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Transmotion by Iris Van Herpen
371

Transmotion by Iris Van Herpen

Fashion Week Iris van Herpen presents the short film entitled 'Transmotion' in collaboration with Carice van Houten, as part of the digital Paris Haute Couture week on July 6 , 2020.   For many, the year 2020 will go down in history books to mark a poignant chapter in their lives. Amidst tension and turmoil, silence has been brewing; clearing the ground for a seed to be planted, an opportunity to incite new growth. In the right conditions, positive change can emerge to welcome first breath.     Iris van Herpen unveils the 'Transmotion' dress in the eponymous short film, featuring mesmeric muse and on-screen maven Carice van Houten. Like most, the past few months have seen Iris van Herpen operating closer to home. Paying homage to the brand's Dutch roots, the homegrown actress serves as both inspiration and collaborator, starring in the film that references the illusionary style of Dutch graphic artist Maurits Cornelis Escher. The term transmotion not only depicts the process of change from one state, form, style or place to another, it is also the visionary perceptions of the seasons and the visual scenes of motion in art and literature. In parallel to Iris van Herpen's drive to visualise the invisible, her quest to question reality and urge to explore the realms of impossibility, the project aims to narrate the process that ushers change, to materialise an unconscious state of meditation.     The 'Transmotion' dress radiates in a diaphanous bloom of white silk organza, translucent layers pleated within the confines of an undulating form, tracing the fluid outline of the creation. Contrasted against the frailty of sheer petals, black branches of duchess satin were laser-cut, hand-stitched and form the central roots of the garment. Threads of inspiration for the graphic yet organic extensions derive from the intricate art of Ruth Asawa. This geometric lattice recalls humankind's inclination to tame nature. Beneath the surface, the branching also reveals the synonymity of mycorrhizal networks (the Wood Wide Web) and the symbiotic nature within human communities. Like fronds frozen in time, crystalline filaments sprout from the heart of the dress. Portraying delicate new life, black seed-like crystals punctuate the tip of each stamen-like strand.     The concept of the creation stems from the notion of growth and regeneration. The seemingly simple seed is the embodiment of life and the potential that comes with it. A seed embedded upside down in dirt still sees the seedling growing the right way up. The dress follows symmetry in both its axis and without context, indiscernible which way is up or down. Motion and fluidity involved in the formation of tessellations highlight the capacity to shift between negatives and positives. Amidst an era when polarising ideologies are heightened, the work reflects upon the nature of perception.     Optics is the study of sight and the behaviour of light, or the properties of transmission, deflection and radiation. Optics is also defined as the way an event or course of action is perceived by the public. Refracted light illuminates the film, igniting a movement for growth. Resembling iridescent flames, pulsating lights and dappled shadows caress Carice van Houten. The facets of perception oscillate between blur and clarity.     Intertwining craftsmanship and innovation, the project is rooted in dichotomy and duality. In line with Iris van Herpen's continuous pursuit to traverse the organic and the synthetic, the film explores the relationship between structure and fluidity. Within nature and societal terms, exist a paradox in how chaos can forge harmony, how destruction can enable regeneration. The process of metamorphosis at its peak is muddled and turbulent. This pertinence extends to the interdependency of the exterior and the interior. In recent times, individuals and communities alike have taken the form of digits on weights and measures. The connection between vigour of physicality and soundness of mind have become especially apparent; mirrored in highlighting how minute actions of individuals are integral to sustain the fabric of society. With bated breath, scales tip between fragility and resilience.     A breath can fan the winds of change, spurring the dispersal of seeds. The film sheds light on the polarisation within our society and the need to sow a catalyst for change. 