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Exploring Maldives with Oumayma Elboumeshouli
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Exploring Maldives with Oumayma Elboumeshouli

Travel I had the opportunity to travel to the Maldives and stay at the beautiful Standard Resort. The resort is not just a typical Maldivian couple resort, there are plenty of activities and details that attract the younger crowd. I’m taking you with me on the journey through a photo-diary I shot. - Oumayma     Getting to the resort:   A breathtaking 35-minute sea plane ride away from Velana International Airport,The Standard, Huruvalhi is nestled between the Raa and Baa Atolls, on a naturally protected island. Guests can also take a combined 20-minute domestic flight to Dharavandhoo and 35-minute speedboat ride to the resort.     The resort:   The resort has 115 overwater and beach villas, each with its own infinity plunge pool and private lounge deck with direct access to the lagoon, ocean or beach. A glittering disco ball strategically perched above the soaking bathtub in every villa bathroom makes for a signature Standard statement piece and serves as a reminder that you really can party anywhere and at anytime of the day at The Standard. As I already mentioned, there are plenty of activities to do besides throwing your own party. The resort has 3 restaurants and 2 bars and everything is on walking distance. The part I loved the most about the resort is the beautiful sunset view at the BERU bar. Each room as water activity equipments to use.         The situation currently:   Traveling to the Maldives is currently safe. As long as you fill in an online form and show a negative PCR result you can enter the country. Unfortunately the capital is still on a lock-down, so I highly recommend to go directly to your resort.      Visit their website here: https://www.standardhotels.com/maldives/properties/huruvalhi I had the opportunity to travel to the Maldives and stay at the beautiful Standard Resort. The resort is not just a typical Maldivian couple resort, there are plenty of activities and details that attract the younger crowd. I’m taking you with me on the journey through a photo-diary I shot. - Oumayma     Getting to the resort:   A breathtaking 35-minute sea plane ride away from Velana International Airport,The Standard, Huruvalhi is nestled between the Raa and Baa Atolls, on a naturally protected island. Guests can also take a combined 20-minute domestic flight to Dharavandhoo and 35-minute speedboat ride to the resort.     The resort:   The resort has 115 overwater and beach villas, each with its own infinity plunge pool and private lounge deck with direct access to the lagoon, ocean or beach. A glittering disco ball strategically perched above the soaking bathtub in every villa bathroom makes for a signature Standard statement piece and serves as a reminder that you really can party anywhere and at anytime of the day at The Standard. As I already mentioned, there are plenty of activities to do besides throwing your own party. The resort has 3 restaurants and 2 bars and everything is on walking distance. The part I loved the most about the resort is the beautiful sunset view at the BERU bar. Each room as water activity equipments to use.         The situation currently:   Traveling to the Maldives is currently safe. As long as you fill in an online form and show a negative PCR result you can enter the country. Unfortunately the capital is still on a lock-down, so I highly recommend to go directly to your resort.      Visit their website here: https://www.standardhotels.com/maldives/properties/huruvalhi

England’s Creative Coast
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England’s Creative Coast

Travel England’s Creative Coast announces new dates for 2021. The landmark partnership project spans 1400 km of stunning coastline stretching from the East Sussex Downs through to the Thames Estuary, launching at Turner Contemporary on 1 May and running until November.   Combining seven Waterfronts art commissions by internationally acclaimed artists with the world’s first art GeoTour, England’s Creative Coastis a new cultural experience connecting art with landscape, local stories with global perspectives and linking seven outstanding arts organisations — Cement Fields, Creative Folkestone, De La Warr Pavilion, Hastings Contemporary, Metal, Towner Eastbourne and Turner Contemporary.     England’s Creative Coastlaunches with lead partner Turner Contemporary on 1 May 2021 and then sequentially with each of the partner arts organisations presenting their Waterfrontscommission — a series of site-specific artworks curated by Tamsin Dillon — and part of the GeoTour. The new launch dates are:     Turner Contemporary presents Michael Rakowitz: ‘From Basra to Margate’ Margate, 1 May Cement Fields presents Jasleen Kaur: ‘The first thing I did was to kiss the ground’ Gravesend, 22 May (launching with Estuary 2021) Metal presents Katrina Palmer: ‘Hello’ and ‘Retreat’ Southend-on-Sea, 22 May (launching with Estuary 2021) De La Warr Pavilion presents Holly Hendry: ‘Invertebrate’ Bexhill-on-Sea, 29 May Hastings Contemporary presents Andreas Angelidakis: ‘Seawall’ Hastings, 29 May Towner Eastbourne presents Mariana Castillo Deball: ‘Walking through the town I followed a pattern on the pavement that became the magnified silhouette of a woman’s profile’Eastbourne, 29 May Creative Folkestone presents Pilar Quinteros: ‘Janus Fortress Folkestone’ Folkestone, 29 May (launch date tbc; and featured in the 2021 Folkestone Triennial)     England’s Creative Coastcrowns an exceptional year for culture along England’s South East coastline. In 2021 Turner Contemporary celebrates its 10th anniversary year; Cement Fields and Metal in partnership lead Estuary 2021, an art, literature, music and film festival celebrating the lives, landscapes and histories of the spectacular Thames Estuary (21 May – 13 June); and later in the year the Folkestone Triennial presents ‘The Plot’, the largest exhibition of newly commissioned work in the UK.     The beautiful and dramatic landscape stretching along the Essex, Kent and East Sussex shorelines has inspired artists for centuries and is home to some of the UK’s most distinctive and visionary galleries and art events, attracting visitors from far and wide. With so much creative commissioning in the public realm next year their cultural contributions are especially valuable, giving visitors the chance to see some of the UK’s best new art works safely in the outdoors.     Sarah Dance, Project Director of England’s Creative Coastcomments: ‘Conceived as a project outside of gallery walls,England's Creative Coast offers a naturally socially-distanced experience that connects people and places across the extraordinary network of arts organisations along the South East coast. We hope that in these troubled times these site-specific art commissions and geocache trail brimming with seaside tales inspire creativity through adventure.’     England’s Creative Coastis led by Turner Contemporary and Visit Kent, and principally funded by Arts Council England and VisitEngland through the Discover England Fund.     For further information please visit the website: www.englandscreativecoast.com. England’s Creative Coast announces new dates for 2021. The landmark partnership project spans 1400 km of stunning coastline stretching from the East Sussex Downs through to the Thames Estuary, launching at Turner Contemporary on 1 May and running until November.   Combining seven Waterfronts art commissions by internationally acclaimed artists with the world’s first art GeoTour, England’s Creative Coastis a new cultural experience connecting art with landscape, local stories with global perspectives and linking seven outstanding arts organisations — Cement Fields, Creative Folkestone, De La Warr Pavilion, Hastings Contemporary, Metal, Towner Eastbourne and Turner Contemporary.     England’s Creative Coastlaunches with lead partner Turner Contemporary on 1 May 2021 and then sequentially with each of the partner arts organisations presenting their Waterfrontscommission — a series of site-specific artworks curated by Tamsin Dillon — and part of the GeoTour. The new launch dates are:     Turner Contemporary presents Michael Rakowitz: ‘From Basra to Margate’ Margate, 1 May Cement Fields presents Jasleen Kaur: ‘The first thing I did was to kiss the ground’ Gravesend, 22 May (launching with Estuary 2021) Metal presents Katrina Palmer: ‘Hello’ and ‘Retreat’ Southend-on-Sea, 22 May (launching with Estuary 2021) De La Warr Pavilion presents Holly Hendry: ‘Invertebrate’ Bexhill-on-Sea, 29 May Hastings Contemporary presents Andreas Angelidakis: ‘Seawall’ Hastings, 29 May Towner Eastbourne presents Mariana Castillo Deball: ‘Walking through the town I followed a pattern on the pavement that became the magnified silhouette of a woman’s profile’Eastbourne, 29 May Creative Folkestone presents Pilar Quinteros: ‘Janus Fortress Folkestone’ Folkestone, 29 May (launch date tbc; and featured in the 2021 Folkestone Triennial)     England’s Creative Coastcrowns an exceptional year for culture along England’s South East coastline. In 2021 Turner Contemporary celebrates its 10th anniversary year; Cement Fields and Metal in partnership lead Estuary 2021, an art, literature, music and film festival celebrating the lives, landscapes and histories of the spectacular Thames Estuary (21 May – 13 June); and later in the year the Folkestone Triennial presents ‘The Plot’, the largest exhibition of newly commissioned work in the UK.     The beautiful and dramatic landscape stretching along the Essex, Kent and East Sussex shorelines has inspired artists for centuries and is home to some of the UK’s most distinctive and visionary galleries and art events, attracting visitors from far and wide. With so much creative commissioning in the public realm next year their cultural contributions are especially valuable, giving visitors the chance to see some of the UK’s best new art works safely in the outdoors.     Sarah Dance, Project Director of England’s Creative Coastcomments: ‘Conceived as a project outside of gallery walls,England's Creative Coast offers a naturally socially-distanced experience that connects people and places across the extraordinary network of arts organisations along the South East coast. We hope that in these troubled times these site-specific art commissions and geocache trail brimming with seaside tales inspire creativity through adventure.’     England’s Creative Coastis led by Turner Contemporary and Visit Kent, and principally funded by Arts Council England and VisitEngland through the Discover England Fund.     For further information please visit the website: www.englandscreativecoast.com.

