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Yamazato, Amsterdam
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Yamazato, Amsterdam

Food Yamazato, a traditional Japanese restaurant located in Hotel Okura Amsterdam, is the first traditional kaiseki restaurant outside of Japan that is awarded with a Michelin star. Executive Chef and Manager Masanori Tomikawa, who is behind the authentic Japanese haute cuisine, prepares the multi-course experience for the guests with traditional Japanese ingredients in a minimalistic style. The typical Japanese materials and interior of the restaurant give you an instant feeling of being in Japan.   1. Chef Tomikawa, you took over as the executive chef and manager of the Michelin star winning restaurant Yamazato in 2010 from chef Oshima. How does it feel to be in charge of the first Michelin star winning Japanese restaurant outside of Japan? Being the Executive Chef & Manager of the first Michelin star winning restaurant outside of Japan, makes me very proud. Our restaurant is one of the few high level authenic Japanese cuisines in Europe, so that is also a surprise for the people.  About 20 years ago the Japanese cuisine was not that popular in the Netherlands, except from sushi and tempura. Nowadays, everybody is aware of the Japanese cuisine, also due to the fact that it became a popular destination.I go to Japan four to five times per year and I noticed that it’s not just Japanese people anymore who are travelling to Japan. More and more Europeans, also Dutch people, are travelling to Japan. When I ask them if they have been to Japan, you will ofter hear that they've been twice already.    2. When and how did your interest for cooking develop? Did you always  know this is something you wanted to do? My interest in food started at an early age. I was around10 years old and my parents, owning their own book store, didn’t have much time to cook so we went out for dinner a lot and got acquainted to many different tastes and dishes. Also, my mother was mostly cooking fish, asshe was born near the sea coast.When I started school, I worked part-time at Hotel Okura Tokyo as a porter. Here I saw the chefscookingall the time andthis inspired me a lot.This was the moment I started thinking, maybe I'd like to be a chef someday.   3. Tell us more about the development of your career, before and since you moved to Amsterdam.  Iinitially started working at Hotel Okura Tokyo, where they also have Yamazato Restaurant and I got the opportunity to do a one-year training course in the kitchen. Curious to learn more about Europe, I decided to continue my career in Amsterdam in 1984. For 17 years I worked with chef Oshima. I have learned a lot from him, especially techniques, skills and speediness.In 2002 I returned to Japan to gain knowledge and experience. During that time I visited the Okurain Kyushu island to learn about their cultures and about the fish. In 2005 I came back to Amsterdam as Chef de Cuisine of Yamazato. Since 2010 I am responsible for the traditional Japanese Yamazato Restaurant and Teppanyaki Restaurant Sazanka, Okura’s other Japanese restaurant.    4. Can you tell us a little bit more about the difference between the Japanese cuisine and Kaiseki ryori? Usually when talking about Japanese cuisine, people think of Japanese food in general, like sushi. Kaiseki Ryori is the most authentic type of Japanese cuisine and it focuses on the purity of traditional Japanese ingredients in a minimalistic, balanced style. At Yamazato, we have three Kaiseki menus – Aoi kaiseki, Yuki kaiseki and Hana kaiseki. They are more like course menus, offering a complete experience when combined with sakes or wines, selected by the sommelier.    5. What are the inspirations behind your dishes?  I certainly get inspired by the season. In the kaiseki cuisine it is crucial to create dishes that are in absolute harmony with the season. The connection with nature is very important in the Japanese culture, which is why we don’t use only traditional Japanese ingredients, but also incorporate Dutch seasonal food into our menus – such as white asparagus in our spring menu. Each season provides us with different ingredients and because of that our menus change very often. This goes beyond the seasonal menus that you will find in most restaurants in Europe. Moreover, the connection with nature can also be found in the decoration of a dish, e.g. the brilliantly coloured autumn leaves in our autumn menu and the beautiful cherry blossoms during spring. Seasons are really important to us, not only our menus are influenced by it, also the flowers in the dining areas, tableware and kimonos of the waitresses change according to the season.    