'Transmotion' follows the process of a germinating first seed, that through nurture, may break ground and bloom into a better world. Iris van Herpen presents the short film entitled 'Transmotion' in collaboration with Carice van Houten, as part of the digital Paris Haute Couture week on July 6 , 2020.   For many, the year 2020 will go down in history books to mark a poignant chapter in their lives. Amidst tension and turmoil, silence has been brewing; clearing the ground for a seed to be planted, an opportunity to incite new growth. In the right conditions, positive change can emerge to welcome first breath.     Iris van Herpen unveils the 'Transmotion' dress in the eponymous short film, featuring mesmeric muse and on-screen maven Carice van Houten. Like most, the past few months have seen Iris van Herpen operating closer to home. Paying homage to the brand's Dutch roots, the homegrown actress serves as both inspiration and collaborator, starring in the film that references the illusionary style of Dutch graphic artist Maurits Cornelis Escher. The term transmotion not only depicts the process of change from one state, form, style or place to another, it is also the visionary perceptions of the seasons and the visual scenes of motion in art and literature. In parallel to Iris van Herpen's drive to visualise the invisible, her quest to question reality and urge to explore the realms of impossibility, the project aims to narrate the process that ushers change, to materialise an unconscious state of meditation.     The 'Transmotion' dress radiates in a diaphanous bloom of white silk organza, translucent layers pleated within the confines of an undulating form, tracing the fluid outline of the creation. Contrasted against the frailty of sheer petals, black branches of duchess satin were laser-cut, hand-stitched and form the central roots of the garment. Threads of inspiration for the graphic yet organic extensions derive from the intricate art of Ruth Asawa. This geometric lattice recalls humankind's inclination to tame nature. Beneath the surface, the branching also reveals the synonymity of mycorrhizal networks (the Wood Wide Web) and the symbiotic nature within human communities. Like fronds frozen in time, crystalline filaments sprout from the heart of the dress. Portraying delicate new life, black seed-like crystals punctuate the tip of each stamen-like strand.     The concept of the creation stems from the notion of growth and regeneration. The seemingly simple seed is the embodiment of life and the potential that comes with it. A seed embedded upside down in dirt still sees the seedling growing the right way up. The dress follows symmetry in both its axis and without context, indiscernible which way is up or down. Motion and fluidity involved in the formation of tessellations highlight the capacity to shift between negatives and positives. Amidst an era when polarising ideologies are heightened, the work reflects upon the nature of perception.     Optics is the study of sight and the behaviour of light, or the properties of transmission, deflection and radiation. Optics is also defined as the way an event or course of action is perceived by the public. Refracted light illuminates the film, igniting a movement for growth. Resembling iridescent flames, pulsating lights and dappled shadows caress Carice van Houten. The facets of perception oscillate between blur and clarity.     Intertwining craftsmanship and innovation, the project is rooted in dichotomy and duality. In line with Iris van Herpen's continuous pursuit to traverse the organic and the synthetic, the film explores the relationship between structure and fluidity. Within nature and societal terms, exist a paradox in how chaos can forge harmony, how destruction can enable regeneration. The process of metamorphosis at its peak is muddled and turbulent. This pertinence extends to the interdependency of the exterior and the interior. In recent times, individuals and communities alike have taken the form of digits on weights and measures. The connection between vigour of physicality and soundness of mind have become especially apparent; mirrored in highlighting how minute actions of individuals are integral to sustain the fabric of society. With bated breath, scales tip between fragility and resilience.     A breath can fan the winds of change, spurring the dispersal of seeds. The film sheds light on the polarisation within our society and the need to sow a catalyst for change. 'Transmotion' follows the process of a germinating first seed, that through nurture, may break ground and bloom into a better world.

