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The floral inspiration for the Spring & Summer collection of Dior
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The floral inspiration for the Spring & Summer collection of Dior

Fashion An ode to the infinite diversity of nature, the bucolic wardrobe designed by Maria Grazia Chiuri for her Spring-Summer 2020 fashion show is elevated by a selection of accessories also inspired by delicate plant life.     Like subtle treasures preserved in the heart of a spring herbier, wildflowers mingle whimsically on a silk scarf and on emblematic scarves in the Mitzah collection. The must-have D-Connect sneakers are sprinkled with a pastoral motif that contrasts with its neoprene upper and rubber details, for a resolutely contemporary look. Daisies and thorny thistles flourish on the iconic Lady Dior, Dior Book Tote and Saddle bags.   Alongside these Dior symbols, jewelry punctuates the Creative Director’s silhouettes:  gold-finish petals embellish Dior Tribales earrings, blending the brilliance of blue amazonite with the depth of violet rhodonite, transposing into precious talismans with a dazzling finish on rings and chokers strung with jasper or unakite. These creations speak in a poetic dialogue, a testament to the rich botanical heritage that must be preserved. An ode to the infinite diversity of nature, the bucolic wardrobe designed by Maria Grazia Chiuri for her Spring-Summer 2020 fashion show is elevated by a selection of accessories also inspired by delicate plant life.     Like subtle treasures preserved in the heart of a spring herbier, wildflowers mingle whimsically on a silk scarf and on emblematic scarves in the Mitzah collection. The must-have D-Connect sneakers are sprinkled with a pastoral motif that contrasts with its neoprene upper and rubber details, for a resolutely contemporary look. Daisies and thorny thistles flourish on the iconic Lady Dior, Dior Book Tote and Saddle bags.   Alongside these Dior symbols, jewelry punctuates the Creative Director’s silhouettes:  gold-finish petals embellish Dior Tribales earrings, blending the brilliance of blue amazonite with the depth of violet rhodonite, transposing into precious talismans with a dazzling finish on rings and chokers strung with jasper or unakite. These creations speak in a poetic dialogue, a testament to the rich botanical heritage that must be preserved.

Yasmin Wijnaldum by Hugh Lippe
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Yasmin Wijnaldum by Hugh Lippe

Fashion Yasmin captured by Hugh Lippe in our second edition.    TEAM CREDITS: Fotografie: Hugh Lippe at Print & Contact Styling: Lisa Jarvis Talent: Yasmin at The Society Management Haar: Lucas Wilson using Bumble and bumble / Home Agency Make-Up: Ralph Siciliano at The Wall Group Manicurist: Dawn Sterling at Statement Artist using Pear Nova Props Stylist: Kounthear Kuch Production: Zhelma San Millan at Navia Vision Locatie: Industria Studios Casting: Timotej Letonja Fashion Market Assistants: Sierra Smith and Share Koech Yasmin captured by Hugh Lippe in our second edition.    TEAM CREDITS: Fotografie: Hugh Lippe at Print & Contact Styling: Lisa Jarvis Talent: Yasmin at The Society Management Haar: Lucas Wilson using Bumble and bumble / Home Agency Make-Up: Ralph Siciliano at The Wall Group Manicurist: Dawn Sterling at Statement Artist using Pear Nova Props Stylist: Kounthear Kuch Production: Zhelma San Millan at Navia Vision Locatie: Industria Studios Casting: Timotej Letonja Fashion Market Assistants: Sierra Smith and Share Koech

Ninamounah 005
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Ninamounah 005

Fashion Ninamounah releases their new 005 collection.   Team Credits :  Photo Nikola Lamburov Art direction Ferdi Sibbel HMU Bastien Zorzetto, assisted by Eva Agerbeek Light Hyung Balkema Digital Jason Tjon Affo Talent Karina, Marianne, Jacopo #NINAMOUNAH #005 Ninamounah releases their new 005 collection.   Team Credits :  Photo Nikola Lamburov Art direction Ferdi Sibbel HMU Bastien Zorzetto, assisted by Eva Agerbeek Light Hyung Balkema Digital Jason Tjon Affo Talent Karina, Marianne, Jacopo #NINAMOUNAH #005