6. How would you describe your culinary style? And how would you describe its development throughout your career? Mostly classic. When Hotel Okura Amsterdam, and simultaneously Yamazato Restaurant, opened its doors in 1971, the Japanese culture was still fairly unfamiliar in the Netherlands and poorly understood. The first years were hard as the Japanese chefs found a food culture that was rather different than they had been accustomed to. Many products, including rice, vegetables and fish were flown in from Japan. Because of the cost involved, this was not a sustainable solution in the long run, also because kaiseki ryori tends to pay homage to local ingredients. The chefs did their best to find sufficient European products and where necessary, they helped food producers to upgrade the quality of their produce. The attention that was given to acquiring the highest quality ingredients, as well as the total dedication given to the preparation and presentation, finally conquered the hearts of the Europeans. Nowadays, the Japanese culture has greatly evolved in Europe and the Netherlands. Not only in the restaurant scene but also in the supermarkets you can find Japanese products. At Yamazato Restaurant, we serve the authentic Japanese haute cuisine, like how it’s served in Japan.     7. Which is your favorite ingredient that you use in your dishes and why? Dashi. People know about Umami, which is a flavour that is obtained from dashi. This ingredient isused a lot at Yamazato Restaurant and we can’t do without it. It creates balance and harmony in a dish.    8. So far, which memory or moment in your carrer as a chef stands out the most to you? Taking over the management of Yamazato, a Michelin star restaurant, in 2010 from chef Oshima.    9. What would you say is the most special thing about Yamazato restaurant for the guests? Yamazato Restaurant is situated in Hotel Okura Amsterdam. A lot of international guests are coming here. Our cuisine is not fusion, it's really authentic. So I like to keep it this way, to show more of the Japanese culture. Not onlyis the cuisine very authentic, but also the setting is typical Japanese. It feels like entering a different world and creates more understanding for the Japanese culture, including traditional Japanese festivals that are celebrated at Yamazato as well.    10. What can we expect from you and Yamazato in the future? I'd like to show more of what Japanese cuisine has to offer. Show more of Japan to the guests. But it's still a challenge for us to bring all the ingredients here. I hope in the future it will become easier to transport these from Japan to the Netherlands.   for more information and bookings please visit their website:www.okura.nl/yamazato Yamazato, a traditional Japanese restaurant located in Hotel Okura Amsterdam, is the first traditional kaiseki restaurant outside of Japan that is awarded with a Michelin star. Executive Chef and Manager Masanori Tomikawa, who is behind the authentic Japanese haute cuisine, prepares the multi-course experience for the guests with traditional Japanese ingredients in a minimalistic style. The typical Japanese materials and interior of the restaurant give you an instant feeling of being in Japan.   1. Chef Tomikawa, you took over as the executive chef and manager of the Michelin star winning restaurant Yamazato in 2010 from chef Oshima. How does it feel to be in charge of the first Michelin star winning Japanese restaurant outside of Japan? Being the Executive Chef & Manager of the first Michelin star winning restaurant outside of Japan, makes me very proud. Our restaurant is one of the few high level authenic Japanese cuisines in Europe, so that is also a surprise for the people.  About 20 years ago the Japanese cuisine was not that popular in the Netherlands, except from sushi and tempura. Nowadays, everybody is aware of the Japanese cuisine, also due to the fact that it became a popular destination.I go to Japan four to five times per year and I noticed that it’s not just Japanese people anymore who are travelling to Japan. More and more Europeans, also Dutch people, are travelling to Japan. When I ask them if they have been to Japan, you will ofter hear that they've been twice already.    2. When and how did your interest for cooking develop? Did you always  know this is something you wanted to do? My interest in food started at an early age. I was around10 years old and my parents, owning their own book store, didn’t have much time to cook so we went out for dinner a lot and got acquainted to many different tastes and dishes. Also, my mother was mostly cooking fish, asshe was born near the sea coast.When I started school, I worked part-time at Hotel Okura Tokyo as a porter. Here I saw the chefscookingall the time andthis inspired me a lot.This was the moment I started thinking, maybe I'd like to be a chef someday.   3. Tell us more about the development of your career, before and since you moved to Amsterdam.  Iinitially started working at Hotel Okura Tokyo, where they also have Yamazato Restaurant and I got the opportunity to do a one-year training course in the kitchen. Curious to learn more about Europe, I decided to continue my career in Amsterdam in 1984. For 17 years I worked with chef Oshima. I have learned a lot from him, especially techniques, skills and speediness.In 2002 I returned to Japan to gain knowledge and experience. During that time I visited the Okurain Kyushu island to learn about their cultures and about the fish. In 2005 I came back to Amsterdam as Chef de Cuisine of Yamazato. Since 2010 I am responsible for the traditional Japanese Yamazato Restaurant and Teppanyaki Restaurant Sazanka, Okura’s other Japanese restaurant.    