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Pablo Erroz presents the new non-seasonal 2022 collection
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Pablo Erroz presents the new non-seasonal 2022 collection

Fashion   Pablo Erroz Non-Seasonal 2022 Collection,  photographed by @_ectortre and styled by @gabriella.norberg  at 080 Barcelona Fashion Week.   Pablo Erroz Non-Seasonal 2022 Collection,  photographed by @_ectortre and styled by @gabriella.norberg  at 080 Barcelona Fashion Week.

CELINE "PARADE"
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CELINE "PARADE"

Fashion “HER GAZE IS LIKE THE GAZE OF STATUES.” - PAUL VERLAINEMY FAMILIAR DREAM     “MY YOUTH HAS BEEN NOTHING BUT A TENEBROUS STORM, PIERCED NOW AND THEN BY RAYS OF BRILLIANT SUNSHINE.” - CHARLES BAUDELAIRE THE ENEMY     “I ALONE HAVE THE KEY TO THIS SAVAGE PARADE.” ARTHUR RIMBAUD PARADE   ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK FOR CELINE.   “UN DAY DREAM” PERFORMED BY REGINA DEMINA. WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY REGINA DEMINA & CHARLES CASTE FEATURING HARP ARRANGEMENTS BY LEONIE FAVRE-TISSOT COMMISSIONED AND CO-PRODUCED BY HEDI SLIMANE FOR PARADE.   CRÉDITS: HAIR STYLIST: ESTHER LANGHAM MAKE-UP: CHRISTELLE COCQUET     “HER GAZE IS LIKE THE GAZE OF STATUES.” - PAUL VERLAINEMY FAMILIAR DREAM     “MY YOUTH HAS BEEN NOTHING BUT A TENEBROUS STORM, PIERCED NOW AND THEN BY RAYS OF BRILLIANT SUNSHINE.” - CHARLES BAUDELAIRE THE ENEMY     “I ALONE HAVE THE KEY TO THIS SAVAGE PARADE.” ARTHUR RIMBAUD PARADE   ORIGINAL SOUNDTRACK FOR CELINE.   “UN DAY DREAM” PERFORMED BY REGINA DEMINA. WRITTEN AND PRODUCED BY REGINA DEMINA & CHARLES CASTE FEATURING HARP ARRANGEMENTS BY LEONIE FAVRE-TISSOT COMMISSIONED AND CO-PRODUCED BY HEDI SLIMANE FOR PARADE.   CRÉDITS: HAIR STYLIST: ESTHER LANGHAM MAKE-UP: CHRISTELLE COCQUET    

DIOR PRESENTS THE FALL 2021 COLLECTION IN SHANGHAI
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DIOR PRESENTS THE FALL 2021 COLLECTION IN SHANGHAI

Fashion For Maria Grazia Chiuri, unveiling the Fall 2021 collection at the Long Museum West Bund in Shanghai* represents an extraordinary opportunity to infuse her creations with a visual force in motion and a new energy, as a celebration of the House’s creativity and the power of world cultures. Featuring acid hues, plays on transparency, and shiny and silvery reflections, the looks celebrate a Pop aesthetic. Embroideries are enhanced with giant sequins, like mirror discs, recalling the faceted disco balls punctuating the show’s set and illuminating four brand new dresses. An invitation to freedom, the leopard print adorning the catwalk crops up on a range of pieces including the iconic Bar jacket. A series of exclusive models, each in a different neon hue — as well as red, which Monsieur Dior considered “the color of life” – also enrich a collection presented to a musical composition by Giorgio Moroder**. As a final surprise, singer Joey Yung and the Chinese rock group Black Panther gave exceptional live performances.     For Maria Grazia Chiuri, unveiling the Fall 2021 collection at the Long Museum West Bund in Shanghai* represents an extraordinary opportunity to infuse her creations with a visual force in motion and a new energy, as a celebration of the House’s creativity and the power of world cultures. Featuring acid hues, plays on transparency, and shiny and silvery reflections, the looks celebrate a Pop aesthetic. Embroideries are enhanced with giant sequins, like mirror discs, recalling the faceted disco balls punctuating the show’s set and illuminating four brand new dresses. An invitation to freedom, the leopard print adorning the catwalk crops up on a range of pieces including the iconic Bar jacket. A series of exclusive models, each in a different neon hue — as well as red, which Monsieur Dior considered “the color of life” – also enrich a collection presented to a musical composition by Giorgio Moroder**. As a final surprise, singer Joey Yung and the Chinese rock group Black Panther gave exceptional live performances.    

