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In conversation with Koen van den Broek
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In conversation with Koen van den Broek

Art We had the pleasure of speaking with Koen van den Broek about his current retrospective exhibition at Galerie Ron Mandos titled The Beginning, and how he feels about the current state of the world.     Talk to us about your background After a classical education (mathematics and Latin), I decided to study civil engineering and architecture at the university. However, after two years I decided toquit the course and make a big change and switch to the Academy of Visual Arts in Antwerp - civil engineering and architecture lacked focus in terms of design an creativity, something I was looking for. In short: I studied art over a period of seven years. In those seven years I have attended the Academy in Antwerp, Academy St Joost in Breda and the Higher Institute of Flanders (HISK). I graduated in 2000, andin that same year I had my first solo exhibition in the Kunsthalle Z33 in Hasselt and a solo with Jay Jopling at White Cube London.   How do you think Covid-19 will affect the art industry on the short and long-term? And what impact will this crisis have on how we perceive art? Covid-19 is a nightmare for millions of people around the world, but in my opinion it is also a blessing in disguise. I feel that the lockdown has been able to temporarilyhalt the ratrace of the art world. We are in a moment of geographical and social limits, which paradoxically gives us more freedom of the mind.   How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined? In contrary from what I hear from other colleagues artists,I have been very busyduring this quarantine. This period allows me to spend a lot of time in my studio where I can focus on my paintings without interruption. Additionally, next to all the preparations that went in to my current show at Galerie Ron Mandos, I am also having a lot of virtual meetings about future projects. This time also gives me the opportunity to spend more quality time with my family, reading, and walking the dog.   What is your first memory related to art? And when did you start painting? When I was around 14 years old my uncle used to take me to a beautiful wooden cabin located in the middle of nature. My uncle, being an amateur painter, was the one who taught me how to work with oil paint and how to paint landscapes.    What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined? I enjoy driving my old Ford Mustang together with my son on roads that are normally super busy but now empty due to everyone staying at home. I learned that during Covid-19 life looks a lot like my paintings. It is a lot more agreeable. Next to that, however it’s not something I “learned”, I can’t stop watching Larry David’s ‘Curb your enthusiasm ‘.  I have to admit – I am fond of curbs.   What is the story behind both silk screenprints: Hamptons & Casting Balance? Both works address very different topics and angles of my work. Hamptons is a work based on a picture that I took west of Long Island, NY. It’s very typical for my work in terms of shadows, streets corners, and referring to details of a movies. Then, when we look at Casting Balance we see a work that was based off a pictureI took at home in my own street, which is the first time I did a painting based on an image close to home. The fragility of Casting Balance is very pure and resembles the end of the life of a small plant before the winter comes. This gives a rich amount of colors balancing in the wind as if the plant is asking to get a role in a movie,casting to be the star in my painting.   The Beginning by Koen van den Broek will be on view until Saturday 13 May at Galerie Ron Mandos in Amsterdam. To visit the exhibition a viewing appointment must be booked via +31 20 320 7036. We had the pleasure of speaking with Koen van den Broek about his current retrospective exhibition at Galerie Ron Mandos titled The Beginning, and how he feels about the current state of the world.     Talk to us about your background After a classical education (mathematics and Latin), I decided to study civil engineering and architecture at the university. However, after two years I decided toquit the course and make a big change and switch to the Academy of Visual Arts in Antwerp - civil engineering and architecture lacked focus in terms of design an creativity, something I was looking for. In short: I studied art over a period of seven years. In those seven years I have attended the Academy in Antwerp, Academy St Joost in Breda and the Higher Institute of Flanders (HISK). I graduated in 2000, andin that same year I had my first solo exhibition in the Kunsthalle Z33 in Hasselt and a solo with Jay Jopling at White Cube London.   How do you think Covid-19 will affect the art industry on the short and long-term? And what impact will this crisis have on how we perceive art? Covid-19 is a nightmare for millions of people around the world, but in my opinion it is also a blessing in disguise. I feel that the lockdown has been able to temporarilyhalt the ratrace of the art world. We are in a moment of geographical and social limits, which paradoxically gives us more freedom of the mind.   How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined? In contrary from what I hear from other colleagues artists,I have been very busyduring this quarantine. This period allows me to spend a lot of time in my studio where I can focus on my paintings without interruption. Additionally, next to all the preparations that went in to my current show at Galerie Ron Mandos, I am also having a lot of virtual meetings about future projects. This time also gives me the opportunity to spend more quality time with my family, reading, and walking the dog.   What is your first memory related to art? And when did you start painting? When I was around 14 years old my uncle used to take me to a beautiful wooden cabin located in the middle of nature. My uncle, being an amateur painter, was the one who taught me how to work with oil paint and how to paint landscapes.    What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined? I enjoy driving my old Ford Mustang together with my son on roads that are normally super busy but now empty due to everyone staying at home. I learned that during Covid-19 life looks a lot like my paintings. It is a lot more agreeable. Next to that, however it’s not something I “learned”, I can’t stop watching Larry David’s ‘Curb your enthusiasm ‘.  I have to admit – I am fond of curbs.   What is the story behind both silk screenprints: Hamptons & Casting Balance? Both works address very different topics and angles of my work. Hamptons is a work based on a picture that I took west of Long Island, NY. It’s very typical for my work in terms of shadows, streets corners, and referring to details of a movies. Then, when we look at Casting Balance we see a work that was based off a pictureI took at home in my own street, which is the first time I did a painting based on an image close to home. The fragility of Casting Balance is very pure and resembles the end of the life of a small plant before the winter comes. This gives a rich amount of colors balancing in the wind as if the plant is asking to get a role in a movie,casting to be the star in my painting.   The Beginning by Koen van den Broek will be on view until Saturday 13 May at Galerie Ron Mandos in Amsterdam. To visit the exhibition a viewing appointment must be booked via +31 20 320 7036.