DIOR PRESENTS ITS AUTUMN-WINTER 2020-2021  HAUTE COUTURE COLLECTION
370

DIOR PRESENTS ITS AUTUMN-WINTER 2020-2021 HAUTE COUTURE COLLECTION

Fashion Week The autumn-winter 2020-2021 haute couture collection by Maria Grazia Chiuri was exclusively revealed online, at the heart of a magical film entitled Le Mythe Dior, directed especially for the House by Matteo Garrone, the emblematic Italian filmmaker who recently signed Pinocchio.     The Atelier’s virtuoso miniature creations come to life as if by magic, traveling through a dreamlike, fantasy universe. Embodying a veritable alchemy of the Dior dream, mythology and the silver screen, this moment of enchantment pays homage to the Théâtre de la mode, a unique event initiated in 1945 to promote French couture around the world, and Paris, more than ever, as the unrivaled capital of haute couture. Luxury being above all about the beauty of gesture, imbued with emotion and joie de vivre, it was essential and symbolic for the Creative Director of Dior women’s collections to in turn perpetuate and reinvent, during these unprecedented times, a spirit of freedom and renewal in the name of the creative energy passed down by Monsieur Dior.      It represents a major feat for Dior’s petites mains, who gamely rose to the challenge of executing miniature tailoring, involving an infinitely rigorous and passionate dialogue with a range of precious savoir-faire skills. The spellbinding collection highlights the noble character of the artisanal poetry that sculpted, shaped, embroidered and sublimated these exceptional creations. In creating these thirty-seven captivating silhouettes, Maria Grazia Chiuri wished to celebrate the work and the journeys of five indomitable, magnificently inspiring figures of the Surrealist movement: Lee Miller, Dora Maar, Dorothea Tanning, Leonora Carrington and Jacqueline Lamba. Each one a visionary, these audacious personalities transcended their role as “muse” by affirming their vocations as artists of dazzling talent. The autumn-winter 2020-2021 haute couture collection by Maria Grazia Chiuri was exclusively revealed online, at the heart of a magical film entitled Le Mythe Dior, directed especially for the House by Matteo Garrone, the emblematic Italian filmmaker who recently signed Pinocchio.     The Atelier’s virtuoso miniature creations come to life as if by magic, traveling through a dreamlike, fantasy universe. Embodying a veritable alchemy of the Dior dream, mythology and the silver screen, this moment of enchantment pays homage to the Théâtre de la mode, a unique event initiated in 1945 to promote French couture around the world, and Paris, more than ever, as the unrivaled capital of haute couture. Luxury being above all about the beauty of gesture, imbued with emotion and joie de vivre, it was essential and symbolic for the Creative Director of Dior women’s collections to in turn perpetuate and reinvent, during these unprecedented times, a spirit of freedom and renewal in the name of the creative energy passed down by Monsieur Dior.      It represents a major feat for Dior’s petites mains, who gamely rose to the challenge of executing miniature tailoring, involving an infinitely rigorous and passionate dialogue with a range of precious savoir-faire skills. The spellbinding collection highlights the noble character of the artisanal poetry that sculpted, shaped, embroidered and sublimated these exceptional creations. In creating these thirty-seven captivating silhouettes, Maria Grazia Chiuri wished to celebrate the work and the journeys of five indomitable, magnificently inspiring figures of the Surrealist movement: Lee Miller, Dora Maar, Dorothea Tanning, Leonora Carrington and Jacqueline Lamba. Each one a visionary, these audacious personalities transcended their role as “muse” by affirming their vocations as artists of dazzling talent.

Hermès men's  Spring & Summer 2021 collection
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Hermès men's Spring & Summer 2021 collection

Men Discover the Men's Spring-Summer 2021 collection created by Véronique Nichanian.      A performance designed with the artistic collaboration of Cyril Teste.     more on Hermes.com Discover the Men's Spring-Summer 2021 collection created by Véronique Nichanian.      A performance designed with the artistic collaboration of Cyril Teste.     more on Hermes.com

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Ninamounah 006
369

Ninamounah 006

Fashion Collection 006 : The Nest. A look at our most intimate surroundings.     For SS21 we looked inwards. Melting together deadstock materials and recalibrated signature silhouettes. Born from a moment of stillness and reassessment, our new collection comes from a feeling of hope for a bright, new future.   Photo @michael_smits Art direction @ferdisibbel Hair @latoyavelberg Make up @janfuite Talent @veronikaqbaron @metropolitanmodelsgroup Collection 006 : The Nest. A look at our most intimate surroundings.     For SS21 we looked inwards. Melting together deadstock materials and recalibrated signature silhouettes. Born from a moment of stillness and reassessment, our new collection comes from a feeling of hope for a bright, new future.   Photo @michael_smits Art direction @ferdisibbel Hair @latoyavelberg Make up @janfuite Talent @veronikaqbaron @metropolitanmodelsgroup

Exclusive Editorial by Omar Macchiavelli
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Exclusive Editorial by Omar Macchiavelli