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A cast of personalities attended ‘Bottega Veneta Salon 02’ at the Berghain
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A cast of personalities attended ‘Bottega Veneta Salon 02’ at the Berghain

Fashion Week Notable people included Burna Boy, Skepta, Slowthai, Kwes Darko, Virgil Abloh, Roberto Bolle, Tricky, Honey Dijon, Stefano Pilati, Oumi Janta, Michelle Nicol, Thea Djordjadze, Sven Marquardt, Marc Goehring, Polina Semionova, Maria and Joerg Koch. Notable people included Burna Boy, Skepta, Slowthai, Kwes Darko, Virgil Abloh, Roberto Bolle, Tricky, Honey Dijon, Stefano Pilati, Oumi Janta, Michelle Nicol, Thea Djordjadze, Sven Marquardt, Marc Goehring, Polina Semionova, Maria and Joerg Koch.

Christian Wijnants presents   the new collection for Fall & Winter 2021
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Christian Wijnants presents the new collection for Fall & Winter 2021

Fashion Week If given the opportunity to explore an empty museum, how would you fill the space? This is the question that inspired Christian Wijnants’ Fall/Winter 2021 collection as he was given unique access to the Antwerp Royal Museum of Fine Arts, a place that has been so dear to him. Over the past 10 years, the Museum has been closed for renovations, only previewing its restored 19th century structure and newly constructed minimalist addition to Christian, inviting him to fill the grandiose rooms and hallways with his creations. A poetic moment for the designer who first visited the museum as a student on the brink of his career, beginning his to-become namesake’s brand connection to art. However, this time, as the museum sits empty, Christian relied on his memories and vision to fill the space and walls that once held the same Flemish Primitives and Baroque paintings that have inspired him today.     The silhouettes are exaggerated, full of volume, designed to physically fill the oversized rooms and elongated, just like the art that used to hang on the walls and doors that welcome you in. There is a down cape and complimenting puffed bags, cacoon coats designed to appear as though they are cut out of woolen blankets, and peasant shapes that draw from medieval underpinnings. Heavy wool fabric is draped into skirts and swept by fridge, like a curtain grazing the old wooden floors. The knitwear brings in a Bicolor Plissé dress and the ottoman stitch, utilized as stripes. A long-sleeve floor length dress is styled with a scarf worn as a hat, materializing the old paintings that stood out in Christian’s memory.      Floral patterns feel like an ancient tapestry, overdyed and overlarge. Stripes are inspired by the chevron wood floors throughout the museum, construed in various ways, from quite fine lines cutting vertically on down jackets and lengthening dresses to magnified stripes seen as a two-tone knit. The colors are strategically chosen to reflect the feeling of exploring the various rooms, misty yet bright and historic, but refreshed. It consists of cooler hues such as antique pink, mint, fresh lime, and pistachio, paired with warmer tones such as emerald, bronze and rust.     The hair is clumsy and reminiscent of historic times, although ambivalent of the exact decade, and make-up is tonal and blurred, imagined to be misconstrued as just the reflection of the green walls. The Fall/Winter 2021 collection comes to life in the collection film, allowing you to explore Christian’s vision, hear the echo of footsteps wandering the space and escape to a feeling of serenity that being in an empty museum provides. If given the opportunity to explore an empty museum, how would you fill the space? This is the question that inspired Christian Wijnants’ Fall/Winter 2021 collection as he was given unique access to the Antwerp Royal Museum of Fine Arts, a place that has been so dear to him. Over the past 10 years, the Museum has been closed for renovations, only previewing its restored 19th century structure and newly constructed minimalist addition to Christian, inviting him to fill the grandiose rooms and hallways with his creations. A poetic moment for the designer who first visited the museum as a student on the brink of his career, beginning his to-become namesake’s brand connection to art. However, this time, as the museum sits empty, Christian relied on his memories and vision to fill the space and walls that once held the same Flemish Primitives and Baroque paintings that have inspired him today.     The silhouettes are exaggerated, full of volume, designed to physically fill the oversized rooms and elongated, just like the art that used to hang on the walls and doors that welcome you in. There is a down cape and complimenting puffed bags, cacoon coats designed to appear as though they are cut out of woolen blankets, and peasant shapes that draw from medieval underpinnings. Heavy wool fabric is draped into skirts and swept by fridge, like a curtain grazing the old wooden floors. The knitwear brings in a Bicolor Plissé dress and the ottoman stitch, utilized as stripes. A long-sleeve floor length dress is styled with a scarf worn as a hat, materializing the old paintings that stood out in Christian’s memory.      Floral patterns feel like an ancient tapestry, overdyed and overlarge. Stripes are inspired by the chevron wood floors throughout the museum, construed in various ways, from quite fine lines cutting vertically on down jackets and lengthening dresses to magnified stripes seen as a two-tone knit. The colors are strategically chosen to reflect the feeling of exploring the various rooms, misty yet bright and historic, but refreshed. It consists of cooler hues such as antique pink, mint, fresh lime, and pistachio, paired with warmer tones such as emerald, bronze and rust.     The hair is clumsy and reminiscent of historic times, although ambivalent of the exact decade, and make-up is tonal and blurred, imagined to be misconstrued as just the reflection of the green walls. The Fall/Winter 2021 collection comes to life in the collection film, allowing you to explore Christian’s vision, hear the echo of footsteps wandering the space and escape to a feeling of serenity that being in an empty museum provides.