SAINT LAURENT RIVE DROITE  ‘NOSES ELBOWS AND KNEES’
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SAINT LAURENT RIVE DROITE ‘NOSES ELBOWS AND KNEES’

Art On May 18TH, the prestigious book curated by Neville Wake eld ‘Noses Elbows and Knees’ by Mario Sorrenti and John Baldessari will be exclusively available for a pre-order in Paris and Los Angeles stores.   Published at the end of 2017, the book includes the works exhibited at Half Gallery, New York (Noses Elbows And Knees exhibition, 14 December 2017 - 20 January 2018). A project under the curatorship of Neville Wake eld in New York.   The artist John Baldessari was famous for his paintings of body parts on photographs, a pinch towards Hollywood culture with his signature being the elements of color. The photographer, Mario Sorrenti, in the 90s, reinterpreted beauty photographs by questioning conventions. Together they wanted to deconstruct familiar representations by stripping off clothes and codes of society, trough fashion, collage and photography.   The book includes a certifcate of authenticity signed by Mario Sorrenti and John Baldessari. On May 18TH, the prestigious book curated by Neville Wake eld ‘Noses Elbows and Knees’ by Mario Sorrenti and John Baldessari will be exclusively available for a pre-order in Paris and Los Angeles stores.   Published at the end of 2017, the book includes the works exhibited at Half Gallery, New York (Noses Elbows And Knees exhibition, 14 December 2017 - 20 January 2018). A project under the curatorship of Neville Wake eld in New York.   The artist John Baldessari was famous for his paintings of body parts on photographs, a pinch towards Hollywood culture with his signature being the elements of color. The photographer, Mario Sorrenti, in the 90s, reinterpreted beauty photographs by questioning conventions. Together they wanted to deconstruct familiar representations by stripping off clothes and codes of society, trough fashion, collage and photography.   The book includes a certifcate of authenticity signed by Mario Sorrenti and John Baldessari.