TOMMY HILFIGER AND PATTA CELEBRATE THE STRENGTH AND UNITY OF THE DIASPORA MOVEMENT IN COLLABORATIVE CAPSULE
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TOMMY HILFIGER AND PATTA CELEBRATE THE STRENGTH AND UNITY OF THE DIASPORA MOVEMENT IN COLLABORATIVE CAPSULE

Fashion Tommy Hilfiger, and trailblazing Amsterdam-based street wear brand, Patta, announce the Spring 2021 PATTAxTOMMY capsule that captures the strength and influence of the African diaspora movement with the message “unity is strength, division is weakness.” Patta and Tommy Hilfiger share a belief in openness and are committed to fostering inclusivity, collaboration and community. The PATTAxTOMMY  range will be available via the Patta retail network and PattaxTommy.com globally beginning Friday, April 9, 2021 at 1 p.m. CEST, and via selected wholesale partners starting April 16, 2021.      Collaborating for the first-time, Patta and Tommy Hilfiger centered the  PATTAxTOMMY capsule around the Pan-African Flag, Black unity and community, channeling a sense of interconnected histories, present times and the future that lies ahead. To celebrate this, the iconic white, red and blue TOMMY colors have been replaced by the traditional Pan-African colors of deep red, black, green and yellow, putting African culture and community self-actualization front and center in this capsule.      The  PATTAxTOMMY campaign aims to shine a light on the multifaceted nature of life in inner cities. The video assets were captured in Lagos, Nigeria by Nigerian filmmaker Dafe Oboro through his short film, “Two Become One,” with campaign photography by Moroccan visual artist Hassan Hajjaj. To further underscore the collection’s message, Patta has produced “Katibo Yeye,” a documentary directed by award-winning Dutch film director, Frank Zichem.. The film follows Clarence Breeveld, a Suriname-born man living in the Netherlands, as he attempts to trace the shipping route from Ghana to Suriname traveled by his enslaved ancestors, visiting locations where slave trading took place. “Katibo Yeye” will be available to watch at PattaxTommy.com for a limited time only.      The unisex PATTAxTOMMY capsule collection is inspired by a series of iconic pieces from the TOMMY JEANS archive. Available in adult and kid’s sizes, the collection includes T-shirts, hoodies, sweatshirts, outerwear, jeans and baseball caps. T-Shirts feature the diaspora message, “GREAT PRINCIPLES, GREAT IDEALS KNOW NO NATIONALITY.” Across the range, a hybrid TOMMY JEANS flag is crossed with a Pan-African flag, which sit above the Patta logo and capsule theme of 'UNITY IS STRENGTH DIVISION IS WEAKNESS’ inspiring positivity and a “love for all” mentality.      As part of this partnership, Tommy Hilfiger and Patta will donate to The Black Archives from Amsterdam, Sistah Space from London, and The Good Neighborhood Collective from Milan – each chosen for their dedication to celebrating Afro-descendants and uplifting their voices. Patta has been a long-time supporter of these three organizations, and through the donations, the Dutch street wear company and Tommy Hilfiger seek to further build on their work to drive awareness, education and empowerment of the African diaspora movement.      For more information about Tommy Hilfiger’s sustainability journey, Make It Possible program and overarching vision to create fashion that “Wastes Nothing and Welcomes All,” visit sustainability.tommy.com. Tommy Hilfiger, and trailblazing Amsterdam-based street wear brand, Patta, announce the Spring 2021 PATTAxTOMMY capsule that captures the strength and influence of the African diaspora movement with the message “unity is strength, division is weakness.” Patta and Tommy Hilfiger share a belief in openness and are committed to fostering inclusivity, collaboration and community. The PATTAxTOMMY  range will be available via the Patta retail network and PattaxTommy.com globally beginning Friday, April 9, 2021 at 1 p.m. CEST, and via selected wholesale partners starting April 16, 2021.      Collaborating for the first-time, Patta and Tommy Hilfiger centered the  PATTAxTOMMY capsule around the Pan-African Flag, Black unity and community, channeling a sense of interconnected histories, present times and the future that lies ahead. To celebrate this, the iconic white, red and blue TOMMY colors have been replaced by the traditional Pan-African colors of deep red, black, green and yellow, putting African culture and community self-actualization front and center in this capsule.      The  PATTAxTOMMY campaign aims to shine a light on the multifaceted nature of life in inner cities. The video assets were captured in Lagos, Nigeria by Nigerian filmmaker Dafe Oboro through his short film, “Two Become One,” with campaign photography by Moroccan visual artist Hassan Hajjaj. To further underscore the collection’s message, Patta has produced “Katibo Yeye,” a documentary directed by award-winning Dutch film director, Frank Zichem.. The film follows Clarence Breeveld, a Suriname-born man living in the Netherlands, as he attempts to trace the shipping route from Ghana to Suriname traveled by his enslaved ancestors, visiting locations where slave trading took place. “Katibo Yeye” will be available to watch at PattaxTommy.com for a limited time only.      The unisex PATTAxTOMMY capsule collection is inspired by a series of iconic pieces from the TOMMY JEANS archive. Available in adult and kid’s sizes, the collection includes T-shirts, hoodies, sweatshirts, outerwear, jeans and baseball caps. T-Shirts feature the diaspora message, “GREAT PRINCIPLES, GREAT IDEALS KNOW NO NATIONALITY.” Across the range, a hybrid TOMMY JEANS flag is crossed with a Pan-African flag, which sit above the Patta logo and capsule theme of 'UNITY IS STRENGTH DIVISION IS WEAKNESS’ inspiring positivity and a “love for all” mentality.      As part of this partnership, Tommy Hilfiger and Patta will donate to The Black Archives from Amsterdam, Sistah Space from London, and The Good Neighborhood Collective from Milan – each chosen for their dedication to celebrating Afro-descendants and uplifting their voices. Patta has been a long-time supporter of these three organizations, and through the donations, the Dutch street wear company and Tommy Hilfiger seek to further build on their work to drive awareness, education and empowerment of the African diaspora movement.      For more information about Tommy Hilfiger’s sustainability journey, Make It Possible program and overarching vision to create fashion that “Wastes Nothing and Welcomes All,” visit sustainability.tommy.com.