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In conversation with Iris Van Herpen
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In conversation with Iris Van Herpen

Fashion Recently we had a chance to speak with Iris Van Herpen about her latest collection, future plans and affects of Covid-19 on the industry. See the interview bellow.   How do you think Covid-19 will effect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion? Do you believe everything will just go back to normal after Covid-19, or how do you see it will be?   Short term the Covid-19 is putting the fashion industry in a limbo- a silent world that stopped producing and is floating in between the old world and the new world.  Fashion was iceskating on thin ice, and the end of the fast fashion system, spring time for the ice, was already in sight. The cracks were everywhere. The Covid-19 made the whole industry swimming. It has to find new land - and fast fashion will become slow fashion.  Short term, brands will produce less collections a year, less products, less shows, alternative marketing. Longer term, the pandemic will influence both the consumers as the brands themselves radically. The values of fashion are shifting. Its really interesting when talking to the young fashion consumers,  buying a sweater or a dress is not only about creating identity and beauty, today buying is a message to your planet, your health, the health of others and the life of the generations after us. More then ever before young people grow up with a feeling of responsibility towards the generations  after them, their children. What you buy today is directly influencing whether your children will have a planet. Its a burden, and a reality at the same time , and this will move the fortunate people that can spend on luxury and fashion more and more, to buy responsible from slow fashion brands.     How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined?   I am working still but alone with my partner, instead of in my atelier. I miss my team and the creative process with them. I am still working on new collection but its a lot harder and slower as the material experiments cannot really happen.  But I am sketching a lot and draping, and these new creations that are growing inside my mind show me that the future is always near. They steer me forward with excitement, confident for a new world to bloom again.     Tell us about the inspiration and design of your latest collection shown during Haute Couture shows in Paris earlier this year.   Being in quarantine now, the last show in Paris feels like a dream. The energy of the atelier, this incredible group of bright minds and creatives together, that are all working together to form our dreams into the textures and materials, its alchemic.  And the recent process was very exciting because we realized some techniques and movement, that I had in mind for a long time and did not worked out earlier. I found inspiration in the art of the Spanish neuroanatomist Ramón y Cajal and the deep seas and ecology of our oceans.  Cajal researched our central nervous system in microscopic detailing and drew his revolutionary findings, which are incredibly delicate anatomical drawings that are art but also important scientific documents. I was moved how seamlessly he merged science with art. Other inspiration came from the deep sea, which have always been a fascination to me but i never really managed to capture the extreme transformative power and movement of these watery living paintings. I started researching the Hydrozoa, a class of delicately branched sea-life organisms that to me look like aqueous fabrics, like layers of living lace. So in the collection I wanted to hold a microscope over these two delicate worlds, to design metaphorical mazes of sensory waves.     What makes this collection different from any of your previous collections? Cajal’s anatomical drawings were revealed in the ‘Labrynthine’ technique; 3D lasercut silk dendrites were heatbonded to blossoming leaves of black transparent glass-organza, to then be hand-embroidered onto  lasercut pearlescent exoskeletons.  And The 'hypertube'  technique was 3D printed from a single-lined web from white silicone thread, that is printed onto black silk-chiffon, twisting down the body. Both techniques were developed for this collection specifically and was a beautiful progress technically. For he ‘Hydrozoa’  technique, cellular aquarelles of dark purples and turquoise were oil-painted and multi-layered into hundreds of transparent lasercut PetG bubbles. The glass organza halos we digitally printed, heatbonded and then hand-stitched into voluminous splashes. The file-work of each layer is drawn to hang upwards, blooming aquatically with each movement, like living coral. This is the closest to the transformative ‘liquification’ of a dress,  that we have ever been able to get.    What is your favourite new technique that you learnt and added do your designing process.   The ‘Morphogenesis’ technique that we have been develloping with long term collaborator, close friend, and professor Philip Beesley. This look is carved by thousands of white-screen printing mesh layers. 3D twisted vortex models were created in Rhino, numbered and sliced into 3mm distance, to then be cut on the KERN lasercutter with a triangulated grid of chevron-holes. Grasshopper scripts smoothened the processes of lofting, slicing and nesting. Each layer was embellished by hand with a grid of minuscule transparent chevrons, creating infinitely flexible forms that expand and contract around the body.   What is in your planning for this year and how will Covid-19 effect that?   The collaborations we were doing are still possible to happen and continue, which is great, its all through skype/zoom now which works nicely and we are working on two solo exhibitions and a book. The Couture show in July in Paris is unfortunately cancelled but we are making a new collection and a large VR experience from the collection so that a much wider audience can experience the collection real scale and three dimensionally. I am very exited by that and I hope in future everybody will be able to experience the delicacy, dimensionality and texture of all the designs much more intimately then a small flat screen. The small size and the two dimensionality just does not translate the full emotional embodiment. Each time someone sees the designs up close for the first time, its a similar respons; this is so much more detailed and its ‘alive’.      What is your favourite painting and has it inspired you for any of your work thus far?   Wauw, that is a difficult one. First that comes to mind is the Garden of Earthly Delights painting from  Hieronymus bosch. My whole family comes from s’Hertogenbosch so I grew up knowing his work well and it keeps on fascinating me how powerful, feraless for its time,  timeless, and transcending his vision was.    Lastly, as the HCPFW in July has been post-poned for now, will you still be releasing a collection in July, perhaps in a different way and if so how?   We are working on the new collection. We have actually already started working on the July collection before the pandemic started. As we are a slow fashion company,  we develop a new collection over 6 months full time with the team,  to develop all the materials, techniques and the final garments. We are still continuing the process but from home, so it all goes a lot slower.  