Advertising
In conversation with Wannes Akop
1805

In conversation with Wannes Akop

Fashion We had a pleasure speaking to Wannes Akop (24), womenswear designer from Dutch-Armenian heritage, who just showed his first collection last month at Amsterdam Fashion Week.        Wannes! Two years ago you were on our first cover, with Daphne Groeneveld wearing that gorgeous jacket. That was your graduation collection. What was your reaction?   I screamed, quite literally! It was a huge surprise that my garments were on the cover, I didn’t expect it at all. Ferdi Sibbel, who styled the shoot, and who I also worked with for my graduation project, requested some of the pieces of the collection. I brought them to Paris myself, because of time constraints. Months later, I suddenly get a message telling me that this specific shot was chosen as the cover. It was something I didn’t expect at all: already dressing Daphne Groeneveld for this editorial was a dream come true and made me really happy. So yes, I screamed!     Only two years later, and you just did your first official show at Amsterdam Fashion Week. How do you feel?   I feel very excited! It’s a scary moment also in a way when you do a show. As a designer you present a collection that is a piece of you and you never know how it will be received. Luckily, It’s been a very interesting process so far and I’ve received great responses, so that’s very exciting. Of course when you graduate you also do a graduation show, but it’s never your own show. I feel so honoured that I was able to fully have my own vision, translated into a presentation, and to be able to present that to the world during Amsterdam Fashion Week.    And I also have to thank the people that have made this possible. One of my best friends, Robin Burggraaf, brand director atNinamounah, who actually introduced me to Danie Bles for the first time, and Danie herself for believing in me and giving me this opportunity.     When did you know that you wanted to pursue a career in fashion?   I feel like this is the question where every creative would answer saying that they knew already from a very young age, but it actually wasn't the case with me. I was thinking of many other careers I wanted to pursue. From archeologist to being a chef. But they were mainly career paths that involved working with your hands. I always loved drawing, painting and being artistic. I remember I used to draw my sisters and basically redesign what they would wear, from this moment on I realized that a career as a designer in fashion was something I definitely wanted to pursue. That’s when I became focused on becoming a designer, and a few years later registered for a fashion education.     For people that are new to your work, how would you describe yourself as a designer?   My work explores the space between my Dutch and Armenian heritage. I try to create a dialogue between these two worlds by taking influences of both to create a story. Largely influenced from the tailoring background of my parents and my family, my designs thus come from a very personal point of view, I feel that it's always a good place to start from because as a designer you want to create something that is close to you.   Growing up with tailors as parents, I have always been taught to appreciate clothes and fabrics. Garments should be well constructed and made of high-quality fabrics I believe, so one can create a piece that lasts longer than one season and doesn’t end up unworn or thrashed like many fast fashion garments.        Could you tell us more about your process?   That wasn't easy at all at first. I was actually working almost full time until 1,5 month before the deadline of the collection. That made the process difficult in the sense that I couldn't spend all of my energy and time on the collection in the first few months of the process.    As I am born and raised in Europe, I never really considered my Armenian heritage when I was growing up, Because when you’re from different ethnic backgrounds or growing up in different countries, you deny elements of your heritage in order to assimilate into another culture. I would end up confused sometimes, and I never really engaged or tapped into the Armenian side of me. It wasn't until I started studying fashion that I started to wonder who I am, and what truly triggers me. I started traveling there more often, looking for what inspires me and that pushed me to create a representation of myself.   The actual process of my collections itself always start out with conversations with my family. They are the core of my inspiration and play a large role in my work. For my Spring - Summer 2022 ‘Nour’ collection, my starting point was a family holiday photo taken by the Black Sea, right before they moved to Europe. Core memories on this summer holiday were of my grandmother’s fringed Posad Pavlova scarf, juxtaposed against the luscious summer fruits such as the pomegranate: the national fruit of Armenia, which inspired the organic lines and sharp shapes. A fusion of my Dutch upbringing and Armenian heritage, my work pays homage to the 90s, the period in which my parents moved to the Netherlands and my sisters began ‘Westernizing’ their sense of style.      What are your plans for the future?   To see Wannes Akop all over the world! We’re currently in touch with online retailers about selling Wannes Akop as a brand.   Besides, I just received pictures yesterday of Imaan Hamman wearing my clothes, and it was a moment that made me realise that this is actually what I am working for. To be able to see people wear your garments is such meaningful moment. Of course there are a few people that I would love to dress: as a designer you always have certain dreams of people to wear your clothes. Cher is big inspiration for me, and she is Armenian too, so she is someone I would love to dress! But also collaborating with Maison Francis Kurkdjian on a scent, who is Armenian too, would be a dream come true. In the end it really is about building this community and relations with people that not only believe in you and want to support you, but also you as a designer believe in.      You collaborated closely with MAC Cosmetics on this show. What was important for you while creating “the look”?   It was really nice to work with MAC, and Hannah and David who are two amazing talents in this industry, on beauty for this collection. I always find eyes of people very intriguing as to me the eyes are the most beautiful part of the face, because they really say something about someone. So we tried to highlight them, but in a very natural and light way. Furthermore, we spoke about the inspiration of the collection, and since that was “A Hot Summer by the Black Sea”, I wanted this fresh feeling. That’s why we used a lot of glossy elements to make the look quite dewy, as if they just came out of the Black Sea, and changed straight into their look, which is an extension of what they were wearing during the day.            The new collection was described by some media as ‘leaving nothing to the imagination’. What is your view on that?   In my opinion it shows that in a way, we as people have become a lot more prude. I think there’s a whole imagination beyond nudity, for me it’s not that special. I think it’s something very natural also. If you are someone who is comfortable showing their body and wearing something that shows a lot of skin, I totally encourage that. Also looking at how we react on social media: where posts are immediately removed when the female body is shown, it just shows it’s not very standardized. I hope that in the future it will be a bit more normalized, and that we will not necessarily look at our bodies in a sexualized way.   Photo credits:   Designer: Wannes Akop for Amsterdam Fashion Week Photography:  Remy Castle  Creative direction: Ferdi Sibbel  Hair: La Toya Velberg for Wella & Sebastian Pro Makeup: David Koppelaar & Hannah Bennet for MAC Cosmetics  Nails: Daniel Smedeman Casting & production: L’Elue Collectif  Talent:  Mickey H, Miko, Robin, Julia, Yenna, Anouk, Aischa, Stella, Tanja, Noria and Athalia Choreography: Frontrowbackstage  Location: Hotel de L’Europe Amsterdam We had a pleasure speaking to Wannes Akop (24), womenswear designer from Dutch-Armenian heritage, who just showed his first collection last month at Amsterdam Fashion Week.        