@
Kinfill launches room spray in collaboration with Supernova Hotel in Rotterdam
808

Kinfill launches room spray in collaboration with Supernova Hotel in Rotterdam

Lifestyle The sustainable Dutch homecare brand Kinfill and the Rotterdam hotel Supernova have announced a special collaboration. Kinfill is releasing a room spray in collaboration with the popular hotel, available in the well-known Kinfill 'Forever Bottle’, made from glass. The 500ml room spray costs € 45.00 and can be purchased exclusively from December 11 via Kinfill.com and at Supernova Hotel. In line with Kinfill's mission to reduce the amount of packaging waste from our daily routines, the glass bottle can be refilled in the Superette, the hotel's shop. A refill costs € 27.50.     Collaboration of young Rotterdam entrepreneurs:   The collaboration fits perfectly within one of Supernova Hotel’s goals, to set up collaborations with local young entrepreneurs. Glenn Severin, co-founder of Supernova Hotel, which won the 2019 Entrance Award for Best Hotel Design, had long wanted to develop a room spray for the hotel and approached fellow Rotterdam-based entrepreneur Reda Jouahri of Kinfill. For Kinfill, the room spray is a logical extension of the existing product line with cleaning extracts, which are available in various scents. The room spray: sandalwood, leather and smoke The scent of the room spray has sandalwood, leather and smoke as its main notes, and is used in all public areas of the hotel. Smells are perceived in the brain in exactly the same place where emotions are stored, hence the strong link between the two. This room spray will serve as the perfect souvenir to relive a trip to the Supernova Hotel. Completely in line with Kinfill's sustainability philosophy, there is the option to refill the Forever Bottle at Supernova. When purchasing the room spray you will also receive a voucher with a discount on an overnight stay in the hotel.     The sustainable Dutch homecare brand Kinfill and the Rotterdam hotel Supernova have announced a special collaboration. Kinfill is releasing a room spray in collaboration with the popular hotel, available in the well-known Kinfill 'Forever Bottle’, made from glass. The 500ml room spray costs € 45.00 and can be purchased exclusively from December 11 via Kinfill.com and at Supernova Hotel. In line with Kinfill's mission to reduce the amount of packaging waste from our daily routines, the glass bottle can be refilled in the Superette, the hotel's shop. A refill costs € 27.50.     Collaboration of young Rotterdam entrepreneurs:   The collaboration fits perfectly within one of Supernova Hotel’s goals, to set up collaborations with local young entrepreneurs. Glenn Severin, co-founder of Supernova Hotel, which won the 2019 Entrance Award for Best Hotel Design, had long wanted to develop a room spray for the hotel and approached fellow Rotterdam-based entrepreneur Reda Jouahri of Kinfill. For Kinfill, the room spray is a logical extension of the existing product line with cleaning extracts, which are available in various scents. The room spray: sandalwood, leather and smoke The scent of the room spray has sandalwood, leather and smoke as its main notes, and is used in all public areas of the hotel. Smells are perceived in the brain in exactly the same place where emotions are stored, hence the strong link between the two. This room spray will serve as the perfect souvenir to relive a trip to the Supernova Hotel. Completely in line with Kinfill's sustainability philosophy, there is the option to refill the Forever Bottle at Supernova. When purchasing the room spray you will also receive a voucher with a discount on an overnight stay in the hotel.    

Jade van der Mark’s new work highlights transformation of city life in the face of the Covid-19 pandemic
806

Jade van der Mark’s new work highlights transformation of city life in the face of the Covid-19 pandemic