We cannot start working on the final garments until the team is back in the atelier. So it will depend on when the Dutch Government- the atelier is in Amsterdam- will advice on that. I highly doubt we will be able to finish the collection already for July, but we aim to release the collection and the VR experience in September/October. Recently we had a chance to speak with Iris Van Herpen about her latest collection, future plans and affects of Covid-19 on the industry. See the interview bellow.   How do you think Covid-19 will effect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion? Do you believe everything will just go back to normal after Covid-19, or how do you see it will be?   Short term the Covid-19 is putting the fashion industry in a limbo- a silent world that stopped producing and is floating in between the old world and the new world.  Fashion was iceskating on thin ice, and the end of the fast fashion system, spring time for the ice, was already in sight. The cracks were everywhere. The Covid-19 made the whole industry swimming. It has to find new land - and fast fashion will become slow fashion.  Short term, brands will produce less collections a year, less products, less shows, alternative marketing. Longer term, the pandemic will influence both the consumers as the brands themselves radically. The values of fashion are shifting. Its really interesting when talking to the young fashion consumers,  buying a sweater or a dress is not only about creating identity and beauty, today buying is a message to your planet, your health, the health of others and the life of the generations after us. More then ever before young people grow up with a feeling of responsibility towards the generations  after them, their children. What you buy today is directly influencing whether your children will have a planet. Its a burden, and a reality at the same time , and this will move the fortunate people that can spend on luxury and fashion more and more, to buy responsible from slow fashion brands.     How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined?   I am working still but alone with my partner, instead of in my atelier. I miss my team and the creative process with them. I am still working on new collection but its a lot harder and slower as the material experiments cannot really happen.  But I am sketching a lot and draping, and these new creations that are growing inside my mind show me that the future is always near. They steer me forward with excitement, confident for a new world to bloom again.     Tell us about the inspiration and design of your latest collection shown during Haute Couture shows in Paris earlier this year.   Being in quarantine now, the last show in Paris feels like a dream. The energy of the atelier, this incredible group of bright minds and creatives together, that are all working together to form our dreams into the textures and materials, its alchemic.  And the recent process was very exciting because we realized some techniques and movement, that I had in mind for a long time and did not worked out earlier. I found inspiration in the art of the Spanish neuroanatomist Ramón y Cajal and the deep seas and ecology of our oceans.  Cajal researched our central nervous system in microscopic detailing and drew his revolutionary findings, which are incredibly delicate anatomical drawings that are art but also important scientific documents. I was moved how seamlessly he merged science with art. Other inspiration came from the deep sea, which have always been a fascination to me but i never really managed to capture the extreme transformative power and movement of these watery living paintings. I started researching the Hydrozoa, a class of delicately branched sea-life organisms that to me look like aqueous fabrics, like layers of living lace. So in the collection I wanted to hold a microscope over these two delicate worlds, to design metaphorical mazes of sensory waves.     What makes this collection different from any of your previous collections? Cajal’s anatomical drawings were revealed in the ‘Labrynthine’ technique; 3D lasercut silk dendrites were heatbonded to blossoming leaves of black transparent glass-organza, to then be hand-embroidered onto  lasercut pearlescent exoskeletons.  And The 'hypertube'  technique was 3D printed from a single-lined web from white silicone thread, that is printed onto black silk-chiffon, twisting down the body. Both techniques were developed for this collection specifically and was a beautiful progress technically. For he ‘Hydrozoa’  technique, cellular aquarelles of dark purples and turquoise were oil-painted and multi-layered into hundreds of transparent lasercut PetG bubbles. The glass organza halos we digitally printed, heatbonded and then hand-stitched into voluminous splashes. The file-work of each layer is drawn to hang upwards, blooming aquatically with each movement, like living coral. This is the closest to the transformative ‘liquification’ of a dress,  that we have ever been able to get.    What is your favourite new technique that you learnt and added do your designing process.   The ‘Morphogenesis’ technique that we have been develloping with long term collaborator, close friend, and professor Philip Beesley. This look is carved by thousands of white-screen printing mesh layers. 3D twisted vortex models were created in Rhino, numbered and sliced into 3mm distance, to then be cut on the KERN lasercutter with a triangulated grid of chevron-holes. Grasshopper scripts smoothened the processes of lofting, slicing and nesting. Each layer was embellished by hand with a grid of minuscule transparent chevrons, creating infinitely flexible forms that expand and contract around the body.   What is in your planning for this year and how will Covid-19 effect that?   The collaborations we were doing are still possible to happen and continue, which is great, its all through skype/zoom now which works nicely and we are working on two solo exhibitions and a book. The Couture show in July in Paris is unfortunately cancelled but we are making a new collection and a large VR experience from the collection so that a much wider audience can experience the collection real scale and three dimensionally. I am very exited by that and I hope in future everybody will be able to experience the delicacy, dimensionality and texture of all the designs much more intimately then a small flat screen. The small size and the two dimensionality just does not translate the full emotional embodiment. Each time someone sees the designs up close for the first time, its a similar respons; this is so much more detailed and its ‘alive’.      What is your favourite painting and has it inspired you for any of your work thus far?   Wauw, that is a difficult one. First that comes to mind is the Garden of Earthly Delights painting from  Hieronymus bosch. My whole family comes from s’Hertogenbosch so I grew up knowing his work well and it keeps on fascinating me how powerful, feraless for its time,  timeless, and transcending his vision was.    Lastly, as the HCPFW in July has been post-poned for now, will you still be releasing a collection in July, perhaps in a different way and if so how?   We are working on the new collection. We have actually already started working on the July collection before the pandemic started. As we are a slow fashion company,  we develop a new collection over 6 months full time with the team,  to develop all the materials, techniques and the final garments. We are still continuing the process but from home, so it all goes a lot slower.  We cannot start working on the final garments until the team is back in the atelier. So it will depend on when the Dutch Government- the atelier is in Amsterdam- will advice on that. I highly doubt we will be able to finish the collection already for July, but we aim to release the collection and the VR experience in September/October.