LOUIS VUITTON PRESENTS THE NEW COLLECTION FOR FALL & WINTER
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LOUIS VUITTON PRESENTS THE NEW COLLECTION FOR FALL & WINTER

Fashion Week There’s no need to venture far to create the impression of traveling. It’s enough to reach far back… to the Golden Age, or Age of Enlightenment, eras that forged the essence of our civilization. Everything is expressed so purely in Greco-Roman antiquity, the acme of an aesthetic whose primacy is uncontested. More than a journey, Louis Vuitton embarks on an odyssey with a Fall-Winter 2021 collection that incorporates fabulous drawings by Fornasetti, the delicate, fanciful engravings of an enduring era. His imaginative strokes explore, illustrate and impart style. It’s also a story of conquest — of body, heart and mind — in which humankind takes centre stage, in all its functional elegance, intellectual dominance, and earthly seduction. The astonishment of age-old principles endures and continues to guide us, such as contrapposto, a stance that first appeared in the 6th century BC and lent statues a dynamic allure, which countless couture poses have reprised since and still denotes a certain stylistic tension in fashion. There’s no need to venture far to create the impression of traveling. It’s enough to reach far back… to the Golden Age, or Age of Enlightenment, eras that forged the essence of our civilization. Everything is expressed so purely in Greco-Roman antiquity, the acme of an aesthetic whose primacy is uncontested. More than a journey, Louis Vuitton embarks on an odyssey with a Fall-Winter 2021 collection that incorporates fabulous drawings by Fornasetti, the delicate, fanciful engravings of an enduring era. His imaginative strokes explore, illustrate and impart style. It’s also a story of conquest — of body, heart and mind — in which humankind takes centre stage, in all its functional elegance, intellectual dominance, and earthly seduction. The astonishment of age-old principles endures and continues to guide us, such as contrapposto, a stance that first appeared in the 6th century BC and lent statues a dynamic allure, which countless couture poses have reprised since and still denotes a certain stylistic tension in fashion.

Ann Demeulemeester presents the new collection for Fall & Winter 2021-2022
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Ann Demeulemeester presents the new collection for Fall & Winter 2021-2022

Fashion Week “Ann Demeulemeester FW/21-22 collection is an exercise in style taken from her passion and mastery in tailoring. Black and white are used pure, with no nuances, as an embodiment of a conversation that exists between this pure palette and the materials chosen for the execution that offers a balance between coarse and refined.” “Ann Demeulemeester FW/21-22 collection is an exercise in style taken from her passion and mastery in tailoring. Black and white are used pure, with no nuances, as an embodiment of a conversation that exists between this pure palette and the materials chosen for the execution that offers a balance between coarse and refined.”

CHANEL PRESENTS THE NEW COLLECTION FOR FALL & WINTER 2021-2022
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CHANEL PRESENTS THE NEW COLLECTION FOR FALL & WINTER 2021-2022