Exhibition Jade van der Mark will exhibit a new body of work in a solo show in London in December, which explores contemporary society, both before and after the coronavirus pandemic, and examines the dichotomy of crowds and human intimacy.     Dutch painter van der Mark, now based in London, uses cities and crowds as a source of inspiration, sketching in the heart of the capital and documenting the vibrancy of urban life. Her large-scale portraits of cities’ inhabitants highlight issues of overpopulation, isolation, greed and oppression, while through colourful and lively figures her works remind us of our shared humanity. Playful but profound, her paintings make the mundane vibrant and beautiful, with an edge of melancholia.     Thick coats of oil paint give life to monumental textured canvases, rich in detail and complexity and majestic in size. The use of bold and abstracted colour palettes conveys a sense of sculptural depth, amplifying their gravitas. As each layer may take up to a week to dry, van der Mark’s paintings are the result of a laboured process lasting up to eight months. Containing multiple stories, which over the course of completion have been altered or painted over, her works unveil hidden narratives that encourage deeper reflection.       Diving into diverse identities, van der Mark reveals a vast network of personal stories that share the same spaces but lack connection. Colourful figures are representative of the artist’s belief in a shared humanity.      Set in decontextualized city spaces, van der Mark’s paintings speak to an overwhelming sense of disconnect that resonates globally. Works created in early 2020 depict crowded scenes, where figures are frozen in the chaos of rush hour, their stress and exhaustion evident in their expressions.      We’re All Human, for example, presents a densely populated crowd sprawling across a wide canvas, measuring over four meters in length and almost three in height. What seem like hundreds of city dwellers, distinguished through lively clothing and colourful faces, move across all directions. With almost no negative spaces between them, individuals remain fully engrossed in their own worlds, often shielded by phones, headphones and masks.     Works created during the 2020 lockdown, instead turn to empty spaces, the absence of crowds, and the disconnect that arises as a result of social distancing. Others recount a society in lockdown, with surreal depictions of supermarket queues, and voyeuristic views of figures isolating inside apartments. The works juxtapose with those created pre lockdown, forcing viewers to reflect on how significantly city life has changed, and asking them not to recall the chaos with rose tinted glasses.      Works such as Judgementand Greedare influenced by the artist’s fashion background, and depict the materialism, and harsh elitism of the fashion world. The figures in Greed queue frantically to get into a large Louis Vuitton store, while Judgementtransports viewers to the front row of a catwalk, where haughty influencers and celebrities scrutinise parading models.      The attention to texture is crucial to van der Mark’s practice as a whole, which combines a passion of painting with an education in Fashion, obtained at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague. A self-taught weaver, she weaves her paintings into elaborate and distinctive items of clothing, works of art in and of themselves. During Milan Fashion Week 2016 she was awarded the Dutch Fashion Award for her exceptional designs.     One of the most exciting young artists to come out of the Dutch art scene, van der Mark was born in the town of Bergen, often regarded as an artists’ town due of its remarkable natural light. Home to the Bergen School of painters in the early 20thcentury, Bergen has been referred to as the birthplace of Dutch expressionism.      Van der Mark spent lockdown at her home in Amsterdam, and feels the coronavirus pandemic has forced us all to slow down, in a way that was highly necessary in our fast paced society. Used to painting in isolation, she has used this time to reflect on the way the virus has simultaneously bought society closer by affecting everyone, but also torn us apart as a result of social distancing.     Van der Mark comments,  “Whilst lockdown has forced us into physical isolation, we had all become more isolated in modern society. Moving around the world, and in cities such as Amsterdam and London, I’ve noticed that no matter the size of the crowd, people still seem, and are, isolated. Lockdown has highlighted this, but it’s also given us the gift of realising the loss of our connection to each other. I hope my paintings remind the viewer of this, whether in a crowd or alone, that we do have a connection, and it vital for us all to remember and nurture this connection.”     Van der Mark has showcased her work widely in the Netherlands and internationally, exhibiting in Amsterdam, Brussels, London, Dubai and Milan. These include a 2018 solo show at ING Headquarters in Amsterdam and participation in Salone Mobile Design Week in Milan in 2016.     Jade Van der Mark’s solo show will open in London in December 2020.      www.jadevandermark.com Jade van der Mark will exhibit a new body of work in a solo show in London in December, which explores contemporary society, both before and after the coronavirus pandemic, and examines the dichotomy of crowds and human intimacy.     Dutch painter van der Mark, now based in London, uses cities and crowds as a source of inspiration, sketching in the heart of the capital and documenting the vibrancy of urban life. Her large-scale portraits of cities’ inhabitants highlight issues of overpopulation, isolation, greed and oppression, while through colourful and lively figures her works remind us of our shared humanity. Playful but profound, her paintings make the mundane vibrant and beautiful, with an edge of melancholia.     Thick coats of oil paint give life to monumental textured canvases, rich in detail and complexity and majestic in size. The use of bold and abstracted colour palettes conveys a sense of sculptural depth, amplifying their gravitas. As each layer may take up to a week to dry, van der Mark’s paintings are the result of a laboured process lasting up to eight months. Containing multiple stories, which over the course of completion have been altered or painted over, her works unveil hidden narratives that encourage deeper reflection.       Diving into diverse identities, van der Mark reveals a vast network of personal stories that share the same spaces but lack connection. Colourful figures are representative of the artist’s belief in a shared humanity.      Set in decontextualized city spaces, van der Mark’s paintings speak to an overwhelming sense of disconnect that resonates globally. Works created in early 2020 depict crowded scenes, where figures are frozen in the chaos of rush hour, their stress and exhaustion evident in their expressions.      We’re All Human, for example, presents a densely populated crowd sprawling across a wide canvas, measuring over four meters in length and almost three in height. What seem like hundreds of city dwellers, distinguished through lively clothing and colourful faces, move across all directions. With almost no negative spaces between them, individuals remain fully engrossed in their own worlds, often shielded by phones, headphones and masks.     Works created during the 2020 lockdown, instead turn to empty spaces, the absence of crowds, and the disconnect that arises as a result of social distancing. Others recount a society in lockdown, with surreal depictions of supermarket queues, and voyeuristic views of figures isolating inside apartments. The works juxtapose with those created pre lockdown, forcing viewers to reflect on how significantly city life has changed, and asking them not to recall the chaos with rose tinted glasses.      Works such as Judgementand Greedare influenced by the artist’s fashion background, and depict the materialism, and harsh elitism of the fashion world. The figures in Greed queue frantically to get into a large Louis Vuitton store, while Judgementtransports viewers to the front row of a catwalk, where haughty influencers and celebrities scrutinise parading models.      The attention to texture is crucial to van der Mark’s practice as a whole, which combines a passion of painting with an education in Fashion, obtained at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague. A self-taught weaver, she weaves her paintings into elaborate and distinctive items of clothing, works of art in and of themselves. During Milan Fashion Week 2016 she was awarded the Dutch Fashion Award for her exceptional designs.     One of the most exciting young artists to come out of the Dutch art scene, van der Mark was born in the town of Bergen, often regarded as an artists’ town due of its remarkable natural light. Home to the Bergen School of painters in the early 20thcentury, Bergen has been referred to as the birthplace of Dutch expressionism.      Van der Mark spent lockdown at her home in Amsterdam, and feels the coronavirus pandemic has forced us all to slow down, in a way that was highly necessary in our fast paced society. Used to painting in isolation, she has used this time to reflect on the way the virus has simultaneously bought society closer by affecting everyone, but also torn us apart as a result of social distancing.     Van der Mark comments,  “Whilst lockdown has forced us into physical isolation, we had all become more isolated in modern society. Moving around the world, and in cities such as Amsterdam and London, I’ve noticed that no matter the size of the crowd, people still seem, and are, isolated. Lockdown has highlighted this, but it’s also given us the gift of realising the loss of our connection to each other. I hope my paintings remind the viewer of this, whether in a crowd or alone, that we do have a connection, and it vital for us all to remember and nurture this connection.”     Van der Mark has showcased her work widely in the Netherlands and internationally, exhibiting in Amsterdam, Brussels, London, Dubai and Milan. These include a 2018 solo show at ING Headquarters in Amsterdam and participation in Salone Mobile Design Week in Milan in 2016.     Jade Van der Mark’s solo show will open in London in December 2020.      www.jadevandermark.com

Pandora is on a mission to spread love and Christmas vibes with its first animated short film:  'One lovely day'
801

Pandora is on a mission to spread love and Christmas vibes with its first animated short film: 'One lovely day'

Jewelry See Pandora’s celebrity friends Millie Bobby Brown, Halima Aden, Georgia May Jagger – and more as you have never seen them before. In collaboration with renowned animation studio, Andy Baker Studios, Pandora is revealing a mixed media short film named ‘One Lovely Day,’ to help spread holiday spirit and love.     In a time when togetherness is needed more than ever, Pandora has brought together Millie Bobby Brown, Coco & Breezy and the Pandora Muses – Nathalie Emmanuel, Halima Aden, Georgia May Jagger, Larsen Thompson, Tasya Van Ree and Margaret Zhang – in a new colourful, virtual world.     See Pandora’s celebrity friends Millie Bobby Brown, Halima Aden, Georgia May Jagger – and more as you have never seen them before. In collaboration with renowned animation studio, Andy Baker Studios, Pandora is revealing a mixed media short film named ‘One Lovely Day,’ to help spread holiday spirit and love.     In a time when togetherness is needed more than ever, Pandora has brought together Millie Bobby Brown, Coco & Breezy and the Pandora Muses – Nathalie Emmanuel, Halima Aden, Georgia May Jagger, Larsen Thompson, Tasya Van Ree and Margaret Zhang – in a new colourful, virtual world.    