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Columbia
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Columbia

Travel Columbia capturd by Pia Riverola. Columbia capturd by Pia Riverola.

EXHIBITION VOICES OF FASHION: BLACK COUTURE, BEAUTY & STYLES IN CENTRAAL MUSEUM UTRECHT
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EXHIBITION VOICES OF FASHION: BLACK COUTURE, BEAUTY & STYLES IN CENTRAAL MUSEUM UTRECHT

Exhibition Centraal Museum Utrecht presents the major fashion exhibition Voices of Fashion: Black Couture, Beauty & Styles, in which iconic designs, models and sources of inspiration promote a more inclusive fashion legacy. In this multi-disciplinary exhibition, fashion curator Ninke Bloemberg teams up with fashion activist, co-curator and founder of Diversity Rules, Janice Deul, to examine how Black designers have influenced the world of fashion, what stereotypes continue to exist, and how beauty is perceived. Voices of Fashion was created in close collaboration with designers, photographers and models from the Netherlands and abroad. The visually striking exhibition design is by AFARAI’s Afaina de Jong, and the exhibition is structured according to several themes.     COUTURE   The exhibition opens with a dazzling display of couture by domestic and international Black designers. To name just a few highlights: first is a highly personal installation by South African designer Thebe Magugu, who also presented this collection during the Paris Fashion Week. Magugu won the prestigious LVHM prize for young designers in 2019. Also, from South Africa, filmmaker and photographer Kristin-Lee Moolman worked with the stylist Ib Kamar to produce photographs and a film featuring Magugu’s work.   Of course the exhibition also features work by Virgil Abloh, creative director of men’s fashion at Louis Vuitton and founder of the label Off-White. Several of his ensembles are on display, including the black- and-white men’s suit consisting of woollen pants and a coat decorated with what seems to be a classic pied-de-poule pattern. On closer inspection, however, the motif turns out to be based on the shape of the African continent.   Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are represented in the exhibition with two ensembles: one which they created for Nina Ricci, consisting of silk pants and blouse and their signature ‘bucket hat’, and a second iconic design by their own Botter label. Maria Grazia Chiuri, the first-ever female creative director at fashion house Dior, worked with the African designer Pathé Ouédraogo – better known as Pathé’O – to pay tribute to the African continent, as part of Dior’s Resort 2020 collection. On display is an indigo-coloured skirt and jacket. This collaboration embodied the identity of the entire collection.   We are also proud to show an iconic evening gown made of down, from Moncler. It is the result of a collaboration between Valentino’s creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli with the Ethiopian label Lemlem, founded by model and designer Liya Kebede. The Surinamese-Dutch designer Marga Weimans launched her own label in 2006 and has presented several successful collections, investigating themes such as identity, technology and beauty. The exhibition shows an outfit from the Power of my Dreams collection, in which she infused traditional African wax prints with new meaning. We furthermore show an impressive black evening gown from her Debut collection, about which Weimans says: “It is my first collection, in which I tell a story about the sublime and seductive beauty of the Parisian couture landscape, using the archetypical ballgown as basis. I combine this with the horrors of slavery, from which the fashion industry arose. The blood, sweat and tears of ambition are mixed with the blood, sweat and tears of my enslaved ancestors.”   Stereotypes still abound: consider the Surinamese-Dutch designer Giorgio Toppin of the Xhosa label, who is regularly asked whether he makes streetwear while in fact, he specialises in men’s couture.     THE INFLUENCE OF STEETWEAR AND MUSIC   Hip-hop music has had a strong impact on everyday fashion and even couture. Cross Colours, famous for dressing ‘the Fresh Prince of Bel Air’, among others, was founded in 1989 by TJ Walker and Carl Jones. Their goal was to design clothing that is blind to prejudice. With their creations, full of symbolism and statements, the designers aim to give Black youths a voice. This goal is echoed by Dutch Black- owned brands like Patta, Daily Paper, Filling Pieces, The New Originals and HOSSELAER. These brands staked out their spot in the fashion industry by selling sneakers or T-shirts, soon followed by complete collections and sales points across the world. Such labels have become a permanent fixture of the fashion landscape. They owe their success in part to their collaborations with domestic and international labels like Nike and Adidas, but the real strength of these entrepreneurs is their sense of shared responsibility towards young people who feel unheard or misunderstood.   Political and social messages are also found in the colourful streetwear collections by Priya Ahluwalia. Her designs are always geared to sustainability, for instance by creating a series of new designs using Adidas deadstock. The creations by Farida Sedoc, artist, entrepreneur and founder of HOSSELAER are likewise suffused by statements. Especially for Voices of Fashion she made an installation using a selection of T-shirts from her private archive.     BEAUTY   Black women often were and continue to be marginalised. Their skills, beauties and body shapes are rarely celebrated and their natural Black hair is viewed as ‘unprofessional’. The cosmetics industry, with its limited colour palette, has likewise seemed to ignore them. Black women have been fighting to change this for decades. A selection of Dutch and international fashion magazine covers from the 1960s until today celebrates the diversity of Black models. This part of the exhibition includes photographs made by Kwame Brathwaite in the 1960s of the people and street images that inspired the Black is Beautiful movement in New York. The Black Panthers and icons such as Angela Davis, instantly recognisable for her large afro, contributed to the international reputation of this movement. More than 50 years on, the goal of highlighting the beauty of Black women remains relevant, although change does seem to be underway.     A BOOK, A MULTI-MEDIA TOUR, AND FRINGE PROGRAMME   The exhibition is accompanied by a lavishly illustrated book containing unique interviews and several long-reads, designed by Serana Angelista and Glamcult.Studio. The book will be published in mid- February and can be purchased in (among other outlets) the Museum Shop and from Waanders publishers.   Discover much more through the Voices of Fashion multi-media tour featuring the voices of Guillaume Schmidt (Patta), Giovanca Ostiana (singer, model, presenter) and Denise Jannah (singer).   There is also an extensive fringe programme, with the collaboration of The Black Archives, the African Fashion Research Institute, The New Originals, and others. More details of this programme will be announced online. The exhibition is sponsored by the City of Utrecht, BankGiro Loterij, Fonds 21, the   Creative Industries Fund NL, VSBfonds, Prins Bernhard Culture Fund, Mondriaan Fund and Prins Claus Fund.   Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race)Voices of fashion is part of Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race), a partnership between twelve museums in the Netherlands that are all working to embed the practices underpinning true inclusion and diversity in the DNA of the museum industry. The Centraal Museum’s partners in this venture are the Amsterdam Museum, the Bonnefanten, the Dordrechts Museum, the Frans Hals Museum, Museum Arnhem, the Rembrandt House Museum, the Rijksmuseum, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, the Van Abbemuseum, the Van Gogh Museum and the Zeeuws Museum. We hope to welcome other museums aboard in the future. The museums in this partnership will this year hold exhibitions and stage events highlighting themes of cultural diversity and slavery/the legacy of colonialism. Centraal Museum Utrecht presents the major fashion exhibition Voices of Fashion: Black Couture, Beauty & Styles, in which iconic designs, models and sources of inspiration promote a more inclusive fashion legacy. In this multi-disciplinary exhibition, fashion curator Ninke Bloemberg teams up with fashion activist, co-curator and founder of Diversity Rules, Janice Deul, to examine how Black designers have influenced the world of fashion, what stereotypes continue to exist, and how beauty is perceived. Voices of Fashion was created in close collaboration with designers, photographers and models from the Netherlands and abroad. The visually striking exhibition design is by AFARAI’s Afaina de Jong, and the exhibition is structured according to several themes.     COUTURE   The exhibition opens with a dazzling display of couture by domestic and international Black designers. To name just a few highlights: first is a highly personal installation by South African designer Thebe Magugu, who also presented this collection during the Paris Fashion Week. Magugu won the prestigious LVHM prize for young designers in 2019. Also, from South Africa, filmmaker and photographer Kristin-Lee Moolman worked with the stylist Ib Kamar to produce photographs and a film featuring Magugu’s work.   Of course the exhibition also features work by Virgil Abloh, creative director of men’s fashion at Louis Vuitton and founder of the label Off-White. Several of his ensembles are on display, including the black- and-white men’s suit consisting of woollen pants and a coat decorated with what seems to be a classic pied-de-poule pattern. On closer inspection, however, the motif turns out to be based on the shape of the African continent.   Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are represented in the exhibition with two ensembles: one which they created for Nina Ricci, consisting of silk pants and blouse and their signature ‘bucket hat’, and a second iconic design by their own Botter label. Maria Grazia Chiuri, the first-ever female creative director at fashion house Dior, worked with the African designer Pathé Ouédraogo – better known as Pathé’O – to pay tribute to the African continent, as part of Dior’s Resort 2020 collection. On display is an indigo-coloured skirt and jacket. This collaboration embodied the identity of the entire collection.   We are also proud to show an iconic evening gown made of down, from Moncler. It is the result of a collaboration between Valentino’s creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli with the Ethiopian label Lemlem, founded by model and designer Liya Kebede. The Surinamese-Dutch designer Marga Weimans launched her own label in 2006 and has presented several successful collections, investigating themes such as identity, technology and beauty. The exhibition shows an outfit from the Power of my Dreams collection, in which she infused traditional African wax prints with new meaning. We furthermore show an impressive black evening gown from her Debut collection, about which Weimans says: “It is my first collection, in which I tell a story about the sublime and seductive beauty of the Parisian couture landscape, using the archetypical ballgown as basis. I combine this with the horrors of slavery, from which the fashion industry arose. The blood, sweat and tears of ambition are mixed with the blood, sweat and tears of my enslaved ancestors.”   Stereotypes still abound: consider the Surinamese-Dutch designer Giorgio Toppin of the Xhosa label, who is regularly asked whether he makes streetwear while in fact, he specialises in men’s couture.     THE INFLUENCE OF STEETWEAR AND MUSIC   Hip-hop music has had a strong impact on everyday fashion and even couture. Cross Colours, famous for dressing ‘the Fresh Prince of Bel Air’, among others, was founded in 1989 by TJ Walker and Carl Jones. Their goal was to design clothing that is blind to prejudice. With their creations, full of symbolism and statements, the designers aim to give Black youths a voice. This goal is echoed by Dutch Black- owned brands like Patta, Daily Paper, Filling Pieces, The New Originals and HOSSELAER. These brands staked out their spot in the fashion industry by selling sneakers or T-shirts, soon followed by complete collections and sales points across the world. Such labels have become a permanent fixture of the fashion landscape. They owe their success in part to their collaborations with domestic and international labels like Nike and Adidas, but the real strength of these entrepreneurs is their sense of shared responsibility towards young people who feel unheard or misunderstood.   Political and social messages are also found in the colourful streetwear collections by Priya Ahluwalia. Her designs are always geared to sustainability, for instance by creating a series of new designs using Adidas deadstock. The creations by Farida Sedoc, artist, entrepreneur and founder of HOSSELAER are likewise suffused by statements. Especially for Voices of Fashion she made an installation using a selection of T-shirts from her private archive.     BEAUTY   Black women often were and continue to be marginalised. Their skills, beauties and body shapes are rarely celebrated and their natural Black hair is viewed as ‘unprofessional’. The cosmetics industry, with its limited colour palette, has likewise seemed to ignore them. Black women have been fighting to change this for decades. A selection of Dutch and international fashion magazine covers from the 1960s until today celebrates the diversity of Black models. This part of the exhibition includes photographs made by Kwame Brathwaite in the 1960s of the people and street images that inspired the Black is Beautiful movement in New York. The Black Panthers and icons such as Angela Davis, instantly recognisable for her large afro, contributed to the international reputation of this movement. More than 50 years on, the goal of highlighting the beauty of Black women remains relevant, although change does seem to be underway.     A BOOK, A MULTI-MEDIA TOUR, AND FRINGE PROGRAMME   The exhibition is accompanied by a lavishly illustrated book containing unique interviews and several long-reads, designed by Serana Angelista and Glamcult.Studio. The book will be published in mid- February and can be purchased in (among other outlets) the Museum Shop and from Waanders publishers.   Discover much more through the Voices of Fashion multi-media tour featuring the voices of Guillaume Schmidt (Patta), Giovanca Ostiana (singer, model, presenter) and Denise Jannah (singer).   There is also an extensive fringe programme, with the collaboration of The Black Archives, the African Fashion Research Institute, The New Originals, and others. More details of this programme will be announced online. The exhibition is sponsored by the City of Utrecht, BankGiro Loterij, Fonds 21, the   Creative Industries Fund NL, VSBfonds, Prins Bernhard Culture Fund, Mondriaan Fund and Prins Claus Fund.   Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race)Voices of fashion is part of Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race), a partnership between twelve museums in the Netherlands that are all working to embed the practices underpinning true inclusion and diversity in the DNA of the museum industry. The Centraal Museum’s partners in this venture are the Amsterdam Museum, the Bonnefanten, the Dordrechts Museum, the Frans Hals Museum, Museum Arnhem, the Rembrandt House Museum, the Rijksmuseum, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, the Van Abbemuseum, the Van Gogh Museum and the Zeeuws Museum. We hope to welcome other museums aboard in the future. The museums in this partnership will this year hold exhibitions and stage events highlighting themes of cultural diversity and slavery/the legacy of colonialism.