4. Can you tell us a little bit more about the difference between the Japanese cuisine and Kaiseki ryori? Usually when talking about Japanese cuisine, people think of Japanese food in general, like sushi. Kaiseki Ryori is the most authentic type of Japanese cuisine and it focuses on the purity of traditional Japanese ingredients in a minimalistic, balanced style. At Yamazato, we have three Kaiseki menus – Aoi kaiseki, Yuki kaiseki and Hana kaiseki. They are more like course menus, offering a complete experience when combined with sakes or wines, selected by the sommelier.    5. What are the inspirations behind your dishes?  I certainly get inspired by the season. In the kaiseki cuisine it is crucial to create dishes that are in absolute harmony with the season. The connection with nature is very important in the Japanese culture, which is why we don’t use only traditional Japanese ingredients, but also incorporate Dutch seasonal food into our menus – such as white asparagus in our spring menu. Each season provides us with different ingredients and because of that our menus change very often. This goes beyond the seasonal menus that you will find in most restaurants in Europe. Moreover, the connection with nature can also be found in the decoration of a dish, e.g. the brilliantly coloured autumn leaves in our autumn menu and the beautiful cherry blossoms during spring. Seasons are really important to us, not only our menus are influenced by it, also the flowers in the dining areas, tableware and kimonos of the waitresses change according to the season.    6. How would you describe your culinary style? And how would you describe its development throughout your career? Mostly classic. When Hotel Okura Amsterdam, and simultaneously Yamazato Restaurant, opened its doors in 1971, the Japanese culture was still fairly unfamiliar in the Netherlands and poorly understood. The first years were hard as the Japanese chefs found a food culture that was rather different than they had been accustomed to. Many products, including rice, vegetables and fish were flown in from Japan. Because of the cost involved, this was not a sustainable solution in the long run, also because kaiseki ryori tends to pay homage to local ingredients. The chefs did their best to find sufficient European products and where necessary, they helped food producers to upgrade the quality of their produce. The attention that was given to acquiring the highest quality ingredients, as well as the total dedication given to the preparation and presentation, finally conquered the hearts of the Europeans. Nowadays, the Japanese culture has greatly evolved in Europe and the Netherlands. Not only in the restaurant scene but also in the supermarkets you can find Japanese products. At Yamazato Restaurant, we serve the authentic Japanese haute cuisine, like how it’s served in Japan.     7. Which is your favorite ingredient that you use in your dishes and why? Dashi. People know about Umami, which is a flavour that is obtained from dashi. This ingredient isused a lot at Yamazato Restaurant and we can’t do without it. It creates balance and harmony in a dish.    8. So far, which memory or moment in your carrer as a chef stands out the most to you? Taking over the management of Yamazato, a Michelin star restaurant, in 2010 from chef Oshima.    9. What would you say is the most special thing about Yamazato restaurant for the guests? Yamazato Restaurant is situated in Hotel Okura Amsterdam. A lot of international guests are coming here. Our cuisine is not fusion, it's really authentic. So I like to keep it this way, to show more of the Japanese culture. Not onlyis the cuisine very authentic, but also the setting is typical Japanese. It feels like entering a different world and creates more understanding for the Japanese culture, including traditional Japanese festivals that are celebrated at Yamazato as well.    10. What can we expect from you and Yamazato in the future? I'd like to show more of what Japanese cuisine has to offer. Show more of Japan to the guests. But it's still a challenge for us to bring all the ingredients here. I hope in the future it will become easier to transport these from Japan to the Netherlands.   for more information and bookings please visit their website:www.okura.nl/yamazato

Moco Museum
18

Moco Museum

Art Moco Museum in Amsterdam is a boutique museum with a wide range of inspiring modern and contemporary art, focusing on bringing modern and contemporary art to the general public. After opening its doors in 2016, Moco has committed to exhibiting iconic works by internationally renowned artists. The collection consists of unique street art pieces and modern, and contemporary art by Daniel Arsham, Banksy, Basquiat, Haring, Hirst, JR, Koons, Kusama, KAWS and many more exciting artists with which they  offer visitors an unparalleled collection of subversive art in which irony and humour are used to reflect on modern society. A one-of-a-kind experience aimed at a wide audience, a visit to Moco is a true eye-opener among being a must place to see in Amsterdam. Moco Museum uses the power of art to challenge the norm, to reveal the truth, to broaden consciousness and to challenge the world around them.  