Wannes! Two years ago you were on our first cover, with Daphne Groeneveld wearing that gorgeous jacket. That was your graduation collection. What was your reaction?   I screamed, quite literally! It was a huge surprise that my garments were on the cover, I didn’t expect it at all. Ferdi Sibbel, who styled the shoot, and who I also worked with for my graduation project, requested some of the pieces of the collection. I brought them to Paris myself, because of time constraints. Months later, I suddenly get a message telling me that this specific shot was chosen as the cover. It was something I didn’t expect at all: already dressing Daphne Groeneveld for this editorial was a dream come true and made me really happy. So yes, I screamed!     Only two years later, and you just did your first official show at Amsterdam Fashion Week. How do you feel?   I feel very excited! It’s a scary moment also in a way when you do a show. As a designer you present a collection that is a piece of you and you never know how it will be received. Luckily, It’s been a very interesting process so far and I’ve received great responses, so that’s very exciting. Of course when you graduate you also do a graduation show, but it’s never your own show. I feel so honoured that I was able to fully have my own vision, translated into a presentation, and to be able to present that to the world during Amsterdam Fashion Week.    And I also have to thank the people that have made this possible. One of my best friends, Robin Burggraaf, brand director atNinamounah, who actually introduced me to Danie Bles for the first time, and Danie herself for believing in me and giving me this opportunity.     When did you know that you wanted to pursue a career in fashion?   I feel like this is the question where every creative would answer saying that they knew already from a very young age, but it actually wasn't the case with me. I was thinking of many other careers I wanted to pursue. From archeologist to being a chef. But they were mainly career paths that involved working with your hands. I always loved drawing, painting and being artistic. I remember I used to draw my sisters and basically redesign what they would wear, from this moment on I realized that a career as a designer in fashion was something I definitely wanted to pursue. That’s when I became focused on becoming a designer, and a few years later registered for a fashion education.     For people that are new to your work, how would you describe yourself as a designer?   My work explores the space between my Dutch and Armenian heritage. I try to create a dialogue between these two worlds by taking influences of both to create a story. Largely influenced from the tailoring background of my parents and my family, my designs thus come from a very personal point of view, I feel that it's always a good place to start from because as a designer you want to create something that is close to you.   Growing up with tailors as parents, I have always been taught to appreciate clothes and fabrics. Garments should be well constructed and made of high-quality fabrics I believe, so one can create a piece that lasts longer than one season and doesn’t end up unworn or thrashed like many fast fashion garments.        Could you tell us more about your process?   That wasn't easy at all at first. I was actually working almost full time until 1,5 month before the deadline of the collection. That made the process difficult in the sense that I couldn't spend all of my energy and time on the collection in the first few months of the process.    As I am born and raised in Europe, I never really considered my Armenian heritage when I was growing up, Because when you’re from different ethnic backgrounds or growing up in different countries, you deny elements of your heritage in order to assimilate into another culture. I would end up confused sometimes, and I never really engaged or tapped into the Armenian side of me. It wasn't until I started studying fashion that I started to wonder who I am, and what truly triggers me. I started traveling there more often, looking for what inspires me and that pushed me to create a representation of myself.   The actual process of my collections itself always start out with conversations with my family. They are the core of my inspiration and play a large role in my work. For my Spring - Summer 2022 ‘Nour’ collection, my starting point was a family holiday photo taken by the Black Sea, right before they moved to Europe. Core memories on this summer holiday were of my grandmother’s fringed Posad Pavlova scarf, juxtaposed against the luscious summer fruits such as the pomegranate: the national fruit of Armenia, which inspired the organic lines and sharp shapes. A fusion of my Dutch upbringing and Armenian heritage, my work pays homage to the 90s, the period in which my parents moved to the Netherlands and my sisters began ‘Westernizing’ their sense of style.      What are your plans for the future?   To see Wannes Akop all over the world! We’re currently in touch with online retailers about selling Wannes Akop as a brand.   Besides, I just received pictures yesterday of Imaan Hamman wearing my clothes, and it was a moment that made me realise that this is actually what I am working for. To be able to see people wear your garments is such meaningful moment. Of course there are a few people that I would love to dress: as a designer you always have certain dreams of people to wear your clothes. Cher is big inspiration for me, and she is Armenian too, so she is someone I would love to dress! But also collaborating with Maison Francis Kurkdjian on a scent, who is Armenian too, would be a dream come true. In the end it really is about building this community and relations with people that not only believe in you and want to support you, but also you as a designer believe in.      You collaborated closely with MAC Cosmetics on this show. What was important for you while creating “the look”?   It was really nice to work with MAC, and Hannah and David who are two amazing talents in this industry, on beauty for this collection. I always find eyes of people very intriguing as to me the eyes are the most beautiful part of the face, because they really say something about someone. So we tried to highlight them, but in a very natural and light way. Furthermore, we spoke about the inspiration of the collection, and since that was “A Hot Summer by the Black Sea”, I wanted this fresh feeling. That’s why we used a lot of glossy elements to make the look quite dewy, as if they just came out of the Black Sea, and changed straight into their look, which is an extension of what they were wearing during the day.            The new collection was described by some media as ‘leaving nothing to the imagination’. What is your view on that?   In my opinion it shows that in a way, we as people have become a lot more prude. I think there’s a whole imagination beyond nudity, for me it’s not that special. I think it’s something very natural also. If you are someone who is comfortable showing their body and wearing something that shows a lot of skin, I totally encourage that. Also looking at how we react on social media: where posts are immediately removed when the female body is shown, it just shows it’s not very standardized. I hope that in the future it will be a bit more normalized, and that we will not necessarily look at our bodies in a sexualized way.   Photo credits:   Designer: Wannes Akop for Amsterdam Fashion Week Photography:  Remy Castle  Creative direction: Ferdi Sibbel  Hair: La Toya Velberg for Wella & Sebastian Pro Makeup: David Koppelaar & Hannah Bennet for MAC Cosmetics  Nails: Daniel Smedeman Casting & production: L’Elue Collectif  Talent:  Mickey H, Miko, Robin, Julia, Yenna, Anouk, Aischa, Stella, Tanja, Noria and Athalia Choreography: Frontrowbackstage  Location: Hotel de L’Europe Amsterdam

