starring Nella Roz

Fashion   photography: Walter Pierre Styling: Koen T. Hendriks @ House of Orange casting: Timotej Letonja Make-up: Anita Jolles Manicure: Frédérique Olthuis @ House of Orange Collage Artist: Marije Seijn Model: Nella Ngingo @ Paparazzi Model Management photography assisntant: Luka Balm Styling assistant: Nour Ezzi   All clothing & accessories:  GUCCI Fall & Winter 2019/20   photography: Walter Pierre Styling: Koen T. Hendriks @ House of Orange casting: Timotej Letonja Make-up: Anita Jolles Manicure: Frédérique Olthuis @ House of Orange Collage Artist: Marije Seijn Model: Nella Ngingo @ Paparazzi Model Management photography assisntant: Luka Balm Styling assistant: Nour Ezzi   All clothing & accessories:  GUCCI Fall & Winter 2019/20

Giorgio Armani presents Maìn
116

Giorgio Armani presents Maìn

Men For spring/summer 2020, Giorgio Armani presents Maìn, a collection inspired by the nautical world featuring pieces and accessories in a colour palette of dark green, white and blue, with touches of red. Paired with trousers and Bermuda shorts, practical and elegant single-breasted or double-breasted jackets in linen and viscose canvas are embellished with satin-finish gold Giorgio Armani-logo buttons, and moss-stitched pinstriping crafted entirely by hand. A durable technical fabric in Maìn green is used for jackets, Bermuda shorts and trousers, and contrasts with the soft white or blue cashmere of cardigans and knitwear with inlayed double stripes. Logo-marked T-shirts and polos are in stretch viscose, and fresh, ultra-lightweight cotton shirts have Mandarin collars or edging details. Rounding off the selection are logo-marked swimwear and accessories, including a beach towel, hat, trainers in the three colours of the collection and a duffel bag in Maìn-green waxed canvas.   For spring/summer 2020, Giorgio Armani presents Maìn, a collection inspired by the nautical world featuring pieces and accessories in a colour palette of dark green, white and blue, with touches of red. Paired with trousers and Bermuda shorts, practical and elegant single-breasted or double-breasted jackets in linen and viscose canvas are embellished with satin-finish gold Giorgio Armani-logo buttons, and moss-stitched pinstriping crafted entirely by hand. A durable technical fabric in Maìn green is used for jackets, Bermuda shorts and trousers, and contrasts with the soft white or blue cashmere of cardigans and knitwear with inlayed double stripes. Logo-marked T-shirts and polos are in stretch viscose, and fresh, ultra-lightweight cotton shirts have Mandarin collars or edging details. Rounding off the selection are logo-marked swimwear and accessories, including a beach towel, hat, trainers in the three colours of the collection and a duffel bag in Maìn-green waxed canvas.  

O'Neill Blue Capsule in collaboration with Kimberley Jenneskens
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O'Neill Blue Capsule in collaboration with Kimberley Jenneskens