Advertising
Advertising
JEANERICA THE SUSTAINABLE DENIM
800

JEANERICA THE SUSTAINABLE DENIM

Fashion Jeanerica is the first sustainable premium denim. Lena Patriksson and Jonas Clason, after respectively working at H&M and Acne Studios, founded Jeanerica in 2017 in Stockholm. Made to last thanks to organic fabrics and innovating techniques, the Jeanerica wardrobe offers modern and timeless pieces.     Jeanerica makes the difference thanks to their ecofriendly engagement. The denim is made with organic cotton and their washing techniques allows notable water savings. Made in Sweden, the collections are unisex and composed of denim essential pieces in organic denim and cotton. The t-shirts and sweatshirts are in biological cotton to follow Jeanerica's sustainable approach. Jeanerica is available online and distributed in several stockists in Scandinavia and Europe.      www.jeanerica.com Jeanerica is the first sustainable premium denim. Lena Patriksson and Jonas Clason, after respectively working at H&M and Acne Studios, founded Jeanerica in 2017 in Stockholm. Made to last thanks to organic fabrics and innovating techniques, the Jeanerica wardrobe offers modern and timeless pieces.     Jeanerica makes the difference thanks to their ecofriendly engagement. The denim is made with organic cotton and their washing techniques allows notable water savings. Made in Sweden, the collections are unisex and composed of denim essential pieces in organic denim and cotton. The t-shirts and sweatshirts are in biological cotton to follow Jeanerica's sustainable approach. Jeanerica is available online and distributed in several stockists in Scandinavia and Europe.      www.jeanerica.com

MAIUM RECYCLES 1 MILLION PLASTIC BOTTLES
805

MAIUM RECYCLES 1 MILLION PLASTIC BOTTLES

Fashion   The young fashion label Maium, which makes raincoats from recycled plastic bottles, has reached a special moment. By the end of 2020, the millionth bottle will be reused, at least 66 plastic bottles will be melted down for each coat. The bottles have been collected from the ocean and from domestic waste, especially from Asia. In the next 5 years, the brand expects to grow to a level where they recycle at least 5 million plastic bottles per year.     ‘Rainwear is by definition designed to protect us from the elements. The effort we make to reconnect with nature by applying sustainable ways of design is our way of giving something back and protecting the elements from us the other way around. We want to prove that fashion and innovation don't have to harm the earth.’ - Hendrik van Benthem, co-founder Maium.   The young fashion label Maium, which makes raincoats from recycled plastic bottles, has reached a special moment. By the end of 2020, the millionth bottle will be reused, at least 66 plastic bottles will be melted down for each coat. The bottles have been collected from the ocean and from domestic waste, especially from Asia. In the next 5 years, the brand expects to grow to a level where they recycle at least 5 million plastic bottles per year.     ‘Rainwear is by definition designed to protect us from the elements. The effort we make to reconnect with nature by applying sustainable ways of design is our way of giving something back and protecting the elements from us the other way around. We want to prove that fashion and innovation don't have to harm the earth.’ - Hendrik van Benthem, co-founder Maium.