LOEWE LAUNCHES ELEPHANT BAG IN SHUKA FABRIC WITH ‘KNOT ON MY PLANET’
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LOEWE LAUNCHES ELEPHANT BAG IN SHUKA FABRIC WITH ‘KNOT ON MY PLANET’

Design In support of the Elephant Crisis Fund, LOEWE’s annual collaboration with Knot On My Planet presents the Elephant bag crafted in traditional Shuka fabricwith a tasselled strap hand-woven by women from Kenya’s Samburu Trust.     LOEWE’s collaboration with wildlife campaign Knot On My Planet is now in its third year, and brings the Elephant bag entirely crafted in Shuka; a vibrant checkered fabric traditionally used by the Kenyan Maasai tribes people to create shawls.     The LOEWE and Knot On My Planet Elephant bag features a tasselled strap hand-woven by an artisan collective of women from the Samburu Trust in Northern Kenya. Also crafted in the same vibrant colours found in the Shuka shawl, this textile speaks of the Samburu people’s affinity with the natural world that sustains their way of life: blue for the sky, red for the blood of their cattle and white for their cows’ milk. Limited to 300 editions, the Elephant bag launches on March 25, 2021 as an online exclusive, on loewe.com and MyTheresa.com.     Named after the age-old tradition of tying knots to remember—as elephants never forget —Knot On My Planet was founded by Trish Goff and David Bonnouvrier, focusing on a simple mission: to highlight the plight of the African Elephant. The continuing demand for and trade in ivory has encouraged the ongoing poaching of these majestic creatures in their natural habitats, dramatically shrinking their numbers. 100 per cent of the bags’ sales proceeds will be donated to the Elephant Crisis Fund—a joint initiative of Save the Elephants and the Wildlife Conservation Network, that funds the best ideas and most urgent actions by highly vetted conservation organization working for safeguard the future of elephants.     #LOEWEkomp #KnotOnMyPlanet #ElephantCrisisFund In support of the Elephant Crisis Fund, LOEWE’s annual collaboration with Knot On My Planet presents the Elephant bag crafted in traditional Shuka fabricwith a tasselled strap hand-woven by women from Kenya’s Samburu Trust.     LOEWE’s collaboration with wildlife campaign Knot On My Planet is now in its third year, and brings the Elephant bag entirely crafted in Shuka; a vibrant checkered fabric traditionally used by the Kenyan Maasai tribes people to create shawls.     The LOEWE and Knot On My Planet Elephant bag features a tasselled strap hand-woven by an artisan collective of women from the Samburu Trust in Northern Kenya. Also crafted in the same vibrant colours found in the Shuka shawl, this textile speaks of the Samburu people’s affinity with the natural world that sustains their way of life: blue for the sky, red for the blood of their cattle and white for their cows’ milk. Limited to 300 editions, the Elephant bag launches on March 25, 2021 as an online exclusive, on loewe.com and MyTheresa.com.     Named after the age-old tradition of tying knots to remember—as elephants never forget —Knot On My Planet was founded by Trish Goff and David Bonnouvrier, focusing on a simple mission: to highlight the plight of the African Elephant. The continuing demand for and trade in ivory has encouraged the ongoing poaching of these majestic creatures in their natural habitats, dramatically shrinking their numbers. 100 per cent of the bags’ sales proceeds will be donated to the Elephant Crisis Fund—a joint initiative of Save the Elephants and the Wildlife Conservation Network, that funds the best ideas and most urgent actions by highly vetted conservation organization working for safeguard the future of elephants.     #LOEWEkomp #KnotOnMyPlanet #ElephantCrisisFund

Hugo Comte's first photo exhibition at Tase Gallery
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Hugo Comte's first photo exhibition at Tase Gallery