Alexander McQueen takes over London skies for the latest show
1755

Alexander McQueen takes over London skies for the latest show

Fashion Week “I am interested in immersing myself in the environment in which we live and work, in London, and in the elements as we experience them each day. We moved from water – and the mud on the banks of the Thames – to the sky and the ever-changing, all-encompassing magnificence that represents. The artwork for the prints in this collection was shot from the rooftops of the studio where we are lucky enough to have the most incredible views of the city: from Saint Paul’s Cathedral to the London Eye. We watched the weather and captured the formation and colouration of clouds from daybreak to nightfall and documented changing patterns, from clear blue skies to more turbulent ones. That led me to storm chasing. I love the idea of the McQueen woman being a storm chaser, of the qualities of storm chasing uniting the passionately individual community of characters wearing the clothes. They inhabit the same universe and the clothes are inspired by and made for them. Storm chasing is not only about the beauty of the views but also a sense of mystery and excitement – about embracing the fact that we can’t ever be sure of what might happen next. To give up control and be directly in touch with the unpredictable is to be part of nature, to see and feel it at its most intense - to be at one with a world that is bigger and more powerful than we are.” - Sarah Burton, Creative Director       “I am interested in immersing myself in the environment in which we live and work, in London, and in the elements as we experience them each day. We moved from water – and the mud on the banks of the Thames – to the sky and the ever-changing, all-encompassing magnificence that represents. The artwork for the prints in this collection was shot from the rooftops of the studio where we are lucky enough to have the most incredible views of the city: from Saint Paul’s Cathedral to the London Eye. We watched the weather and captured the formation and colouration of clouds from daybreak to nightfall and documented changing patterns, from clear blue skies to more turbulent ones. That led me to storm chasing. I love the idea of the McQueen woman being a storm chaser, of the qualities of storm chasing uniting the passionately individual community of characters wearing the clothes. They inhabit the same universe and the clothes are inspired by and made for them. Storm chasing is not only about the beauty of the views but also a sense of mystery and excitement – about embracing the fact that we can’t ever be sure of what might happen next. To give up control and be directly in touch with the unpredictable is to be part of nature, to see and feel it at its most intense - to be at one with a world that is bigger and more powerful than we are.” - Sarah Burton, Creative Director      

Ninamounah launches The Fertile, the Spring Summer 2022 Collection
1747

Ninamounah launches The Fertile, the Spring Summer 2022 Collection

Fashion Week Ninamounah launches The Fertile, the Spring Summer 2022 Collection of the Amsterdam based brand, presented today at Paris Fashion Week. True to the vision of creative director Ninamounah Langestraat, the new proposal of the fashion house receives inspiration from the most instinctive natural senses that fuel the firm's unique personality.     Found throughout the collection in her most personal collection yet, Ninamounah features references to the natural world incorporating bodily visuals combined with fluid lines that aim to celebrate a sense of lust and fertility.     Defined by the flesh of each wearer, the garments adapt to the human shape molding V-shaped waistbands on flowy trousers and guiding the viewer's eyes towards the mons veneris using high cut body blouses, signature silhouette of the brand.     Following this very natural sensuality defined by the designer, other pieces drape and wrap fabrics to fabricate voluptuous impressions resulting in a compelling and appealing visual narrative.     Silk garments envelope the waist and strapped tops hold onto the neck and shoulders, featuring swirling slithery lines that take on a feminine spatiality. Tension is created between the flowing garments and the structurality given by leather belts wrapped around hips and limbs.      A butterfly, a symbol of fertility and transformation is a key element to the collection. It lands in the hair, circles around the hips as a belt, creates a glistening dress and various accessories. The influence of Dutch contemporary artist Kinke Kooi’s work is felt in the undulating folds and organic contiguity of strings of pearls in the butterfly dress, made of genuine butterflies and jade pearls.      The neutral colours of the collection, applied in leather and satin, are accompanied by a luscious green and a contrasting purple in laces and silky fabrics, as well as goopy prints revealing compositions of sexual indulgences.     The collection’s audiovisual piece is inspired by the Swedish midsummer, in which the phallic maypole is stuck in the ground to fertilise the dirt. The film is shot in a lush grass field, with models walking in a choreography that mimics the seasonal ritual. In the background plays Cherry Bomb by The Runaways. The fruit often refers to a person’s ‘virginity’. The punk-rock tune reinterprets the cherry and claims it as a symbol of lust and rock. Ninamounah takes a holistic approach to the social construct that is virginity. Ninamounah launches The Fertile, the Spring Summer 2022 Collection of the Amsterdam based brand, presented today at Paris Fashion Week. True to the vision of creative director Ninamounah Langestraat, the new proposal of the fashion house receives inspiration from the most instinctive natural senses that fuel the firm's unique personality.     Found throughout the collection in her most personal collection yet, Ninamounah features references to the natural world incorporating bodily visuals combined with fluid lines that aim to celebrate a sense of lust and fertility.     Defined by the flesh of each wearer, the garments adapt to the human shape molding V-shaped waistbands on flowy trousers and guiding the viewer's eyes towards the mons veneris using high cut body blouses, signature silhouette of the brand.     Following this very natural sensuality defined by the designer, other pieces drape and wrap fabrics to fabricate voluptuous impressions resulting in a compelling and appealing visual narrative.     Silk garments envelope the waist and strapped tops hold onto the neck and shoulders, featuring swirling slithery lines that take on a feminine spatiality. Tension is created between the flowing garments and the structurality given by leather belts wrapped around hips and limbs.      A butterfly, a symbol of fertility and transformation is a key element to the collection. It lands in the hair, circles around the hips as a belt, creates a glistening dress and various accessories. The influence of Dutch contemporary artist Kinke Kooi’s work is felt in the undulating folds and organic contiguity of strings of pearls in the butterfly dress, made of genuine butterflies and jade pearls.      The neutral colours of the collection, applied in leather and satin, are accompanied by a luscious green and a contrasting purple in laces and silky fabrics, as well as goopy prints revealing compositions of sexual indulgences.     The collection’s audiovisual piece is inspired by the Swedish midsummer, in which the phallic maypole is stuck in the ground to fertilise the dirt. The film is shot in a lush grass field, with models walking in a choreography that mimics the seasonal ritual. In the background plays Cherry Bomb by The Runaways. The fruit often refers to a person’s ‘virginity’. The punk-rock tune reinterprets the cherry and claims it as a symbol of lust and rock. Ninamounah takes a holistic approach to the social construct that is virginity.