In conversation with Christoph Grainger-Herr, CEO of IWC
721

In conversation with Christoph Grainger-Herr, CEO of IWC

Watches We had a deligt speaking with the CEO of IWC, Christoph Grainger-Herr.       Tell us about your experience in several different departments and divisions at IWC. Where did it all start and how were the transitions like into new departments?   Well, that's an interesting thing. You know, I think I had probably 13 or so jobs, but I've always done the same. So to the present day, it hasn't really changed. I've started in trademarketing on the exhibitions and boutiques. Back in the day, I’ve really just been hired as a project manager. And then I started to design the stuff from a laptop and drive our creative director absolutely crazy, because I started to change things. I did thisa couple of years, and then the trademarketing things,which really is all of that plus visual merchandising, architecture, exhibitions and so on. What I’ve learned from all of that, I'd be seeing different countries, different cultures, what our clients are looking for, the building specifics in all of these different countries, which is super interesting. And also you get to meet all of the global teams. After that, I did a little bit of a stint in marketing. This was basically everything apart from Corp comms, but all of the print marketing, consumer marketing, catalogues, websiteand all that. And from there, I started to work quite heavily on other brands within the group. We did the retail concept, we would agree to BM concept for merch. Then in the end, I returned to retail here in Switzerland, did that for about two months. Then I did the sales director role for about 10 days, four to six weeks or something. And then the announcement came. So it was quite linear in the end and quite fast and quite scary. But, here we are.   And I think really, what have I taken from it? I think, it's when you work transversally, it's very, very, very interesting because you get to learn the entire organization inside out, including different countries. I think that gives you a really good head start to then pick up all sorts of different tasks and challenges. But once you understand what production takes, you know I worked for six years on the manufacturer design here for the new manufacturing building, that really gives you the inside out view of how, what comes together. And after that you see the whole commercial side for the boutiques and the exhibitions and that in the end gives you quite a good understanding of the global picture.   And you learn. I mean, at the end of the day you learned that in luxury brand you're telling an aesthetic story and that story has to be consistent across all the different touch points. And the more you are able to combine the unique different requirements of social media versus physical stores versus production facilities into a consistent story that both your colleagues, as well as your clients and everybody can buy into mentally, the easier job you have to explain what your brand stands for and what is on brand and what is not on brand. And I think one of the most difficult things is if you have brands that are completely inconsistently implemented and then have like a front of house in the back of house, it sometimes becomes confusing to take the right decisions. Whereas I think if you have this consistency, then after that, it's much easier for people to make their own judgmentson what's the right thing to do or not, because we're not in a business that's based on purely data and research. I mean, it is increasingly luckily based on some data inside, but you know, the best creations in the world of luxury are not derived by data analytics or marketing briefing or anything like that. It takes a moment of creativity and then you have to do a call whether this is something that fits your brand or not. And that's the decision between hopefully a hit product and something that ends up in the door.     When you say creativity, how important do you think is innovation in the luxury segment, particularly for watches?   Well, if you think about the fact that we're basically in a moment central business, we don't make something that is based on purely functional need, on just functional characteristics. So that moves it away from the ins and outs of checklists, right or wrong assessment of what you're doing. And you're into an area where it's all about the emotion you evoke, it's about things like scarcity, it's about things like perceived hotness and exclusivity and that you can only do by creating. I wouldn't necessarily always call it purely sort of innovation in terms of technical content, but it is really in the entire brand universe, from products to communication, to retail experience, to the way you talk about the brand, of what it activates. Creativity is absolutely key. And keeping that fascination, that’s not killing off the brand into something too predictable or even too boring, it's always this balancing act between newness and the sort of preserving the icons that we've been familiar with for the last 18 years or longer. And that's at the end of the day heritage and DNA versus newness and supply versus scarcity. That's kind of the leavers, which we have to play in our industry to keep our brands relevant and keep our fans.     When did your first interest for watches arise?   The first time I showed interest for watches was kind of a forced situation. My dad was buying his first Patek Nautilus back in the eighties. It felt to me like it took all day and I was sitting there looking at all these watches and I apparently knew this was a quality of mine when I was younger. I must've lost that, I was incredibly patient and waited there for hours on end. And in the end they bought me a Bernese dog cuddly toy. That was kinda my first contact with watches. Then I think I really picked it up again at the university. In my gap year I had the chance to work not only in fashion stores about men's jewelry and accessories, but also in the heart of London.   I think that's the first time when I really started to look into the beauty of these objects, when the shop kind of becomes an art gallery. And I think this is the thing with hard luxury. It's almost like a sculpture museum space rather than just a shop. It's very different from a fashion store. And I started to like that because the complexity that goes into something very simple, it's all about presentation, lighting, quality, etc., but you have all of the requirements of security materials, automation, all of this stuff behind. I really started to enjoy that sort of work. And I walked past the jewelers near my university in Bournemouth. And I started to really feel quite interested in IWC back in the day, because I loved the purity of detail.   I love that engineering approach to the design, that understated confidence in the brand quite a lot. And then it will only be a couple of years later when I moved to Switzerland and I started to go privately to shows like Baselworldand become actually interested in IWC and the first watch that really caught me at the end was 2004 generation of the Aquatimer, which was made about the time when I moved to Switzerland. And then a couple of years into my university and professional experience here, there was a phone call whether we wanted to design an IWC museum. I loved that idea and jumped at itand that was it. I walked into the door here and thoughtI like it and that's never changed.     I’ve also read and found quite interesting that you were a former military athlete. How do you manage to stay in shape nowadays, with such a time consuming job?   I think you have to define at some point what do you mean by staying in shape for yourself. Because in the beginning, when you're at university, you have the time to properly train for competitions and so on. And especially when you're in the world of mountain running, trail running, any series of skiing. Whatever it is, it takes a tremendous amount of prep time. And at some point in your professional life you have to realize that can't be objective anymore. I mean, I admire all of the CEOs that do on eIronman after another. Literally, I'm not that angry at myself that I would get up at three o'clock every morning and do triathlon training. I think once you're in this mode in your life, it never goes away, but you have to realize at some point that you're going to be mildly ambitious. These days, I do about one bigger thing a year, be that a competition or a ride or something else. But I do this for the fun of it and not for beating the world record. It's changed quite a bit.    I don't know how I do it. Well, actually when you're traveling outside of the current lockdown, it's easy. Cause I only have myself to look after when I'm traveling. I enjoy running, whether it’s in Central park, Hong Kong, Red Rock Canyon or Vegas. There's plenty of stunning runs in South beach, Miami. I often pick my hotels in a way that they're convenient for exercising. Just recently, on the last trip before lockdown, it was my first time to Dallas. And we really needed to look at hotels so that they're close to the most promising running routes. Here at home, I try and fit it in whenever I can.      What are your thoughts on sustainability in the watch industry? Is there anything particularly that you are doing to do more sustainable and responsible to the environment?   I think it starts really with the product itself. When I look today at what we have done as humankind over the last 30, 40 years, we we've gone into quite a questionable cycle of throwaway consumption, times where things are being bought and replaced really frequently. We buy clothes and devices and we replace some of them and throw them away. And I think that mechanical watches have always made quite a powerful statement about sustainability, because you creating something that a is not in fashion, but that is timeless beauty. You build it in a way that it's designed to last forever and you maintain it for sometimes hundreds and hundreds of years. There’s really trust in where they’re made in, in one place in the heart of Europe that is preserving jobs, preserving craftsmanship and skills.    At the same time, you are not shipping products 16 times around the planet before they get to end consumers. When you come to Schaffhausen, we were set up right here where I'm sitting in my office. Florentine Ariosto Jones came from America and he set up IWC here and we're still here today, taking the same power from the river that Jones took directly via boats. We take it from the hydroponic station, but it's still the same thing.   When you come to Chicago, I can show you everybody from the initial watch designer to every step of the process of construction, to every step of manufacturing and even to the people who write the advertising headline, who create the movies and design the boutiques. I don't think that today there's many industries in many businesses, where you can still go to a single place and see the creation of something from start to finish. And when you buy it, you have something which really is absolutely unique to that process.    And then on top of that, I think my approach to sustainability is always that for us, it's a mindset. And that's a constant striving for trying to do things better than we did before. Nobody is perfect, but if we can improve our sourcing like we did with the gold sourcing, where we came out on top of the WWF study a couple of years ago, if we start launching sustainability reports, if we reduce the packaging that we ship around, eliminate plastic and non-recycled materials, eliminate plastic as much as we can from the supply chain in the brand globally, then bit by bit you're creating a product that people can feel genuinely good about.    One of the key things for us is that I don't run a front of house, back of house operations. So we welcome up to 10.000 people a year here in Schaffhausenand we show them everything and they can meet the people behind the process. And there's no double floors or hidden dark room. That's really important, because I think increasingly consumers demand, rightfully, to know where things are coming from, how things are being made and what the impact is.   It's something that is also coming out of the current situation. If we question a little bit the way we consume and the way we focus on things that really mean something to us and that we enjoy every time we use them. We wear them and we look after them and we repair them and fix them and maintain them. I do think that there is something to be learned from a throwaway consumption culture. When you think about the fact that all humans on the planet can probably fit into one cubic kilometer, if we pack them in tightly, it the end we deplete all of the resources on that very quickly. It's something to reconsider. And I think making things that are designed to be beautiful in hundreds of years and designed to last, can only be a good thing in that context.     Have you ever been to Amsterdam and if so, how would you describe the experience?   Yes, I've been to Amsterdam a few times. It looks like it has abeautiful quality of life and the right balance between urban density, sort of design, art, expression and instill kind of energy, which I like. Our e-com shipping center for Europe actually sits right in the heart of Amsterdam and there are some practical challenges when you are in an old, historic building in the heart of the city and you're trying to adapt that to modern automated warehouse standards. It’s a beautiful city to be in.    But I would change your airport, I think the distance between the runway and the terminal at Schipol is just ridiculous. To get from your gate to the exit of Schipol youcan probably easily walk for 40 minutes. The craziest spread out airport terminals anywhere on the planet. Zurich is literally, and I'm not saying that because we use it here, one of the most efficient airports where you can fly direct to almost anywhere, but you can get from the aircraft door to your car in literally seven minutes, if you don't have checked luggage, so it's ultra efficient in and out.      What do you have planned in the future, not after Corona really but in general?   As you know and as you're experiencing yourself, we just had a crash course in all sorts of video, remote technology. And that's really driven a whole range of innovation projects very quickly. So we're excited about all the possibilities that we've discovered through remote events and streaming and being able to extend sort of everything that we do or have done traditionally physically into the digital space, where we're suddenly creating a much broader reach and a much better experience for people who weren't able to travel halfway around the globe to take part in something previously. I think there's a lot of exciting things to come and the habits that have been formed in the last couple of months will surely stay with us and are really accelerating that process towards a more integrated world of physical and digital. And I'm very excited about that, because at the end of the day, that's just going to make our brands a better experience and we will be able to provide a better service.         