The Modern Contemporary (Moco) Museum has made its home in Villa Alsberg, a townhouse overlooking Museumplein in the heart of Amsterdam. The building was designed in 1904 by Eduard Cuypers, nephew of the renowned Pierre Cuypers who designed Amsterdam’s Central Station and the Rijksmuseum, which is at the opposite end of the square. This privately-owned residence was one of the first family homes built along Museumplein and retained this function until 1939. Subsequently, the house was let to priests who taught at the Saint Nicolas School in Amsterdam, and later it was converted into an office for a law firm. Moco Museum is the private initiative of Lionel and Kim Logchies. For over 20 years, the art couple has worked with international art legends. From Picasso to Koons, from Hirst to Warhol. Creating the Moco Museum has allowed the entrepreneurial couple to display incredible works of art that would otherwise remain private and unseen to the general public. The majority of the art has been made available to the museum by an international network of collectors. A part of the MOCO earnings will be donated to charities that are close to the couple's hearts. The museum is truly a must place to see  for visitors as it includes a lot of incredible, fun and exciting art both indoor and on their exterior garden. The artist selection is wide and captures everyone's attention. The museum could not have any better location that it does, normally there are cues, however we suggest pre-buying the tickets online ansd skipping the line at the entrance. The building has 3 floors full of paintings, statues and incredible art instalations all around you everywhere you look inside; the museum also has many pieces presented on their beautiful garden surronding the building.  Moco Museum is known for hosting many great events through-out the year. While there also check-out their boutique on the lower floor with a big selection of art, posters, books that you can purchase for your own collection. Currently the museum exhibitions range from Banksy, Kaws, Arsham and many more; while incredibly exciting exhibitions are coming to Moco very soon including many female artists. More about it soon on our website and social media. for current exhibitions, tickets and more information go to mocomuseum.com and @mocomuseum on social media.   Moco Museum in Amsterdam is a boutique museum with a wide range of inspiring modern and contemporary art, focusing on bringing modern and contemporary art to the general public. After opening its doors in 2016, Moco has committed to exhibiting iconic works by internationally renowned artists. The collection consists of unique street art pieces and modern, and contemporary art by Daniel Arsham, Banksy, Basquiat, Haring, Hirst, JR, Koons, Kusama, KAWS and many more exciting artists with which they  offer visitors an unparalleled collection of subversive art in which irony and humour are used to reflect on modern society. A one-of-a-kind experience aimed at a wide audience, a visit to Moco is a true eye-opener among being a must place to see in Amsterdam. Moco Museum uses the power of art to challenge the norm, to reveal the truth, to broaden consciousness and to challenge the world around them.  The Modern Contemporary (Moco) Museum has made its home in Villa Alsberg, a townhouse overlooking Museumplein in the heart of Amsterdam. The building was designed in 1904 by Eduard Cuypers, nephew of the renowned Pierre Cuypers who designed Amsterdam’s Central Station and the Rijksmuseum, which is at the opposite end of the square. This privately-owned residence was one of the first family homes built along Museumplein and retained this function until 1939. Subsequently, the house was let to priests who taught at the Saint Nicolas School in Amsterdam, and later it was converted into an office for a law firm. Moco Museum is the private initiative of Lionel and Kim Logchies. For over 20 years, the art couple has worked with international art legends. From Picasso to Koons, from Hirst to Warhol. Creating the Moco Museum has allowed the entrepreneurial couple to display incredible works of art that would otherwise remain private and unseen to the general public. The majority of the art has been made available to the museum by an international network of collectors. A part of the MOCO earnings will be donated to charities that are close to the couple's hearts. The museum is truly a must place to see  for visitors as it includes a lot of incredible, fun and exciting art both indoor and on their exterior garden. The artist selection is wide and captures everyone's attention. The museum could not have any better location that it does, normally there are cues, however we suggest pre-buying the tickets online ansd skipping the line at the entrance. The building has 3 floors full of paintings, statues and incredible art instalations all around you everywhere you look inside; the museum also has many pieces presented on their beautiful garden surronding the building.  Moco Museum is known for hosting many great events through-out the year. While there also check-out their boutique on the lower floor with a big selection of art, posters, books that you can purchase for your own collection. Currently the museum exhibitions range from Banksy, Kaws, Arsham and many more; while incredibly exciting exhibitions are coming to Moco very soon including many female artists. More about it soon on our website and social media. for current exhibitions, tickets and more information go to mocomuseum.com and @mocomuseum on social media.  