Advertising
Advertising
CHANEL SPRING-SUMMER 2022 READY-TO-WEAR COLLECTION
1744

CHANEL SPRING-SUMMER 2022 READY-TO-WEAR COLLECTION

Fashion Week The model Vivienne Rohner taking a photo: this is the black and white portrait that appears on the invitation and in the decor for the CHANEL Spring-Summer 2022 Ready-to-Wear show: “Because fashion is about clothes, models and photographers,” confides Virginie Viard. “Karl Lagerfeld used to photograph the CHANEL campaigns himself. Today, I call upon photographers. I love the way that they see CHANEL. It supports and inspires me.” The duo Inez & Vinoodh have signed the images for this collection, including five films featuring Lily-Rose Depp, Alma Jodorowsky, JENNIE, Rebecca Dayan and Quannah Chasinghorse-Potts all repeating the same gesture, a camera in hand. “It's a magical object and a sexy gesture, which evokes so many memories. I used to love the sound of flashbulbs going off at the shows in the eighties, when the models were on a raised runway. I wanted to recapture that emotion.” And recreate that type of runway at the Grand Palais Éphémère, a human-sized space whose atmosphere made her yearn for, “a lot of very simple bathing suits in gold or white with black trimmings. Short dresses in pink or mauve tweed, fishnet skirts, jackets embellished with multicolour crochet and denim suits. There are also a lot of prints: big, colourful butterfly wings on black chiffon.” Certain silhouettes are punctuated with a big shopper or a soft quilted bag embellished with a large chain. The flared heels and the buckles of the Mary-Janes and sandals “remind us of pirate shoes,” Virginie Viard says with amusement. “I always like to have something romantic. A touch of mystery.”       #CHANELSpringSummer The model Vivienne Rohner taking a photo: this is the black and white portrait that appears on the invitation and in the decor for the CHANEL Spring-Summer 2022 Ready-to-Wear show: “Because fashion is about clothes, models and photographers,” confides Virginie Viard. “Karl Lagerfeld used to photograph the CHANEL campaigns himself. Today, I call upon photographers. I love the way that they see CHANEL. It supports and inspires me.” The duo Inez & Vinoodh have signed the images for this collection, including five films featuring Lily-Rose Depp, Alma Jodorowsky, JENNIE, Rebecca Dayan and Quannah Chasinghorse-Potts all repeating the same gesture, a camera in hand. “It's a magical object and a sexy gesture, which evokes so many memories. I used to love the sound of flashbulbs going off at the shows in the eighties, when the models were on a raised runway. I wanted to recapture that emotion.” And recreate that type of runway at the Grand Palais Éphémère, a human-sized space whose atmosphere made her yearn for, “a lot of very simple bathing suits in gold or white with black trimmings. Short dresses in pink or mauve tweed, fishnet skirts, jackets embellished with multicolour crochet and denim suits. There are also a lot of prints: big, colourful butterfly wings on black chiffon.” Certain silhouettes are punctuated with a big shopper or a soft quilted bag embellished with a large chain. The flared heels and the buckles of the Mary-Janes and sandals “remind us of pirate shoes,” Virginie Viard says with amusement. “I always like to have something romantic. A touch of mystery.”       #CHANELSpringSummer

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN PRESENTS LOUBILLUSIONS A PRESENTATION & COCKTAIL PARTY TO CELEBRATE THE DEBUT OF THE WOMEN’S SPRING-SUMMER 2022 COLLECTION
1742

CHRISTIAN LOUBOUTIN PRESENTS LOUBILLUSIONS A PRESENTATION & COCKTAIL PARTY TO CELEBRATE THE DEBUT OF THE WOMEN’S SPRING-SUMMER 2022 COLLECTION

Fashion Week Last week Christian Louboutin unveiled his Spring-Summer 2022 Women’s collection with Loubillusions a 360° immersive experience & event.     Having spent the last a few seasons exploring digital formats like Augmented Reality, 3D and the gaming platform Zepeto, Louboutin selected L’Atelier des Lumières, a one-of-a-kind venue dedicated to digital art exhibitions to debut his latest collection.     The over 3,000 square meter space, showcased a rotating series of original animations, encompassing guests in settings that explore seven of his key points of inspiration, from a zen Japanese garden to magnificent golden waterfalls and fresh summer water.     Guests discovered at Loubillusions Christian Louboutin’s newest creations including the highlights: his brand-new bag, the Carasky, inspired by his passion for gems and crowns and Our Angels, a genderless capsule collection including bags, and high-end shoes ranging sizes from 36 to 46.     The daytime exhibit was followed by celebratory cocktail party in the space later that same evening.         Last week Christian Louboutin unveiled his Spring-Summer 2022 Women’s collection with Loubillusions a 360° immersive experience & event.     Having spent the last a few seasons exploring digital formats like Augmented Reality, 3D and the gaming platform Zepeto, Louboutin selected L’Atelier des Lumières, a one-of-a-kind venue dedicated to digital art exhibitions to debut his latest collection.     The over 3,000 square meter space, showcased a rotating series of original animations, encompassing guests in settings that explore seven of his key points of inspiration, from a zen Japanese garden to magnificent golden waterfalls and fresh summer water.     Guests discovered at Loubillusions Christian Louboutin’s newest creations including the highlights: his brand-new bag, the Carasky, inspired by his passion for gems and crowns and Our Angels, a genderless capsule collection including bags, and high-end shoes ranging sizes from 36 to 46.     The daytime exhibit was followed by celebratory cocktail party in the space later that same evening.        