Fashion Exclusive digital editorial captured in Milan by Omar Macchiavelli in collaboration with Marco de Vincenzo.     Team: photographer: Omar Macchiavelli @ Aura Photo Agency  @omarmacchiavelli @auraphotoagency stylist: Francesco Casarotto @francerto  all clothing by  Marco de Vincenzo @marcodevincenzo Hair by Lorenzo Zavatta Model: Symon @symonmartyn_  @elitemodelworld Exclusive digital editorial captured in Milan by Omar Macchiavelli in collaboration with Marco de Vincenzo.     Team: photographer: Omar Macchiavelli @ Aura Photo Agency  @omarmacchiavelli @auraphotoagency stylist: Francesco Casarotto @francerto  all clothing by  Marco de Vincenzo @marcodevincenzo Hair by Lorenzo Zavatta Model: Symon @symonmartyn_  @elitemodelworld

The floral inspiration for the Spring & Summer collection of Dior
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The floral inspiration for the Spring & Summer collection of Dior

Fashion An ode to the infinite diversity of nature, the bucolic wardrobe designed by Maria Grazia Chiuri for her Spring-Summer 2020 fashion show is elevated by a selection of accessories also inspired by delicate plant life.     Like subtle treasures preserved in the heart of a spring herbier, wildflowers mingle whimsically on a silk scarf and on emblematic scarves in the Mitzah collection. The must-have D-Connect sneakers are sprinkled with a pastoral motif that contrasts with its neoprene upper and rubber details, for a resolutely contemporary look. Daisies and thorny thistles flourish on the iconic Lady Dior, Dior Book Tote and Saddle bags.   Alongside these Dior symbols, jewelry punctuates the Creative Director’s silhouettes:  gold-finish petals embellish Dior Tribales earrings, blending the brilliance of blue amazonite with the depth of violet rhodonite, transposing into precious talismans with a dazzling finish on rings and chokers strung with jasper or unakite. These creations speak in a poetic dialogue, a testament to the rich botanical heritage that must be preserved. An ode to the infinite diversity of nature, the bucolic wardrobe designed by Maria Grazia Chiuri for her Spring-Summer 2020 fashion show is elevated by a selection of accessories also inspired by delicate plant life.     Like subtle treasures preserved in the heart of a spring herbier, wildflowers mingle whimsically on a silk scarf and on emblematic scarves in the Mitzah collection. The must-have D-Connect sneakers are sprinkled with a pastoral motif that contrasts with its neoprene upper and rubber details, for a resolutely contemporary look. Daisies and thorny thistles flourish on the iconic Lady Dior, Dior Book Tote and Saddle bags.   Alongside these Dior symbols, jewelry punctuates the Creative Director’s silhouettes:  gold-finish petals embellish Dior Tribales earrings, blending the brilliance of blue amazonite with the depth of violet rhodonite, transposing into precious talismans with a dazzling finish on rings and chokers strung with jasper or unakite. These creations speak in a poetic dialogue, a testament to the rich botanical heritage that must be preserved.

Yasmin Wijnaldum by Hugh Lippe
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Yasmin Wijnaldum by Hugh Lippe

Fashion Yasmin captured by Hugh Lippe in our second edition.    TEAM CREDITS: Fotografie: Hugh Lippe at Print & Contact Styling: Lisa Jarvis Talent: Yasmin at The Society Management Haar: Lucas Wilson using Bumble and bumble / Home Agency Make-Up: Ralph Siciliano at The Wall Group Manicurist: Dawn Sterling at Statement Artist using Pear Nova Props Stylist: Kounthear Kuch Production: Zhelma San Millan at Navia Vision Locatie: Industria Studios Casting: Timotej Letonja Fashion Market Assistants: Sierra Smith and Share Koech Yasmin captured by Hugh Lippe in our second edition.    TEAM CREDITS: Fotografie: Hugh Lippe at Print & Contact Styling: Lisa Jarvis Talent: Yasmin at The Society Management Haar: Lucas Wilson using Bumble and bumble / Home Agency Make-Up: Ralph Siciliano at The Wall Group Manicurist: Dawn Sterling at Statement Artist using Pear Nova Props Stylist: Kounthear Kuch Production: Zhelma San Millan at Navia Vision Locatie: Industria Studios Casting: Timotej Letonja Fashion Market Assistants: Sierra Smith and Share Koech