We had a deligt speaking with the CEO of IWC, Christoph Grainger-Herr.       Tell us about your experience in several different departments and divisions at IWC. Where did it all start and how were the transitions like into new departments?   Well, that's an interesting thing. You know, I think I had probably 13 or so jobs, but I've always done the same. So to the present day, it hasn't really changed. I've started in trademarketing on the exhibitions and boutiques. Back in the day, I’ve really just been hired as a project manager. And then I started to design the stuff from a laptop and drive our creative director absolutely crazy, because I started to change things. I did thisa couple of years, and then the trademarketing things,which really is all of that plus visual merchandising, architecture, exhibitions and so on. What I’ve learned from all of that, I'd be seeing different countries, different cultures, what our clients are looking for, the building specifics in all of these different countries, which is super interesting. And also you get to meet all of the global teams. After that, I did a little bit of a stint in marketing. This was basically everything apart from Corp comms, but all of the print marketing, consumer marketing, catalogues, websiteand all that. And from there, I started to work quite heavily on other brands within the group. We did the retail concept, we would agree to BM concept for merch. Then in the end, I returned to retail here in Switzerland, did that for about two months. Then I did the sales director role for about 10 days, four to six weeks or something. And then the announcement came. So it was quite linear in the end and quite fast and quite scary. But, here we are.   And I think really, what have I taken from it? I think, it's when you work transversally, it's very, very, very interesting because you get to learn the entire organization inside out, including different countries. I think that gives you a really good head start to then pick up all sorts of different tasks and challenges. But once you understand what production takes, you know I worked for six years on the manufacturer design here for the new manufacturing building, that really gives you the inside out view of how, what comes together. And after that you see the whole commercial side for the boutiques and the exhibitions and that in the end gives you quite a good understanding of the global picture.   And you learn. I mean, at the end of the day you learned that in luxury brand you're telling an aesthetic story and that story has to be consistent across all the different touch points. And the more you are able to combine the unique different requirements of social media versus physical stores versus production facilities into a consistent story that both your colleagues, as well as your clients and everybody can buy into mentally, the easier job you have to explain what your brand stands for and what is on brand and what is not on brand. And I think one of the most difficult things is if you have brands that are completely inconsistently implemented and then have like a front of house in the back of house, it sometimes becomes confusing to take the right decisions. Whereas I think if you have this consistency, then after that, it's much easier for people to make their own judgmentson what's the right thing to do or not, because we're not in a business that's based on purely data and research. I mean, it is increasingly luckily based on some data inside, but you know, the best creations in the world of luxury are not derived by data analytics or marketing briefing or anything like that. It takes a moment of creativity and then you have to do a call whether this is something that fits your brand or not. And that's the decision between hopefully a hit product and something that ends up in the door.     When you say creativity, how important do you think is innovation in the luxury segment, particularly for watches?   Well, if you think about the fact that we're basically in a moment central business, we don't make something that is based on purely functional need, on just functional characteristics. So that moves it away from the ins and outs of checklists, right or wrong assessment of what you're doing. And you're into an area where it's all about the emotion you evoke, it's about things like scarcity, it's about things like perceived hotness and exclusivity and that you can only do by creating. I wouldn't necessarily always call it purely sort of innovation in terms of technical content, but it is really in the entire brand universe, from products to communication, to retail experience, to the way you talk about the brand, of what it activates. Creativity is absolutely key. And keeping that fascination, that’s not killing off the brand into something too predictable or even too boring, it's always this balancing act between newness and the sort of preserving the icons that we've been familiar with for the last 18 years or longer. And that's at the end of the day heritage and DNA versus newness and supply versus scarcity. That's kind of the leavers, which we have to play in our industry to keep our brands relevant and keep our fans.     When did your first interest for watches arise?   The first time I showed interest for watches was kind of a forced situation. My dad was buying his first Patek Nautilus back in the eighties. It felt to me like it took all day and I was sitting there looking at all these watches and I apparently knew this was a quality of mine when I was younger. I must've lost that, I was incredibly patient and waited there for hours on end. And in the end they bought me a Bernese dog cuddly toy. That was kinda my first contact with watches. Then I think I really picked it up again at the university. In my gap year I had the chance to work not only in fashion stores about men's jewelry and accessories, but also in the heart of London.   I think that's the first time when I really started to look into the beauty of these objects, when the shop kind of becomes an art gallery. And I think this is the thing with hard luxury. It's almost like a sculpture museum space rather than just a shop. It's very different from a fashion store. And I started to like that because the complexity that goes into something very simple, it's all about presentation, lighting, quality, etc., but you have all of the requirements of security materials, automation, all of this stuff behind. I really started to enjoy that sort of work. And I walked past the jewelers near my university in Bournemouth. And I started to really feel quite interested in IWC back in the day, because I loved the purity of detail.   I love that engineering approach to the design, that understated confidence in the brand quite a lot. And then it will only be a couple of years later when I moved to Switzerland and I started to go privately to shows like Baselworldand become actually interested in IWC and the first watch that really caught me at the end was 2004 generation of the Aquatimer, which was made about the time when I moved to Switzerland. And then a couple of years into my university and professional experience here, there was a phone call whether we wanted to design an IWC museum. I loved that idea and jumped at itand that was it. I walked into the door here and thoughtI like it and that's never changed.     I’ve also read and found quite interesting that you were a former military athlete. How do you manage to stay in shape nowadays, with such a time consuming job?   I think you have to define at some point what do you mean by staying in shape for yourself. Because in the beginning, when you're at university, you have the time to properly train for competitions and so on. And especially when you're in the world of mountain running, trail running, any series of skiing. Whatever it is, it takes a tremendous amount of prep time. And at some point in your professional life you have to realize that can't be objective anymore. I mean, I admire all of the CEOs that do on eIronman after another. Literally, I'm not that angry at myself that I would get up at three o'clock every morning and do triathlon training. I think once you're in this mode in your life, it never goes away, but you have to realize at some point that you're going to be mildly ambitious. These days, I do about one bigger thing a year, be that a competition or a ride or something else. But I do this for the fun of it and not for beating the world record. It's changed quite a bit.    I don't know how I do it. Well, actually when you're traveling outside of the current lockdown, it's easy. Cause I only have myself to look after when I'm traveling. I enjoy running, whether it’s in Central park, Hong Kong, Red Rock Canyon or Vegas. There's plenty of stunning runs in South beach, Miami. I often pick my hotels in a way that they're convenient for exercising. Just recently, on the last trip before lockdown, it was my first time to Dallas. And we really needed to look at hotels so that they're close to the most promising running routes. Here at home, I try and fit it in whenever I can.      What are your thoughts on sustainability in the watch industry? Is there anything particularly that you are doing to do more sustainable and responsible to the environment?   I think it starts really with the product itself. When I look today at what we have done as humankind over the last 30, 40 years, we we've gone into quite a questionable cycle of throwaway consumption, times where things are being bought and replaced really frequently. We buy clothes and devices and we replace some of them and throw them away. And I think that mechanical watches have always made quite a powerful statement about sustainability, because you creating something that a is not in fashion, but that is timeless beauty. You build it in a way that it's designed to last forever and you maintain it for sometimes hundreds and hundreds of years. There’s really trust in where they’re made in, in one place in the heart of Europe that is preserving jobs, preserving craftsmanship and skills.    At the same time, you are not shipping products 16 times around the planet before they get to end consumers. When you come to Schaffhausen, we were set up right here where I'm sitting in my office. Florentine Ariosto Jones came from America and he set up IWC here and we're still here today, taking the same power from the river that Jones took directly via boats. We take it from the hydroponic station, but it's still the same thing.   When you come to Chicago, I can show you everybody from the initial watch designer to every step of the process of construction, to every step of manufacturing and even to the people who write the advertising headline, who create the movies and design the boutiques. I don't think that today there's many industries in many businesses, where you can still go to a single place and see the creation of something from start to finish. And when you buy it, you have something which really is absolutely unique to that process.    And then on top of that, I think my approach to sustainability is always that for us, it's a mindset. And that's a constant striving for trying to do things better than we did before. Nobody is perfect, but if we can improve our sourcing like we did with the gold sourcing, where we came out on top of the WWF study a couple of years ago, if we start launching sustainability reports, if we reduce the packaging that we ship around, eliminate plastic and non-recycled materials, eliminate plastic as much as we can from the supply chain in the brand globally, then bit by bit you're creating a product that people can feel genuinely good about.    One of the key things for us is that I don't run a front of house, back of house operations. So we welcome up to 10.000 people a year here in Schaffhausenand we show them everything and they can meet the people behind the process. And there's no double floors or hidden dark room. That's really important, because I think increasingly consumers demand, rightfully, to know where things are coming from, how things are being made and what the impact is.   It's something that is also coming out of the current situation. If we question a little bit the way we consume and the way we focus on things that really mean something to us and that we enjoy every time we use them. We wear them and we look after them and we repair them and fix them and maintain them. I do think that there is something to be learned from a throwaway consumption culture. When you think about the fact that all humans on the planet can probably fit into one cubic kilometer, if we pack them in tightly, it the end we deplete all of the resources on that very quickly. It's something to reconsider. And I think making things that are designed to be beautiful in hundreds of years and designed to last, can only be a good thing in that context.     Have you ever been to Amsterdam and if so, how would you describe the experience?   Yes, I've been to Amsterdam a few times. It looks like it has abeautiful quality of life and the right balance between urban density, sort of design, art, expression and instill kind of energy, which I like. Our e-com shipping center for Europe actually sits right in the heart of Amsterdam and there are some practical challenges when you are in an old, historic building in the heart of the city and you're trying to adapt that to modern automated warehouse standards. It’s a beautiful city to be in.    But I would change your airport, I think the distance between the runway and the terminal at Schipol is just ridiculous. To get from your gate to the exit of Schipol youcan probably easily walk for 40 minutes. The craziest spread out airport terminals anywhere on the planet. Zurich is literally, and I'm not saying that because we use it here, one of the most efficient airports where you can fly direct to almost anywhere, but you can get from the aircraft door to your car in literally seven minutes, if you don't have checked luggage, so it's ultra efficient in and out.      What do you have planned in the future, not after Corona really but in general?   As you know and as you're experiencing yourself, we just had a crash course in all sorts of video, remote technology. And that's really driven a whole range of innovation projects very quickly. So we're excited about all the possibilities that we've discovered through remote events and streaming and being able to extend sort of everything that we do or have done traditionally physically into the digital space, where we're suddenly creating a much broader reach and a much better experience for people who weren't able to travel halfway around the globe to take part in something previously. I think there's a lot of exciting things to come and the habits that have been formed in the last couple of months will surely stay with us and are really accelerating that process towards a more integrated world of physical and digital. And I'm very excited about that, because at the end of the day, that's just going to make our brands a better experience and we will be able to provide a better service.        