BALENCIAGA PRESENTS SUMMER 2022 RED CARPET
1741

BALENCIAGA PRESENTS SUMMER 2022 RED CARPET

Fashion Week Balenciaga’s Summer 22 presentation consists of two parts: a photocall on a Hollywood-style red carpet, and a movie premiere. Guests wearing the new collection pause on the walkway before being ushered into a theater screening the short film The Simpsons I Balenciaga.     The Simpsons for Balenciaga is the latest in a progression of activations that push certain boundaries set up between fashion and other forms of entertainment, culture, and technology, shifting the brand away from an easily definable category.     A cast consisting of Balenciaga’s friends, models and team members wearing the Summer 22 collection are part of an automatic performance wherein the premiere event becomes the show itself. Red-carpet arrivals are documented, setting up a series of role reversals like in The Simpsons I Balenciaga where the audience becomes the protagonists and vice-versa.     The collection represents the complete Balenciaga palette: a wardrobe of streetwear, daywear, tailoring, elegant eveningwear and proto-couture pieces. Silhouettes vary from ultra-slim to disproportionately oversized.     A commitment to responsible production continues, represented this season with upcycled denim, leather, fine textiles, and embroidery, as well as material innovation: plant-based leather is made from a mix of fibers derived from cactus and bio polymers. 95.2% of plain and printed fabrics in the collection are certified sustainable.     The collection includes several accessory debuts and updates. The Space Shoe is a highly innovative single mold alternative to the classic derby, made entirely of EVA material. Loafers made of soft calf become slipper-like, accentuating the notion of comfort in a classic men’s shoe.     Part of an ongoing collaboration with Crocs, Hard Crocs turn the soft clog into a metal-fortified platform with a cyber goth aesthetic. The Defender is a new super- chunky sneaker with extreme tire tread. Trompe l’œil boots mimic a stiletto sandal worn over a sock. The Cagole Boot is a footwear version of the classic studded bag made in arena leather.     The XX Bag reinterprets the Hourglass silhouette by filling its negative space and creating a new form. The Triplet Bag is an interpretation of a classic chain purse, made with three separate compartments. Looks are completed with new eyewear, accessory, and jewelry styles. Balenciaga’s Summer 22 presentation consists of two parts: a photocall on a Hollywood-style red carpet, and a movie premiere. Guests wearing the new collection pause on the walkway before being ushered into a theater screening the short film The Simpsons I Balenciaga.     The Simpsons for Balenciaga is the latest in a progression of activations that push certain boundaries set up between fashion and other forms of entertainment, culture, and technology, shifting the brand away from an easily definable category.     A cast consisting of Balenciaga’s friends, models and team members wearing the Summer 22 collection are part of an automatic performance wherein the premiere event becomes the show itself. Red-carpet arrivals are documented, setting up a series of role reversals like in The Simpsons I Balenciaga where the audience becomes the protagonists and vice-versa.     The collection represents the complete Balenciaga palette: a wardrobe of streetwear, daywear, tailoring, elegant eveningwear and proto-couture pieces. Silhouettes vary from ultra-slim to disproportionately oversized.     A commitment to responsible production continues, represented this season with upcycled denim, leather, fine textiles, and embroidery, as well as material innovation: plant-based leather is made from a mix of fibers derived from cactus and bio polymers. 95.2% of plain and printed fabrics in the collection are certified sustainable.     The collection includes several accessory debuts and updates. The Space Shoe is a highly innovative single mold alternative to the classic derby, made entirely of EVA material. Loafers made of soft calf become slipper-like, accentuating the notion of comfort in a classic men’s shoe.     Part of an ongoing collaboration with Crocs, Hard Crocs turn the soft clog into a metal-fortified platform with a cyber goth aesthetic. The Defender is a new super- chunky sneaker with extreme tire tread. Trompe l’œil boots mimic a stiletto sandal worn over a sock. The Cagole Boot is a footwear version of the classic studded bag made in arena leather.     The XX Bag reinterprets the Hourglass silhouette by filling its negative space and creating a new form. The Triplet Bag is an interpretation of a classic chain purse, made with three separate compartments. Looks are completed with new eyewear, accessory, and jewelry styles.

GIVENCHY PRESENTS THE NEW SPRING & SUMMER 2022 COLLECTION
1740

GIVENCHY PRESENTS THE NEW SPRING & SUMMER 2022 COLLECTION

Fashion Week "For the Spring-Summer 22 collection, I wanted to build on the tradition of Givenchy's history while also really looking towards the future. To do this, I worked with people I admire across different disciplines who have truly unique perspectives including the artist Josh Smith, whose iconic work is incorporated throughout the collection, and the musician Young Thug, who created the entire score for the show. The collaboration and this collection offer people a remarkably immersive and special experience." Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     In Matthew M. Williams’ Givenchy, there is a mix of luxury and utility, lavishness and austerity, together with imperfect beauty and humanity. It points to the distinctly emotional side of the business of luxury and fashion that is sometimes forgotten in its confines; something that Williams is keen for all to partake in, particularly in this first live show experience.     Bridging the classical, radical and practical, the silhouettes for both women and men explore the tension between extravagance and discipline, tradition and today. Material experimentation and construction of the silhouette is combined with an intense contrast in clothing that could only be achieved and exist now. At the same time, the collection embraces tradition, the techniques of the salon and timelessness, proving that these distinct elements are not mutually exclusive. As always, at Givenchy, both classicism and subversion play a part.     A stratification of eras and influences is found in the clothing, purposely layered and juxtaposed in looks: traditional masculine tailoring fabrics are featured in women’s and menswear, mohair wools, Napa leathers, cotton herringbones and Prince of Wales checks are bonded with neoprene and sculpted in form, applied to both corsets and peplums – drawn from Monsieur de Givenchy’s archive – together with shorts and minis, as well as more conventional suiting. Raw edges are cleanly sliced and embraced, adding a sense of modernity throughout; delicate Broderie Anglaise is contrasted and exposed, bound in as trim, while tulle and transparencies add lightness, freshness and airy appositions; the urbane savoir-faire of the house and the homespun simplicity of handcraft are brought together in intricate tooling and ‘basket woven’leatherwork, with macramé and raffia techniques for both clothing and bags. "For the Spring-Summer 22 collection, I wanted to build on the tradition of Givenchy's history while also really looking towards the future. To do this, I worked with people I admire across different disciplines who have truly unique perspectives including the artist Josh Smith, whose iconic work is incorporated throughout the collection, and the musician Young Thug, who created the entire score for the show. The collaboration and this collection offer people a remarkably immersive and special experience." Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     In Matthew M. Williams’ Givenchy, there is a mix of luxury and utility, lavishness and austerity, together with imperfect beauty and humanity. It points to the distinctly emotional side of the business of luxury and fashion that is sometimes forgotten in its confines; something that Williams is keen for all to partake in, particularly in this first live show experience.     Bridging the classical, radical and practical, the silhouettes for both women and men explore the tension between extravagance and discipline, tradition and today. Material experimentation and construction of the silhouette is combined with an intense contrast in clothing that could only be achieved and exist now. At the same time, the collection embraces tradition, the techniques of the salon and timelessness, proving that these distinct elements are not mutually exclusive. As always, at Givenchy, both classicism and subversion play a part.     A stratification of eras and influences is found in the clothing, purposely layered and juxtaposed in looks: traditional masculine tailoring fabrics are featured in women’s and menswear, mohair wools, Napa leathers, cotton herringbones and Prince of Wales checks are bonded with neoprene and sculpted in form, applied to both corsets and peplums – drawn from Monsieur de Givenchy’s archive – together with shorts and minis, as well as more conventional suiting. Raw edges are cleanly sliced and embraced, adding a sense of modernity throughout; delicate Broderie Anglaise is contrasted and exposed, bound in as trim, while tulle and transparencies add lightness, freshness and airy appositions; the urbane savoir-faire of the house and the homespun simplicity of handcraft are brought together in intricate tooling and ‘basket woven’leatherwork, with macramé and raffia techniques for both clothing and bags.