Second Issue is just around the corner
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Second Issue is just around the corner

Fashion Remembering our first issue, as the second one is just around the corner.     #NumeroNetherlandsSS2020 #ComingSoon Remembering our first issue, as the second one is just around the corner.     #NumeroNetherlandsSS2020 #ComingSoon

Marni takes us backstage
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Marni takes us backstage

Fashion Week Marni backstage images from the men's show for Fall & Winter 2020-2021.   Marni backstage images from the men's show for Fall & Winter 2020-2021.  

It's Called Fashion Darling by Claudio & Tomas
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It's Called Fashion Darling by Claudio & Tomas

Fashion Exclusive editorial, captured by Claudio and Tomas. Team Credits: SHOT BY CLAUDIO AND TOMAS STYLING BY JERMAINE DALEY CASTING BY BRENT CHUA HAIR BY TAICHI SAITO MAKEUP BY REI TAJIMA MODEL: MANAMI KINOSHITA @ MUSE MODELS STYLING ASSISTANT: ORE ZACCHEUS PHOTO ASSISTANT: ANDRES JANA Exclusive editorial, captured by Claudio and Tomas. Team Credits: SHOT BY CLAUDIO AND TOMAS STYLING BY JERMAINE DALEY CASTING BY BRENT CHUA HAIR BY TAICHI SAITO MAKEUP BY REI TAJIMA MODEL: MANAMI KINOSHITA @ MUSE MODELS STYLING ASSISTANT: ORE ZACCHEUS PHOTO ASSISTANT: ANDRES JANA

In conversation with Tiffany Hsu
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In conversation with Tiffany Hsu