Lois Jeans introduces their new collection for Spring & Summer 2021
797

Lois Jeans introduces their new collection for Spring & Summer 2021

Fashion This season they have kept close to our essentials.
 They’ve connected to our signature basics and redefined classics from the past. Their Spanish roots have deepened and established a modern and strong Mediterranean aesthetic to carry throughout our brand. With everything they do they stay ‘close to home,’ creating their very own Casa Lois.     Casa Lois is a reflection of their essence, housing everything that is Lois. Their Amsterdam Galería turned into a warm and welcoming home, our customers became guests and our garments are closer to our DNA than ever before.     Collection No12 houses a mix of our worlds; ‘city cool’ and ‘modern Mediterranean’ with our signature jeans and airy linens as focal points. The freshness of blue and the warmth of earth tones make for an authentic contrast. This season’s sets and suits are effortlessly sexy, keeping it simple in the best of ways. Ton-sur-ton looks, intricate details, iconic prints, exclusive fabrics, No12 takes it home.     Between their familiar fits thy’ve also drawn inspiration from their archives to create new and exciting fits that take it to the next level.     This season they have kept close to our essentials.
 They’ve connected to our signature basics and redefined classics from the past. Their Spanish roots have deepened and established a modern and strong Mediterranean aesthetic to carry throughout our brand. With everything they do they stay ‘close to home,’ creating their very own Casa Lois.     Casa Lois is a reflection of their essence, housing everything that is Lois. Their Amsterdam Galería turned into a warm and welcoming home, our customers became guests and our garments are closer to our DNA than ever before.     Collection No12 houses a mix of our worlds; ‘city cool’ and ‘modern Mediterranean’ with our signature jeans and airy linens as focal points. The freshness of blue and the warmth of earth tones make for an authentic contrast. This season’s sets and suits are effortlessly sexy, keeping it simple in the best of ways. Ton-sur-ton looks, intricate details, iconic prints, exclusive fabrics, No12 takes it home.     Between their familiar fits thy’ve also drawn inspiration from their archives to create new and exciting fits that take it to the next level.    