At home with ballet dancer Rhys Kosakowski
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At home with ballet dancer Rhys Kosakowski

Men We are delighted to share our latest collaboration with incredibly talented ballet dancer Rhys Kosakowski.   Exclusive images and a short film by Zeb Daemen.   Who are you  and what is your profession?   Well... My name is Rhys Kosakowski, and I'm a professional dancer with the Sydney Dance Company and former Ballet Dancer with The Houston Ballet Company. I am a fiery, creative and forward thinking person always looking to push myself artistically and physically. I have been merging my dance career with the fashion industry for about 5 years now and love the way movement and fashion go hand in hand. Its a beautiful thing to see all Artistic Art forms come together to make even more diverse and interesting ART.     How do you think Covid-19 will affect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion? Do you believe everything will just go back to normal after Covid-19, or how do you see it will be?   ​I don't know too much about the entire Fashion Industry but I know that it has struggled through this time with getting materials from overseas, struggling to promote labels with out being able to shoot clothes on models and have new campaigns out and just the overall loss of money most brands are facing. Knowing how fast the world moves I'm pretty certain things will go back to normal in 6 months or so but you never know. People will always love fashion, because everyone desires to look good and fantasize's about luxury products.    How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined?   I consider myself very lucky to be an artist because it means i can stay creative no matter where I am stuck in isolation... Lately to keep myself happy and motivated I've been doing repertoire memory and ballet class every morning with my Company and occasional yoga and stretching classes to maintain my body. Working out in the sun on my rooftop has been extra special because I've just moved into my new apartment and I have never had a rooftop before so very exciting. Also been doing things like potting plants, making macrame planters, drawing, cooking and self care.      What is in your planning or was in your planning for this year and how will Covid-19 effect that?   It is my first season with The Sydney Dance Company and we had about 19 tours planned this year, Nationally and Internationally. The Government has said Performances of all kinds will not take place for another 4 months. We are all hoping that we can get on stage soon after September.    What is your daily beauty routine like? And what beauty products you cannot go without?   Water and Avocados are definitely my number one beauty products, but lets talk about face products as well because i love self care especially when its to do with my skin. ​I cleanse my face with Ursa Major Fantastic Face Wash and tone straight after with Ursa Major Face Tonic. Then to hydrate i use Savant Apothecary Face Lotion. These three products i have been using for two years and could not live with out.     What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined and how did you learn it?   When i was a young kid i used to draw and sketch a lot, but haven't picked up a pencil and paper in about 10 years. My sister is an amazing artist and draws beautiful sketches of fairies and creatures covered in plants and flowers. I got inspired and started draw again during isolation and realized.... i still got it! I have fascination and love for plants so I've been enjoying sketching them on paper and taking the time to imagine what plants might look like in another world.   How old were you when you first started dancing ballet and what made you start?   ​My Mum put me into tap lessons when i was 4 and got obsessed with performing. So when i turned 9 I started Jazz and Ballet. My first professional job as a dancer was when i landed the role of Billy Elliot in Billy Elliot the Musical when i was 12 years old.     Describe to me your favourite thing about dancing. How does it make you feel when you dance?    Its a really out of this world, euphoric sort of feeling. No one can really describe it unless they experience it. The way my body feels when I'm dancing is like small vibrations or electricity connecting and moving and feeling at one with the music I'm dancing to. Its so beautiful and very addictive, clearly very addictive as i haven't been able to stop dancing for years. ​The feeling i just described and being able to portray music through my body would be my favorite thing about dancing.     What is your favorite painting and has it inspired you for any of your work thus far?   ​Would have to be Salvador Dali ' DREAM CAUSED BY THE FLIGHT OF A BEE AROUND A POMEGRANATE A SECOND BEFORE AWAKENING'   ​Its my favourite because of the way his mind wanders to other places, its definitely fictional to us but makes you think twice about what could be out there in other dimensions or other planets in the universe we have not yet discovered. This keeps me inspired because it reminds me there is always something new to discover and create.      