Sorry I'm late!
11

Sorry I'm late!

Music Sorry I'm late! Allow me to introduce myself ; my name is Asma Emy El Ghalbzouri and i am the Music and Culture editor for Numéro magazine Netherlands. As we strive to make up for lost time when it comes to music we would love to give you a recap and a small taste of all thats coming in 2020.   Let's start at the beginning and honor some of the most amazing festivals this summer. Mojo has been a big player in Holland for some time now and Lowlands has been their pride and joy. Although the festivals features quite a bit of hip hop acts,it didn’t stop them from wanting to dabble in a full hip hop festival and with great success if you ask us. WOO HAH is a splendid gathering in the south of Holland with a wide selection of hip hop’s latest and finest.   Mysteryland never ceases to disappoint either. A wide variety of house,edm and techno djs, all of them being household names in their genre, grace the immaculate and beautifully decorated stages for energetic sets. I have always had a soft spot hardstyle and hardcore. it is the most fascinating part of Dutch culture and grew to be a worldwide phenomenon. Defqon being one of the coolest and most celebrated of them all really blew me away this summer.   We also visited some festivals abroad in a region that is finally celebrated and honored for its amazing musical talent ; North Africa. We have choosen to explore Morocco and the country has stolen our musical hearts. We spoke to different established and emerging artists and we were mesmerized. Loco Dice, Chromeo and Yesin Bey played Oasis festival and I was so delighted to find out that Dave’s mother is from Moroccan jewish decent. I remember walking the streets of New York back when I used to be a hairstylist and got to assist backstage at the seasonal hectic fashion frenzy also known as fashion week. Chromeo blasting in my ears with help of revolutionary item called the ipod. Dj Kicks (remix) is one of the coolest albums out there and i will fight you for it.   Moroccan dj’s Yasmean, Dris Bennis aka Casa Voyager and African kings Art Comes First played immaculate sets and took us through a magical journey that embodies progressive Africa at Oasis festival.As the night progressed Walshy Fire,Art Comes First and Chromeo decided to share a stage and played a back to back which I will forever cherish as one of the most enchanting musical moments in my life.   Atlas Electronic gave us hedonistic and gypsy vibes. Dj Gan Gah showed up and out as he plays a set featuring well known edited chaabi and reggada songs. I must say he is one of my favorite discoveries yet! Born in Morocco and now residing in Brussels,this Moroccan powerhouse mixes Moroccan folk music in techno and house edits making it possible to enjoy at any music festival. I would suggest you check out his Habib Tronics on Spotify,its the new wave chaabi music he created just for our enjoyment. Zohra Idrissi aka Gypzee seranedes us under a star filled sky with the sweetest funky songs. She reminds me of a young Erica Badu. Sassy and lyricly on point. This Moroccan beauty, who lives in London, has slowly but surely making her way in music and this time blessing us with this beautiful performance in this magical country she calls home as well.   The interviews with all these amazing artists and more are featured in our music and culture special about Morocco which will be posted in 2020!   We lavishly resided in excellent care at Riad 144 in the old town of Marrakech as owner Jean Witho opened his heart and home to wandering artists and reporters. This Riad has a few of the most exciting and beautiful rooms I have ever seen. Each one with a different theme displaying different sides and styles of Morocco. The Berber room displaying beautiful amazigh art or the more “modern” room if you will with African contemporary pieces. Tobias the turtle roams free in the communal area just to make sure all the guests have a good time and will join you for your afternoon tea or beautiful glass of wine.   We have some great interviews with legendary djs, producers, rockstars and rappers making its way to online and print. We spoke to the movers and shakers when it comes to innovation in sound, venues, managing artists and festivals. We had drinks with emerging artists and went to heaps of listening parties to share in their new found excitement.   We can't wait to share more and to inspire you to listen to great artists and visit different places around the world to change your “backdrop” as you dance the night away. We wish a very magical 2020! aftermovie of Oasis Festival: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dx9DwpbEgM&feature=youtu.be  special thanks to Riad 144 - https://www.riad144.com/   Sorry I'm late! Allow me to introduce myself ; my name is Asma Emy El Ghalbzouri and i am the Music and Culture editor for Numéro magazine Netherlands. As we strive to make up for lost time when it comes to music we would love to give you a recap and a small taste of all thats coming in 2020.   