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Givenchy for Spring & Summer 2021
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Givenchy for Spring & Summer 2021

Fashion Week “You find the pieces of the puzzle for a collection, building it from symbols and signs, but never forgetting the reality of the person who will wear it and bring it to life. The women and men should be powerful and effortless, equal and joyful, a reflection of who they really are – only more so. It’s about finding the humanity in luxury.” Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     At Matthew M. Williams’ Givenchy, ‘Hardware’ is key. Eschewing, gendered notions of jewellery and accessories, rather it is hardware that unites the women and men of Givenchy, a symbolic nexus of utility and luxury and the place where this collection began. The Lover’s Lock is a unisex object of utility, decoration, commitment and emotion; a sincere yet playful symbol of Paris – it nods to the lost locks of Le Pont des Arts – it is an object punctuated throughout this initial collection as both decoration and fastenings. It also points to Williams’ commitment to the world of Givenchy in this first proposal as thehouse’s Creative Director.     The Spring-Summer ‘21 collection explores Givenchy in the form of a stream of consciousness for Williams and is a ‘sampler’ of what is to come. Begun in the midst of a pandemic and completed within two months, this is a new beginning, yet is intermingled with elements of the archive and is a utilisation of Givenchy’s distinct lineage, pointing to the past, present and future. Above all, there is a sense of celebration, of the people who have led Williams here and those he wants to wear the clothes. This is expressed in the images that reveals the collection, a photographic study by the creative director together with the artist Heji Shin – a photographer who also gets to the heart of who a person is as much as to the clothes they wear.     From Hubert de Givenchy’s swathes of looped drapery, lighter-than-air transparencies, linear necklines and ‘Jour’ open backs, to the McQueen horn, reborn; both the classical and radical contrasts of Givenchy are embraced and shown to have always been part of the house’s history in the collection. Ultimately, it is a feeling of elegance, playfulness and pragmatism that is key to Matthew M. Williams’ vision for the house.     There is a notion of evolution, both lighthearted and serious, in this play of elements past and present. From the Tryp-toe shoe and stockings, the Horn-heel and hat together with a further examination of the Antigona bag, each is a play on and development of existing objects in the archive. They are joined by the new unisex Cut-out bag in its many iterations, as well as the G chains, objects that are destined to add to the history of the house and are interspersed throughout. Williams’ signature technical material experimentation is balanced by the traditional, natural and opulent. From the use of a cotton Ottoman for both genders in outerwear, technical taffeta in tailoring and structured Punto di Milano jersey to evoke more pure forms in dressmaking, tradition is respected yet refined and re-contextualised. At the same time, an experiment in different densities of injected foam leads to an evolution of the slide, the ultra-comfortable Marshmallow Slide is the footwear that underpins much of the collection, quite literally providing a casual, insouciant foundation for many of the more formal looks. The study of casual archetypes continues throughout the collection, including new technical coatings of denim in both paint and resin, work that is as labour intensive as the collection’s more traditional embroideries. It is a sign ofWilliams’ Californian sensibility transplanted to Europe that he approaches the two sides with equal aplomb and rigour, both classicism and subversion, with a sense of ease and respect for the humanity of the wearer infusing all. “You find the pieces of the puzzle for a collection, building it from symbols and signs, but never forgetting the reality of the person who will wear it and bring it to life. The women and men should be powerful and effortless, equal and joyful, a reflection of who they really are – only more so. It’s about finding the humanity in luxury.” Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     At Matthew M. Williams’ Givenchy, ‘Hardware’ is key. Eschewing, gendered notions of jewellery and accessories, rather it is hardware that unites the women and men of Givenchy, a symbolic nexus of utility and luxury and the place where this collection began. The Lover’s Lock is a unisex object of utility, decoration, commitment and emotion; a sincere yet playful symbol of Paris – it nods to the lost locks of Le Pont des Arts – it is an object punctuated throughout this initial collection as both decoration and fastenings. It also points to Williams’ commitment to the world of Givenchy in this first proposal as thehouse’s Creative Director.     The Spring-Summer ‘21 collection explores Givenchy in the form of a stream of consciousness for Williams and is a ‘sampler’ of what is to come. Begun in the midst of a pandemic and completed within two months, this is a new beginning, yet is intermingled with elements of the archive and is a utilisation of Givenchy’s distinct lineage, pointing to the past, present and future. Above all, there is a sense of celebration, of the people who have led Williams here and those he wants to wear the clothes. This is expressed in the images that reveals the collection, a photographic study by the creative director together with the artist Heji Shin – a photographer who also gets to the heart of who a person is as much as to the clothes they wear.     From Hubert de Givenchy’s swathes of looped drapery, lighter-than-air transparencies, linear necklines and ‘Jour’ open backs, to the McQueen horn, reborn; both the classical and radical contrasts of Givenchy are embraced and shown to have always been part of the house’s history in the collection. Ultimately, it is a feeling of elegance, playfulness and pragmatism that is key to Matthew M. Williams’ vision for the house.     There is a notion of evolution, both lighthearted and serious, in this play of elements past and present. From the Tryp-toe shoe and stockings, the Horn-heel and hat together with a further examination of the Antigona bag, each is a play on and development of existing objects in the archive. They are joined by the new unisex Cut-out bag in its many iterations, as well as the G chains, objects that are destined to add to the history of the house and are interspersed throughout. Williams’ signature technical material experimentation is balanced by the traditional, natural and opulent. From the use of a cotton Ottoman for both genders in outerwear, technical taffeta in tailoring and structured Punto di Milano jersey to evoke more pure forms in dressmaking, tradition is respected yet refined and re-contextualised. At the same time, an experiment in different densities of injected foam leads to an evolution of the slide, the ultra-comfortable Marshmallow Slide is the footwear that underpins much of the collection, quite literally providing a casual, insouciant foundation for many of the more formal looks. The study of casual archetypes continues throughout the collection, including new technical coatings of denim in both paint and resin, work that is as labour intensive as the collection’s more traditional embroideries. It is a sign ofWilliams’ Californian sensibility transplanted to Europe that he approaches the two sides with equal aplomb and rigour, both classicism and subversion, with a sense of ease and respect for the humanity of the wearer infusing all.