LOEWE WOMEN’S SPRING SUMMER 2022
1737

LOEWE WOMEN’S SPRING SUMMER 2022

Fashion Week "Neurotic, psychedelic, completely hysterical". The LOEWE Spring Summer 2022 collection is an experimental statement that marks a point of departure, and opens a new chapter. Provocation, sensuality, movement and amusement break up the LOEWE mould. In devising a vision rooted in the moment, creative director Jonathan Anderson looks at the mannerist, hysterical world of Renaissance painter Pontormo, exploring notions of draping, sculpting and colour by way of torsions, diversions and distortions. The new beginning becomes a renaissance of sorts.     The line is vertical. The body is twisted, turned, contorted. Long dresses protrude in unexpected places, metal plates are integrated into coats and dresses, drawing an altered body, augmenting the reality of dressing into another dimension. Capes like wings de ne erotic manga characters, while draped elements hang, fall, turn all over. Denim, too, is treated in sculptural ways, while sequins and ounces are a moment of shimmer and utter. Long dresses emanate from torsos cast in resin. Reduction is the byword: silhouettes are divided in chapters, building up moments that add nuance to a vision of the now.     Dresses with 3D metal wire elements underneath. Trench coats. Draped tops, dresses and leggings. Giant trousers and blousons; twisted denim jackets and skirts. Sequin slip dresses with ounces. Sequin miniskirts and jumpers. Elongated sleeves and culottes. Revealing holes and slits.     Pumps and sandals have ready-made heels - soap bars, candles, eggs, a nail polish, a rose - as to suggest fragility and spontaneity. The Flow runner comes in a compostable plastic version that reveals the feet. Soft teddy bear fabric boots fall loosely around the ankle. Bags include a draped Goya long clutch and the Flamenco in teddy bear fabric. The curvaceous LOEWE Luna bag comes in smooth leather and in Anagram jacquard. The Hammock Nugget in nappa calf adds new proportions to an enduring LOEWE style. Colourful sterling silver bracelets decorate the wrist.     New archetypes are de ned. A collection that asks to be seen owing in movement, as experimentation unfolds on living bodies in a real space.     #LOEWE #LOEWESS22 "Neurotic, psychedelic, completely hysterical". The LOEWE Spring Summer 2022 collection is an experimental statement that marks a point of departure, and opens a new chapter. Provocation, sensuality, movement and amusement break up the LOEWE mould. In devising a vision rooted in the moment, creative director Jonathan Anderson looks at the mannerist, hysterical world of Renaissance painter Pontormo, exploring notions of draping, sculpting and colour by way of torsions, diversions and distortions. The new beginning becomes a renaissance of sorts.     The line is vertical. The body is twisted, turned, contorted. Long dresses protrude in unexpected places, metal plates are integrated into coats and dresses, drawing an altered body, augmenting the reality of dressing into another dimension. Capes like wings de ne erotic manga characters, while draped elements hang, fall, turn all over. Denim, too, is treated in sculptural ways, while sequins and ounces are a moment of shimmer and utter. Long dresses emanate from torsos cast in resin. Reduction is the byword: silhouettes are divided in chapters, building up moments that add nuance to a vision of the now.     Dresses with 3D metal wire elements underneath. Trench coats. Draped tops, dresses and leggings. Giant trousers and blousons; twisted denim jackets and skirts. Sequin slip dresses with ounces. Sequin miniskirts and jumpers. Elongated sleeves and culottes. Revealing holes and slits.     Pumps and sandals have ready-made heels - soap bars, candles, eggs, a nail polish, a rose - as to suggest fragility and spontaneity. The Flow runner comes in a compostable plastic version that reveals the feet. Soft teddy bear fabric boots fall loosely around the ankle. Bags include a draped Goya long clutch and the Flamenco in teddy bear fabric. The curvaceous LOEWE Luna bag comes in smooth leather and in Anagram jacquard. The Hammock Nugget in nappa calf adds new proportions to an enduring LOEWE style. Colourful sterling silver bracelets decorate the wrist.     New archetypes are de ned. A collection that asks to be seen owing in movement, as experimentation unfolds on living bodies in a real space.     #LOEWE #LOEWESS22

GCDS PRESENTS SPRING & SUMMER 2022 COLLECTION  “ISLAND APPROPRIATE”
1732

GCDS PRESENTS SPRING & SUMMER 2022 COLLECTION “ISLAND APPROPRIATE”