You can follow Rhys on instagram: @rhyskosakowski We are delighted to share our latest collaboration with incredibly talented ballet dancer Rhys Kosakowski.   Exclusive images and a short film by Zeb Daemen.   Who are you  and what is your profession?   Well... My name is Rhys Kosakowski, and I'm a professional dancer with the Sydney Dance Company and former Ballet Dancer with The Houston Ballet Company. I am a fiery, creative and forward thinking person always looking to push myself artistically and physically. I have been merging my dance career with the fashion industry for about 5 years now and love the way movement and fashion go hand in hand. Its a beautiful thing to see all Artistic Art forms come together to make even more diverse and interesting ART.     How do you think Covid-19 will affect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion? Do you believe everything will just go back to normal after Covid-19, or how do you see it will be?   ​I don't know too much about the entire Fashion Industry but I know that it has struggled through this time with getting materials from overseas, struggling to promote labels with out being able to shoot clothes on models and have new campaigns out and just the overall loss of money most brands are facing. Knowing how fast the world moves I'm pretty certain things will go back to normal in 6 months or so but you never know. People will always love fashion, because everyone desires to look good and fantasize's about luxury products.    How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined?   I consider myself very lucky to be an artist because it means i can stay creative no matter where I am stuck in isolation... Lately to keep myself happy and motivated I've been doing repertoire memory and ballet class every morning with my Company and occasional yoga and stretching classes to maintain my body. Working out in the sun on my rooftop has been extra special because I've just moved into my new apartment and I have never had a rooftop before so very exciting. Also been doing things like potting plants, making macrame planters, drawing, cooking and self care.      What is in your planning or was in your planning for this year and how will Covid-19 effect that?   It is my first season with The Sydney Dance Company and we had about 19 tours planned this year, Nationally and Internationally. The Government has said Performances of all kinds will not take place for another 4 months. We are all hoping that we can get on stage soon after September.    What is your daily beauty routine like? And what beauty products you cannot go without?   Water and Avocados are definitely my number one beauty products, but lets talk about face products as well because i love self care especially when its to do with my skin. ​I cleanse my face with Ursa Major Fantastic Face Wash and tone straight after with Ursa Major Face Tonic. Then to hydrate i use Savant Apothecary Face Lotion. These three products i have been using for two years and could not live with out.     What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined and how did you learn it?   When i was a young kid i used to draw and sketch a lot, but haven't picked up a pencil and paper in about 10 years. My sister is an amazing artist and draws beautiful sketches of fairies and creatures covered in plants and flowers. I got inspired and started draw again during isolation and realized.... i still got it! I have fascination and love for plants so I've been enjoying sketching them on paper and taking the time to imagine what plants might look like in another world.   How old were you when you first started dancing ballet and what made you start?   ​My Mum put me into tap lessons when i was 4 and got obsessed with performing. So when i turned 9 I started Jazz and Ballet. My first professional job as a dancer was when i landed the role of Billy Elliot in Billy Elliot the Musical when i was 12 years old.     Describe to me your favourite thing about dancing. How does it make you feel when you dance?    Its a really out of this world, euphoric sort of feeling. No one can really describe it unless they experience it. The way my body feels when I'm dancing is like small vibrations or electricity connecting and moving and feeling at one with the music I'm dancing to. Its so beautiful and very addictive, clearly very addictive as i haven't been able to stop dancing for years. ​The feeling i just described and being able to portray music through my body would be my favorite thing about dancing.     What is your favorite painting and has it inspired you for any of your work thus far?   ​Would have to be Salvador Dali ' DREAM CAUSED BY THE FLIGHT OF A BEE AROUND A POMEGRANATE A SECOND BEFORE AWAKENING'   ​Its my favourite because of the way his mind wanders to other places, its definitely fictional to us but makes you think twice about what could be out there in other dimensions or other planets in the universe we have not yet discovered. This keeps me inspired because it reminds me there is always something new to discover and create.      You can follow Rhys on instagram: @rhyskosakowski