Fashion Week On March 6 O'Neill presents the Blue Capsule collection during Amsterdam Fashion Week in Het Hem. The Blue Capsule collections represent the future of the brand, aiming for a growing sustainability percentage with the mission to ensure that the entire O'Neill collection is sustainable by 2025. For the latest capsule collection, we collaborated with all-round creative Kimberley Jenneskens. As a brand ambassador, Kimberley is responsible for the upcoming campaign shoots and presentation during Amsterdam Fashion Week. As far as O'Neill is concerned, this is the start of a broader collaboration.   O'Neill Blue Capsule: Inspired by Jack O'Neills Objective Vision, the iconic lifestyle surf brand focuses on change and sustainability with the aim of preserving the Earth for our kids and all generations to come. Each O´Neill Blue Capsule is released in a limited edition and the entire collection is made according to the O'Neill Ocean Mission guidelines. Already 44% of winter and 42% of the summer collection consists of sustainable items. The swimwear collection is even 78% sustainable. Collection is processed with recycled consumer waste, PET bottles and old fishing nets. For the Blue collection, we collaborate with various partners including Repreve, Econyl, Waste 2 Wear and BCI. Blue summer and winter capsule: During Amsterdam Fashion Week, a sneak preview of the summer and winter capsule collection was given in Het Hem. The summer capsule draws attention to the problem of micro plastic in the ocean, which is reflected in the use of bright colors and abstract shapes. The winter capsule zooms in on the endangered species from the ocean images within the color palette and prints. Kimberly Jenneskens for O'Neill: For the Blue Ocean Mission, partnerships are sought that support the Ocean mission and increase its impact. Kimberly Jenneskens was chosen as the first Dutch fire ambassador. Dutch designer and all-round creative Kimberley Jenneskens and sports brand O'Neill found each other in their love for sustainability, tech and sportswear. They join forces to bring the Ocean Mission to the attention of a new generation. On March 6 O'Neill presents the Blue Capsule collection during Amsterdam Fashion Week in Het Hem. The Blue Capsule collections represent the future of the brand, aiming for a growing sustainability percentage with the mission to ensure that the entire O'Neill collection is sustainable by 2025. For the latest capsule collection, we collaborated with all-round creative Kimberley Jenneskens. As a brand ambassador, Kimberley is responsible for the upcoming campaign shoots and presentation during Amsterdam Fashion Week. As far as O'Neill is concerned, this is the start of a broader collaboration.   O'Neill Blue Capsule: Inspired by Jack O'Neills Objective Vision, the iconic lifestyle surf brand focuses on change and sustainability with the aim of preserving the Earth for our kids and all generations to come. Each O´Neill Blue Capsule is released in a limited edition and the entire collection is made according to the O'Neill Ocean Mission guidelines. Already 44% of winter and 42% of the summer collection consists of sustainable items. The swimwear collection is even 78% sustainable. Collection is processed with recycled consumer waste, PET bottles and old fishing nets. For the Blue collection, we collaborate with various partners including Repreve, Econyl, Waste 2 Wear and BCI. Blue summer and winter capsule: During Amsterdam Fashion Week, a sneak preview of the summer and winter capsule collection was given in Het Hem. The summer capsule draws attention to the problem of micro plastic in the ocean, which is reflected in the use of bright colors and abstract shapes. The winter capsule zooms in on the endangered species from the ocean images within the color palette and prints. Kimberly Jenneskens for O'Neill: For the Blue Ocean Mission, partnerships are sought that support the Ocean mission and increase its impact. Kimberly Jenneskens was chosen as the first Dutch fire ambassador. Dutch designer and all-round creative Kimberley Jenneskens and sports brand O'Neill found each other in their love for sustainability, tech and sportswear. They join forces to bring the Ocean Mission to the attention of a new generation.

G-Star RAW guerrilla show
107

G-Star RAW guerrilla show

Fashion Week On Saturday evening, March 7, Felice Noordhoff opened the G-Star RAW guerrilla show, which literally took travelers and guests through 30 years of denim innovation in the Metro from North to South. The show - a collaboration between G-Star, Amsterdam Fashion Week and the GVB - turned out to be a surprising combination of three Amsterdam brands. Influencers, press and friends of the brand gathered at Metro Station North of the North / South Line. The surprise was great when everyone was asked to board the metro, together with unsuspecting travelers in possession of a valid GVB ticket. During the ride from North to South, models displayed a combination of G-Star RAW icons, such as the 5620 G-Star Elwood, artwork from shows from New York Fashion Week and new Hardcore Denim styles, among others - without interrupting normal service. The unprecedented manifesto of G-Star was evident during the show: dedicated to denim's fabric, craft, culture and history. Gwenda van Vliet, CMO of G-Star RAW: 'We have been innovating in the field of denim for 30 years. We wanted to show this in a unique way. A guerrilla show in a subway tunnel - that's G-Star RAW. ' On Saturday evening, March 7, Felice Noordhoff opened the G-Star RAW guerrilla show, which literally took travelers and guests through 30 years of denim innovation in the Metro from North to South. The show - a collaboration between G-Star, Amsterdam Fashion Week and the GVB - turned out to be a surprising combination of three Amsterdam brands. Influencers, press and friends of the brand gathered at Metro Station North of the North / South Line. The surprise was great when everyone was asked to board the metro, together with unsuspecting travelers in possession of a valid GVB ticket. During the ride from North to South, models displayed a combination of G-Star RAW icons, such as the 5620 G-Star Elwood, artwork from shows from New York Fashion Week and new Hardcore Denim styles, among others - without interrupting normal service. The unprecedented manifesto of G-Star was evident during the show: dedicated to denim's fabric, craft, culture and history. Gwenda van Vliet, CMO of G-Star RAW: 'We have been innovating in the field of denim for 30 years. We wanted to show this in a unique way. A guerrilla show in a subway tunnel - that's G-Star RAW. '