Let's start at the beginning and honor some of the most amazing festivals this summer. Mojo has been a big player in Holland for some time now and Lowlands has been their pride and joy. Although the festivals features quite a bit of hip hop acts,it didn’t stop them from wanting to dabble in a full hip hop festival and with great success if you ask us. WOO HAH is a splendid gathering in the south of Holland with a wide selection of hip hop’s latest and finest.   Mysteryland never ceases to disappoint either. A wide variety of house,edm and techno djs, all of them being household names in their genre, grace the immaculate and beautifully decorated stages for energetic sets. I have always had a soft spot hardstyle and hardcore. it is the most fascinating part of Dutch culture and grew to be a worldwide phenomenon. Defqon being one of the coolest and most celebrated of them all really blew me away this summer.   We also visited some festivals abroad in a region that is finally celebrated and honored for its amazing musical talent ; North Africa. We have choosen to explore Morocco and the country has stolen our musical hearts. We spoke to different established and emerging artists and we were mesmerized. Loco Dice, Chromeo and Yesin Bey played Oasis festival and I was so delighted to find out that Dave’s mother is from Moroccan jewish decent. I remember walking the streets of New York back when I used to be a hairstylist and got to assist backstage at the seasonal hectic fashion frenzy also known as fashion week. Chromeo blasting in my ears with help of revolutionary item called the ipod. Dj Kicks (remix) is one of the coolest albums out there and i will fight you for it.   Moroccan dj’s Yasmean, Dris Bennis aka Casa Voyager and African kings Art Comes First played immaculate sets and took us through a magical journey that embodies progressive Africa at Oasis festival.As the night progressed Walshy Fire,Art Comes First and Chromeo decided to share a stage and played a back to back which I will forever cherish as one of the most enchanting musical moments in my life.   Atlas Electronic gave us hedonistic and gypsy vibes. Dj Gan Gah showed up and out as he plays a set featuring well known edited chaabi and reggada songs. I must say he is one of my favorite discoveries yet! Born in Morocco and now residing in Brussels,this Moroccan powerhouse mixes Moroccan folk music in techno and house edits making it possible to enjoy at any music festival. I would suggest you check out his Habib Tronics on Spotify,its the new wave chaabi music he created just for our enjoyment. Zohra Idrissi aka Gypzee seranedes us under a star filled sky with the sweetest funky songs. She reminds me of a young Erica Badu. Sassy and lyricly on point. This Moroccan beauty, who lives in London, has slowly but surely making her way in music and this time blessing us with this beautiful performance in this magical country she calls home as well.   The interviews with all these amazing artists and more are featured in our music and culture special about Morocco which will be posted in 2020!   We lavishly resided in excellent care at Riad 144 in the old town of Marrakech as owner Jean Witho opened his heart and home to wandering artists and reporters. This Riad has a few of the most exciting and beautiful rooms I have ever seen. Each one with a different theme displaying different sides and styles of Morocco. The Berber room displaying beautiful amazigh art or the more “modern” room if you will with African contemporary pieces. Tobias the turtle roams free in the communal area just to make sure all the guests have a good time and will join you for your afternoon tea or beautiful glass of wine.   We have some great interviews with legendary djs, producers, rockstars and rappers making its way to online and print. We spoke to the movers and shakers when it comes to innovation in sound, venues, managing artists and festivals. We had drinks with emerging artists and went to heaps of listening parties to share in their new found excitement.   We can't wait to share more and to inspire you to listen to great artists and visit different places around the world to change your “backdrop” as you dance the night away. We wish a very magical 2020! aftermovie of Oasis Festival: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3dx9DwpbEgM&feature=youtu.be  special thanks to Riad 144 - https://www.riad144.com/  

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Interview with Xinyi Cheng : “Painting take a lot of planning but also a lot of accidents”
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Interview with Xinyi Cheng : “Painting take a lot of planning but also a lot of accidents”

Art It’s in Paris’s lively Belleville quarter that the Chinese artist has set up shop, where she paints the sensual portraits which won her this year’s Baloise Art Prize at Art Basel.   It’s in Paris’s lively Belleville quarter that the Chinese artist has set up shop, where she paints the sensual portraits which won her this year’s Baloise Art Prize at Art Basel.  

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