Advertising
In conversation with Dylan Westerweel
1901

In conversation with Dylan Westerweel

Fashion DYLAN WESTERWEEL     What made you want to embrace this career path and what were the main challenges at the start of your journey?   From a young age, I’ve always searched for ways to express my points of view. I went through several disciplines and finally landed on fashion. Fashion sets me free from having to express myself through my own body while giving me the freedom to share my vision. This also comes with the challenge of being misunderstood in the way you wish to share your story. I’ve had to learn that my vision will not always translate to someone else’s understanding and situation.   As a designer, what is your mission to achieve for your artistic vision?   My brand focuses on telling queer stories. I believe there are too many stories that are wasted away in some library, never to be told. We always focus on the same 10 stories, but what about the queer kid that grew up in the ’60s, who never rose to fame? Is their life of less value? What did it mean to stand in their shoes? I always want to find these stories and let them soar through my research. I’m extremely research-based and want to build worlds and the galaxy’s around my next characters.   How do you describe the vision of your designs or brand?   I want to let go of the idea of masculinity in my upcoming work. I’ve always focussed on the idea of redefining masculinity, but what if I fully let go? This brings up so many questions about the function of gender expression. So for now, my vision is a question mark, and I love it.   What are the criteria for choosing fabrics? Why do you use certain fabrics?   For trilling, I only use deadstock materials, for the final pieces I only use natural fibers. This is an easy way for me to keep an eye on my footprint.   How would you describe the labor process of your clothes?   All items are extremely labor-intensive. I’m at a point where everything is made in-house and with extreme detail. Some items take weeks to finish due to different phases of dies, paints, and embroidery techniques.   What is your collection about?   Claude is a love letter to queer beauty, researching the idea of the performance of being a queer person. What are the necessities to remain hidden or express oneself to the fullest? Living as a queer person can mean moving through stages, reinventing oneself, undressing, and re-dressing. It can be fragile and powerful, beautiful and hard to look at. What would one wear while dressing for the next performance on the stage of life?   How do you describe the vision of your designs or brand?   My vision is that queer people are the future. As queer people, we have been propelled into a society that at this point is not made for us. That has made us adaptable and has ensured some of us grow up really fast. We’ve had to think outside of the “box” because that’s the way we’re born. I wish to develop a space and voice for this point of view in my brand.   What do you think about circularity, and do you incorporate it in your productions, if so what is your take on that?   Circularity is of the utmost importance to ensure that our planet will keep existing. It sounds rather strange coming from someone who designs pieces, but we have enough stuff. We don’t need more things. I’m currently working on repurposing and reviving materials in sculptures and new textile research. There is so much stuff, it’s shocking.   Are there any other designers you look up to that maybe share your same creative perspective?   Arturo Obegero from Paris makes wonderfully queer items out of deadstock materials. It’s sexy and sophisticated. A dream!   What is freedom for you?   Being able to be unapologetically myself. That fluctuates every day and embracing that and being able to embrace that feels like the ultimate f*ck you to society. DYLAN WESTERWEEL     What made you want to embrace this career path and what were the main challenges at the start of your journey?   From a young age, I’ve always searched for ways to express my points of view. I went through several disciplines and finally landed on fashion. Fashion sets me free from having to express myself through my own body while giving me the freedom to share my vision. This also comes with the challenge of being misunderstood in the way you wish to share your story. I’ve had to learn that my vision will not always translate to someone else’s understanding and situation.   As a designer, what is your mission to achieve for your artistic vision?   My brand focuses on telling queer stories. I believe there are too many stories that are wasted away in some library, never to be told. We always focus on the same 10 stories, but what about the queer kid that grew up in the ’60s, who never rose to fame? Is their life of less value? What did it mean to stand in their shoes? I always want to find these stories and let them soar through my research. I’m extremely research-based and want to build worlds and the galaxy’s around my next characters.   How do you describe the vision of your designs or brand?   I want to let go of the idea of masculinity in my upcoming work. I’ve always focussed on the idea of redefining masculinity, but what if I fully let go? This brings up so many questions about the function of gender expression. So for now, my vision is a question mark, and I love it.   What are the criteria for choosing fabrics? Why do you use certain fabrics?   For trilling, I only use deadstock materials, for the final pieces I only use natural fibers. This is an easy way for me to keep an eye on my footprint.   How would you describe the labor process of your clothes?   All items are extremely labor-intensive. I’m at a point where everything is made in-house and with extreme detail. Some items take weeks to finish due to different phases of dies, paints, and embroidery techniques.   What is your collection about?   Claude is a love letter to queer beauty, researching the idea of the performance of being a queer person. What are the necessities to remain hidden or express oneself to the fullest? Living as a queer person can mean moving through stages, reinventing oneself, undressing, and re-dressing. It can be fragile and powerful, beautiful and hard to look at. What would one wear while dressing for the next performance on the stage of life?   How do you describe the vision of your designs or brand?   My vision is that queer people are the future. As queer people, we have been propelled into a society that at this point is not made for us. That has made us adaptable and has ensured some of us grow up really fast. We’ve had to think outside of the “box” because that’s the way we’re born. I wish to develop a space and voice for this point of view in my brand.   What do you think about circularity, and do you incorporate it in your productions, if so what is your take on that?   Circularity is of the utmost importance to ensure that our planet will keep existing. It sounds rather strange coming from someone who designs pieces, but we have enough stuff. We don’t need more things. I’m currently working on repurposing and reviving materials in sculptures and new textile research. There is so much stuff, it’s shocking.   Are there any other designers you look up to that maybe share your same creative perspective?   Arturo Obegero from Paris makes wonderfully queer items out of deadstock materials. It’s sexy and sophisticated. A dream!   What is freedom for you?   Being able to be unapologetically myself. That fluctuates every day and embracing that and being able to embrace that feels like the ultimate f*ck you to society.