In conversation with Nicolas Gerlier, founder of La Bouche Rouge
796

In conversation with Nicolas Gerlier, founder of La Bouche Rouge

Beauty The Manifesto Reasoned Beauty Today, true luxury implies sustainable objects and formulas.     Producing and consuming in a sustainable manner is no longer solely urgent, it’s now also vital. La Bouche Rouge intends to lead the way in reinventing everyday objects, guiding women to consume dierently and think in a new manner. Without greenwashing, La Bouche Rouge chose to avoid all use of plastics, even those recycled. The first makeup routine without microplastics. La Bouche Rouge launches its complete line that reinvents the makeup ritual.     Why did you create La Bouche Rouge?   After a long career working for a large cosmetics group, I wanted to take on a project that resonated with my values. As a father of three, I wanted to show them that it was possible to build a better world: with La Bouche Rouge, I created a company that respects the planet and that avoids all use of plastic, a problem that wasn’t considered at that time. I wanted to create beautiful, desirable objects that are made to endure and accompany women allthroughout their lives. I wished to work with French artisans and artists, to create a brand that is alive, intelligent, creative, and which has a purpose and impact on the world. This, for me, is true modernity. We start a revolution with each of our daily choices. La Bouche Rouge is part of that.     For you, how does the beauty of tomorrow look?   I think that the crisis that we are currently experiencing will put an end to the consumer habits of the 20th century. Luxury should be the first sector to show the way. Luxury’s mission is to render our lives sublime. It’s therefore unthinkable for us to create objects that destroy the planet. That would be senseless! One of our cherished values is also that of a positive economy: luxury companies should have a positive social, human and environmental impact. We are committed to this through each step of our products creation. This also entails the quality ofour products, with their clean formulas and high na-turality, which are easy and pleasant to use. The future is also a world without plastic. Since 1950, only 9% of plastic waste in the world has been recycled, and around 12% is burned. The majority of it ends up in dumps, nature or the oceans. The cosmetics industry has the potential to bring about tremendous change: it’s the third most polluting industry in terms of plastic, after automobiles and fashion.That’s why we’re working towards a path of cleaner beauty. We created beauty without plastic at each step, from production to our formulas, even, for instance, with regards to our lipstick moulds and how we present our products in stores.     Why did you choose not to use recycled plastics?   Recycled plastic is the exact opposite of sustainability. It’s a material that is still poorly transformed: the majority of recycling methods still pollute and createwaste. The methods that recreate plastic that’s 100% reusable are rare. Because of its brittleness, plastic, even recycled, continues to leave microparticles. To avoid this, we have to create new desires. That’s LaBouche Rouge’s mission: to create objects so beautiful that you don’t wish to toss them, but rather, to reuse them.     How did you conceive the mascara brush in castor oil?   It entails the same method as traditional brushes: castor oil is poured into the same moulds that areused to create plastic brushes. It naturally solidies. Once solid, it can be used just as long as the mascara itself, without transferring into the formula. It’s therst of its kind in the world!       How did you choose the metal alloy that constitutes the universal case?   It’s a blend of zinc, aluminium, magnesium and copper, of which a portion is already recycled. It is highly resistant, does not get easily ruined and canbe recycled an in nite number of times. As it is heavy and precious, it is easily identified by waste sorting channels: this guarantees that it will be properly recycled, unlike other metals.     Why did you choose to use leather?   We use scraps of leather from the luxury industry. This allows us to highlight French artisanry, without producing any additional leather. Thanks to this, we maintain ties with French living heritage companies, which hold an unparalleled, traditional savoir-faire. This allows us to create artisanal, French objects that are at the fore front of fashion, which isprecisely what we all want to create today. To satisfyall our clients, we also have a vegan version. Speaking of which, all La Bouche Rouge formulas are vegan.     Why were you adamant about avoiding all microplastics in your products?   They pose a health risk: mascara and shadow particles – glitter, for instance – can fall into the eye, thereby altering the mucous membrane and causingeye diseases. An American study proved that we find nearly 30% of microplastics in the form of silicone or glitter in the eye after application. Therefore, we created formulas without risks for one’s health, and which can be used with contact lenses.   The Manifesto Reasoned Beauty Today, true luxury implies sustainable objects and formulas.     Producing and consuming in a sustainable manner is no longer solely urgent, it’s now also vital. La Bouche Rouge intends to lead the way in reinventing everyday objects, guiding women to consume dierently and think in a new manner. Without greenwashing, La Bouche Rouge chose to avoid all use of plastics, even those recycled. The first makeup routine without microplastics. La Bouche Rouge launches its complete line that reinvents the makeup ritual.     Why did you create La Bouche Rouge?   After a long career working for a large cosmetics group, I wanted to take on a project that resonated with my values. As a father of three, I wanted to show them that it was possible to build a better world: with La Bouche Rouge, I created a company that respects the planet and that avoids all use of plastic, a problem that wasn’t considered at that time. I wanted to create beautiful, desirable objects that are made to endure and accompany women allthroughout their lives. I wished to work with French artisans and artists, to create a brand that is alive, intelligent, creative, and which has a purpose and impact on the world. This, for me, is true modernity. We start a revolution with each of our daily choices. La Bouche Rouge is part of that.     For you, how does the beauty of tomorrow look?   I think that the crisis that we are currently experiencing will put an end to the consumer habits of the 20th century. Luxury should be the first sector to show the way. Luxury’s mission is to render our lives sublime. It’s therefore unthinkable for us to create objects that destroy the planet. That would be senseless! One of our cherished values is also that of a positive economy: luxury companies should have a positive social, human and environmental impact. We are committed to this through each step of our products creation. This also entails the quality ofour products, with their clean formulas and high na-turality, which are easy and pleasant to use. The future is also a world without plastic. Since 1950, only 9% of plastic waste in the world has been recycled, and around 12% is burned. The majority of it ends up in dumps, nature or the oceans. The cosmetics industry has the potential to bring about tremendous change: it’s the third most polluting industry in terms of plastic, after automobiles and fashion.That’s why we’re working towards a path of cleaner beauty. We created beauty without plastic at each step, from production to our formulas, even, for instance, with regards to our lipstick moulds and how we present our products in stores.     Why did you choose not to use recycled plastics?   Recycled plastic is the exact opposite of sustainability. It’s a material that is still poorly transformed: the majority of recycling methods still pollute and createwaste. The methods that recreate plastic that’s 100% reusable are rare. Because of its brittleness, plastic, even recycled, continues to leave microparticles. To avoid this, we have to create new desires. That’s LaBouche Rouge’s mission: to create objects so beautiful that you don’t wish to toss them, but rather, to reuse them.     How did you conceive the mascara brush in castor oil?   It entails the same method as traditional brushes: castor oil is poured into the same moulds that areused to create plastic brushes. It naturally solidies. Once solid, it can be used just as long as the mascara itself, without transferring into the formula. It’s therst of its kind in the world!       How did you choose the metal alloy that constitutes the universal case?   It’s a blend of zinc, aluminium, magnesium and copper, of which a portion is already recycled. It is highly resistant, does not get easily ruined and canbe recycled an in nite number of times. As it is heavy and precious, it is easily identified by waste sorting channels: this guarantees that it will be properly recycled, unlike other metals.     Why did you choose to use leather?   We use scraps of leather from the luxury industry. This allows us to highlight French artisanry, without producing any additional leather. Thanks to this, we maintain ties with French living heritage companies, which hold an unparalleled, traditional savoir-faire. This allows us to create artisanal, French objects that are at the fore front of fashion, which isprecisely what we all want to create today. To satisfyall our clients, we also have a vegan version. Speaking of which, all La Bouche Rouge formulas are vegan.     Why were you adamant about avoiding all microplastics in your products?   They pose a health risk: mascara and shadow particles – glitter, for instance – can fall into the eye, thereby altering the mucous membrane and causingeye diseases. An American study proved that we find nearly 30% of microplastics in the form of silicone or glitter in the eye after application. Therefore, we created formulas without risks for one’s health, and which can be used with contact lenses.  