DIOR for Fall & Winter 2020-2021
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DIOR for Fall & Winter 2020-2021

Fashion Week “It doesn’t matter where we start from1...” Carla Lonzi, Autoritratto, 1969. Autobiography, self-portrait, story. Associating places, images, words. Freely, with fresh eyes. For this fall-winter 2020- 2021 ready-to-wear collection, Maria Grazia Chiuri maps out an atlas of emotions through the prism of her teenage diary. Two photos of her mother transport her back to this time in her life, a laboratory brimming with possibilities of what the future may hold. Images reappear, including photos of actresses who served as inspiration for clients of her mother’s couture atelier, as well as for the Creative Director herself, who used fashion as a way of asserting herself, of rebelling, and communicating to others how she wanted to be perceived. Next came other photos from the past that she revisits with her vision today: Germana Marucelli’s studio in Milan, designed by artist Paolo Scheggi; that of Mila Schön by Ugo Mulas and, lastly, portraits of Carla Accardi. This arborescent diagram inspired Maria Grazia Chiuri’s very own The Little Dictionary of Fashion2, with jeans, as well as the checks that Monsieur Dior was so fond of. “I love checks. They can be fancy and simple; elegant and easy; young and always right3.” Checks resurface on an ensemble designed by Marc Bohan: it’s this outfit, with the motif placed on the bias, that inspired the structure of the collection’s skirts. There’s also the pea coat and pleated skirts. Little collars with ties. Black and white. All this is at the heart of a perfectly balanced collection. A polka dot scarf found in the Dior archives serves as the starting point for a series of dresses in various lengths that explore the print’s infinite possibilities. As Christian Dior writes in his The Little Dictionary of Fashion: “I would say the same about dots as about checks. They are lovely, elegant, easy and always in fashion.3” Not to mention fringes, which provide mobile ornamentation on long skirts. Knitwear spans all the wardrobe essentials: sweaters, jackets, skirts, and pants. The show venue was designed in collaboration with the Claire Fontaine collective, which has exhibited at the National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art in Rome. The museum is also home to the archives of Carla Lonzi, a charismatic figure who was an art critic before committing to the feminist cause. “Io Dico Io – I Say I4”, the title of an upcoming exhibition dedicated to Italian women artists, supported by Dior, becomes the starting point for a series of manifesto-like phrases. Evoking these words in English – “I Say I” – right at the show’s entrance brings to life a story of powerful self-assertion. They are the symbol of a joyful singularity, as well as a creative and collective way of approaching the multiple aspects of feminine subjectivity — and the infinite project that femininity represents.   “It doesn’t matter where we start from1...” Carla Lonzi, Autoritratto, 1969. Autobiography, self-portrait, story. Associating places, images, words. Freely, with fresh eyes. For this fall-winter 2020- 2021 ready-to-wear collection, Maria Grazia Chiuri maps out an atlas of emotions through the prism of her teenage diary. Two photos of her mother transport her back to this time in her life, a laboratory brimming with possibilities of what the future may hold. Images reappear, including photos of actresses who served as inspiration for clients of her mother’s couture atelier, as well as for the Creative Director herself, who used fashion as a way of asserting herself, of rebelling, and communicating to others how she wanted to be perceived. Next came other photos from the past that she revisits with her vision today: Germana Marucelli’s studio in Milan, designed by artist Paolo Scheggi; that of Mila Schön by Ugo Mulas and, lastly, portraits of Carla Accardi. This arborescent diagram inspired Maria Grazia Chiuri’s very own The Little Dictionary of Fashion2, with jeans, as well as the checks that Monsieur Dior was so fond of. “I love checks. They can be fancy and simple; elegant and easy; young and always right3.” Checks resurface on an ensemble designed by Marc Bohan: it’s this outfit, with the motif placed on the bias, that inspired the structure of the collection’s skirts. There’s also the pea coat and pleated skirts. Little collars with ties. Black and white. All this is at the heart of a perfectly balanced collection. A polka dot scarf found in the Dior archives serves as the starting point for a series of dresses in various lengths that explore the print’s infinite possibilities. As Christian Dior writes in his The Little Dictionary of Fashion: “I would say the same about dots as about checks. They are lovely, elegant, easy and always in fashion.3” Not to mention fringes, which provide mobile ornamentation on long skirts. Knitwear spans all the wardrobe essentials: sweaters, jackets, skirts, and pants. The show venue was designed in collaboration with the Claire Fontaine collective, which has exhibited at the National Gallery of Modern and Contemporary Art in Rome. The museum is also home to the archives of Carla Lonzi, a charismatic figure who was an art critic before committing to the feminist cause. “Io Dico Io – I Say I4”, the title of an upcoming exhibition dedicated to Italian women artists, supported by Dior, becomes the starting point for a series of manifesto-like phrases. Evoking these words in English – “I Say I” – right at the show’s entrance brings to life a story of powerful self-assertion. They are the symbol of a joyful singularity, as well as a creative and collective way of approaching the multiple aspects of feminine subjectivity — and the infinite project that femininity represents.  