Style We had a delight to speak with Tiffany about the coming Spring & Summer trends and her highlights.   What are your top 5 new trends for Spring & Summer 2020?   90´s Clean Lines: A ‘90s mood for clean, monochromatic elegance was a favourite in Milan, particularly from the likes of Jil Sander and Bottega Veneta. Minimalism and streamlined tailoring is still a mainstay trend continuing from last season— this time, in an even more pared-back way. We loved the elegant box blazers from newcomer Low Classic, as well as The Row’s impeccable construction. The simple leather accessories we saw at Loewe—modern staples with simple lines—made the biggest statement.   Neon: A rainbow of neons was seen on the runway, with over-the-top fuchsia, fluorescent orange, bright yellow and lime green making a statement within the collections. Dries Van Noten—with a surprise appearance from fashion legend Christian Lacroix —was the occasion to see a sophisticated spin on neon colours that was more inclined towards eveningwear and dresses. Standout styles for us included Valentino’s pairing of tone-on-tone bags with belts, diamonds-meet-neon jewellery from Melissa Kaye and EÉRA, and Kwaidan Editions’ highlighter-green power suit.   Jungle: Strutting down the runway in the same plunging silk-chiffon jungle dress she infamously wore to the Grammy Awards in 2000, Jennifer Lopez’s appearance at Versace was on everyone’s feeds and lips this September. The dress inspired the creation of Google Images, as well as one of the strongest prints for next season. From Fendi’s and Dolce & Gabbana’s luxuriant green leaves to Marni’s abstract blooms, tropical prints have been flowering during Spring/Summer ’20, with palm trees and vivid colors invading dresses, jackets and footwear.   Leather: Following the wave of leather-on-leather men’s tailoring, new leather looks appeared in the womenswear collections. Even if all-black leather is still a favourite, new and different shapes have emerged, such as power shoulders at Maison Margiela and elegantly oversized dresses at Givenchy. Designers also incorporated new colors, such as Gucci’s slit pencil skirt in butter yellow and Bottega Veneta’s anorak dress in tan.          Bermuda Shorts: Bermuda shorts have been introduced as the new suiting silhouette of the season, as seen from Chloé, Max Mara and Valentino. Our clients not only purchase suits as all-in-one looks, but also as separates—making this trend a key transeasonal look that offers even more options to layer and mix. Another highlight for next season is the sophisticated leather short. Exhibit A: a nappa leather, thigh-length version, brought to you by Daniel Lee’s Bottega Veneta.     How do fashion weeks in different cities and countries differentiate for you?    Generally all cities have a unique aesthetic and approach to their respectable fashion weeks. London for example is quite compact and curated – only talents that have been selected by the British Fashion Council are able to present their latest collection. Therefore you are able to see the best that the city has to offer within a short period of time. Paris on the other hand is well known for its big productions of the major fashion houses: complex backdrops and breath-taking locations are a must. For me personally Paris is always quite busy and hectic since I am not just attending shows but am also  simultaneously buying for Mytheresa. Milan, comparable to Paris, is a fashion mecca and the home of luxury heritage brands. Their creations are about incredible craftsmanship, highest qualities and tailoring. Finally New York is very laid back and the fashion crowd seems to be more experimental – something that I find inspiring.      Name some of your new fashion week highlights.   Peter Do: I am super obsessed with this up and coming US based brand. Peter’s designs are minimal and androgynous, like a 90ies revival of Helmut Lang mixed with #oldceline. What’s not to like about this super cool brand.   Low Classic: A Korean based contemporary brand which offers all the fashion staples you need in your wardrobe without burning a hole in your pocket. High waisted blazers combined with easy culottes – you name it, they have it.   Nodaleto: Julia Toledano is the “new kid on the block” in the shoe world. She offers cool chunky heels with a bit grungy touch, but not too alternative. Her styles are perfect for the fashion savvy cool girls who want something different.     What were a few of your favourite shows for SS2020?   Bottega Veneta Valentino Loewe Jacquemus Gabriela Hearst   All the amazing pieces from the looks Tiffany is wearing on the images you can now purchase at MyTheresa.com     We had a delight to speak with Tiffany about the coming Spring & Summer trends and her highlights.   