Ninamounah 005
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Ninamounah 005

Fashion Ninamounah releases their new 005 collection.   Team Credits :  Photo Nikola Lamburov Art direction Ferdi Sibbel HMU Bastien Zorzetto, assisted by Eva Agerbeek Light Hyung Balkema Digital Jason Tjon Affo Talent Karina, Marianne, Jacopo #NINAMOUNAH #005 Ninamounah releases their new 005 collection.   Team Credits :  Photo Nikola Lamburov Art direction Ferdi Sibbel HMU Bastien Zorzetto, assisted by Eva Agerbeek Light Hyung Balkema Digital Jason Tjon Affo Talent Karina, Marianne, Jacopo #NINAMOUNAH #005

In conversation with Iris Van Herpen
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In conversation with Iris Van Herpen

Fashion Recently we had a chance to speak with Iris Van Herpen about her latest collection, future plans and affects of Covid-19 on the industry. See the interview bellow.   How do you think Covid-19 will effect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion? Do you believe everything will just go back to normal after Covid-19, or how do you see it will be?   Short term the Covid-19 is putting the fashion industry in a limbo- a silent world that stopped producing and is floating in between the old world and the new world.  Fashion was iceskating on thin ice, and the end of the fast fashion system, spring time for the ice, was already in sight. The cracks were everywhere. The Covid-19 made the whole industry swimming. It has to find new land - and fast fashion will become slow fashion.  Short term, brands will produce less collections a year, less products, less shows, alternative marketing. Longer term, the pandemic will influence both the consumers as the brands themselves radically. The values of fashion are shifting. Its really interesting when talking to the young fashion consumers,  buying a sweater or a dress is not only about creating identity and beauty, today buying is a message to your planet, your health, the health of others and the life of the generations after us. More then ever before young people grow up with a feeling of responsibility towards the generations  after them, their children. What you buy today is directly influencing whether your children will have a planet. Its a burden, and a reality at the same time , and this will move the fortunate people that can spend on luxury and fashion more and more, to buy responsible from slow fashion brands.     How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined?   I am working still but alone with my partner, instead of in my atelier. I miss my team and the creative process with them. I am still working on new collection but its a lot harder and slower as the material experiments cannot really happen.  But I am sketching a lot and draping, and these new creations that are growing inside my mind show me that the future is always near. They steer me forward with excitement, confident for a new world to bloom again.     Tell us about the inspiration and design of your latest collection shown during Haute Couture shows in Paris earlier this year.   Being in quarantine now, the last show in Paris feels like a dream. The energy of the atelier, this incredible group of bright minds and creatives together, that are all working together to form our dreams into the textures and materials, its alchemic.  And the recent process was very exciting because we realized some techniques and movement, that I had in mind for a long time and did not worked out earlier. I found inspiration in the art of the Spanish neuroanatomist Ramón y Cajal and the deep seas and ecology of our oceans.  Cajal researched our central nervous system in microscopic detailing and drew his revolutionary findings, which are incredibly delicate anatomical drawings that are art but also important scientific documents. I was moved how seamlessly he merged science with art. Other inspiration came from the deep sea, which have always been a fascination to me but i never really managed to capture the extreme transformative power and movement of these watery living paintings. I started researching the Hydrozoa, a class of delicately branched sea-life organisms that to me look like aqueous fabrics, like layers of living lace. So in the collection I wanted to hold a microscope over these two delicate worlds, to design metaphorical mazes of sensory waves.     What makes this collection different from any of your previous collections? Cajal’s anatomical drawings were revealed in the ‘Labrynthine’ technique; 3D lasercut silk dendrites were heatbonded to blossoming leaves of black transparent glass-organza, to then be hand-embroidered onto  lasercut pearlescent exoskeletons.  And The 'hypertube'  technique was 3D printed from a single-lined web from white silicone thread, that is printed onto black silk-chiffon, twisting down the body. Both techniques were developed for this collection specifically and was a beautiful progress technically. For he ‘Hydrozoa’  technique, cellular aquarelles of dark purples and turquoise were oil-painted and multi-layered into hundreds of transparent lasercut PetG bubbles. The glass organza halos we digitally printed, heatbonded and then hand-stitched into voluminous splashes. The file-work of each layer is drawn to hang upwards, blooming aquatically with each movement, like living coral. This is the closest to the transformative ‘liquification’ of a dress,  that we have ever been able to get.    