Daily Paper Debuts Their First SS21 Drop
791

Daily Paper Debuts Their First SS21 Drop

Fashion Daily Paper introduces their latest Spring/Summer 2021 collection Future Roots. Debuting their first arrivals including dark vintage washed denim with a lasered-on monogram print alongside essential athleisure wear in updated seasonal colorways. The drop gives a sneak peek of what we can expect from the brands’ SS21 season.      The first drop will be available on Friday, December 11, at 12 PM CET and can be purchased at Daily Paper storefronts in Amsterdam, selected retailers worldwide as well as online at www.dailypaperclothing.com. Daily Paper introduces their latest Spring/Summer 2021 collection Future Roots. Debuting their first arrivals including dark vintage washed denim with a lasered-on monogram print alongside essential athleisure wear in updated seasonal colorways. The drop gives a sneak peek of what we can expect from the brands’ SS21 season.      The first drop will be available on Friday, December 11, at 12 PM CET and can be purchased at Daily Paper storefronts in Amsterdam, selected retailers worldwide as well as online at www.dailypaperclothing.com.

DIOR PRESENTS THE MEN’S FALL 2021 COLLECTION
788

DIOR PRESENTS THE MEN’S FALL 2021 COLLECTION

Fashion HYPERCOLORED, HYPERREAL; THE FALL 2021 MEN'S COLLECTION BY KIM JONES MARRIES THE HOUSE’S UNIQUE HERITAGE WITH EXCELLENCE OF SAVOIR-FAIRE REINTERPRETED THROUGH INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES. A PHILOSOPHY THAT IS REFLECTED IN THE HEART OF EACH CREATION, INFORMED BY A REVISITED SPIRIT OF TAILORING AS WELL AS KENNY SCHARF’S* VIBRANT NEON PALETTE. COMBINING POP CULTURE AND SCIENCE FICTION, AND INSPIRED BY CARTOONS AND SURREALISM, THE AMERICAN ARTIST, IN COLLABORATION WITH THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR OF DIOR MEN’S COLLECTIONS, DESIGNED A SERIES OF PRINTS AND EMBROIDERIES IN BRIGHT HUES BRIMMING WITH A JOYFUL ENERGY. UNVEILED IN BEIJING AT AN EVENT THAT REINVENTED THE FASHION SHOW EXPERIENCE, THESE NEW SILHOUETTES CELEBRATE EXCEPTIONAL CHINESE CRAFTSMANSHIP IN A CAPTIVATING DIALOGUE WITH HOUSE CODES. BRIDGING ANCESTRAL TECHNIQUES AND FUTURISTIC AUDACITY, THESE MULTIFACETED AND VIRTUOSO ENCOUNTERS ARE REVEALED VIA AN EXCLUSIVE VIDEO EXPLORING TRANSFORMATIONS OF THE PERCEPTION OF TIME AND SPACE IN THIS PARTICULAR GLOBAL CONTEXT. HYPERCOLORED, HYPERREAL; THE FALL 2021 MEN'S COLLECTION BY KIM JONES MARRIES THE HOUSE’S UNIQUE HERITAGE WITH EXCELLENCE OF SAVOIR-FAIRE REINTERPRETED THROUGH INNOVATIVE TECHNOLOGIES. A PHILOSOPHY THAT IS REFLECTED IN THE HEART OF EACH CREATION, INFORMED BY A REVISITED SPIRIT OF TAILORING AS WELL AS KENNY SCHARF’S* VIBRANT NEON PALETTE. COMBINING POP CULTURE AND SCIENCE FICTION, AND INSPIRED BY CARTOONS AND SURREALISM, THE AMERICAN ARTIST, IN COLLABORATION WITH THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR OF DIOR MEN’S COLLECTIONS, DESIGNED A SERIES OF PRINTS AND EMBROIDERIES IN BRIGHT HUES BRIMMING WITH A JOYFUL ENERGY. UNVEILED IN BEIJING AT AN EVENT THAT REINVENTED THE FASHION SHOW EXPERIENCE, THESE NEW SILHOUETTES CELEBRATE EXCEPTIONAL CHINESE CRAFTSMANSHIP IN A CAPTIVATING DIALOGUE WITH HOUSE CODES. BRIDGING ANCESTRAL TECHNIQUES AND FUTURISTIC AUDACITY, THESE MULTIFACETED AND VIRTUOSO ENCOUNTERS ARE REVEALED VIA AN EXCLUSIVE VIDEO EXPLORING TRANSFORMATIONS OF THE PERCEPTION OF TIME AND SPACE IN THIS PARTICULAR GLOBAL CONTEXT.

Small things that matter by KOMONO
787

Small things that matter by KOMONO

Accessories This holiday season, we invite you to cherish your memories and save them for a special moment. We designed a hardcase gifting box which contains one of our favorite watches, the Harlow or the Lewis, together with an extra complimentary strap and washi tape. This box can be repurposed to collect your precious letters, notes, drawings, photographs or other small things of sentimental value. Seal it off with the washi tape and re-open for a journey back in time. Besides the gifting box, we offer a curated selection of other small things that matter, from precious watches to sleek snow glasses. In our campaign, we recollect our own memories by inviting some of our dearest friends to talk about what matters to them and share their personal stories.     komono.com This holiday season, we invite you to cherish your memories and save them for a special moment. We designed a hardcase gifting box which contains one of our favorite watches, the Harlow or the Lewis, together with an extra complimentary strap and washi tape. This box can be repurposed to collect your precious letters, notes, drawings, photographs or other small things of sentimental value. Seal it off with the washi tape and re-open for a journey back in time. Besides the gifting box, we offer a curated selection of other small things that matter, from precious watches to sleek snow glasses. In our campaign, we recollect our own memories by inviting some of our dearest friends to talk about what matters to them and share their personal stories.     komono.com

The tie-dye creations by DIOR
786

The tie-dye creations by DIOR

Fashion A tribute to the beauty and priceless craftsmanship of Puglia, a region close to Maria Grazia Chiuri’s heart, the 2021 Cruise collection celebrates the Dior codes and motifs the Creative Director loves, such as Tie & Dior. A testimony to excellence of savoir-faire, this precious dyeing technique is used to color long skirts, flowing shirts, flared pants and matching tops in a palette of delicate shades from pale pink to sky blue, sweet notes underscored by intense black. These hypnotic designs also unfurl on scarves and the iconic Lady Dior and Dior Book Tote bags, enhanced by captivating plays on materials such as three-dimensional cotton embroidery and faded denim layers. The fruit of constant research and experimentation, fabrics with surprising and unique looks have become a House emblem. A tribute to the beauty and priceless craftsmanship of Puglia, a region close to Maria Grazia Chiuri’s heart, the 2021 Cruise collection celebrates the Dior codes and motifs the Creative Director loves, such as Tie & Dior. A testimony to excellence of savoir-faire, this precious dyeing technique is used to color long skirts, flowing shirts, flared pants and matching tops in a palette of delicate shades from pale pink to sky blue, sweet notes underscored by intense black. These hypnotic designs also unfurl on scarves and the iconic Lady Dior and Dior Book Tote bags, enhanced by captivating plays on materials such as three-dimensional cotton embroidery and faded denim layers. The fruit of constant research and experimentation, fabrics with surprising and unique looks have become a House emblem.

loading
More articles