Ninamounah's Collection 005
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Ninamounah's Collection 005

Fashion Week Ninamounah is an Amsterdam-based label headed by creative director and designer Ninamounah Langestraat and brand director Robin Burggraaf, using biological methods to dissect the deeper layers of the cultural mantle found in fashion design. Emphasizing instinctive and experimental strengths that transcend bodily and mental conventions and constructs. Ninamounah is making the unusual usual—transgressing comfort zones in fashion and exploring humans animalistic side.   The second act of Ninamounah's fifth collection continues to transfigure the concept of Metamorphosis following previous conceptual explorations of the intersection between biology and fashion design. Bypassing evolution by synthesizing traits of our animal ancestors and our techno-future. Instinct lead the way, forced by a collective memory between all species.   Meta·​mor·​pho·​sis: a morphological mutation, a time of dramatic change in form and appearance, affecting the core of one's being. After the completed metamorphosis the transformation becomes visible. From larva to cocoon, the organism finally enters its final stage. A time of sexual maturity.   Shapes and proportions carry both robust stillness and fluid movement, like metamorphosing lobster. Adapting to its surroundings, our muse represents an infinite of possibilities. Motor references are visible in office wear, a shirt transforms into a high cut bodysuit. Draped looks are liquified into momentous designs.   Traditional shirting and tailoring comes with an exoskeleton of boning, creating dominant silhouettes and strong shoulders. A layered suit and a sleeveless puffer coat reference a protective shell still in the process of growth. Capturing a freedom of spirit, stereotypical staples are reinterpreted with a luxurious punk attitude. A matching shirt and tie combo paired with a hybrid of a pleated skirt and tailored trousers.   A disfigurement of the artisanal tradition. Pinstripe blues and blacks, herringbone browns and green and grey checks come in pure virgin wool and luxurious silks. Reinterpretations of the label's key pieces, the garments are a natural extension of their archival counterparts. Ninamounah does not aim to reinvent itself drastically every new season, but chooses to slowly grow with time, opting to perfect and reinterpret its own core pieces.   A hybrid of past and future.   PRODUCTION Made in Amsterdam, Ninamounah is committed to have a positive impact on its production chain. Working closely with local ateliers, they are perfectly equipped to ensure the integrity of both the garments and the teams producing them.    Deadstock garments are heavily reworked and re-tailored into sensual and subversive shapes. By embracing the method of recycling and using materials with a specific user's history for our designs, Ninamounah synthesizes traces of a forlorn past with future realities while pushing fashion into aa sustainable practice.    Tailoring grows the body strong, motor garments keep the spirit restless   ARTIST COLLABORATION STEF VAN LOOVEREN Stef Van Looveren (1992) is an Antwerp based multidisciplinary genderfluid artist. They studied Fine Arts at Central Saint Martins, London and Sint Lucas, Antwerp.   Stef Van Looveren's practice translates itself into video installation, photo, sculpture and performance. Van Looveren uses the installations as an attempt to reflect and dismantle the performativity of our human behaviour, primarily within the notion of gender. Playfully mimicking our social conducts along with visual culture, their work moves towards a surreal gesture.   