What are your top 5 new trends for Spring & Summer 2020?   90´s Clean Lines: A ‘90s mood for clean, monochromatic elegance was a favourite in Milan, particularly from the likes of Jil Sander and Bottega Veneta. Minimalism and streamlined tailoring is still a mainstay trend continuing from last season— this time, in an even more pared-back way. We loved the elegant box blazers from newcomer Low Classic, as well as The Row’s impeccable construction. The simple leather accessories we saw at Loewe—modern staples with simple lines—made the biggest statement.   Neon: A rainbow of neons was seen on the runway, with over-the-top fuchsia, fluorescent orange, bright yellow and lime green making a statement within the collections. Dries Van Noten—with a surprise appearance from fashion legend Christian Lacroix —was the occasion to see a sophisticated spin on neon colours that was more inclined towards eveningwear and dresses. Standout styles for us included Valentino’s pairing of tone-on-tone bags with belts, diamonds-meet-neon jewellery from Melissa Kaye and EÉRA, and Kwaidan Editions’ highlighter-green power suit.   Jungle: Strutting down the runway in the same plunging silk-chiffon jungle dress she infamously wore to the Grammy Awards in 2000, Jennifer Lopez’s appearance at Versace was on everyone’s feeds and lips this September. The dress inspired the creation of Google Images, as well as one of the strongest prints for next season. From Fendi’s and Dolce & Gabbana’s luxuriant green leaves to Marni’s abstract blooms, tropical prints have been flowering during Spring/Summer ’20, with palm trees and vivid colors invading dresses, jackets and footwear.   Leather: Following the wave of leather-on-leather men’s tailoring, new leather looks appeared in the womenswear collections. Even if all-black leather is still a favourite, new and different shapes have emerged, such as power shoulders at Maison Margiela and elegantly oversized dresses at Givenchy. Designers also incorporated new colors, such as Gucci’s slit pencil skirt in butter yellow and Bottega Veneta’s anorak dress in tan.          Bermuda Shorts: Bermuda shorts have been introduced as the new suiting silhouette of the season, as seen from Chloé, Max Mara and Valentino. Our clients not only purchase suits as all-in-one looks, but also as separates—making this trend a key transeasonal look that offers even more options to layer and mix. Another highlight for next season is the sophisticated leather short. Exhibit A: a nappa leather, thigh-length version, brought to you by Daniel Lee’s Bottega Veneta.     How do fashion weeks in different cities and countries differentiate for you?    Generally all cities have a unique aesthetic and approach to their respectable fashion weeks. London for example is quite compact and curated – only talents that have been selected by the British Fashion Council are able to present their latest collection. Therefore you are able to see the best that the city has to offer within a short period of time. Paris on the other hand is well known for its big productions of the major fashion houses: complex backdrops and breath-taking locations are a must. For me personally Paris is always quite busy and hectic since I am not just attending shows but am also  simultaneously buying for Mytheresa. Milan, comparable to Paris, is a fashion mecca and the home of luxury heritage brands. Their creations are about incredible craftsmanship, highest qualities and tailoring. Finally New York is very laid back and the fashion crowd seems to be more experimental – something that I find inspiring.      Name some of your new fashion week highlights.   Peter Do: I am super obsessed with this up and coming US based brand. Peter’s designs are minimal and androgynous, like a 90ies revival of Helmut Lang mixed with #oldceline. What’s not to like about this super cool brand.   Low Classic: A Korean based contemporary brand which offers all the fashion staples you need in your wardrobe without burning a hole in your pocket. High waisted blazers combined with easy culottes – you name it, they have it.   Nodaleto: Julia Toledano is the “new kid on the block” in the shoe world. She offers cool chunky heels with a bit grungy touch, but not too alternative. Her styles are perfect for the fashion savvy cool girls who want something different.     What were a few of your favourite shows for SS2020?   Bottega Veneta Valentino Loewe Jacquemus Gabriela Hearst   All the amazing pieces from the looks Tiffany is wearing on the images you can now purchase at MyTheresa.com    

Sculptural Bodies by Claudio & Tomas.
174

Sculptural Bodies by Claudio & Tomas.