Fashion Week “I love contrasts, so for the more voluminous winter pieces, I wanted a small space. I don’t know if this is because of the times we live in, but I wanted something warm, lively. I imagined the models doing a show for themselves, going from room to room, crossing each other in staircases, piling their coats up in the cloakroom and going up to the next floor to get changed. And I thought of the shows that Karl would tell me about, back in the day, a long time ago, when the models would dress themselves and do their own make-up,” says Virginie Viard describing the atmosphere of the CHANEL Fall-Winter 2021/22 Ready-to-Wear show.     “So, I decided to go to Castel. I like Castel so much for its many salons, the spiral staircase, its bar, the journey through this venue, its little house style, where the models can get changed, dressed and undressed, do their make-up together, and have fun like a girls night in. It’s very sensual.” A sensuality that also touches the collection teasers and press kit, staged by the duo Inez & Vinoodh who filmed this show playing with the contrasts so loved by Virginie Viard. Contrasts between volumes, materials and spirit. A long tweed coat with a chevron motif reveals bare legs wearing voluminous boots in black curly faux fur; a trouser suit in black tweed with small checks in blue lurex is adorned with thin braces in pearls and layers of sautoir necklaces. A white coat in patent sheepskin and lined with faux fur, is coupled with “down jacket” style two-tone boots, with unzippable legs giving way to a pair of silver heeled booties to go dancing in. The salopettes-ski suits in white quilting embroidered with red and blue motifs, or in fuchsia tweed, are worn with strappy sandals embellished with chains and little black bows or pumps adorned with a camellia, while delicate blouses in chiffon or crêpe de Chine are combined with pieces inspired by winter sportswear. “This collection is a mix of two influences: the ambiance of ski holidays, which I adore, and a certain idea of cool Parisian chic, from the 1970s to now.”     Sequinned ballet flats, strass-covered minaudières worn like a sautoir necklace, a man’s black shirt with a white collar and cuffs under a precious suit in navy lurex, a tweed kilt over a knitted jumpsuit embellished with iridescent threads… “Today some of these silhouettes make me think of Stella Tennant’s allure, the way she wore certain pieces, it was so Chanel.”       #CHANELFallWinter “I love contrasts, so for the more voluminous winter pieces, I wanted a small space. I don’t know if this is because of the times we live in, but I wanted something warm, lively. I imagined the models doing a show for themselves, going from room to room, crossing each other in staircases, piling their coats up in the cloakroom and going up to the next floor to get changed. And I thought of the shows that Karl would tell me about, back in the day, a long time ago, when the models would dress themselves and do their own make-up,” says Virginie Viard describing the atmosphere of the CHANEL Fall-Winter 2021/22 Ready-to-Wear show.     “So, I decided to go to Castel. I like Castel so much for its many salons, the spiral staircase, its bar, the journey through this venue, its little house style, where the models can get changed, dressed and undressed, do their make-up together, and have fun like a girls night in. It’s very sensual.” A sensuality that also touches the collection teasers and press kit, staged by the duo Inez & Vinoodh who filmed this show playing with the contrasts so loved by Virginie Viard. Contrasts between volumes, materials and spirit. A long tweed coat with a chevron motif reveals bare legs wearing voluminous boots in black curly faux fur; a trouser suit in black tweed with small checks in blue lurex is adorned with thin braces in pearls and layers of sautoir necklaces. A white coat in patent sheepskin and lined with faux fur, is coupled with “down jacket” style two-tone boots, with unzippable legs giving way to a pair of silver heeled booties to go dancing in. The salopettes-ski suits in white quilting embroidered with red and blue motifs, or in fuchsia tweed, are worn with strappy sandals embellished with chains and little black bows or pumps adorned with a camellia, while delicate blouses in chiffon or crêpe de Chine are combined with pieces inspired by winter sportswear. “This collection is a mix of two influences: the ambiance of ski holidays, which I adore, and a certain idea of cool Parisian chic, from the 1970s to now.”     Sequinned ballet flats, strass-covered minaudières worn like a sautoir necklace, a man’s black shirt with a white collar and cuffs under a precious suit in navy lurex, a tweed kilt over a knitted jumpsuit embellished with iridescent threads… “Today some of these silhouettes make me think of Stella Tennant’s allure, the way she wore certain pieces, it was so Chanel.”       #CHANELFallWinter

DIOR PRESENTS THE NEW COLLECTION FOR FALL & WINTER 2021-2022
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DIOR PRESENTS THE NEW COLLECTION FOR FALL & WINTER 2021-2022

Fashion Week For the autumn-winter 2021-2022 ready-to-wear collection, Maria Grazia Chiuri explores the world of fairy tales. A network of symbols, these fantasy worlds are in no way a means of escape; they serve to question and challenge, above and beyond stereotypes. Like an invitation to self-affirmation, the tin soldier’s uniform is transformed into a series of blue cashmere coats enhanced with red and white accents. Black takes pride of place on a range of looks, from skirts to the Bar jacket punctuated with Dior’s iconic cannage motif or fitted with a hood, which might have been worn by Angela Carter’s Little Red Riding Hood*. Reinvented, feminine magic, and a subtle path towards a new awareness.     #DiorAW21 For the autumn-winter 2021-2022 ready-to-wear collection, Maria Grazia Chiuri explores the world of fairy tales. A network of symbols, these fantasy worlds are in no way a means of escape; they serve to question and challenge, above and beyond stereotypes. Like an invitation to self-affirmation, the tin soldier’s uniform is transformed into a series of blue cashmere coats enhanced with red and white accents. Black takes pride of place on a range of looks, from skirts to the Bar jacket punctuated with Dior’s iconic cannage motif or fitted with a hood, which might have been worn by Angela Carter’s Little Red Riding Hood*. Reinvented, feminine magic, and a subtle path towards a new awareness.     #DiorAW21