JD Sports opens second Flagship Store in Amsterdam
1899

JD Sports opens second Flagship Store in Amsterdam

Accessories JD Sports, "King of the Streets", will open the doors of its new Flagship Store on the Kalverstraat 99 in Amsterdam on Friday 26 November 2021. The store offers a dedicated two-floor shopping experience covering 736 m2 on the most popular shopping streets in the Netherlands. JD keeps evolving its shopping experience and this new Flagships reflects that. In addition to the wide selection of top brands & iconic products the store also offers exclusive ‘Only at JD’ drops, created in collaboration with some of the most desirable brands in sports & street wear today. with premium partners.      JD has never been a brand that plays it safe and has been present in youth & street culture since it opened its first store in the UK 40 years ago. Today it actively works with the world’s most desirable brands & creators, relevant to an audience that identify with and are part of an authentic culture rooted around sport, fashion, music and creativity. JD offers the freshest kicks, the coolest apparel and the new brands you need to know.      Walk into store and discover the curated collection of exclusive sneakers from brands including Nike, Jordan, Adidas, New Balance, Puma, Converse, Vans and others – that confirms JD’s reputation as the "Undisputed King of Trainers".      The JD Flagship Store, Kalverstraat 99, Amsterdam  Expect the freshest product from iconic brands such as Nike, Adidas, The North Face, Under Armour, Levi's, Puma, New Balance, and Jordan and be ready to discover what else is new & emerging in store. JD Sports, "King of the Streets", will open the doors of its new Flagship Store on the Kalverstraat 99 in Amsterdam on Friday 26 November 2021. The store offers a dedicated two-floor shopping experience covering 736 m2 on the most popular shopping streets in the Netherlands. JD keeps evolving its shopping experience and this new Flagships reflects that. In addition to the wide selection of top brands & iconic products the store also offers exclusive ‘Only at JD’ drops, created in collaboration with some of the most desirable brands in sports & street wear today. with premium partners.      JD has never been a brand that plays it safe and has been present in youth & street culture since it opened its first store in the UK 40 years ago. Today it actively works with the world’s most desirable brands & creators, relevant to an audience that identify with and are part of an authentic culture rooted around sport, fashion, music and creativity. JD offers the freshest kicks, the coolest apparel and the new brands you need to know.      Walk into store and discover the curated collection of exclusive sneakers from brands including Nike, Jordan, Adidas, New Balance, Puma, Converse, Vans and others – that confirms JD’s reputation as the "Undisputed King of Trainers".      The JD Flagship Store, Kalverstraat 99, Amsterdam  Expect the freshest product from iconic brands such as Nike, Adidas, The North Face, Under Armour, Levi's, Puma, New Balance, and Jordan and be ready to discover what else is new & emerging in store.

Exclusive digital editorial by Kay Nambiar
1900

Exclusive digital editorial by Kay Nambiar

Fashion Brand new digital exclusive editorial captured on the streets of Paris by Kay Nambiar.     Photographer KAY NAMBIAR Styling:  CLOTILDE FRANCESCHI Make up artist: ANITA JOLLES Hair stylist:  NATSUMI EBIKO Talent:  BIN AT LIS RUTTEN AGENCY AND JULIA AT METROPOLITAN MODELS GROUP   Brand new digital exclusive editorial captured on the streets of Paris by Kay Nambiar.     Photographer KAY NAMBIAR Styling:  CLOTILDE FRANCESCHI Make up artist: ANITA JOLLES Hair stylist:  NATSUMI EBIKO Talent:  BIN AT LIS RUTTEN AGENCY AND JULIA AT METROPOLITAN MODELS GROUP  

Advertising
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THE MARC O’POLO CHRISTMAS CAMPAIGN 2021 LIGHTENS TRAVELING.
1898

THE MARC O’POLO CHRISTMAS CAMPAIGN 2021 LIGHTENS TRAVELING.