Fashion Exclusive editorial by Claudio and Tomas.   TEAM CREDITS: SHOT BY CLAUDIO AND TOMAS STYLING BY JERMAINE DALEY CASTING BY BRENT CHUA HAIR BY TAICHI SAITO MAKEUP BY AYANA AWATA MODEL: ALEXI CHAPARRO @ NEXT STYLING ASSISTANT: ORE ZACCHEUS PHOTO ASSISTANT: ANDRES JANA Exclusive editorial by Claudio and Tomas.   TEAM CREDITS: SHOT BY CLAUDIO AND TOMAS STYLING BY JERMAINE DALEY CASTING BY BRENT CHUA HAIR BY TAICHI SAITO MAKEUP BY AYANA AWATA MODEL: ALEXI CHAPARRO @ NEXT STYLING ASSISTANT: ORE ZACCHEUS PHOTO ASSISTANT: ANDRES JANA

Patrizia Pepe previews Fall & Winter Collection
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Patrizia Pepe previews Fall & Winter Collection

Fashion A journey through London’s neighbourhoods and its highly stylish, trendy and creative environments. The most vibrant looks ofthe season, distinct yet complementary, inspired by a love for music and the New Wave rhythms of the English capital. For sensual, daring and irreverent femininity. Iridescent and transparent effects form the background to the Dance Studio theme, evoking the Royal Ballet as a metaphor for the gentle, yet feisty spirit of the contemporary woman. Pure shades wrap the delicate, impalpable interseasonal garments, which are embellished with pleats, see-through meshes and rock-style logos. The unstructured, asymmetrical and cut-out jacket is overlaid on a maxi white shirt for a contemporary and non-conformist look.   A punk-chic elegance emerges from the legendary ’90s, celebrating the brand’s DNA and its bold, unconventional style. Shades of Black Rebel, Glam Lips, Optical White and Guitar Red catch the eye. Satin dresses and tailored suits define Patrizia Pepe’s City Ska ‘new look’. The celebration of the brand’s stylistic hallmarks continues with a return to floral motifs on hyper-light créponné and jacquardwoven with lurex. Patrizia Pepe’s signature looks, crafted from stretch fabrics and a perfect fit, include the suit illuminated by metal eyelets and the clubbing dress with prominent shoulders, wraparound draping and a hyper-sexy vertical slit. Contamination between masculine and feminine pervades the Tomboy theme, alternating David Bowie-style shiny acid greensatin suits with portrait prints reinterpreted with a graphic twist as the season’s Rock Icon element. The pinstripe trench coat becomes a metropolitan uniform, characterized by large lapels, shoulder patches and a waist belt with a Fly metal buckle.   In the streets of Shoreditch, the metropolitan nomad starts to draw on Brick Lane’s street art and the hipster vibrations of the EastEnd, alternating utility and sensuality. The result is a new ‘military style’ that rethinks ‘urban contemporary’ with practical shapesand natural shades. Among vintage markets and trendy bars, the ‘officer’ wardrobe shifts towards the passion of Absinth Yellow, Black and Denim.In the Sensual Shoreditch theme, rigid silhouettes give way to versatile denim workwear jumpsuits and flowing satin dresses with soft pleats.   The “Gentle Rebel” journey ends with the sporting atmosphere of Stratford, the symbolic district of West Ham football club. Dynamic silhouettes and athletic details, with a focus on urban mobility, are characterized by extra-comfortable technical materials ranging from nylon to super-stretch Lycra with contrasting colours. The oversized trench coat has a vibrant Orange Alert shade that enhances the large, enveloping design, adapting to the fast pace of the day and the glamour of the evening.     The accessories explore every possible shape and material combination. The bucket bag with a drawstring and rigid clutch bag are lit up with shiny laminated tassels. The iconic Sleepy Fly combines powder shades with punk interpretations featuring large metal sail rings. The multi-coloured lettering explodes on the surface to create a new graphic code, while the sport-style buckles are covered with coloured and logoed fabrics. Inspired by the world of gyms, the technical fabric pouch bag and shoulder bag are decorated with striking metal elements, large zips and neon pullers.   