Fashion Week With a modern runway fashion film, GCDS Reveals its Spring/Summer 2022 Collection directed by Giuliano Calza     “Close to Positano, there are age-old myths of mermaids and underwater garden worlds. These fables from Southern Italy have influenced my imagination over the years — the Neapolitan sea is, no doubt, a place of endless inspiration. With this collection, I’m letting you dive into the dream with me—and splicing it with a high fashion fantasy,” says Giuliano Calza, Creative Director of GCDS.     As Calza’s fashion journey continues to evolve, the designer has found himself on a proverbial island in the sun, shining with surreal brilliance far beyond the horizon. In this paradise, there’s an element of escapism, and the freedom one might find in getting away from the turmoil of the past eighteen months. Throughout this nautical frontier, Calza’s favorite fashion fixations have become the stylings of a water-world fairytale. They revel in both relaxation and hedonism; they’re a prologue to a bright new future.      GCDS’s aquatic adventure starts with draped, rewashed deadstock denim, accentuated by straw hats and sparkling stone chains (the collection features hundreds of thousands of Preciosa crystals). A diaphanous and sexy visual element starts to come into play, while wave-motif blazers, swimwear and new Ibex clogs—made of recycled and compostable materials—follow the swell. Throughout the lineup, there’s a Made in Italy imprimatur of high-quality knitwear, including elongated (and sometimes beaded) tassels on blazers, sweaters and skirts, featherlight robes, crochet dresses, and labor intensive macramé vests. Embellished denim (springing in inspiration from GCDS’s original choker necklaces) and bedazzled jumpsuits only fuel the dream-state. The finale sees crystal-studded liquid body suits, which seem to imagine the gloss of a future mermaid’s skin. Nothing is overcomplicated or extra-elaborate, however; eclectic ease is central to GCDS’s summery sentiment. Also, worth noting: GCDS introduces its newest footwear designs this season, such as the above-mentioned slip-on clogs, the new everyday “Nami” sneaker and the street-strutting “Rider” pumps. The same goes for handbags: See the new “Matilda” small bags.     To present Spring/Summer 2022—the first collection shown since GCDS sold a majority stake position to the Made in Italy Fund—Calza conceived and directed a short fantasy film. After the success of the Fall/Winter 2021 digital catwalk (which amounted over 1.5 million views), this season marks step two in demonstrating Calza’s fantastical imagination.      The film tracks the collection through the oft unusual monotony of day-to-day life, extending across a barren desert. It concludes, however, with the discovery of a new paradise. Against an imaginative aquarium, a symbol of this brave and bright new future, anthropomorphic crossover is possible and mythic beauty suddenly becomes real.      “When it comes to creativity, I begin everything from a place of deep resonance,” says Calza. “I take these cues and emotions and power them by seeing optimism and brightness at the end of the tunnel. Living life is all about growth and getting through the tough parts, so, this collection and this film are a representation of that. Of hitting a point of liberty and ecstasy.”     This season, Calza sought to infuse his creative expression with an explosion of Spanish energy. The film was lensed in Spain, and such talents as Sita Abellan feature prominently. Others in the cast include Maggie Rawlins, Isabeli Fontana, Raya Martigny, Ceval Omar and Diego Villareal. There’s also a cameo by Nathy Peluso, the Barcelona-based singer and songwriter. The short was scored by the composer Katoo in partnership with Calza.     The GCDS Spring/Summer 2022 collection’s most notable collaboration is with One Piece, the Japanese animated series produced by Toei Animation in 1999 scheduled to debut its 1000th episode this fall. The iconic series is an adaptation from the eponymous manga created in 1997 by Eiichiro Oda. GCDS draws influence from One Piece’s under-the-sea drawings, with graphic motifs (including the fusion with GCDS’ own Bunny Girl character) appearing on bowling shirts, cargo sweats and jersey knits. One Piece’s “Jolly Roger” icon also finds itself in knitted form embellished by sparkling crystals.  With a modern runway fashion film, GCDS Reveals its Spring/Summer 2022 Collection directed by Giuliano Calza     “Close to Positano, there are age-old myths of mermaids and underwater garden worlds. These fables from Southern Italy have influenced my imagination over the years — the Neapolitan sea is, no doubt, a place of endless inspiration. With this collection, I’m letting you dive into the dream with me—and splicing it with a high fashion fantasy,” says Giuliano Calza, Creative Director of GCDS.     As Calza’s fashion journey continues to evolve, the designer has found himself on a proverbial island in the sun, shining with surreal brilliance far beyond the horizon. In this paradise, there’s an element of escapism, and the freedom one might find in getting away from the turmoil of the past eighteen months. Throughout this nautical frontier, Calza’s favorite fashion fixations have become the stylings of a water-world fairytale. They revel in both relaxation and hedonism; they’re a prologue to a bright new future.      GCDS’s aquatic adventure starts with draped, rewashed deadstock denim, accentuated by straw hats and sparkling stone chains (the collection features hundreds of thousands of Preciosa crystals). A diaphanous and sexy visual element starts to come into play, while wave-motif blazers, swimwear and new Ibex clogs—made of recycled and compostable materials—follow the swell. Throughout the lineup, there’s a Made in Italy imprimatur of high-quality knitwear, including elongated (and sometimes beaded) tassels on blazers, sweaters and skirts, featherlight robes, crochet dresses, and labor intensive macramé vests. Embellished denim (springing in inspiration from GCDS’s original choker necklaces) and bedazzled jumpsuits only fuel the dream-state. The finale sees crystal-studded liquid body suits, which seem to imagine the gloss of a future mermaid’s skin. Nothing is overcomplicated or extra-elaborate, however; eclectic ease is central to GCDS’s summery sentiment. Also, worth noting: GCDS introduces its newest footwear designs this season, such as the above-mentioned slip-on clogs, the new everyday “Nami” sneaker and the street-strutting “Rider” pumps. The same goes for handbags: See the new “Matilda” small bags.     To present Spring/Summer 2022—the first collection shown since GCDS sold a majority stake position to the Made in Italy Fund—Calza conceived and directed a short fantasy film. After the success of the Fall/Winter 2021 digital catwalk (which amounted over 1.5 million views), this season marks step two in demonstrating Calza’s fantastical imagination.      The film tracks the collection through the oft unusual monotony of day-to-day life, extending across a barren desert. It concludes, however, with the discovery of a new paradise. Against an imaginative aquarium, a symbol of this brave and bright new future, anthropomorphic crossover is possible and mythic beauty suddenly becomes real.      “When it comes to creativity, I begin everything from a place of deep resonance,” says Calza. “I take these cues and emotions and power them by seeing optimism and brightness at the end of the tunnel. Living life is all about growth and getting through the tough parts, so, this collection and this film are a representation of that. Of hitting a point of liberty and ecstasy.”     This season, Calza sought to infuse his creative expression with an explosion of Spanish energy. The film was lensed in Spain, and such talents as Sita Abellan feature prominently. Others in the cast include Maggie Rawlins, Isabeli Fontana, Raya Martigny, Ceval Omar and Diego Villareal. There’s also a cameo by Nathy Peluso, the Barcelona-based singer and songwriter. The short was scored by the composer Katoo in partnership with Calza.     The GCDS Spring/Summer 2022 collection’s most notable collaboration is with One Piece, the Japanese animated series produced by Toei Animation in 1999 scheduled to debut its 1000th episode this fall. The iconic series is an adaptation from the eponymous manga created in 1997 by Eiichiro Oda. GCDS draws influence from One Piece’s under-the-sea drawings, with graphic motifs (including the fusion with GCDS’ own Bunny Girl character) appearing on bowling shirts, cargo sweats and jersey knits. One Piece’s “Jolly Roger” icon also finds itself in knitted form embellished by sparkling crystals. 