Fashion The annual Marc O’Polo Christmas initiative is traditionally dedicated to a good cause. Christmas 2021 continues this tradition, building on all of the sustainability e orts made during the year while focusing on sustainable travel.   How we travel, and how often, has changed signi cantly and is being reshaped by two major themes: sustainability and health. The pandemic has turned the everyday into the extraordinary. Travelling is no longer a given, whether for vacations, bank holi- days or special occasions; whether to see friends and family, visit dream destinations or attend business meetings. We are rethinking travel’s meaning and increasingly asking ourselves what impact our ights, boat trips, and car and train journeys are having on our environment. We want to celebrate travel again: more sustainably and consciously. And CO2-neutral. Hence the title of this year’s Christmas capsule collection: “COMING HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS – Travel lightly: With every purchase, we are sponsoring a climate project saving 50kg of CO2.”   The finely curated Sustainable Travel Essentials collection offers everything one needs to lighten the journey during the festive season: Marc O’Polo products with sustainable standards as well as selected products created in cooperation with Native Union and Sprekenhus. For every item sold from the Christmas capsule collection, Marc O’Polo will work with ClimatePartner to support a climate project that o sets 50kg of CO2. This roughly equates to a train journey of 640km, or a car journey of around 150km, and symbolises the upcoming Christmas journey to visit friends and family.   Scandinavian and stylish. Casual and contemporary. The Sustainable Travel Essentialscollection combines all styles for the modern head-to-toe look. From outerwear to trousers to cardigans and various top styles. From bag to shoes, hat to scarf to gloves: All Marc O’Polo from the collection products bear the sustainable product label, as do all technical must-haves from Marc O’Polo and Native Union to match the collection, as well as all grooming travel companions from Marc O’Polo and Sprekenhus.   Marc O’Polo has been a partner of ClimatePartner since 2020. Together, the two have already implemented several climate protection projects. As part of its “01 Journey - 10 Pathways” sustainability strategy, Marc O’Polo has set itself the goal of becoming a climate-neutral brand by 2025.     The Sustainable Travel Essentials collection will be available in the Marc O’Polo online store and selected stores from mid-November.     The annual Marc O’Polo Christmas initiative is traditionally dedicated to a good cause. Christmas 2021 continues this tradition, building on all of the sustainability e orts made during the year while focusing on sustainable travel.   How we travel, and how often, has changed signi cantly and is being reshaped by two major themes: sustainability and health. The pandemic has turned the everyday into the extraordinary. Travelling is no longer a given, whether for vacations, bank holi- days or special occasions; whether to see friends and family, visit dream destinations or attend business meetings. We are rethinking travel’s meaning and increasingly asking ourselves what impact our ights, boat trips, and car and train journeys are having on our environment. We want to celebrate travel again: more sustainably and consciously. And CO2-neutral. Hence the title of this year’s Christmas capsule collection: “COMING HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS – Travel lightly: With every purchase, we are sponsoring a climate project saving 50kg of CO2.”   The finely curated Sustainable Travel Essentials collection offers everything one needs to lighten the journey during the festive season: Marc O’Polo products with sustainable standards as well as selected products created in cooperation with Native Union and Sprekenhus. For every item sold from the Christmas capsule collection, Marc O’Polo will work with ClimatePartner to support a climate project that o sets 50kg of CO2. This roughly equates to a train journey of 640km, or a car journey of around 150km, and symbolises the upcoming Christmas journey to visit friends and family.   Scandinavian and stylish. Casual and contemporary. The Sustainable Travel Essentialscollection combines all styles for the modern head-to-toe look. From outerwear to trousers to cardigans and various top styles. From bag to shoes, hat to scarf to gloves: All Marc O’Polo from the collection products bear the sustainable product label, as do all technical must-haves from Marc O’Polo and Native Union to match the collection, as well as all grooming travel companions from Marc O’Polo and Sprekenhus.   Marc O’Polo has been a partner of ClimatePartner since 2020. Together, the two have already implemented several climate protection projects. As part of its “01 Journey - 10 Pathways” sustainability strategy, Marc O’Polo has set itself the goal of becoming a climate-neutral brand by 2025.     The Sustainable Travel Essentials collection will be available in the Marc O’Polo online store and selected stores from mid-November.    

DIOR PRESENTS THE DIOR VIBE SNEAKERS
1895

DIOR PRESENTS THE DIOR VIBE SNEAKERS

Accessories New to the women's wardrobe, the Dior Vibe sneakers, designed by Maria Grazia Chiuri for the Dior Cruise 2022 collection, revisit the running shoe. Distinctive for their play of transparent materials enhanced by gold or silver inserts, they feature a flexible rubber sole. A star – a magical code dear to the founding couturier –, adorns the creations, finished with the "Christian Dior” signature. Combining the world of sportswear and Dior style, these objects of desire are currently available in boutiques and at Dior.com.     New to the women's wardrobe, the Dior Vibe sneakers, designed by Maria Grazia Chiuri for the Dior Cruise 2022 collection, revisit the running shoe. Distinctive for their play of transparent materials enhanced by gold or silver inserts, they feature a flexible rubber sole. A star – a magical code dear to the founding couturier –, adorns the creations, finished with the "Christian Dior” signature. Combining the world of sportswear and Dior style, these objects of desire are currently available in boutiques and at Dior.com.    