Photography Image-Maker Hugo Comte, launches his first collective works this February in the form of a curated book of imagery. The book is accompanied by an exhibition at the Tase Gallery, LA, where Comte will be exhibiting in the form of a one-week show of seven selected works in the brand new gallery space ( February 25th – March 3rd).     Intending to bring together women who’ve inspired him, the artist has created an object where all of his portraits can be viewed in one place. A combination of existing and never-before-seen imagery, featuring muses such as Bella Hadid, Kendall Jenner, Irina Shayk, as well as Dua Lipa, for whom Comte shot her latest album imagery. The book is a celebration of women who have always been at the centre of his artistic vision. Commanding the camera, these women aren't merely subjects; Comte aims to capture their thoughts, emotions and desires... They are watching us, allowing the viewer to gaze whilst they remain completely in control. The subjects featured all possess marked differences but each becomes synchronised, encompassed in Comte’s cinematic and dreamlike spaces and creates an intimacy between the subject and the person viewing – we become a part of their dreams. This is, in no small way, due to his meticulous creative process and almost architectural approach to space, light and atmosphere. The book also showcases never before seen works including special pieces made in collaboration with airbrush artists to repaint his imagery, as well as unique CGI pieces, designed in a similar grained texture and culminating in the recognisable style for which he’s best known. The works are extremely realistic whilst retaining an air of mystery. The book itself is paired back and minimal in approach, remaining all white externally and nameless. The aim is for the book to live and be used, the white changing with time and age. Hugo worked with Art Director David McKelvey on the 200-page collection, which boasts 85 images and has only a sole barcode on its front cover, which is a symbol of huge significance to Comte. In the similar way in which artists’ name their most famous pieces, Comte has always bestowed a barcode upon each of his images; turning something digital into a more physical and material piece. When used in the book, the barcode is given more space and importance, becoming an artwork in itself and very much a symbol of the artist's work.     We had a chance to speak with Hugo about his new exhibition and book.     Tell us about your new book, what inspired it and what is your message with the newly launched book?   'The book is a hybrid retrospective; putting into perspective archives and new work together, in order to create a new narrative and narrow my identity into a precise vision of attitudes, atmosphere and colours. Creating new narratives between the muses themselves, as well as between the muses and the viewer. The book becomes an object of synchronisation, affirmation and contemplation. A style and design manifesto defining an era for the artist and whoever projects their dreams into his imagery.    The book doesn't have a given title because I didn’t want people to associate any particular thought around this vision of women or the object itself. I wanted it to remain completely neutral and feel the collection of images are the title and don't require an additional label. The barcode is the symbol of the book, which in itself is unpronounceable and is its own language, much like Prince’s love symbol .      What is it like for you personally to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic? Have you been able to stay creative during these times? Perhaps you developed new dreams, projects, or discovered new passions?   The process of creating, selecting, and narrowing my work for this project has really highlighted what is the most exciting and important part for me and that is my process of working with these models, as well as the importance of colour. By creating a book it has made me realise who I am as an artist, and how I want to represent myself by translating my identity through design, art and communication which is very interesting.     What do you think is the most important thing about the current times? What positive aspects can we draw from this difficult period?   'I think the entire industry started to give real credit to new creatives right away; giving a voice to new creatives with way more diversity because they want to hear new thoughts and vibes, and not waiting for validation. I think this is very beautiful and exciting and very motivating for everyone'       Tell us about the inspiring people photographed for your new book. What are some of your personal highlights?   My first thought was to use only portraits of women as I feel it is the most intimate part of my work and where I express myself the best.  Groups wouldn’t allow such intimacy as a portrait does, where it's the viewer and the woman only. When I shoot an image I always try to give the feeling that the woman is not being photographed but that she is looking through the camera, which gives a direct contact between the watcher and the muse.   A model’s depth, the intensity in her intention, and the ability to synchronise this with the way she looks is the most important thing for me.   I dedicate my entire being, energy and focus to making these women as beautiful as possible. Not just a universal vision of beauty but in a very personal way. I really look at them constantly and am very present, I am completely involved and hands-on in every part of the process, and they know that my intention and only concern the whole day is to dedicate myself to them.       We also had a delight speaking with Jessie Andrews, founder of Tase Gallery in LA.     What exhibitions  do you have planned for in Tase Gallery for the coming months?   Hugo is the first exhibition outside of my own. For the month of March for Women’s Month we have rotating female artist each week that will be featured, and in April we have Claude Home who is a NYC based mid-century furniture collector who will replicate her studio at Tase. In May we’re working with ‘Structure’ a segment of Better Shelter — the Ikea Foundation and the UN created a humanitarian innovation project which finds housing solutions for refugees — they will be building a structure inside of the gallery and we will allow people to come see and donate to the NFP.        With your new opening of your own gallery, what inspired you to open it?     I wanted to change the way people interact with fashion and art. More communal than cold. Life is about community and supporting each other and now I have a space where I can do that!         Tell us something that is not on your resume.   Coffee connoisseur.      What is your biggest lesson learnt from 2020?   2020 for me was the year that made me dive deeper into what I was already doing and take time for myself. I learned who I really wanted to spend time with, what projects I actually cared about and what excites me. It helped me refine the gallery project. Made me create sustainably initiatives for Bagatiba. Plan further ahead for my ready to wear project Jeu. Now in 2021 I must put them all into effect!  Image-Maker Hugo Comte, launches his first collective works this February in the form of a curated book of imagery. The book is accompanied by an exhibition at the Tase Gallery, LA, where Comte will be exhibiting in the form of a one-week show of seven selected works in the brand new gallery space ( February 25th – March 3rd).     Intending to bring together women who’ve inspired him, the artist has created an object where all of his portraits can be viewed in one place. A combination of existing and never-before-seen imagery, featuring muses such as Bella Hadid, Kendall Jenner, Irina Shayk, as well as Dua Lipa, for whom Comte shot her latest album imagery. The book is a celebration of women who have always been at the centre of his artistic vision. Commanding the camera, these women aren't merely subjects; Comte aims to capture their thoughts, emotions and desires... They are watching us, allowing the viewer to gaze whilst they remain completely in control. The subjects featured all possess marked differences but each becomes synchronised, encompassed in Comte’s cinematic and dreamlike spaces and creates an intimacy between the subject and the person viewing – we become a part of their dreams. This is, in no small way, due to his meticulous creative process and almost architectural approach to space, light and atmosphere. The book also showcases never before seen works including special pieces made in collaboration with airbrush artists to repaint his imagery, as well as unique CGI pieces, designed in a similar grained texture and culminating in the recognisable style for which he’s best known. The works are extremely realistic whilst retaining an air of mystery. The book itself is paired back and minimal in approach, remaining all white externally and nameless. The aim is for the book to live and be used, the white changing with time and age. Hugo worked with Art Director David McKelvey on the 200-page collection, which boasts 85 images and has only a sole barcode on its front cover, which is a symbol of huge significance to Comte. In the similar way in which artists’ name their most famous pieces, Comte has always bestowed a barcode upon each of his images; turning something digital into a more physical and material piece. When used in the book, the barcode is given more space and importance, becoming an artwork in itself and very much a symbol of the artist's work.     We had a chance to speak with Hugo about his new exhibition and book.     Tell us about your new book, what inspired it and what is your message with the newly launched book?   'The book is a hybrid retrospective; putting into perspective archives and new work together, in order to create a new narrative and narrow my identity into a precise vision of attitudes, atmosphere and colours. Creating new narratives between the muses themselves, as well as between the muses and the viewer. The book becomes an object of synchronisation, affirmation and contemplation. A style and design manifesto defining an era for the artist and whoever projects their dreams into his imagery.    The book doesn't have a given title because I didn’t want people to associate any particular thought around this vision of women or the object itself. I wanted it to remain completely neutral and feel the collection of images are the title and don't require an additional label. The barcode is the symbol of the book, which in itself is unpronounceable and is its own language, much like Prince’s love symbol .      What is it like for you personally to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic? Have you been able to stay creative during these times? Perhaps you developed new dreams, projects, or discovered new passions?   The process of creating, selecting, and narrowing my work for this project has really highlighted what is the most exciting and important part for me and that is my process of working with these models, as well as the importance of colour. By creating a book it has made me realise who I am as an artist, and how I want to represent myself by translating my identity through design, art and communication which is very interesting.     What do you think is the most important thing about the current times? What positive aspects can we draw from this difficult period?   'I think the entire industry started to give real credit to new creatives right away; giving a voice to new creatives with way more diversity because they want to hear new thoughts and vibes, and not waiting for validation. I think this is very beautiful and exciting and very motivating for everyone'       Tell us about the inspiring people photographed for your new book. What are some of your personal highlights?   My first thought was to use only portraits of women as I feel it is the most intimate part of my work and where I express myself the best.  Groups wouldn’t allow such intimacy as a portrait does, where it's the viewer and the woman only. When I shoot an image I always try to give the feeling that the woman is not being photographed but that she is looking through the camera, which gives a direct contact between the watcher and the muse.   A model’s depth, the intensity in her intention, and the ability to synchronise this with the way she looks is the most important thing for me.   I dedicate my entire being, energy and focus to making these women as beautiful as possible. Not just a universal vision of beauty but in a very personal way. I really look at them constantly and am very present, I am completely involved and hands-on in every part of the process, and they know that my intention and only concern the whole day is to dedicate myself to them.       We also had a delight speaking with Jessie Andrews, founder of Tase Gallery in LA.     What exhibitions  do you have planned for in Tase Gallery for the coming months?   Hugo is the first exhibition outside of my own. For the month of March for Women’s Month we have rotating female artist each week that will be featured, and in April we have Claude Home who is a NYC based mid-century furniture collector who will replicate her studio at Tase. In May we’re working with ‘Structure’ a segment of Better Shelter — the Ikea Foundation and the UN created a humanitarian innovation project which finds housing solutions for refugees — they will be building a structure inside of the gallery and we will allow people to come see and donate to the NFP.        With your new opening of your own gallery, what inspired you to open it?     I wanted to change the way people interact with fashion and art. More communal than cold. Life is about community and supporting each other and now I have a space where I can do that!         Tell us something that is not on your resume.   Coffee connoisseur.      What is your biggest lesson learnt from 2020?   2020 for me was the year that made me dive deeper into what I was already doing and take time for myself. I learned who I really wanted to spend time with, what projects I actually cared about and what excites me. It helped me refine the gallery project. Made me create sustainably initiatives for Bagatiba. Plan further ahead for my ready to wear project Jeu. Now in 2021 I must put them all into effect! 