Acne Studios presents the Women’s Spring & Summer 2022 collection
1731

Acne Studios presents the Women’s Spring & Summer 2022 collection

Fashion Week The clash of handcrafted historical pieces with a hyper futuristic attitude. A collection about self-identity and instinct, an experimentation that has always been the heart of Acne Studios.     “We live in the age of self-identity, of instinct and experimentation. The look is provocative and hard, yet is grounded in handcrafts that are then subverted,” says Jonny Johansson, Creative Director of Acne Studios.     Finding strength in contrast, there are four main themes: chi on matched with leather; plaid contrasted with lingerie; crochet and knits that are toughened up; handcrafted corsets that are exploded and unleashed. It’s about a juxtaposition of grandeur with erce energy, and the possibilities of play.     Chi on shirts have an etched baroque print, held by ties at the neck and chest, and trailing from the oversized cu . Aged leather button-fronted mini skirts have buckled belts attached, like the straps of a saddle. A high-necked long sleeve short leather dress is patchworked from purposefully irregular rectangles, with corset lacing that holds an open seam from armhole to hem. Just as strong is a full lengthprinted chi on dress, its keyhole decolletage held by ties.     Panels of plaid are applied to a mesh base to create a little jacket with jewelled buttons, worn with a soft jersey rib skirt that plays with lingerie detailing, like hook and eye fastenings and suspenders. Sheer jersey socks continue the story, with corset lacing that goes all the way to the knee. A tank top is cut from a plaidshirt, matched with a rib knit shrug and white leather pants patchworked from a blown-up baroque pattern.     A white o -the-shoulder jumpsuit is knitted in a diamond crochet stitch, the elegance of the necklinecontrasting with the purposeful irregularity of its seams that are whip-stitched together. Silhouettes are subverted, like a portrait neckline cropped jacket in eyelash stitch worn with a little eyelash stitch skirt,while a hand-crocheted little vest is resplendent with crochet owers, echoing the hand-crocheted bags.     Traditionally handmade corsets are cut up and reappropriated, released from constriction but keeping their strength of line. A corset top has attached sleeves, worn with a skirt constructed as if from a corset turned upside down and inside out. A sheer wrapped dress sits under a corset that’s upside down, giving freedomof movement, while an open corset is stitched into a dress fringed with beaded orals, its squared hipscreated from the pattern lines of a bodice.     Jewellery chains, necklaces and charms are as if thrown on, while small leather half-moon bags have wide guitar-like straps. Sunglasses are futuristic, mirroring the ergonomic lines of super high wooden platforms.     The Venezuelan artist Arca has created an original composition for the show, SMOKEBENDING, to capture the sense of performance and occasion. “Arca represents everything this collection is about,” says Johansson, “and it is our honour that she created music especially for this show.” The clash of handcrafted historical pieces with a hyper futuristic attitude. A collection about self-identity and instinct, an experimentation that has always been the heart of Acne Studios.     “We live in the age of self-identity, of instinct and experimentation. The look is provocative and hard, yet is grounded in handcrafts that are then subverted,” says Jonny Johansson, Creative Director of Acne Studios.     Finding strength in contrast, there are four main themes: chi on matched with leather; plaid contrasted with lingerie; crochet and knits that are toughened up; handcrafted corsets that are exploded and unleashed. It’s about a juxtaposition of grandeur with erce energy, and the possibilities of play.     Chi on shirts have an etched baroque print, held by ties at the neck and chest, and trailing from the oversized cu . Aged leather button-fronted mini skirts have buckled belts attached, like the straps of a saddle. A high-necked long sleeve short leather dress is patchworked from purposefully irregular rectangles, with corset lacing that holds an open seam from armhole to hem. Just as strong is a full lengthprinted chi on dress, its keyhole decolletage held by ties.     Panels of plaid are applied to a mesh base to create a little jacket with jewelled buttons, worn with a soft jersey rib skirt that plays with lingerie detailing, like hook and eye fastenings and suspenders. Sheer jersey socks continue the story, with corset lacing that goes all the way to the knee. A tank top is cut from a plaidshirt, matched with a rib knit shrug and white leather pants patchworked from a blown-up baroque pattern.     A white o -the-shoulder jumpsuit is knitted in a diamond crochet stitch, the elegance of the necklinecontrasting with the purposeful irregularity of its seams that are whip-stitched together. Silhouettes are subverted, like a portrait neckline cropped jacket in eyelash stitch worn with a little eyelash stitch skirt,while a hand-crocheted little vest is resplendent with crochet owers, echoing the hand-crocheted bags.     Traditionally handmade corsets are cut up and reappropriated, released from constriction but keeping their strength of line. A corset top has attached sleeves, worn with a skirt constructed as if from a corset turned upside down and inside out. A sheer wrapped dress sits under a corset that’s upside down, giving freedomof movement, while an open corset is stitched into a dress fringed with beaded orals, its squared hipscreated from the pattern lines of a bodice.     Jewellery chains, necklaces and charms are as if thrown on, while small leather half-moon bags have wide guitar-like straps. Sunglasses are futuristic, mirroring the ergonomic lines of super high wooden platforms.     The Venezuelan artist Arca has created an original composition for the show, SMOKEBENDING, to capture the sense of performance and occasion. “Arca represents everything this collection is about,” says Johansson, “and it is our honour that she created music especially for this show.”

loading
More articles