Contrasts also characterize the shoes, such as the pleated sandals with a ‘dancer’ look, boots with pointed toes and chunky heels, biker boots with branded lug soles and a soft, feminine design with new geometric heels. Contemporary sneakers, the emblem of the Patrizia Pepe woman’s streetwear style, reveal new designs boasting neon touches, all-over logos and technical finishes.   more on: patriziapepe.com A journey through London’s neighbourhoods and its highly stylish, trendy and creative environments. The most vibrant looks ofthe season, distinct yet complementary, inspired by a love for music and the New Wave rhythms of the English capital. For sensual, daring and irreverent femininity. Iridescent and transparent effects form the background to the Dance Studio theme, evoking the Royal Ballet as a metaphor for the gentle, yet feisty spirit of the contemporary woman. Pure shades wrap the delicate, impalpable interseasonal garments, which are embellished with pleats, see-through meshes and rock-style logos. The unstructured, asymmetrical and cut-out jacket is overlaid on a maxi white shirt for a contemporary and non-conformist look.   A punk-chic elegance emerges from the legendary ’90s, celebrating the brand’s DNA and its bold, unconventional style. Shades of Black Rebel, Glam Lips, Optical White and Guitar Red catch the eye. Satin dresses and tailored suits define Patrizia Pepe’s City Ska ‘new look’. The celebration of the brand’s stylistic hallmarks continues with a return to floral motifs on hyper-light créponné and jacquardwoven with lurex. Patrizia Pepe’s signature looks, crafted from stretch fabrics and a perfect fit, include the suit illuminated by metal eyelets and the clubbing dress with prominent shoulders, wraparound draping and a hyper-sexy vertical slit. Contamination between masculine and feminine pervades the Tomboy theme, alternating David Bowie-style shiny acid greensatin suits with portrait prints reinterpreted with a graphic twist as the season’s Rock Icon element. The pinstripe trench coat becomes a metropolitan uniform, characterized by large lapels, shoulder patches and a waist belt with a Fly metal buckle.   In the streets of Shoreditch, the metropolitan nomad starts to draw on Brick Lane’s street art and the hipster vibrations of the EastEnd, alternating utility and sensuality. The result is a new ‘military style’ that rethinks ‘urban contemporary’ with practical shapesand natural shades. Among vintage markets and trendy bars, the ‘officer’ wardrobe shifts towards the passion of Absinth Yellow, Black and Denim.In the Sensual Shoreditch theme, rigid silhouettes give way to versatile denim workwear jumpsuits and flowing satin dresses with soft pleats.   The “Gentle Rebel” journey ends with the sporting atmosphere of Stratford, the symbolic district of West Ham football club. Dynamic silhouettes and athletic details, with a focus on urban mobility, are characterized by extra-comfortable technical materials ranging from nylon to super-stretch Lycra with contrasting colours. The oversized trench coat has a vibrant Orange Alert shade that enhances the large, enveloping design, adapting to the fast pace of the day and the glamour of the evening.     The accessories explore every possible shape and material combination. The bucket bag with a drawstring and rigid clutch bag are lit up with shiny laminated tassels. The iconic Sleepy Fly combines powder shades with punk interpretations featuring large metal sail rings. The multi-coloured lettering explodes on the surface to create a new graphic code, while the sport-style buckles are covered with coloured and logoed fabrics. Inspired by the world of gyms, the technical fabric pouch bag and shoulder bag are decorated with striking metal elements, large zips and neon pullers.   Contrasts also characterize the shoes, such as the pleated sandals with a ‘dancer’ look, boots with pointed toes and chunky heels, biker boots with branded lug soles and a soft, feminine design with new geometric heels. Contemporary sneakers, the emblem of the Patrizia Pepe woman’s streetwear style, reveal new designs boasting neon touches, all-over logos and technical finishes.   more on: patriziapepe.com

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