Paco Rabanne for Spring & Summer 2020
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Paco Rabanne for Spring & Summer 2020

Fashion Week Whether in the galleries or on the runways, as music or as theatre, avant-garde has always signaled a certain radicality, an impulse for experimentation. This concept is innate to Paco Rabanne, dating back to the designer’s first collection in 1966, Twelve Dresses in Unwearable Materials.    But does avant-garde expression serve a purpose when life itself feels so radically different? What if an everyday wardrobe could be reimagined with an avant-garde attitude? Conceived by Julien Dossena, this Paco Rabanne collection is a garde-robe of looks that are instinctive rather than declarative. Individuality surfaces as an extreme remix of wearable pieces. The statement is visibly less formal but technically precise – an undoing of stylistic archetypes to arrive at a deliberately destabilized allure.    Each look suggests an association of ideas that are as likely to be counterintuitive as complementary. Amidst the season’s sparkling head-to-toe geometric and flowery assemblages, leopard motifs and lingerie or baby-doll dresses with lace incrustations tempt a more louche, beguiling vision. Bustiers and washed denim recur as wardrobe foundation pieces, often layered with elongated tailored jackets or a relaxed, metal mesh robe. Striped ribbed knits stamped with silver create kinetic curves while metal mesh dresses in gold and silver are newly knotted at the bustline, suggesting a gesture of insouciance. Where moulded tops and jewellery plates around the clavicle and navel accentuate the figure outward, exaggerated jewel prints drape and contour the body with trompe l’oeil glitz. Updated for the times, a classic trench is sheathed in clear plastic as a partial barrier.    On foot, boots set within tubular steel frames have been re-edited from the archive. They showcase the artistic side of Paco Rabanne’s avant-garde spirit – a conceptual, sculptural base for silhouettes drawn from real life.  Whether in the galleries or on the runways, as music or as theatre, avant-garde has always signaled a certain radicality, an impulse for experimentation. This concept is innate to Paco Rabanne, dating back to the designer’s first collection in 1966, Twelve Dresses in Unwearable Materials.    But does avant-garde expression serve a purpose when life itself feels so radically different? What if an everyday wardrobe could be reimagined with an avant-garde attitude? Conceived by Julien Dossena, this Paco Rabanne collection is a garde-robe of looks that are instinctive rather than declarative. Individuality surfaces as an extreme remix of wearable pieces. The statement is visibly less formal but technically precise – an undoing of stylistic archetypes to arrive at a deliberately destabilized allure.    Each look suggests an association of ideas that are as likely to be counterintuitive as complementary. Amidst the season’s sparkling head-to-toe geometric and flowery assemblages, leopard motifs and lingerie or baby-doll dresses with lace incrustations tempt a more louche, beguiling vision. Bustiers and washed denim recur as wardrobe foundation pieces, often layered with elongated tailored jackets or a relaxed, metal mesh robe. Striped ribbed knits stamped with silver create kinetic curves while metal mesh dresses in gold and silver are newly knotted at the bustline, suggesting a gesture of insouciance. Where moulded tops and jewellery plates around the clavicle and navel accentuate the figure outward, exaggerated jewel prints drape and contour the body with trompe l’oeil glitz. Updated for the times, a classic trench is sheathed in clear plastic as a partial barrier.    On foot, boots set within tubular steel frames have been re-edited from the archive. They showcase the artistic side of Paco Rabanne’s avant-garde spirit – a conceptual, sculptural base for silhouettes drawn from real life. 

BREGUET TRADITION QUANTIÈME RETROGRADE 7597
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BREGUET TRADITION QUANTIÈME RETROGRADE 7597