His DPA Bags are modelled on genitalia and are moulded on a diverse range of body types in order to be as inclusive as possible. The bags support their vision that 'sex' should be seen as an interchangeable, wearable accessory, something that the wearer can play around with. Celebrating the distinction between 'sex' and 'gender'. Ninamounah is an Amsterdam-based label headed by creative director and designer Ninamounah Langestraat and brand director Robin Burggraaf, using biological methods to dissect the deeper layers of the cultural mantle found in fashion design. Emphasizing instinctive and experimental strengths that transcend bodily and mental conventions and constructs. Ninamounah is making the unusual usual—transgressing comfort zones in fashion and exploring humans animalistic side.   The second act of Ninamounah's fifth collection continues to transfigure the concept of Metamorphosis following previous conceptual explorations of the intersection between biology and fashion design. Bypassing evolution by synthesizing traits of our animal ancestors and our techno-future. Instinct lead the way, forced by a collective memory between all species.   Meta·​mor·​pho·​sis: a morphological mutation, a time of dramatic change in form and appearance, affecting the core of one's being. After the completed metamorphosis the transformation becomes visible. From larva to cocoon, the organism finally enters its final stage. A time of sexual maturity.   Shapes and proportions carry both robust stillness and fluid movement, like metamorphosing lobster. Adapting to its surroundings, our muse represents an infinite of possibilities. Motor references are visible in office wear, a shirt transforms into a high cut bodysuit. Draped looks are liquified into momentous designs.   Traditional shirting and tailoring comes with an exoskeleton of boning, creating dominant silhouettes and strong shoulders. A layered suit and a sleeveless puffer coat reference a protective shell still in the process of growth. Capturing a freedom of spirit, stereotypical staples are reinterpreted with a luxurious punk attitude. A matching shirt and tie combo paired with a hybrid of a pleated skirt and tailored trousers.   A disfigurement of the artisanal tradition. Pinstripe blues and blacks, herringbone browns and green and grey checks come in pure virgin wool and luxurious silks. Reinterpretations of the label's key pieces, the garments are a natural extension of their archival counterparts. Ninamounah does not aim to reinvent itself drastically every new season, but chooses to slowly grow with time, opting to perfect and reinterpret its own core pieces.   A hybrid of past and future.   PRODUCTION Made in Amsterdam, Ninamounah is committed to have a positive impact on its production chain. Working closely with local ateliers, they are perfectly equipped to ensure the integrity of both the garments and the teams producing them.    Deadstock garments are heavily reworked and re-tailored into sensual and subversive shapes. By embracing the method of recycling and using materials with a specific user's history for our designs, Ninamounah synthesizes traces of a forlorn past with future realities while pushing fashion into aa sustainable practice.    Tailoring grows the body strong, motor garments keep the spirit restless   ARTIST COLLABORATION STEF VAN LOOVEREN Stef Van Looveren (1992) is an Antwerp based multidisciplinary genderfluid artist. They studied Fine Arts at Central Saint Martins, London and Sint Lucas, Antwerp.   Stef Van Looveren's practice translates itself into video installation, photo, sculpture and performance. Van Looveren uses the installations as an attempt to reflect and dismantle the performativity of our human behaviour, primarily within the notion of gender. Playfully mimicking our social conducts along with visual culture, their work moves towards a surreal gesture.   His DPA Bags are modelled on genitalia and are moulded on a diverse range of body types in order to be as inclusive as possible. The bags support their vision that 'sex' should be seen as an interchangeable, wearable accessory, something that the wearer can play around with. Celebrating the distinction between 'sex' and 'gender'.

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