What is your favourite new technique that you learnt and added do your designing process.   The ‘Morphogenesis’ technique that we have been develloping with long term collaborator, close friend, and professor Philip Beesley. This look is carved by thousands of white-screen printing mesh layers. 3D twisted vortex models were created in Rhino, numbered and sliced into 3mm distance, to then be cut on the KERN lasercutter with a triangulated grid of chevron-holes. Grasshopper scripts smoothened the processes of lofting, slicing and nesting. Each layer was embellished by hand with a grid of minuscule transparent chevrons, creating infinitely flexible forms that expand and contract around the body.   What is in your planning for this year and how will Covid-19 effect that?   The collaborations we were doing are still possible to happen and continue, which is great, its all through skype/zoom now which works nicely and we are working on two solo exhibitions and a book. The Couture show in July in Paris is unfortunately cancelled but we are making a new collection and a large VR experience from the collection so that a much wider audience can experience the collection real scale and three dimensionally. I am very exited by that and I hope in future everybody will be able to experience the delicacy, dimensionality and texture of all the designs much more intimately then a small flat screen. The small size and the two dimensionality just does not translate the full emotional embodiment. Each time someone sees the designs up close for the first time, its a similar respons; this is so much more detailed and its ‘alive’.      What is your favourite painting and has it inspired you for any of your work thus far?   Wauw, that is a difficult one. First that comes to mind is the Garden of Earthly Delights painting from  Hieronymus bosch. My whole family comes from s’Hertogenbosch so I grew up knowing his work well and it keeps on fascinating me how powerful, feraless for its time,  timeless, and transcending his vision was.    Lastly, as the HCPFW in July has been post-poned for now, will you still be releasing a collection in July, perhaps in a different way and if so how?   We are working on the new collection. We have actually already started working on the July collection before the pandemic started. As we are a slow fashion company,  we develop a new collection over 6 months full time with the team,  to develop all the materials, techniques and the final garments. We are still continuing the process but from home, so it all goes a lot slower.  We cannot start working on the final garments until the team is back in the atelier. So it will depend on when the Dutch Government- the atelier is in Amsterdam- will advice on that. I highly doubt we will be able to finish the collection already for July, but we aim to release the collection and the VR experience in September/October. Recently we had a chance to speak with Iris Van Herpen about her latest collection, future plans and affects of Covid-19 on the industry. See the interview bellow.   How do you think Covid-19 will effect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion? Do you believe everything will just go back to normal after Covid-19, or how do you see it will be?   Short term the Covid-19 is putting the fashion industry in a limbo- a silent world that stopped producing and is floating in between the old world and the new world.  Fashion was iceskating on thin ice, and the end of the fast fashion system, spring time for the ice, was already in sight. The cracks were everywhere. The Covid-19 made the whole industry swimming. It has to find new land - and fast fashion will become slow fashion.  Short term, brands will produce less collections a year, less products, less shows, alternative marketing. Longer term, the pandemic will influence both the consumers as the brands themselves radically. The values of fashion are shifting. Its really interesting when talking to the young fashion consumers,  buying a sweater or a dress is not only about creating identity and beauty, today buying is a message to your planet, your health, the health of others and the life of the generations after us. More then ever before young people grow up with a feeling of responsibility towards the generations  after them, their children. What you buy today is directly influencing whether your children will have a planet. Its a burden, and a reality at the same time , and this will move the fortunate people that can spend on luxury and fashion more and more, to buy responsible from slow fashion brands.     How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined?   I am working still but alone with my partner, instead of in my atelier. I miss my team and the creative process with them. I am still working on new collection but its a lot harder and slower as the material experiments cannot really happen.  But I am sketching a lot and draping, and these new creations that are growing inside my mind show me that the future is always near. They steer me forward with excitement, confident for a new world to bloom again.     Tell us about the inspiration and design of your latest collection shown during Haute Couture shows in Paris earlier this year.   