Watches The Tradition line draws its inspiration directly from the caliber of the subscription watch created by Breguet at the end of the eighteenth century. This new model offers an open view of the movement with all its architectural shapes and shows not only the hours and minutes but retrograde date.     The Tradition collection actually takes its inspiration from one of the most significant piecesof Breguet’s history: the subscription watch. Purposefully simple and stripped-back, its fully visible movement unveils a perfectly symmetrical design. In the new Tradition 7597 model, it also features a retrograde date display, a complication that the watchmaker was one of the first to develop, and which it has bestowed on some of its most famous creations.     Adjusted in a fluted white gold 40 mm case, the 505Q self-winding caliber is equipped with a reverse in-line lever escapement with silicon horns, as well as a Breguet balance spring also in silicon. The gold rotor visible through the transparent caseback is reminiscent of that of the Perpetuelles, or first self-winding watches, further testimony to the ingenuity of the master watchmaker.     Original design, symmetrical assembly:   A perfectionist, concerned with both technology as well as aesthetics, Abraham-Louis Breguet designed a movement the modernity of which is still astonishing to this day. Crossing the centuries, his design is at the very root of the Tradition range: positioned in the center, the large barrel is topped by a symmetrically arranged gear train. As such, the center wheelat 8 o’clock triggers the oscillating mechanism of the same size at 4 o’clock. This is equippedwith the famous pare-chute invented by the master watchmaker, the ancestor of all today’santi-shock mechanisms, and signature element of the Tradition collection. Another specific feature is the hour and minute dial that, eccentrically positioned at 12 o’clock and made of gold, is inspired by that of certain Breguet tact watches. As such, the new Tradition 7597 features an hours chapter with Roman numerals, bordered by a delicate engine-turned Clous de Paris pattern, which serves as a backdrop for blued Breguet hands.     In the interests of balance, a retrograde date section is positioned between the 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock and a skillfully curved hand indicates the date moving in the vertical plane, fitting in with the ultra-architectural movement. A patented mechanism provides for a fine adjustment of the date hand. The latter is multi-tiered, allowing it to fly over the movementcomponents. At 10 o’clock, a screw-in corrector allows users to set the date safely.     The subscription watch, a masterpiece of simplicity:   Abraham-Louis Breguet was one of the most talented watchmakers of all time, the architect of technology innovations adopted throughout the profession, such as the gong spring for repeating watches (1783) or the tourbillon (1801). But while he has created some of the most complicated timepieces there are, he is also known for creating the simplest piece. After having spent two years in Switzerland at the height of the French Revolution, Abraham-Louis Breguet resumed the management of his Parisian workshop on Quai del’Horloge, on the Ile de la Cité, in the spring of 1795. His first step was to attract some new clientele. Therefore, he invented a watch that was both of the utmost simplicity and extremely reliable. He offered a subscription service for this. This would go on to be a spectacular commercial success. Today his creations can be admired at the Breguet Museum in Paris and various other European museums; subscription watch number 947, sold in 1802, is on display in the Louvre Museum. Breguet used the caliber of the subscription watches to create the first tact watches, sometimes adding a little dial to them; this was the inspiration for the Tradition collection launched in 2005, which marked a return to this very typical architecture.       “The chronometer had been manufactured in Breguet’s workshops,to a level of perfection that goes without saying.”Jules Verne, Captain Antifer, 1894 The Tradition line draws its inspiration directly from the caliber of the subscription watch created by Breguet at the end of the eighteenth century. This new model offers an open view of the movement with all its architectural shapes and shows not only the hours and minutes but retrograde date.     The Tradition collection actually takes its inspiration from one of the most significant piecesof Breguet’s history: the subscription watch. Purposefully simple and stripped-back, its fully visible movement unveils a perfectly symmetrical design. In the new Tradition 7597 model, it also features a retrograde date display, a complication that the watchmaker was one of the first to develop, and which it has bestowed on some of its most famous creations.     Adjusted in a fluted white gold 40 mm case, the 505Q self-winding caliber is equipped with a reverse in-line lever escapement with silicon horns, as well as a Breguet balance spring also in silicon. The gold rotor visible through the transparent caseback is reminiscent of that of the Perpetuelles, or first self-winding watches, further testimony to the ingenuity of the master watchmaker.     Original design, symmetrical assembly:   A perfectionist, concerned with both technology as well as aesthetics, Abraham-Louis Breguet designed a movement the modernity of which is still astonishing to this day. Crossing the centuries, his design is at the very root of the Tradition range: positioned in the center, the large barrel is topped by a symmetrically arranged gear train. As such, the center wheelat 8 o’clock triggers the oscillating mechanism of the same size at 4 o’clock. This is equippedwith the famous pare-chute invented by the master watchmaker, the ancestor of all today’santi-shock mechanisms, and signature element of the Tradition collection. Another specific feature is the hour and minute dial that, eccentrically positioned at 12 o’clock and made of gold, is inspired by that of certain Breguet tact watches. As such, the new Tradition 7597 features an hours chapter with Roman numerals, bordered by a delicate engine-turned Clous de Paris pattern, which serves as a backdrop for blued Breguet hands.     In the interests of balance, a retrograde date section is positioned between the 3 o’clock and 9 o’clock and a skillfully curved hand indicates the date moving in the vertical plane, fitting in with the ultra-architectural movement. A patented mechanism provides for a fine adjustment of the date hand. The latter is multi-tiered, allowing it to fly over the movementcomponents. At 10 o’clock, a screw-in corrector allows users to set the date safely.     The subscription watch, a masterpiece of simplicity:   Abraham-Louis Breguet was one of the most talented watchmakers of all time, the architect of technology innovations adopted throughout the profession, such as the gong spring for repeating watches (1783) or the tourbillon (1801). But while he has created some of the most complicated timepieces there are, he is also known for creating the simplest piece. After having spent two years in Switzerland at the height of the French Revolution, Abraham-Louis Breguet resumed the management of his Parisian workshop on Quai del’Horloge, on the Ile de la Cité, in the spring of 1795. His first step was to attract some new clientele. Therefore, he invented a watch that was both of the utmost simplicity and extremely reliable. He offered a subscription service for this. This would go on to be a spectacular commercial success. Today his creations can be admired at the Breguet Museum in Paris and various other European museums; subscription watch number 947, sold in 1802, is on display in the Louvre Museum. Breguet used the caliber of the subscription watches to create the first tact watches, sometimes adding a little dial to them; this was the inspiration for the Tradition collection launched in 2005, which marked a return to this very typical architecture.       “The chronometer had been manufactured in Breguet’s workshops,to a level of perfection that goes without saying.”Jules Verne, Captain Antifer, 1894

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Opening Design Studio by TextielMuseum
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Opening Design Studio by TextielMuseum

Art Have you ever wanted to step into a designer’s shoes for a day? You’ll shortly be able to. Well … into their socks, to be precise. Because from 26 September 2020, visitors to the TextielMuseum in Tilburg will be able to create their own personalised designer socks and scarves on a new state-of-the-art knitting machine. This special experience will take place in the TextielLab, the fully equipped development centre that’s a home-from-home for many well-known designers.   Visitors to the TextielMuseum are invited to reserve a timeslot to make a pair of socks (€20) or a scarf (€120).   To kick off this new activity, which is called Design Studio, the museum is collaborating with Dutch designer Bertjan Pot. Together, they have developed a digital application which enables museum visitors to design their own items around the theme of “colour”. A creative process that is also completely coronavirus-proof!   Bertjan Pot: “A single colour has no meaning. As I see it, colours only count when they’re blending and contrasting with each other. This is something we’re now trying to achieve with this innovative knitting machine. Socks and scarves are basically very simple. It’s the use of colour that ultimately sets them apart.”   Design Studio: Design Studio, which consists of three different spaces, will be a permanent feature within the museum, with each space covering a different phase in the design process: inspiration, design and production. The first ‘inspiration’ space is where you explore the world of leading designer Bertjan Pot, who extends an invitation to get started via a set of design principles. Moving on to the ‘design’ space, it’s time to play with colours to determine an individual design. Finally, in the ‘production’ space, visitors use the workstations to translate ideas, which may include customised text, into digital instructions. These are then sent to the knitting machine for production. It’s a unique experience and opportunity to dip your toes into the world of being a designer. You’ll be able to take your socks home with you, and scarves will be sent on afterwards. Either way, Design Studio knitwear is a fantastic gift, either as a treat for yourself or to give to someone else.   With on-demand fashion, local production, sustainable materials and zero waste now more relevant than ever, Design Studio certainly has its sights on the future of fashion.    https://www.textielmuseum.nl/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI1sLwjsGd7AIVyYBQBh0gUAE7EAAYASAAEgJhqvD_BwE   Have you ever wanted to step into a designer’s shoes for a day? You’ll shortly be able to. Well … into their socks, to be precise. Because from 26 September 2020, visitors to the TextielMuseum in Tilburg will be able to create their own personalised designer socks and scarves on a new state-of-the-art knitting machine. This special experience will take place in the TextielLab, the fully equipped development centre that’s a home-from-home for many well-known designers.   Visitors to the TextielMuseum are invited to reserve a timeslot to make a pair of socks (€20) or a scarf (€120).   To kick off this new activity, which is called Design Studio, the museum is collaborating with Dutch designer Bertjan Pot. Together, they have developed a digital application which enables museum visitors to design their own items around the theme of “colour”. A creative process that is also completely coronavirus-proof!   Bertjan Pot: “A single colour has no meaning. As I see it, colours only count when they’re blending and contrasting with each other. This is something we’re now trying to achieve with this innovative knitting machine. Socks and scarves are basically very simple. It’s the use of colour that ultimately sets them apart.”   Design Studio: Design Studio, which consists of three different spaces, will be a permanent feature within the museum, with each space covering a different phase in the design process: inspiration, design and production. The first ‘inspiration’ space is where you explore the world of leading designer Bertjan Pot, who extends an invitation to get started via a set of design principles. Moving on to the ‘design’ space, it’s time to play with colours to determine an individual design. Finally, in the ‘production’ space, visitors use the workstations to translate ideas, which may include customised text, into digital instructions. These are then sent to the knitting machine for production. It’s a unique experience and opportunity to dip your toes into the world of being a designer. You’ll be able to take your socks home with you, and scarves will be sent on afterwards. Either way, Design Studio knitwear is a fantastic gift, either as a treat for yourself or to give to someone else.   With on-demand fashion, local production, sustainable materials and zero waste now more relevant than ever, Design Studio certainly has its sights on the future of fashion.    https://www.textielmuseum.nl/?gclid=EAIaIQobChMI1sLwjsGd7AIVyYBQBh0gUAE7EAAYASAAEgJhqvD_BwE  