Bob Marley x Daily Paper Capsule Collection
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Bob Marley x Daily Paper Capsule Collection

Fashion Paying homage to the icon's legacy, on the weekend that marks his 76th birthday.     With Daily Paper’s recent introduction to their SS21 collection Future Roots, the brand continues to honour its heroes from the past, as they hope to inspire and educate the current generation to realise their potential for the future to come. This time by shining a light on the legacy of Bob Marley -- the singer-songwriter, activist and all-round trailblazer in the fight for social justice, human rights, peace, love and unity in his lifetime and beyond.          This February 6 marks the icon’s 76th birthday, coinciding with the brand's Bob Marley x Daily Paper capsule, celebrating his powerful impact through penmanship and song lyrics. Echoing wisdom of the past, Marley’s song lyrics are broken down into renowned lines, embroidered and printed onto the garments in decorative forms and shapes.      One reading NONE BUT OURSELVES CAN FREE OUR MINDS, from his widely known Redemption Song, recalling our capability to observe and influence our thoughts and opinions; whilst LOVE WOULD NEVER LEAVE US ALONE from the classic Could You Be Loved reminds us of the power of love.      The capsule features a range of soft cotton athleisure styles, sand checkered work-wear inspired silhouettes, next to a continuance of brown jacquard designs and custom made lace, firstly introduced in Daily Paper’s foregoing Spring/Summer ready release.  Paying homage to the icon's legacy, on the weekend that marks his 76th birthday.     With Daily Paper’s recent introduction to their SS21 collection Future Roots, the brand continues to honour its heroes from the past, as they hope to inspire and educate the current generation to realise their potential for the future to come. This time by shining a light on the legacy of Bob Marley -- the singer-songwriter, activist and all-round trailblazer in the fight for social justice, human rights, peace, love and unity in his lifetime and beyond.          This February 6 marks the icon’s 76th birthday, coinciding with the brand's Bob Marley x Daily Paper capsule, celebrating his powerful impact through penmanship and song lyrics. Echoing wisdom of the past, Marley’s song lyrics are broken down into renowned lines, embroidered and printed onto the garments in decorative forms and shapes.      One reading NONE BUT OURSELVES CAN FREE OUR MINDS, from his widely known Redemption Song, recalling our capability to observe and influence our thoughts and opinions; whilst LOVE WOULD NEVER LEAVE US ALONE from the classic Could You Be Loved reminds us of the power of love.      The capsule features a range of soft cotton athleisure styles, sand checkered work-wear inspired silhouettes, next to a continuance of brown jacquard designs and custom made lace, firstly introduced in Daily Paper’s foregoing Spring/Summer ready release. 

Louis Vuitton partners up with UNICEF
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Louis Vuitton partners up with UNICEF

Fashion As part of its Louis Vuitton for UNICEF partnership, Louis Vuitton adds four new colours of the Silver Lockit bracelets and launches its first Doudou Louis.      Louis Vuitton for UNICEF presents four new Silver Lockit bracelets and the Doudou Louis to raise funds for children in need. Perfectly colour coordinated, the new Silver Lockit bracelets come in pastel blue, pink, celadon green, and black. Incorporating recycled silver and organic cotton for the first time, the Silver Lockit bracelets feature the iconic padlock as well as the LV signature circular logo. In its rainbow of pastel colours, Doudou Louis, the Louis Vuitton for UNICEF teddy bear appears for the first time in textile format. Made from organic cotton, the Monogram printed textile covers the teddy bear, with embroidered Monogram flowers making up Doudou Louis’ blue eyes. Worn solo, stacked along one’s wrist, or even as snug tiny necklaces on Doudou Louis, the Silver Lockit bracelets and teddy bear are collector’s items for all admirers alike.    In continuation of its #MAKEAPROMISE campaign, Louis Vuitton is committed to raising awareness and funds for UNICEF to support the most vulnerable children around the world. By purchasing the Silver Lockit and Doudou Louis, clients will have the opportunity to help support UNICEF’s work on providing access to water, sanitation, nutrition, education, health and protection services to the most vulnerable children. This also includes support of UNICEF’s COVID-19 emergency response efforts to recover and to reimagine a world fit for every child in this unprecedented global health, economic, and social crisis.   The Silver Lockit is inspired by the tumbler lock invented by Georges Vuitton in 1890 to protect clients’ most precious belongings. Created in 2016, it was chosen as a symbol of sealing one’s promise to help children at risk. The four new Silver Lockit bracelets retail at $465 US, $100 US of which is donated to UNICEF and the Doudou Louis retails at $955 US, of which $200 US is donated to UNICEF.   Since the launch of the Silver Lockit, the partnership has raised nearly $13 million US for UNICEF. The Silver Lockit bracelets and Doudou Louis launch on 29th January on louisvuitton.com and in selected Louis Vuitton stores worldwide.   Join us. #MAKEAPROMISE UNICEF does not endorse any company, brand, product or service. As part of its Louis Vuitton for UNICEF partnership, Louis Vuitton adds four new colours of the Silver Lockit bracelets and launches its first Doudou Louis.      Louis Vuitton for UNICEF presents four new Silver Lockit bracelets and the Doudou Louis to raise funds for children in need. Perfectly colour coordinated, the new Silver Lockit bracelets come in pastel blue, pink, celadon green, and black. Incorporating recycled silver and organic cotton for the first time, the Silver Lockit bracelets feature the iconic padlock as well as the LV signature circular logo. In its rainbow of pastel colours, Doudou Louis, the Louis Vuitton for UNICEF teddy bear appears for the first time in textile format. Made from organic cotton, the Monogram printed textile covers the teddy bear, with embroidered Monogram flowers making up Doudou Louis’ blue eyes. Worn solo, stacked along one’s wrist, or even as snug tiny necklaces on Doudou Louis, the Silver Lockit bracelets and teddy bear are collector’s items for all admirers alike.    In continuation of its #MAKEAPROMISE campaign, Louis Vuitton is committed to raising awareness and funds for UNICEF to support the most vulnerable children around the world. By purchasing the Silver Lockit and Doudou Louis, clients will have the opportunity to help support UNICEF’s work on providing access to water, sanitation, nutrition, education, health and protection services to the most vulnerable children. This also includes support of UNICEF’s COVID-19 emergency response efforts to recover and to reimagine a world fit for every child in this unprecedented global health, economic, and social crisis.   The Silver Lockit is inspired by the tumbler lock invented by Georges Vuitton in 1890 to protect clients’ most precious belongings. Created in 2016, it was chosen as a symbol of sealing one’s promise to help children at risk. The four new Silver Lockit bracelets retail at $465 US, $100 US of which is donated to UNICEF and the Doudou Louis retails at $955 US, of which $200 US is donated to UNICEF.   Since the launch of the Silver Lockit, the partnership has raised nearly $13 million US for UNICEF. The Silver Lockit bracelets and Doudou Louis launch on 29th January on louisvuitton.com and in selected Louis Vuitton stores worldwide.   Join us. #MAKEAPROMISE UNICEF does not endorse any company, brand, product or service.