In conversation with John Jay
1890

In conversation with John Jay

Fashion In conversation with John Jay, president of Global Creative at UNIQLO, about LifeWear, the impact of art and culture and abandoned refrigerators.    Interview by Jan Morrison Schmid   Who is John Jay and how did your relationship with UNIQLO evolve over the years?    My name is John Jay and I have a long relationship with UNIQLO which dates back to 1998 before Fast Retailing had stores in Tokyo. I helped to launch the brand in 1999 with their first-ever advertising campaigns. Currently, I am the president of Global Creative for Fast Retailing, which is a holding company that owns UNIQLO. I normally live and work in three cities. Recently, I said to friends that if there's an explosion in New York and Tokyo simultaneously, have no worries, it's probably because I haven't been home in those two places and I haven’t emptied my refrigerator for over a year. My third base is in Portland, Oregon since I was a partner and creative director at Wieden + Kennedy.   Because of the recent situation, which makes traveling harder, I fully moved to New York six months ago. I am here at the Global Creative Lab, which is a creation of mine that I started six years ago to answer a question from our founder, Mr. Yanai. He asked me how we could evolve ourselves from being a great company from Japan to truly becoming a great global brand. I watched UNIQLO grow over the years and it's been an extraordinary journey. Today, I'm fortunate to be able to work in many different areas of creativity. We have a very strong allegiance to the arts and culture. On the surface, it may seem like we are in the apparel business, but we're actually in the business of culture.      What is the idea behind the Creative Labs?   ​​I came to New York to take over the global Creative Lab and responsibilities here. There are global Creative Labs in Portland, which is the very first one, New York, Tokyo, and Shanghai. The idea of the mobile Creative Labs was to begin to grow and nurture creativity as the center of a company within our DNA. We retain our learnings, our processes, and our research. It works very much like a magazine. With every new issue and the more you grow and nurture, the more your team begins to understand the deeper meaning. That's what we're trying to do at UNIQLO.      What does a usual day look like to you?    In Tokyo, I'm in my office at 5:45 am. Since I'm a night person, it was quite an adjustment for me. I do like to start early to write all my thoughts and notes down. The schedule is nonstop so it’s very important to prepare in the morning. I'm currently back in New York which means that I'm back to my New York ways. Last night I was up until 3:45 am, writing notes and brainstorming.   How do you maintain a good work-life balance?    I may be unusual in this aspect. What if your work is even more exciting than your play? I do have hobbies and I enjoy free-time activities but I have to say that my work is the most exciting thing to me.    From my point of view, the distinction between vocation and vacation may be inseparable. Some time ago I was in Milan at the Design Festival with a client and I was being given an overview of an art installation. I remember how exciting, intellectually invigorating, and rewarding that was. I can't separate the experiences I make while working from the ones that happen in my personal life. Not everyone has the great fortune to have that in their life and I'm not saying that it's healthy to live by this idea at the time. But I am very happy about the fact that I've been able to carve out a career where I make these kinds of experiences quite frequently.   I always say that it is not a company's job to inspire. Everyone has to find their own path to inspiration. As a creative director, my number one responsibility is to inspire. It's about lifting the abilities, aspirations, and futures of all the people that surround me. It is my responsibility to lift every person that looks to me for guidance. I have to make sure to give them the opportunity to succeed. I say to my co-workers that whenever they are going to leave and go to their next job, I want them to say to themselves that they've had an unbelievable experience and that they are proud of what they have achieved.     How have your milestones and experiences throughout your career shaped the professional creative that you are today?   I've had an interesting history, and I hope to continue that. I first started in journalism in New York. All my superiors were editors, which was an incredible learning experience. The magazines that I worked at were small, but they were focused on social issues. I did not come from a fashion lifestyle background. I worked on magazines that were about business, science, Wall Street, and technology. I learned so much about how to make good stories about topics that are highly conceptual and difficult to express. This field differs a lot from a fashion story where one can show the beaches of Ibiza or the clothing that is fresh off the runway. When it comes to a highly conceptual story it is important to think about how to make it interesting for people.    This is why I love doing the magazine at UNIQLO because it brought me back. I love making magazines and books and the editorial journey from the front page to the back page and the interaction between copy and visuals and how they intersect. Storytelling is embedded in me from my early days in New York.    From that, I jumped to becoming creative director at Bloomingdale's, the famous department store, which was the cultural force of New York back then. I managed to work with every person that I admired and dreamed of working with and traveled to India, China, and many other countries. I went from business and science magazines with no experience in lifestyle or advertising, to Bloomingdale's for 12 years. It was like my graduate school of culture and an extraordinary time.   The next step on my path was Wieden + Kennedy where I worked on Nike, with no previous experience in the advertising agency world, and later I landed where I am today at Fast Retailing. The journey has been very interesting because I'm able to switch from one type of business of creativity to another.    What is your vision at UNIQLO?    What makes us so unique is this philosophy of LifeWear. First of all, it's a very radical idea and I say that with love. As a baby boomer, anything radical is beautiful to me, so I'm a little biased.   When we think of LifeWear and the exhibitions that we've had all over the world, of course, we're very proud of the technology, and the quality. But quite frankly, culture is a strong part of LifeWear itself. It is not simply about the clothes but also about the philosophy of how we look at the world. LifeWear has a lot to do with how we act in your region, in your city, and your neighborhood.    Clearly, the DNA from Japan has a strong hand in the brand core of UNIQLO. Every day in Japanese culture is exalted. It has a very special place in the philosophical ideas of the culture. My job is to help create the highest quality of experiences for the greatest number of people on Earth. We live by the idea that quality is affordable and deserved by everyone.   We heard about the „Made for All“ campaign which we are very excited about. How were you involved in this project and what does it mean to you?   LifeWear is made for all. The descriptor "Made for All" is the basic foundation of what makes it so unique. The communication of LifeWear is often about the product and the technology that is being used. Yet a huge part of why we exist in every community is the service that we give back to the community. Most people don't know that we work with nonprofit organizations to distribute our clothing to the ones in need. Just recently the entire office of our Paris store, including the president of our French company, volunteered on the streets of Paris together with an organization that helps to take care of homeless people. In the neighborhoods of Brooklyn, we provide a space for challenged and underprivileged kids where they can come together and use sports as a tool for education, self-improvement, and gaining self-confidence. We don't spend enough time talking about these things because we're a very modest company. Yet, I wanted to make sure that people understood that "LifeWear - Made for All" has a deeper meaning than just clothing.    We're very committed to helping in the refugee crisis around the world, beyond the act of donating clothes. One of the great joys that we had, was to include a refugee, who had the dream to work in the fashion business. He now is part of the team of the UNIQLO store in Milan. We talked to him about his journey and we shared his story in our Video campaigns to help people to see that the dreams they have do come true. "Made for all" is about providing jobs and helping to educate and to inspire young people in need.   Can you tell us anything about exciting future projects?   We have quite a few exciting things that we're doing at the moment. We just came up with our magazine "The Spirit of Soho", which celebrates legends in the future of art and culture in Soho. Every major city in the world has its own. The spirit itself was not delegated only to the 10 blocks in New York, but it is more of a global feeling. The spirit of creativity also gave birth to what we call Downtown. Every boardroom of every luxury brand and record label is highly influenced by the spirit of Downtown at this moment. To us, it is very important to help our audience dive deeper into the culture which leads to a greater understanding of our society and current issues. In conversation with John Jay, president of Global Creative at UNIQLO, about LifeWear, the impact of art and culture and abandoned refrigerators.    