STONE ISLAND X PERSOL
547

STONE ISLAND X PERSOL

Accessories Present pilot frame P02460S — the reinterpretation of an archive model of sunglasses from the '70s to give birth to the PO2460S pilot frame, a new exclusive style that combines the spirit and the excellence of the two Italian brands. A single style and colorway.   It is a tantalizing convergence of the two brands, each being steeped in a rich heritage of Italian design and known for their devotion to craftmanship and technology. Separately they have defined excellence in their own fields. Together, they have created a new milestone in luxury eyewear. A mix of a shared vision.     A bold pilot profile is characterized by a metal bridge with visible screws, crafted with an exclusive attention to all details to ensure maximum protection, always in style. The metal bridge is hand brushed for an exquisite opal effect, in contrast with the frame. The gunmetal frame has temples enriched by the famous stylized Arrow and Meflecto technology and features yellow temple tips with the print of the iconic Stone Island logo. The frame is sanded by hand, making sure to give a luminous effect to the Arrow. The model has light blue polarized lenses, with both Persol and Stone Island engraved logos, one for each lens.     The sunglasses come with a multi-functional box that includes the sunglasses and their dedicated case, a branded lanyard and a special cleaning kit, embodying both brands’ attitude to the function.       Present pilot frame P02460S — the reinterpretation of an archive model of sunglasses from the '70s to give birth to the PO2460S pilot frame, a new exclusive style that combines the spirit and the excellence of the two Italian brands. A single style and colorway.   It is a tantalizing convergence of the two brands, each being steeped in a rich heritage of Italian design and known for their devotion to craftmanship and technology. Separately they have defined excellence in their own fields. Together, they have created a new milestone in luxury eyewear. A mix of a shared vision.     A bold pilot profile is characterized by a metal bridge with visible screws, crafted with an exclusive attention to all details to ensure maximum protection, always in style. The metal bridge is hand brushed for an exquisite opal effect, in contrast with the frame. The gunmetal frame has temples enriched by the famous stylized Arrow and Meflecto technology and features yellow temple tips with the print of the iconic Stone Island logo. The frame is sanded by hand, making sure to give a luminous effect to the Arrow. The model has light blue polarized lenses, with both Persol and Stone Island engraved logos, one for each lens.     The sunglasses come with a multi-functional box that includes the sunglasses and their dedicated case, a branded lanyard and a special cleaning kit, embodying both brands’ attitude to the function.      

Daily Paper and Van Gogh Museum Reunite for a Second Collaborative Line
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Daily Paper and Van Gogh Museum Reunite for a Second Collaborative Line

Fashion For the Fall/Winter 2020 season, Daily Paper and the Van Gogh Museum reprise for a second collaboration which sees a selection of legendary Dutch artist Vincent Van Gogh’s artwork reinterpreted and reproduced on a collection of winter-ready garments. While the first Daily Paper x Van Gogh Museum explored the subject matter of Van Gogh’s art, for this second collaboration we turn our gaze back upon the artist himself. We hope to inspire and educate a generation by connecting the dots between the old and new. Read the full press release and download the assets below. The Daily Paper x Van Gogh Museum collection is priced from €70 - €280 and will be available at Daily Paper and Van Gogh Museum online websites, both storefronts, and selected retailers worldwide from October 2, 2020, 12 PM CET.   Collection: Van Gogh’s Body of Work Translated into Winter Garments: This sophomore capsule sees the evolution of concepts explored in our debut collection, with several of Van Gogh’s most iconic pieces of artwork executed as graphics on street-ready winter outerwear. New silhouettes this season include Daily Paper’s signature puffer jacket adorned with an allover print of the Dutch artist’s The Potato Eaters (1885) alongside some of his floral compositions. Elsewhere, the Daily Paper cold-weather essentials like the reversible bomber jacket, woven beanie and scarf are elevated through the dual-branded logo that is a hallmark of the collaboration. Alongside sportswear staples like tees and hoodies, other highlights include floral printed denim jeans and tote and two-toned split shirting.   For the Fall/Winter 2020 season, Daily Paper and the Van Gogh Museum reprise for a second collaboration which sees a selection of legendary Dutch artist Vincent Van Gogh’s artwork reinterpreted and reproduced on a collection of winter-ready garments. While the first Daily Paper x Van Gogh Museum explored the subject matter of Van Gogh’s art, for this second collaboration we turn our gaze back upon the artist himself. We hope to inspire and educate a generation by connecting the dots between the old and new. Read the full press release and download the assets below. The Daily Paper x Van Gogh Museum collection is priced from €70 - €280 and will be available at Daily Paper and Van Gogh Museum online websites, both storefronts, and selected retailers worldwide from October 2, 2020, 12 PM CET.   Collection: Van Gogh’s Body of Work Translated into Winter Garments: This sophomore capsule sees the evolution of concepts explored in our debut collection, with several of Van Gogh’s most iconic pieces of artwork executed as graphics on street-ready winter outerwear. New silhouettes this season include Daily Paper’s signature puffer jacket adorned with an allover print of the Dutch artist’s The Potato Eaters (1885) alongside some of his floral compositions. Elsewhere, the Daily Paper cold-weather essentials like the reversible bomber jacket, woven beanie and scarf are elevated through the dual-branded logo that is a hallmark of the collaboration. Alongside sportswear staples like tees and hoodies, other highlights include floral printed denim jeans and tote and two-toned split shirting.  