TOMMY HILFIGER PRESENTS FASHION FRONTIER CHALLENGE PROGRAM
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TOMMY HILFIGER PRESENTS FASHION FRONTIER CHALLENGE PROGRAM

Fashion Tommy Hilfiger, is accepting applications for the third edition of the Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge from today through March 8. The global program aims to support entrepreneurial start-up and scale-up stage businesses that develop solutions that make a positive social impact on the fashion landscape.     Since its start in 2018, the Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge has awarded 350,000 euros to entrepreneurs. Building upon Hilfiger’s sustainability platform to Waste Nothing and Welcome All, the third edition of the program aims to amplify and support Black, Indigenous and people of color entrepreneurs who are working to advance their communities and foster a more inclusive future of fashion.     For the first time, consumers are also invited to get involved and help judge submissions.     “The Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge puts a spotlight on entrepreneurs putting their heart and soul into making a positive social impact in our industry,” Tommy Hilfiger said. “This year, we want to showcase an even more diverse range of perspectives, ideas and communities by supporting BIPOC entrepreneurs. We have a responsibility to drive change across the fashion landscape, and I am honored to further our commitment to inclusivity and equal representation through the upcoming Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge.”     Interested businesses are invited to submit project proposals that focus on creating a more inclusive fashion value chain. Applicants will be narrowed down to six finalists in the fall, who will be invited to develop their project plans virtually with the support of dedicated Hilfiger and external subject matter experts. Finalists, who will get training from an experienced pitch coach, will present their final concept to a jury panel and associate audience at the global Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge final event to be held in early 2022.     Consumer judges will be asked to narrow down finalists from 200 to 50, with each being sent at least four applications to judge via the brand’s online microsite. Applications to become a consumer judge and to apply can be made through responsibility.pvh.com/tommy/fashion-frontier-challenge.     This year’s program prizes have been increased from previous years. A total of 200,000 euros will be awarded between winners. There is also an opportunity for an additional 15,000 euros prize for winning the “Audience Favorite Vote.” Prizes also include a yearlong mentorship with global Hilfiger internal experts, a place on the INSEAD Social Entrepreneurship Program and a yearlong INSEAD mentorship.     “While the fashion industry has taken positive steps toward becoming more inclusive and diverse, there is still more to be done,” said Martijn Hagman, chief executive officer of Tommy Hilfiger Global. “Through the Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge, we are furthering our commitment toward representation and diversity and helping drive the changes we most want, and need, to see.”     Last February, Hilfiger chose Apon Wellbeing and A Beautiful Mess as winners of the 2019 Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge, as reported. Apon Wellbeing, founded by Saif Rashid, was awarded 75,000 euros. The Bangladesh-based scale-up opens fair-priced shops carrying daily necessities inside factories, with products offered at a 10 percent discount to external prices and a points program that workers collect for free health insurance and health services.     Dutch start-up A Beautiful Mess was also awarded 75,000 euros. The business runs a creative space to assist refugees in helping to achieve social and economic independence by creating sustainable apparel products.     A third start-up, Sudara, was selected as the “Audience Favorite Vote,” and was awarded 10,000 euros. Based in India and the U.S., Sudara is a scale-up pajama and loungewear company that develops professional and sewing skills in women who have escaped from or are at high risk of being sex-trafficked.   Tommy Hilfiger, is accepting applications for the third edition of the Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge from today through March 8. The global program aims to support entrepreneurial start-up and scale-up stage businesses that develop solutions that make a positive social impact on the fashion landscape.     Since its start in 2018, the Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge has awarded 350,000 euros to entrepreneurs. Building upon Hilfiger’s sustainability platform to Waste Nothing and Welcome All, the third edition of the program aims to amplify and support Black, Indigenous and people of color entrepreneurs who are working to advance their communities and foster a more inclusive future of fashion.     For the first time, consumers are also invited to get involved and help judge submissions.     “The Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge puts a spotlight on entrepreneurs putting their heart and soul into making a positive social impact in our industry,” Tommy Hilfiger said. “This year, we want to showcase an even more diverse range of perspectives, ideas and communities by supporting BIPOC entrepreneurs. We have a responsibility to drive change across the fashion landscape, and I am honored to further our commitment to inclusivity and equal representation through the upcoming Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge.”     Interested businesses are invited to submit project proposals that focus on creating a more inclusive fashion value chain. Applicants will be narrowed down to six finalists in the fall, who will be invited to develop their project plans virtually with the support of dedicated Hilfiger and external subject matter experts. Finalists, who will get training from an experienced pitch coach, will present their final concept to a jury panel and associate audience at the global Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge final event to be held in early 2022.     Consumer judges will be asked to narrow down finalists from 200 to 50, with each being sent at least four applications to judge via the brand’s online microsite. Applications to become a consumer judge and to apply can be made through responsibility.pvh.com/tommy/fashion-frontier-challenge.     This year’s program prizes have been increased from previous years. A total of 200,000 euros will be awarded between winners. There is also an opportunity for an additional 15,000 euros prize for winning the “Audience Favorite Vote.” Prizes also include a yearlong mentorship with global Hilfiger internal experts, a place on the INSEAD Social Entrepreneurship Program and a yearlong INSEAD mentorship.     “While the fashion industry has taken positive steps toward becoming more inclusive and diverse, there is still more to be done,” said Martijn Hagman, chief executive officer of Tommy Hilfiger Global. “Through the Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge, we are furthering our commitment toward representation and diversity and helping drive the changes we most want, and need, to see.”     Last February, Hilfiger chose Apon Wellbeing and A Beautiful Mess as winners of the 2019 Tommy Hilfiger Fashion Frontier Challenge, as reported. Apon Wellbeing, founded by Saif Rashid, was awarded 75,000 euros. The Bangladesh-based scale-up opens fair-priced shops carrying daily necessities inside factories, with products offered at a 10 percent discount to external prices and a points program that workers collect for free health insurance and health services.     Dutch start-up A Beautiful Mess was also awarded 75,000 euros. The business runs a creative space to assist refugees in helping to achieve social and economic independence by creating sustainable apparel products.     A third start-up, Sudara, was selected as the “Audience Favorite Vote,” and was awarded 10,000 euros. Based in India and the U.S., Sudara is a scale-up pajama and loungewear company that develops professional and sewing skills in women who have escaped from or are at high risk of being sex-trafficked.  

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