Interview by Jan Morrison Schmid   Who is John Jay and how did your relationship with UNIQLO evolve over the years?    My name is John Jay and I have a long relationship with UNIQLO which dates back to 1998 before Fast Retailing had stores in Tokyo. I helped to launch the brand in 1999 with their first-ever advertising campaigns. Currently, I am the president of Global Creative for Fast Retailing, which is a holding company that owns UNIQLO. I normally live and work in three cities. Recently, I said to friends that if there's an explosion in New York and Tokyo simultaneously, have no worries, it's probably because I haven't been home in those two places and I haven’t emptied my refrigerator for over a year. My third base is in Portland, Oregon since I was a partner and creative director at Wieden + Kennedy.   Because of the recent situation, which makes traveling harder, I fully moved to New York six months ago. I am here at the Global Creative Lab, which is a creation of mine that I started six years ago to answer a question from our founder, Mr. Yanai. He asked me how we could evolve ourselves from being a great company from Japan to truly becoming a great global brand. I watched UNIQLO grow over the years and it's been an extraordinary journey. Today, I'm fortunate to be able to work in many different areas of creativity. We have a very strong allegiance to the arts and culture. On the surface, it may seem like we are in the apparel business, but we're actually in the business of culture.      What is the idea behind the Creative Labs?   ​​I came to New York to take over the global Creative Lab and responsibilities here. There are global Creative Labs in Portland, which is the very first one, New York, Tokyo, and Shanghai. The idea of the mobile Creative Labs was to begin to grow and nurture creativity as the center of a company within our DNA. We retain our learnings, our processes, and our research. It works very much like a magazine. With every new issue and the more you grow and nurture, the more your team begins to understand the deeper meaning. That's what we're trying to do at UNIQLO.      What does a usual day look like to you?    In Tokyo, I'm in my office at 5:45 am. Since I'm a night person, it was quite an adjustment for me. I do like to start early to write all my thoughts and notes down. The schedule is nonstop so it’s very important to prepare in the morning. I'm currently back in New York which means that I'm back to my New York ways. Last night I was up until 3:45 am, writing notes and brainstorming.   How do you maintain a good work-life balance?    I may be unusual in this aspect. What if your work is even more exciting than your play? I do have hobbies and I enjoy free-time activities but I have to say that my work is the most exciting thing to me.    From my point of view, the distinction between vocation and vacation may be inseparable. Some time ago I was in Milan at the Design Festival with a client and I was being given an overview of an art installation. I remember how exciting, intellectually invigorating, and rewarding that was. I can't separate the experiences I make while working from the ones that happen in my personal life. Not everyone has the great fortune to have that in their life and I'm not saying that it's healthy to live by this idea at the time. But I am very happy about the fact that I've been able to carve out a career where I make these kinds of experiences quite frequently.   I always say that it is not a company's job to inspire. Everyone has to find their own path to inspiration. As a creative director, my number one responsibility is to inspire. It's about lifting the abilities, aspirations, and futures of all the people that surround me. It is my responsibility to lift every person that looks to me for guidance. I have to make sure to give them the opportunity to succeed. I say to my co-workers that whenever they are going to leave and go to their next job, I want them to say to themselves that they've had an unbelievable experience and that they are proud of what they have achieved.     How have your milestones and experiences throughout your career shaped the professional creative that you are today?   I've had an interesting history, and I hope to continue that. I first started in journalism in New York. All my superiors were editors, which was an incredible learning experience. The magazines that I worked at were small, but they were focused on social issues. I did not come from a fashion lifestyle background. I worked on magazines that were about business, science, Wall Street, and technology. I learned so much about how to make good stories about topics that are highly conceptual and difficult to express. This field differs a lot from a fashion story where one can show the beaches of Ibiza or the clothing that is fresh off the runway. When it comes to a highly conceptual story it is important to think about how to make it interesting for people.    This is why I love doing the magazine at UNIQLO because it brought me back. I love making magazines and books and the editorial journey from the front page to the back page and the interaction between copy and visuals and how they intersect. Storytelling is embedded in me from my early days in New York.    From that, I jumped to becoming creative director at Bloomingdale's, the famous department store, which was the cultural force of New York back then. I managed to work with every person that I admired and dreamed of working with and traveled to India, China, and many other countries. I went from business and science magazines with no experience in lifestyle or advertising, to Bloomingdale's for 12 years. It was like my graduate school of culture and an extraordinary time.   The next step on my path was Wieden + Kennedy where I worked on Nike, with no previous experience in the advertising agency world, and later I landed where I am today at Fast Retailing. The journey has been very interesting because I'm able to switch from one type of business of creativity to another.    What is your vision at UNIQLO?    What makes us so unique is this philosophy of LifeWear. First of all, it's a very radical idea and I say that with love. As a baby boomer, anything radical is beautiful to me, so I'm a little biased.   When we think of LifeWear and the exhibitions that we've had all over the world, of course, we're very proud of the technology, and the quality. But quite frankly, culture is a strong part of LifeWear itself. It is not simply about the clothes but also about the philosophy of how we look at the world. LifeWear has a lot to do with how we act in your region, in your city, and your neighborhood.    Clearly, the DNA from Japan has a strong hand in the brand core of UNIQLO. Every day in Japanese culture is exalted. It has a very special place in the philosophical ideas of the culture. My job is to help create the highest quality of experiences for the greatest number of people on Earth. We live by the idea that quality is affordable and deserved by everyone.   We heard about the „Made for All“ campaign which we are very excited about. How were you involved in this project and what does it mean to you?   LifeWear is made for all. The descriptor "Made for All" is the basic foundation of what makes it so unique. The communication of LifeWear is often about the product and the technology that is being used. Yet a huge part of why we exist in every community is the service that we give back to the community. Most people don't know that we work with nonprofit organizations to distribute our clothing to the ones in need. Just recently the entire office of our Paris store, including the president of our French company, volunteered on the streets of Paris together with an organization that helps to take care of homeless people. In the neighborhoods of Brooklyn, we provide a space for challenged and underprivileged kids where they can come together and use sports as a tool for education, self-improvement, and gaining self-confidence. We don't spend enough time talking about these things because we're a very modest company. Yet, I wanted to make sure that people understood that "LifeWear - Made for All" has a deeper meaning than just clothing.    We're very committed to helping in the refugee crisis around the world, beyond the act of donating clothes. One of the great joys that we had, was to include a refugee, who had the dream to work in the fashion business. He now is part of the team of the UNIQLO store in Milan. We talked to him about his journey and we shared his story in our Video campaigns to help people to see that the dreams they have do come true. "Made for all" is about providing jobs and helping to educate and to inspire young people in need.   Can you tell us anything about exciting future projects?   We have quite a few exciting things that we're doing at the moment. We just came up with our magazine "The Spirit of Soho", which celebrates legends in the future of art and culture in Soho. Every major city in the world has its own. The spirit itself was not delegated only to the 10 blocks in New York, but it is more of a global feeling. The spirit of creativity also gave birth to what we call Downtown. Every boardroom of every luxury brand and record label is highly influenced by the spirit of Downtown at this moment. To us, it is very important to help our audience dive deeper into the culture which leads to a greater understanding of our society and current issues.