LOEWE WOMEN’S SPRING SUMMER 2021 SHOW-ON-THE-WALL
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LOEWE WOMEN’S SPRING SUMMER 2021 SHOW-ON-THE-WALL

Fashion Week The LOEWE SS21 Show-on-the-Wall will feature a series of online content to expand and enrich the personal experience of putting together and enjoying a paper show. The events will be aired throughout the day on the LOEWE social media channels. The idea is to offer deeper knowledge about the collection, the show concept and the artists involved, as well as entertainment, creating an experience that further enhances the identity of LOEWE as a cultural brand. The content will follow a xed agenda, with additional elements being added throughout the day.   Anthea Hamilton’s Collaboration British artist Anthea Hamilton (b. 1978) has created a unique wallpaper for this collection. Hamilton works in sculpture, installation and performance and is fascinated by the multiple meanings and resonances an image can provoke. Unexpected juxtapositions and surreal collisions of form and material abound in her work, with detours through the worlds of art, music, fashion and popular culture: from postmodern architecture or Japanese Noh and Kabuki theatre. Hamilton’s wallpaper Sr Jeanne Wavy Boots w. Gazanias and Snails (2020) is a collage of a boot and flower motif which frequently reoccur in her work. The wallpaper was designed as the backdrop for the SS21 collection and has been transformed into a textile as part of the collection. Hamilton has collaborated with LOEWE on several occasions, including for her major installation The Squash at Tate Britain in 2018. Her monumental Vulcano Table (2014) is part of the Loewe Foundation Art Collection and is currently installed in the Casa Loewe store on London’s Bond Street. The LOEWE SS21 Show-on-the-Wall will feature a series of online content to expand and enrich the personal experience of putting together and enjoying a paper show. The events will be aired throughout the day on the LOEWE social media channels. The idea is to offer deeper knowledge about the collection, the show concept and the artists involved, as well as entertainment, creating an experience that further enhances the identity of LOEWE as a cultural brand. The content will follow a xed agenda, with additional elements being added throughout the day.   Anthea Hamilton’s Collaboration British artist Anthea Hamilton (b. 1978) has created a unique wallpaper for this collection. Hamilton works in sculpture, installation and performance and is fascinated by the multiple meanings and resonances an image can provoke. Unexpected juxtapositions and surreal collisions of form and material abound in her work, with detours through the worlds of art, music, fashion and popular culture: from postmodern architecture or Japanese Noh and Kabuki theatre. Hamilton’s wallpaper Sr Jeanne Wavy Boots w. Gazanias and Snails (2020) is a collage of a boot and flower motif which frequently reoccur in her work. The wallpaper was designed as the backdrop for the SS21 collection and has been transformed into a textile as part of the collection. Hamilton has collaborated with LOEWE on several occasions, including for her major installation The Squash at Tate Britain in 2018. Her monumental Vulcano Table (2014) is part of the Loewe Foundation Art Collection and is currently installed in the Casa Loewe store on London’s Bond Street.

HELMUT LANG X ANTHONY VACCARELLO SAINT LAURENT RIVE DROITE
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HELMUT LANG X ANTHONY VACCARELLO SAINT LAURENT RIVE DROITE

Design As part of the Saint Laurent Rive Droite project, Anthony Vaccarello has decided to give his creations to artist Helmut Lang to exert as raw materials for a set of unique sculptures.   In his quest for new partnerships and ideas to expand the identity of Saint Laurent, Anthony Vaccarello has handpicked Helmut Lang, whose body of work in fashion re ect a strict construction that can be seen as an underground in uence upon Anthony’s vision. He has always admired and respected Helmut Lang, who made a name for himself from the late 80s and on by inventing a brand new design language that is still the ultimate embodiment of minimalism, modernity and restrained opulence. Helmut has been part of Anthony Vaccarello’s inspiration as a designer but also as a person who always made the right choice. Also concerned with modern issues like sustainability, durability, lasting power of the ever-shifting nature of fashion collections and cycles, Anthony Vaccarello has found the perfect interlocutor for a project that is also a dialogue.   Helmut Lang questioned the very de nition of luxury and the meaning of the clothes’ function. He initiated with close artists, Louise Bourgeois and Jenny Holzer, which turned into a habit in the 21st century: a collaboration between an artist and a fashion designer. These close links put new interrogations at the forefront of the ever-evolving fashion industry: fashion a form of applied art, the time-frame of fashion creations, its more or less perennial impact on global culture are probably the only two who are still at the heart of today’s discussions. With that background and creative philosophy, it seemed natural for the designer to turn to art full-time in 2005. His unique ability to turn items, either raw or discarded, into pieces of art, made him the perfect partner for this project.   Anthony Vaccarello invited him to work with past collections he made for Saint Laurent, thus contributing, in a sel ess gesture, to the transmutation of his creations for the house into another form of art. Clothing and accessory prototypes, garments and jewels left un nished and deserted, remaining testimonies of Anthony Vaccarello’s creativity has been morphed into a new life. Shredded, mixed with a pigmented resin then molded in aluminum, these former fashion objects will become primal totems with unique textures reminiscing both, a precious past and a promising future. The sculptures will be displayed at Rive Droite, rst in Paris, then in Los Angeles and will be available for sale. As part of the Saint Laurent Rive Droite project, Anthony Vaccarello has decided to give his creations to artist Helmut Lang to exert as raw materials for a set of unique sculptures.   In his quest for new partnerships and ideas to expand the identity of Saint Laurent, Anthony Vaccarello has handpicked Helmut Lang, whose body of work in fashion re ect a strict construction that can be seen as an underground in uence upon Anthony’s vision. He has always admired and respected Helmut Lang, who made a name for himself from the late 80s and on by inventing a brand new design language that is still the ultimate embodiment of minimalism, modernity and restrained opulence. Helmut has been part of Anthony Vaccarello’s inspiration as a designer but also as a person who always made the right choice. Also concerned with modern issues like sustainability, durability, lasting power of the ever-shifting nature of fashion collections and cycles, Anthony Vaccarello has found the perfect interlocutor for a project that is also a dialogue.   Helmut Lang questioned the very de nition of luxury and the meaning of the clothes’ function. He initiated with close artists, Louise Bourgeois and Jenny Holzer, which turned into a habit in the 21st century: a collaboration between an artist and a fashion designer. These close links put new interrogations at the forefront of the ever-evolving fashion industry: fashion a form of applied art, the time-frame of fashion creations, its more or less perennial impact on global culture are probably the only two who are still at the heart of today’s discussions. With that background and creative philosophy, it seemed natural for the designer to turn to art full-time in 2005. His unique ability to turn items, either raw or discarded, into pieces of art, made him the perfect partner for this project.   Anthony Vaccarello invited him to work with past collections he made for Saint Laurent, thus contributing, in a sel ess gesture, to the transmutation of his creations for the house into another form of art. Clothing and accessory prototypes, garments and jewels left un nished and deserted, remaining testimonies of Anthony Vaccarello’s creativity has been morphed into a new life. Shredded, mixed with a pigmented resin then molded in aluminum, these former fashion objects will become primal totems with unique textures reminiscing both, a precious past and a promising future. The sculptures will be displayed at Rive Droite, rst in Paris, then in Los Angeles and will be available for sale.