Being in quarantine now, the last show in Paris feels like a dream. The energy of the atelier, this incredible group of bright minds and creatives together, that are all working together to form our dreams into the textures and materials, its alchemic.  And the recent process was very exciting because we realized some techniques and movement, that I had in mind for a long time and did not worked out earlier. I found inspiration in the art of the Spanish neuroanatomist Ramón y Cajal and the deep seas and ecology of our oceans.  Cajal researched our central nervous system in microscopic detailing and drew his revolutionary findings, which are incredibly delicate anatomical drawings that are art but also important scientific documents. I was moved how seamlessly he merged science with art. Other inspiration came from the deep sea, which have always been a fascination to me but i never really managed to capture the extreme transformative power and movement of these watery living paintings. I started researching the Hydrozoa, a class of delicately branched sea-life organisms that to me look like aqueous fabrics, like layers of living lace. So in the collection I wanted to hold a microscope over these two delicate worlds, to design metaphorical mazes of sensory waves.     What makes this collection different from any of your previous collections? Cajal’s anatomical drawings were revealed in the ‘Labrynthine’ technique; 3D lasercut silk dendrites were heatbonded to blossoming leaves of black transparent glass-organza, to then be hand-embroidered onto  lasercut pearlescent exoskeletons.  And The 'hypertube'  technique was 3D printed from a single-lined web from white silicone thread, that is printed onto black silk-chiffon, twisting down the body. Both techniques were developed for this collection specifically and was a beautiful progress technically. For he ‘Hydrozoa’  technique, cellular aquarelles of dark purples and turquoise were oil-painted and multi-layered into hundreds of transparent lasercut PetG bubbles. The glass organza halos we digitally printed, heatbonded and then hand-stitched into voluminous splashes. The file-work of each layer is drawn to hang upwards, blooming aquatically with each movement, like living coral. This is the closest to the transformative ‘liquification’ of a dress,  that we have ever been able to get.    What is your favourite new technique that you learnt and added do your designing process.   The ‘Morphogenesis’ technique that we have been develloping with long term collaborator, close friend, and professor Philip Beesley. This look is carved by thousands of white-screen printing mesh layers. 3D twisted vortex models were created in Rhino, numbered and sliced into 3mm distance, to then be cut on the KERN lasercutter with a triangulated grid of chevron-holes. Grasshopper scripts smoothened the processes of lofting, slicing and nesting. Each layer was embellished by hand with a grid of minuscule transparent chevrons, creating infinitely flexible forms that expand and contract around the body.   What is in your planning for this year and how will Covid-19 effect that?   The collaborations we were doing are still possible to happen and continue, which is great, its all through skype/zoom now which works nicely and we are working on two solo exhibitions and a book. The Couture show in July in Paris is unfortunately cancelled but we are making a new collection and a large VR experience from the collection so that a much wider audience can experience the collection real scale and three dimensionally. I am very exited by that and I hope in future everybody will be able to experience the delicacy, dimensionality and texture of all the designs much more intimately then a small flat screen. The small size and the two dimensionality just does not translate the full emotional embodiment. Each time someone sees the designs up close for the first time, its a similar respons; this is so much more detailed and its ‘alive’.      What is your favourite painting and has it inspired you for any of your work thus far?   Wauw, that is a difficult one. First that comes to mind is the Garden of Earthly Delights painting from  Hieronymus bosch. My whole family comes from s’Hertogenbosch so I grew up knowing his work well and it keeps on fascinating me how powerful, feraless for its time,  timeless, and transcending his vision was.    Lastly, as the HCPFW in July has been post-poned for now, will you still be releasing a collection in July, perhaps in a different way and if so how?   We are working on the new collection. We have actually already started working on the July collection before the pandemic started. As we are a slow fashion company,  we develop a new collection over 6 months full time with the team,  to develop all the materials, techniques and the final garments. We are still continuing the process but from home, so it all goes a lot slower.  We cannot start working on the final garments until the team is back in the atelier. So it will depend on when the Dutch Government- the atelier is in Amsterdam- will advice on that. I highly doubt we will be able to finish the collection already for July, but we aim to release the collection and the VR experience in September/October.

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