New Balance Releases XC-72 Silhouette Inspired by Retro-Futurism
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New Balance Releases XC-72 Silhouette Inspired by Retro-Futurism

Accessories Joining the 327 and 237 models within the brand’s Shifted collection, this new unisex silhouette leans into 1970s nostalgia andfeatures sustainable details.     The new XC-72 pushes its classic sources of inspiration even further into unexplored territory, with a time-bending design inspired by the speculative technological optimism of 1970s concept cars. Three distinctive traction outsole patterns and angular features are employed to give the familiar low-cut sleekness of the era’s running shoes an aggressive, experimental edge. The XC-72 is the future that the past dreamed about, come to life.     The global launch of the XC-72 comes on the heels of the silhouette’s debut with long-time collaborator Casablanca and builds on the release of the trend-forward 327, which also combines '70s heritage and contemporary design.      The XC-72 amplifies that dichotomy and accelerates the Shifted collection into a new conceptual space, blending high quality materials and modern trends with nostalgia-inducing details such as a squared toe inspired by 1970s concept car designs.      “The XC-72 is the physical embodiment of retro-futurism,” said XC-72 designer Charlotte Lee. “As with the 327, I asked myself ‘if I was a designer in the 70’s what would I create as new balance’s concept car?’. I took inspiration and specific elements from the past and reimagined them for today’s consumer. This methodology creates a timeless design that we hope will be reimagined, yet again, in another 40 years.”     To purchase the latest New Balance XC-72 color way visit,   their website.   Joining the 327 and 237 models within the brand’s Shifted collection, this new unisex silhouette leans into 1970s nostalgia andfeatures sustainable details.     The new XC-72 pushes its classic sources of inspiration even further into unexplored territory, with a time-bending design inspired by the speculative technological optimism of 1970s concept cars. Three distinctive traction outsole patterns and angular features are employed to give the familiar low-cut sleekness of the era’s running shoes an aggressive, experimental edge. The XC-72 is the future that the past dreamed about, come to life.     The global launch of the XC-72 comes on the heels of the silhouette’s debut with long-time collaborator Casablanca and builds on the release of the trend-forward 327, which also combines '70s heritage and contemporary design.      The XC-72 amplifies that dichotomy and accelerates the Shifted collection into a new conceptual space, blending high quality materials and modern trends with nostalgia-inducing details such as a squared toe inspired by 1970s concept car designs.      “The XC-72 is the physical embodiment of retro-futurism,” said XC-72 designer Charlotte Lee. “As with the 327, I asked myself ‘if I was a designer in the 70’s what would I create as new balance’s concept car?’. I took inspiration and specific elements from the past and reimagined them for today’s consumer. This methodology creates a timeless design that we hope will be reimagined, yet again, in another 40 years.”     To purchase the latest New Balance XC-72 color way visit,   their website.  

C.P. COMPANY CINQUANTA CHAPTER 09 – The Hybrid Jacket
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C.P. COMPANY CINQUANTA CHAPTER 09 – The Hybrid Jacket

Fashion One of the design seeds planted in the brand’s DNA that developed through the last decades is the study of clothing that mixes functional elements of outerwear with the comfort of knitwear to create new hybrids that reflect changing ways of dressing. For the ninth chapter of its 50th Anniversary, C.P. Company wants to celebrate one of its most sophisticated technical skills: the use of multiple materials to manufacture hybrid apparel. The C.P. Company hybrid jacket, the peak of mastery of mixing multiple materials in the same piece to the outerwear category.     In 2006, Alessandro Pungetti, created a short Goggle Jacket which mixed a shearling body with nylon-cotton canvas sleeves and removable hood. The beautiful quality and details of the piece are epitomised by the hood, which is lined with suede whilst the outer uses the same double-recipe garment dyed nylon-canvas as the sleeves of the jacket.     “One of my favourite C.P. Company pieces I can remember having bought in the 1980s,” says C.P. Company designer Alessandro Pungetti, “was a leather jacket with beautiful knitwear lining… I’ve always been fascinated by the challenge of trying to combine materials that are difficult to match with each other.”     For its anniversary, C.P. Company presents re-mastered version of Alessandro Pungetti’s Goggle Jacket with contemporary fit and volume, combining shearling body with CO-TED nylon sleeves and removable hood.      The Hybrid Jacket will be available on  50.cpcompany.com and in all C.P. Company flagship stores in Milan, Amsterdam, London and Riccione starting from November 11th. In addition to C.P. Company official sales channels, the Hybrid Jacket will be also exclusively sold on ssense.com.     50.cpcompany.com #cpcompany50 One of the design seeds planted in the brand’s DNA that developed through the last decades is the study of clothing that mixes functional elements of outerwear with the comfort of knitwear to create new hybrids that reflect changing ways of dressing. For the ninth chapter of its 50th Anniversary, C.P. Company wants to celebrate one of its most sophisticated technical skills: the use of multiple materials to manufacture hybrid apparel. The C.P. Company hybrid jacket, the peak of mastery of mixing multiple materials in the same piece to the outerwear category.     In 2006, Alessandro Pungetti, created a short Goggle Jacket which mixed a shearling body with nylon-cotton canvas sleeves and removable hood. The beautiful quality and details of the piece are epitomised by the hood, which is lined with suede whilst the outer uses the same double-recipe garment dyed nylon-canvas as the sleeves of the jacket.     “One of my favourite C.P. Company pieces I can remember having bought in the 1980s,” says C.P. Company designer Alessandro Pungetti, “was a leather jacket with beautiful knitwear lining… I’ve always been fascinated by the challenge of trying to combine materials that are difficult to match with each other.”     For its anniversary, C.P. Company presents re-mastered version of Alessandro Pungetti’s Goggle Jacket with contemporary fit and volume, combining shearling body with CO-TED nylon sleeves and removable hood.      The Hybrid Jacket will be available on  50.cpcompany.com and in all C.P. Company flagship stores in Milan, Amsterdam, London and Riccione starting from November 11th. In addition to C.P. Company official sales channels, the Hybrid Jacket will be also exclusively sold on ssense.com.     50.cpcompany.com #cpcompany50