DIOR for Spring & Summer 2021
527

DIOR for Spring & Summer 2021

Fashion Week For the Dior spring-summer 2021 ready-to-wear show, Maria Grazia Chiuri continues her committed reflection on the origins of fashion, and the meaning of cut and creation, as artistic lexicons in perpetual movement. Inspired by the work of Lucia Marcucci - an emblematic figure of the Italian avant-garde who designed the show's scenography - she chose the aesthetics of collage and visual poetry as a new space for expression. Patchworks of scarves in a mix of paisley and floral motifs, punctuated with lace fragments, accessorize a series of dresses and pants, opening up infinite possibilities for the imagination. Fascinated by the power of thought embodied by authors such as Virginia Woolf and Susan Sontag, the Creative Director of Dior women’s collections revisits the concept of clothing in its essence, from men’s shirts to sleek coats, celebrating the skills of cultures around the world, from Japan to Indonesia. A striking and magnetic choral work transcended by the female voices of the Sequenza 9.3 ensemble - directed by Catherine Simonpietri - (re)interpreting Lucia Ronchetti's Sangu di rosa and the Voceri tradition, like an ode to beauty in all its plurality. The ultimate surprise of this collective odyssey comes in the form of a unique visual work bridging reality and fiction by the filmmaker Alina Marazzi, a tribute to Lucia Marcucci mixing texts and textiles, voices and images. For the Dior spring-summer 2021 ready-to-wear show, Maria Grazia Chiuri continues her committed reflection on the origins of fashion, and the meaning of cut and creation, as artistic lexicons in perpetual movement. Inspired by the work of Lucia Marcucci - an emblematic figure of the Italian avant-garde who designed the show's scenography - she chose the aesthetics of collage and visual poetry as a new space for expression. Patchworks of scarves in a mix of paisley and floral motifs, punctuated with lace fragments, accessorize a series of dresses and pants, opening up infinite possibilities for the imagination. Fascinated by the power of thought embodied by authors such as Virginia Woolf and Susan Sontag, the Creative Director of Dior women’s collections revisits the concept of clothing in its essence, from men’s shirts to sleek coats, celebrating the skills of cultures around the world, from Japan to Indonesia. A striking and magnetic choral work transcended by the female voices of the Sequenza 9.3 ensemble - directed by Catherine Simonpietri - (re)interpreting Lucia Ronchetti's Sangu di rosa and the Voceri tradition, like an ode to beauty in all its plurality. The ultimate surprise of this collective odyssey comes in the form of a unique visual work bridging reality and fiction by the filmmaker Alina Marazzi, a tribute to Lucia Marcucci mixing texts and textiles, voices and images.

Gucci’s new Men’s Tailoring Campaign: Life of a Rock Star
526

Gucci’s new Men’s Tailoring Campaign: Life of a Rock Star

Men For Gucci’s new men’s tailoring collection, Creative Director Alessandro Michele calls on three idiosyncratic musicians and chooses to work again with photographer and director Harmony Korine to conjure images of an archetypical rock star lifestyle, envisioning a meeting of eccentric creatives in a Californian modernist mansion, located in Los Angeles where the campaign was shot in February.   Among the bold architectural spaces and the wood, stone, glass and shagpile of this West Coast pad, musicians A$AP Rocky, Iggy Pop and Tyler, The Creator hang out with Iggy’s pet parrot, Biggy Pop, and its friend, a striking blue hyacinth macaw. The housemates goof about with their pets on the grassy terrace at night, at the kitchen table with a huge pot of spaghetti, and in the lounge in the afternoon sunlight. Together the trio have fun, and while each is undoubtedly a separate, powerful personality, their shared love of panache creates common ground.   Alessandro Michele’s eclectic vision put together these three cult artists, who have distinctive style, creating a strange, unexpected dialogue.  “The result is a group campaign with three men who I believe had fun too. There is always this image of eccentricity, because they are in fact eccentric themselves. A certain type of fun is also portrayed and the idea of how one’s obsession with appearances can create a kind of common ground that can become a sort of brotherhood. It was beautiful to see these three men together, seemingly different but very similar”, explains the Creative Director. “This is another chapter of this journey. With these campaigns, I am working on different ways of being elegant, and these three men embody this idea perfectly. I like to tell the story of elegance in completely arbitrary and unexpected ways. Perhaps elegance is something in the air that sometimes you are not even ready for. Male elegance can be unpredictable and strange.”     CREDITS: Creative Director: Alessandro Michele Art Director: Christopher Simmonds Photographer/Director: Harmony Korine Hair: Paul Hanlon Make-up: Thomas De Kluyver Talents: A$AP Rocky; Iggy Pop; Tyler, The Creator For Gucci’s new men’s tailoring collection, Creative Director Alessandro Michele calls on three idiosyncratic musicians and chooses to work again with photographer and director Harmony Korine to conjure images of an archetypical rock star lifestyle, envisioning a meeting of eccentric creatives in a Californian modernist mansion, located in Los Angeles where the campaign was shot in February.   Among the bold architectural spaces and the wood, stone, glass and shagpile of this West Coast pad, musicians A$AP Rocky, Iggy Pop and Tyler, The Creator hang out with Iggy’s pet parrot, Biggy Pop, and its friend, a striking blue hyacinth macaw. The housemates goof about with their pets on the grassy terrace at night, at the kitchen table with a huge pot of spaghetti, and in the lounge in the afternoon sunlight. Together the trio have fun, and while each is undoubtedly a separate, powerful personality, their shared love of panache creates common ground.   Alessandro Michele’s eclectic vision put together these three cult artists, who have distinctive style, creating a strange, unexpected dialogue.  “The result is a group campaign with three men who I believe had fun too. There is always this image of eccentricity, because they are in fact eccentric themselves. A certain type of fun is also portrayed and the idea of how one’s obsession with appearances can create a kind of common ground that can become a sort of brotherhood. It was beautiful to see these three men together, seemingly different but very similar”, explains the Creative Director. “This is another chapter of this journey. With these campaigns, I am working on different ways of being elegant, and these three men embody this idea perfectly. I like to tell the story of elegance in completely arbitrary and unexpected ways. Perhaps elegance is something in the air that sometimes you are not even ready for. Male elegance can be unpredictable and strange.”     CREDITS: Creative Director: Alessandro Michele Art Director: Christopher Simmonds Photographer/Director: Harmony Korine Hair: Paul Hanlon Make-up: Thomas De Kluyver Talents: A$AP Rocky; Iggy Pop; Tyler, The Creator