GIVENCHY PRESENTS THE FALL & WINTER 2021 WOMEN’S & MEN'S READY-TO-WEAR COLLECTION
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GIVENCHY PRESENTS THE FALL & WINTER 2021 WOMEN’S & MEN'S READY-TO-WEAR COLLECTION

Fashion Week “In many ways, this collection is about a constant tension between two worlds. It’s about finding personal meaning in difficult circumstances; it’s about sincerity in what we do rather than strategy. We wanted to bring a sense of lived reality alongside precision, elegance and extravagance in the clothing and looks. Ultimately, fashion for us is a way of being, feeling and connecting rather than a game to be played. It’s almost like monumentalising the everyday, filling it with emotion – like music you can wear.” Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     In Williams’ Givenchy, there is a mix of lavishness and austerity, together with the imperfect beauty of humanity. It invokes the distinctly emotional side of the business of luxury and fashion – for both maker and wearer – something once again utilised and celebrated by Givenchy.     The nexus of utility and luxury, protection and comfort, is at the heart of this clothing, infused as it is with the isolation and poignancy of the past year. Yet at the same time, it is a collection that is at once monumental and intimate, giving the wearer presence and audaciousness, yet still with a sense of a person at its centre with a to- hell-with-it attitude. Ultimately, it is an offering that transcends troubled times.     Bridging the classical, radical and practical, the silhouettes for both men and women explore the tension between extravagance and discipline. Sensoriality and voluptuary prevail in the use of materials, particularly faux fur and real shearling – materials that almost swaddle the wearer, enveloping and cocooning. Volumes are explored through layering, quite purposefully emphasising a more exaggerated and monumental winter silhouette. Here, feelings of comfort and protection, ease and extravagance all come into play for the wearer. In contrast to this ‘macro’ line, there is the ‘micro’ – the tension explored between the two, often appearing in the same silhouette. Here, long, lean lines are contrasted against short, taut crops or expansive, voluminous, draperies and embroideries. Outerwear is oversized, yet tautness, discipline and rigour underpin all, particularly through the tailoring traditions of the Givenchy atelier. Strong shoulders and sleeves display an architectural approach to tailoring. At the same time, sculpted, fine knitwear emphasises freedom of movement and the liberation of the body, with particular concentration on the waist.   “In many ways, this collection is about a constant tension between two worlds. It’s about finding personal meaning in difficult circumstances; it’s about sincerity in what we do rather than strategy. We wanted to bring a sense of lived reality alongside precision, elegance and extravagance in the clothing and looks. Ultimately, fashion for us is a way of being, feeling and connecting rather than a game to be played. It’s almost like monumentalising the everyday, filling it with emotion – like music you can wear.” Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     In Williams’ Givenchy, there is a mix of lavishness and austerity, together with the imperfect beauty of humanity. It invokes the distinctly emotional side of the business of luxury and fashion – for both maker and wearer – something once again utilised and celebrated by Givenchy.     The nexus of utility and luxury, protection and comfort, is at the heart of this clothing, infused as it is with the isolation and poignancy of the past year. Yet at the same time, it is a collection that is at once monumental and intimate, giving the wearer presence and audaciousness, yet still with a sense of a person at its centre with a to- hell-with-it attitude. Ultimately, it is an offering that transcends troubled times.     Bridging the classical, radical and practical, the silhouettes for both men and women explore the tension between extravagance and discipline. Sensoriality and voluptuary prevail in the use of materials, particularly faux fur and real shearling – materials that almost swaddle the wearer, enveloping and cocooning. Volumes are explored through layering, quite purposefully emphasising a more exaggerated and monumental winter silhouette. Here, feelings of comfort and protection, ease and extravagance all come into play for the wearer. In contrast to this ‘macro’ line, there is the ‘micro’ – the tension explored between the two, often appearing in the same silhouette. Here, long, lean lines are contrasted against short, taut crops or expansive, voluminous, draperies and embroideries. Outerwear is oversized, yet tautness, discipline and rigour underpin all, particularly through the tailoring traditions of the Givenchy atelier. Strong shoulders and sleeves display an architectural approach to tailoring. At the same time, sculpted, fine knitwear emphasises freedom of movement and the liberation of the body, with particular concentration on the waist.  

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