In conversation with Timotej Letonja
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In conversation with Timotej Letonja

Portrait At only 26 years old Timotej Letonja is the editor-in-chief and creative director of Numéro Netherlands, one of the most influential fashion magazines in the country. Over the past years, Timotej has built a strong network of creatives that collectively creates Numéro’s very distinct Identity.  His social media expertise and his strong connection to print media make Timotej’s platform very versatile.      His openness and creativity make him a very progressive and innovative person who is always up for a challenge.  Timotej is very ambitious to share his experiences and thoughts with his peers to maintain a constant flow of new ideas.      We talked to Timi, that is how his friends call him, about day-to-day life, working in print media, and what he would tell his 18-year old self.             What are three things you would most like to accomplish in the next 5 years and what is your biggest wish for the future?    Definitely to continue growing our brand and the magazine as well as learning how to drive a car. I also want to learn more languages including Dutch as I plan on staying in The Netherlands.   My biggest wish for the future is to have a healthier planet for all to live on.     What’s your biggest inspiration?    My biggest inspiration is my surrounding, new places and new cultures around the world, nature, the mind, colors, interior, and fashion design and so much more.     What do you like most about your job and the industry?    It is full of creativity, which is fun most of the time but it can also get a bit overwhelming. I adore the fact that I have had the opportunity to meet so many incredible people next to all those beautiful places I get to see.   Many of the topics that I truly care about, like sustainability and genderless fashion are also tackled in my work field which is a fact that makes me love my job.     How do you define Happiness?   Happiness for me is when I am around people I care about, traveling, relaxing, and enjoying life which is not always easy when you are constantly busy. Happiness is all about living life passionately.     Do you have a personal mantra or motto that keeps you motivated and helps you in your daily life?   Stay active and live life passionately and take breaks and time for yourself. Dream big.       Tell us 3 things that is left on your bucket list?   1. To see the world,   2. To go skydiving,     3. To climb a mountain.       if you could have any super power, what would you choose and why?   To be able to teleport myself and see the world without having to use transportation :)         What does Freedom mean to you?   Freedom to me is the emotional and physical feeling of not being restricted by any boundaries. Emotional openness and connecting with oneself and with others is the first step to self-liberation and acceptance. After a long period of conscious reflection we are now, more than ever, able to understand ourselves, articulate our thoughts, and share them with the world. The privileges of self-expression and individuality are key elements to living a life outside of the limitations built by societal judgment and rejection. Everyone should have the opportunity to be confident with who they are or who they want to be.     What is your favorite color and is there a reason for it?    My two favorite colors are blue and green. Blue reminds me of the sea and the sky while green makes me think of home and nature.     What was the biggest turning point in your career?   Definitely when I launched Numéro Netherlands in 2019.      What would you tell your 18-year-old self?    To explore more, to try more things, and to stress less.     Can you describe your character with one adjective?    Energetic.     What’s the role of print media in this fast-paced industry?   The role of print media is to inspire, create long-lasting products, publish less frequently and share relevant stories and news while maintaining low usage of natural resources. Quality over quantity in any case.      What’s the first thing you want to do when you retire?    I want to travel, simply enjoy my free time, and see friends and family as often as possible.      What’s the best and the worst thing about the fashion industry?   The best is all the creativity around.   The worst is the speed of how fast fashion is made and how unsustainable it is. At only 26 years old Timotej Letonja is the editor-in-chief and creative director of Numéro Netherlands, one of the most influential fashion magazines in the country. Over the past years, Timotej has built a strong network of creatives that collectively creates Numéro’s very distinct Identity.  His social media expertise and his strong connection to print media make Timotej’s platform very versatile.      His openness and creativity make him a very progressive and innovative person who is always up for a challenge.  Timotej is very ambitious to share his experiences and thoughts with his peers to maintain a constant flow of new ideas.      We talked to Timi, that is how his friends call him, about day-to-day life, working in print media, and what he would tell his 18-year old self.             What are three things you would most like to accomplish in the next 5 years and what is your biggest wish for the future?    Definitely to continue growing our brand and the magazine as well as learning how to drive a car. I also want to learn more languages including Dutch as I plan on staying in The Netherlands.   My biggest wish for the future is to have a healthier planet for all to live on.     What’s your biggest inspiration?    My biggest inspiration is my surrounding, new places and new cultures around the world, nature, the mind, colors, interior, and fashion design and so much more.     What do you like most about your job and the industry?    It is full of creativity, which is fun most of the time but it can also get a bit overwhelming. I adore the fact that I have had the opportunity to meet so many incredible people next to all those beautiful places I get to see.   Many of the topics that I truly care about, like sustainability and genderless fashion are also tackled in my work field which is a fact that makes me love my job.     How do you define Happiness?   Happiness for me is when I am around people I care about, traveling, relaxing, and enjoying life which is not always easy when you are constantly busy. Happiness is all about living life passionately.     Do you have a personal mantra or motto that keeps you motivated and helps you in your daily life?   Stay active and live life passionately and take breaks and time for yourself. Dream big.       Tell us 3 things that is left on your bucket list?   1. To see the world,   2. To go skydiving,     3. To climb a mountain.       if you could have any super power, what would you choose and why?   To be able to teleport myself and see the world without having to use transportation :)         What does Freedom mean to you?   Freedom to me is the emotional and physical feeling of not being restricted by any boundaries. Emotional openness and connecting with oneself and with others is the first step to self-liberation and acceptance. After a long period of conscious reflection we are now, more than ever, able to understand ourselves, articulate our thoughts, and share them with the world. The privileges of self-expression and individuality are key elements to living a life outside of the limitations built by societal judgment and rejection. Everyone should have the opportunity to be confident with who they are or who they want to be.     What is your favorite color and is there a reason for it?    My two favorite colors are blue and green. Blue reminds me of the sea and the sky while green makes me think of home and nature.     What was the biggest turning point in your career?   Definitely when I launched Numéro Netherlands in 2019.      What would you tell your 18-year-old self?    To explore more, to try more things, and to stress less.     Can you describe your character with one adjective?    Energetic.     What’s the role of print media in this fast-paced industry?   The role of print media is to inspire, create long-lasting products, publish less frequently and share relevant stories and news while maintaining low usage of natural resources. Quality over quantity in any case.      What’s the first thing you want to do when you retire?    I want to travel, simply enjoy my free time, and see friends and family as often as possible.      What’s the best and the worst thing about the fashion industry?   The best is all the creativity around.   The worst is the speed of how fast fashion is made and how unsustainable it is.