Louis Vuitton invites six artists to join its Artycapucines collection
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Louis Vuitton invites six artists to join its Artycapucines collection

Accessories The Artycapucines collection sees six leading contemporary artists bring their unique visions to Louis Vuitton’s modern classic bag: the Capucines.   Celebrated international artists Beatriz Milhazes, Jean-Michel Othoniel, Josh Smith, Henry Taylor, Liu Wei and Zhao Zhao have all created beautifully imagined and stunningly worked versions of the iconic Capucines bag.   The Artycapucines collection is further proof of Louis Vuitton’s unique ability and desire to use its innovative spirit and artisanal savoir-faire to help artists bring their ideas to life.     From the 30th October, each bag in the Artycapucines collection will be released in a limited edition of 200 in selected stores worldwide. The Artycapucines collection sees six leading contemporary artists bring their unique visions to Louis Vuitton’s modern classic bag: the Capucines.   Celebrated international artists Beatriz Milhazes, Jean-Michel Othoniel, Josh Smith, Henry Taylor, Liu Wei and Zhao Zhao have all created beautifully imagined and stunningly worked versions of the iconic Capucines bag.   The Artycapucines collection is further proof of Louis Vuitton’s unique ability and desire to use its innovative spirit and artisanal savoir-faire to help artists bring their ideas to life.     From the 30th October, each bag in the Artycapucines collection will be released in a limited edition of 200 in selected stores worldwide.

Conservatorium Hotel Amsterdam
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Conservatorium Hotel Amsterdam