MOOSE KNUCKLES PRESENTS FALL & WINTER 21 GOLD COLLECTION
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MOOSE KNUCKLES PRESENTS FALL & WINTER 21 GOLD COLLECTION

Fashion This season Canadian luxury outerwear brand, Moose Knuckles steps into the surreal with a highly cinematic campaign featuring fashion maverick Bloody Osiris and beauty guru Ella Bands for its Fall/Winter 2021 Gold Collection. Winter romance, captured on film by visual artist Bladi, serves as the heart for this season’s storytelling. Set in the streets of a cold Harlem evening, offers uptown love a new meaning this holiday season.      The Gold Collection is a capsule to the Fall/Winter 2021 collection, and engineered to endure the extreme cold. Garments feature a contemporary slim fit that are tailored and designed to compliment one’s silhouette instead of covering it up. The Gold Collection includes items for both men and women that exudes luxury with 24-karat gold-plated logos, gold-tone hardware, and golden monogrammed jacquard lining.     Core styles consist of the Sainte Flavie and Kandik bombers, along with the Grand Metis parka for women and the Stag Lake parka and Battis jacket for men with accents of golden details and available in fur with black and milky way tones. The men’s Goodwin zip-up and women’s Comptoir puffer are fur-free options, designed in recycled sherpa and nylon, while the Desble and Nooka hoodie and jogger are 100% interlock and french terry cotton.      In celebration of its Gold Collection, Moose Knuckles announces its latest partnership with New York-based premiere audio label, Master & Dynamic. The MW08 Wireless Sport Earphone and MW65 Noise Canceling Headphones are set to launch in December, just in time for the holiday season. The functionality for this collaboration is engineered with exceptional quality and custom Beryllium high-performance drivers that produce a rich, warm sound. While the MW08 Sport Earphone is crafted using gold glass and black kevlar, the MW65 Headphones are made with anodized aluminum and the finest leathers.      The Gold Collection is available today at mooseknucklescanada.com, Moose Knuckles’ stores worldwide, and select global retailers including Harrods, Selfridges, Verso and Luisaviaroma.      Visit Moose Knuckles Canada for more details. This season Canadian luxury outerwear brand, Moose Knuckles steps into the surreal with a highly cinematic campaign featuring fashion maverick Bloody Osiris and beauty guru Ella Bands for its Fall/Winter 2021 Gold Collection. Winter romance, captured on film by visual artist Bladi, serves as the heart for this season’s storytelling. Set in the streets of a cold Harlem evening, offers uptown love a new meaning this holiday season.      The Gold Collection is a capsule to the Fall/Winter 2021 collection, and engineered to endure the extreme cold. Garments feature a contemporary slim fit that are tailored and designed to compliment one’s silhouette instead of covering it up. The Gold Collection includes items for both men and women that exudes luxury with 24-karat gold-plated logos, gold-tone hardware, and golden monogrammed jacquard lining.     Core styles consist of the Sainte Flavie and Kandik bombers, along with the Grand Metis parka for women and the Stag Lake parka and Battis jacket for men with accents of golden details and available in fur with black and milky way tones. The men’s Goodwin zip-up and women’s Comptoir puffer are fur-free options, designed in recycled sherpa and nylon, while the Desble and Nooka hoodie and jogger are 100% interlock and french terry cotton.      In celebration of its Gold Collection, Moose Knuckles announces its latest partnership with New York-based premiere audio label, Master & Dynamic. The MW08 Wireless Sport Earphone and MW65 Noise Canceling Headphones are set to launch in December, just in time for the holiday season. The functionality for this collaboration is engineered with exceptional quality and custom Beryllium high-performance drivers that produce a rich, warm sound. While the MW08 Sport Earphone is crafted using gold glass and black kevlar, the MW65 Headphones are made with anodized aluminum and the finest leathers.      The Gold Collection is available today at mooseknucklescanada.com, Moose Knuckles’ stores worldwide, and select global retailers including Harrods, Selfridges, Verso and Luisaviaroma.      Visit Moose Knuckles Canada for more details.

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