Travel The three founding hotels of The Set are located in the cultural heart of their vibrant cities. They have for decades a racted people who drive change and creativity and are places where established and emerging ideas come together to shape the future. Matching the spirit and pace of contemporary life, The Set hotels are explicitly designed to enable new discoveries and to capture the hearts and minds of guests in the process. These are places people love, want to return to and to tell others about. Simply put, they are the modern grand hotels of our time.     Over 100 years ago, architect Daniel Knuttel turned to a mix of neo-Gothic and Art Nouveau principles to visually celebrate the importance of the Conservatorium building. Today, Italian architect Piero Lissoni uses a contemporary design language to complement and continue this narrative. Inside and out, a strong design aesthetic is fundamental to the Conservatorium. It actually tells its story. The building’s original function as a savings bank is apparent in the playful details so embraced by the Art Nouveau movement. There are stone pigs carved into the staircase to symbolise piggy banks; spider webs on the tiles in the shopping arcade allude to spiders trapping ies to consume later; and the tiles also portray bees, which, metaphorically, save stocks of honey for the wintertime. These elements demonstrate an attention to design detail that remains today. Italian architect and design maestro Piero Lissoni was responsible for evolving this rich design history into a contemporary space. The way he merged the 19th century edi ce by encasing its interior courtyard in glass demonstrates a seamless, innate understanding of old and new, public and private. Lissoni’s style is rich, muted and stylishly pared-back. While his vision contrasts to the decorative nature of the original 19th century edice, it brings a new mood – and a new function – to this historic landmark building.     The Conservatorium regularly collaborates with the Conservatorium van Amsterdam music school and together they started the Expression of Art Award series. Each year, students from the jazz department are invited to play at the hotel. A jury is present to announce the winner, who is awarded with a monetary fund to encourage them in their musical career. The hotel’s cultural commitment goes beyond music. It has an ever-changing roster of contemporary artists displaying their work in the hotel lobby. These artists range from emerging talent to globally established names such as Banksy and Scholten & Baijings. Local artists also decorate the Artist in Residence Suites upstairs with works. These pieces are rotated frequently and are shown alongside publications giving details. They are accompanied by a series of lectures and workshops. The permanent art collection in the hotel has been curated by architect Piero Lissoni, and includes everything from reproductions of historic Dutch masterpieces to brand new commissions inspired by the Conservatorium’s cultural and musical history.   The Conservatorium has an illustrious, century-long past where society has always gathered together. This is especially apparent today in its elegant bar and restaurants. The restaurant Taiko rede nes contemporary Asian cuisine with authentic dishes made of local, seasonal products. Taiko takes its name from the Japanese for ‘drum’, and is located in the percussion room of the old music school. For something more casual, there is the Brasserie where platters full of healthy dishes greet customers as they arrive and afternoon tea is served every day. Lastly, the Tunes Bar serves cocktails, which are best enjoyed during the weekend when the in-house DJ brings the room alive.   The Akasha Holistic Wellbeing Centre marries innovative Western practices with ancient Eastern traditions. It boasts seven treatment rooms, including a double treatment suite, and o ers some of the nest signature spa treatments in Amsterdam. There is a private Hammam for purifying scrubs and massages. Akasha also features Amsterdam’s only Watsu pool for tailored hydro-treatments and guided meditation, as well as a large gym featuring Life Fitness equipment and private studios for yoga, pilates and more.     Located on Museumplein – Amsterdam’s historic cultural hub – the Conservatorium is surrounded by legendary artworks, ne examples of the applied arts and classical and jazz music in a set of world-famous institutions. Paintings by the Netherland’s greatest master can be found at the Van Gogh Museum and the Rijksmuseum has a team of historic Dutch masterpieces by Rembrandt, Vermeer and Frans Hals. Contemporary art is shown close by at the Stedelijk Museum and Moco Museum and opposite is the Concertgebouw, which has one of Europe’s best music programmes. This community of culture is within footsteps of the Conservatorium.     Are you planning your next trip but want maximum flexibility? With The Set Flex you can book now, but change your dates and/or destination up to two times, up to the end of 2021. Have you booked your stay at the Conservatorium Hotel, but decide to go to Paris or London after all, with The Set Flex you can change the destination and the dates easily. Furthermore, you will get 25% discount on our best available rate and you can enjoy at the relaxing environment of the Akasha Holistic Wellbeing at each of our beautifully composed properties.   We love treats - who doesn't? Book your stay with us directly or via your preferred travel advisor and we'll treat you to a €30 hotel credit (or €60 for suite bookings) to enjoy in our restaurants or spa, a guaranteed upgrade, a guaranteed early check-in and a guaranteed late check-out until 3 pm. The best offer you will find, guaranteed. T&Cs apply.   For more information and booking please visit their website: conservatoriumhotel.com The three founding hotels of The Set are located in the cultural heart of their vibrant cities. They have for decades a racted people who drive change and creativity and are places where established and emerging ideas come together to shape the future. Matching the spirit and pace of contemporary life, The Set hotels are explicitly designed to enable new discoveries and to capture the hearts and minds of guests in the process. These are places people love, want to return to and to tell others about. Simply put, they are the modern grand hotels of our time.     Over 100 years ago, architect Daniel Knuttel turned to a mix of neo-Gothic and Art Nouveau principles to visually celebrate the importance of the Conservatorium building. Today, Italian architect Piero Lissoni uses a contemporary design language to complement and continue this narrative. Inside and out, a strong design aesthetic is fundamental to the Conservatorium. It actually tells its story. The building’s original function as a savings bank is apparent in the playful details so embraced by the Art Nouveau movement. There are stone pigs carved into the staircase to symbolise piggy banks; spider webs on the tiles in the shopping arcade allude to spiders trapping ies to consume later; and the tiles also portray bees, which, metaphorically, save stocks of honey for the wintertime. These elements demonstrate an attention to design detail that remains today. Italian architect and design maestro Piero Lissoni was responsible for evolving this rich design history into a contemporary space. The way he merged the 19th century edi ce by encasing its interior courtyard in glass demonstrates a seamless, innate understanding of old and new, public and private. Lissoni’s style is rich, muted and stylishly pared-back. While his vision contrasts to the decorative nature of the original 19th century edice, it brings a new mood – and a new function – to this historic landmark building.     The Conservatorium regularly collaborates with the Conservatorium van Amsterdam music school and together they started the Expression of Art Award series. Each year, students from the jazz department are invited to play at the hotel. A jury is present to announce the winner, who is awarded with a monetary fund to encourage them in their musical career. The hotel’s cultural commitment goes beyond music. It has an ever-changing roster of contemporary artists displaying their work in the hotel lobby. These artists range from emerging talent to globally established names such as Banksy and Scholten & Baijings. Local artists also decorate the Artist in Residence Suites upstairs with works. These pieces are rotated frequently and are shown alongside publications giving details. They are accompanied by a series of lectures and workshops. The permanent art collection in the hotel has been curated by architect Piero Lissoni, and includes everything from reproductions of historic Dutch masterpieces to brand new commissions inspired by the Conservatorium’s cultural and musical history.   The Conservatorium has an illustrious, century-long past where society has always gathered together. This is especially apparent today in its elegant bar and restaurants. The restaurant Taiko rede nes contemporary Asian cuisine with authentic dishes made of local, seasonal products. Taiko takes its name from the Japanese for ‘drum’, and is located in the percussion room of the old music school. For something more casual, there is the Brasserie where platters full of healthy dishes greet customers as they arrive and afternoon tea is served every day. Lastly, the Tunes Bar serves cocktails, which are best enjoyed during the weekend when the in-house DJ brings the room alive.   The Akasha Holistic Wellbeing Centre marries innovative Western practices with ancient Eastern traditions. It boasts seven treatment rooms, including a double treatment suite, and o ers some of the nest signature spa treatments in Amsterdam. There is a private Hammam for purifying scrubs and massages. Akasha also features Amsterdam’s only Watsu pool for tailored hydro-treatments and guided meditation, as well as a large gym featuring Life Fitness equipment and private studios for yoga, pilates and more.     Located on Museumplein – Amsterdam’s historic cultural hub – the Conservatorium is surrounded by legendary artworks, ne examples of the applied arts and classical and jazz music in a set of world-famous institutions. Paintings by the Netherland’s greatest master can be found at the Van Gogh Museum and the Rijksmuseum has a team of historic Dutch masterpieces by Rembrandt, Vermeer and Frans Hals. Contemporary art is shown close by at the Stedelijk Museum and Moco Museum and opposite is the Concertgebouw, which has one of Europe’s best music programmes. This community of culture is within footsteps of the Conservatorium.     Are you planning your next trip but want maximum flexibility? With The Set Flex you can book now, but change your dates and/or destination up to two times, up to the end of 2021. Have you booked your stay at the Conservatorium Hotel, but decide to go to Paris or London after all, with The Set Flex you can change the destination and the dates easily. Furthermore, you will get 25% discount on our best available rate and you can enjoy at the relaxing environment of the Akasha Holistic Wellbeing at each of our beautifully composed properties.   We love treats - who doesn't? Book your stay with us directly or via your preferred travel advisor and we'll treat you to a €30 hotel credit (or €60 for suite bookings) to enjoy in our restaurants or spa, a guaranteed upgrade, a guaranteed early check-in and a guaranteed late check-out until 3 pm. The best offer you will find, guaranteed. T&Cs apply.   For more information and booking please visit their website: conservatoriumhotel.com

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