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	 Non-profit initiative Pictures for Purpose launches fundraising print sale of established and emerging artists based in the Netherlands
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Non-profit initiative Pictures for Purpose launches fundraising print sale of established and emerging artists based in the Netherlands

Exhibition The new non-profit initiative Pictures for Purpose has launched a fundraising print sale by photographers based in the Netherlands, responding to the implications of the Covid-19 pandemic.For two weeks, works by various photographers based in the Netherlands are available for €125. Inspired by artist-led initiatives in the USA with Pictures for Elmhurst and Italy with 100 Fotografi per Bergamo the proceeds from each print sold will be shared between the Dutch Food Bank and the participating photographers. The fundraiser offers a varied and unique range of established names and emerging talent, all based in the Netherlands, including works by Viviane Sassen, Bertien van Manen, Scarlett Hooft Graafland, Awoiska van de Molen, Kyle Weeks and Hajar Benjida.  The Covid-19 pandemic presents a series of difficult challenges for those operating at various levels within the cultural sector. At times like these, Pictures for Purpose aspires to offer crucial support to members of the creative community. Participating artists can therefore opt to receive up to 50% of the proceeds of each print sold to help recoup lost income. A minimum of 50% of the proceeds are then donated to the Voedselbank. The Association of Dutch Food Banks continues to fight poverty in the Netherlands, providing food to those most in need of support. Due to the severe socioeconomic consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic, food banks are experiencing growing demand and increasing shortages. In Amsterdam, the number of households reliant on food banks has risen significantly in recent weeks and is expected to increase further in the near future. Where €5 can provide one household with food for a week, the proceeds from each print sold could support at least 10 families.   What to expect of pictures for purpose: All artists are selected with care and chosen because of their unique view and skills in contemporary photography One image per artist has been selected All prints are available for a donation of €125.00 (including tax) All prints are 210 x 297 mm in size, with a variable printed area depending on the aspect ratio of the photograph in question. All artworks are unsigned and available in an open edition Participating artists can opt to receive either 25% or 50% of the proceeds from each print sold to help recoup lost income. A minimum of 50% of the proceeds will be donated to the Dutch Food Bank.  Every artist can alternatively decide to donate all of the proceeds to the Dutch Food Bank. The fundraiser runs for two weeks from Monday May 11th until Monday May 25th. The Amsterdam-based Fotolab will provide professional printing, packaging and shipping services. A subsidised fee of €13.30 will be allocated from each print sold to production expenses.     The fundraiser runs for two weeks, from Monday May 11th until Monday May 25th through the online platform www.picturesforpurpose.org. The new non-profit initiative Pictures for Purpose has launched a fundraising print sale by photographers based in the Netherlands, responding to the implications of the Covid-19 pandemic.For two weeks, works by various photographers based in the Netherlands are available for €125. Inspired by artist-led initiatives in the USA with Pictures for Elmhurst and Italy with 100 Fotografi per Bergamo the proceeds from each print sold will be shared between the Dutch Food Bank and the participating photographers. The fundraiser offers a varied and unique range of established names and emerging talent, all based in the Netherlands, including works by Viviane Sassen, Bertien van Manen, Scarlett Hooft Graafland, Awoiska van de Molen, Kyle Weeks and Hajar Benjida.  The Covid-19 pandemic presents a series of difficult challenges for those operating at various levels within the cultural sector. At times like these, Pictures for Purpose aspires to offer crucial support to members of the creative community. Participating artists can therefore opt to receive up to 50% of the proceeds of each print sold to help recoup lost income. A minimum of 50% of the proceeds are then donated to the Voedselbank. The Association of Dutch Food Banks continues to fight poverty in the Netherlands, providing food to those most in need of support. Due to the severe socioeconomic consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic, food banks are experiencing growing demand and increasing shortages. In Amsterdam, the number of households reliant on food banks has risen significantly in recent weeks and is expected to increase further in the near future. Where €5 can provide one household with food for a week, the proceeds from each print sold could support at least 10 families.   What to expect of pictures for purpose: All artists are selected with care and chosen because of their unique view and skills in contemporary photography One image per artist has been selected All prints are available for a donation of €125.00 (including tax) All prints are 210 x 297 mm in size, with a variable printed area depending on the aspect ratio of the photograph in question. All artworks are unsigned and available in an open edition Participating artists can opt to receive either 25% or 50% of the proceeds from each print sold to help recoup lost income. A minimum of 50% of the proceeds will be donated to the Dutch Food Bank.  Every artist can alternatively decide to donate all of the proceeds to the Dutch Food Bank. The fundraiser runs for two weeks from Monday May 11th until Monday May 25th. The Amsterdam-based Fotolab will provide professional printing, packaging and shipping services. A subsidised fee of €13.30 will be allocated from each print sold to production expenses.     The fundraiser runs for two weeks, from Monday May 11th until Monday May 25th through the online platform www.picturesforpurpose.org.

The Desire Path by Helen Beard
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The Desire Path by Helen Beard

Art   Visually exciting – bright, dynamic and voyeuristic – the work of British artist Helen Beard wields colour, texture and abstraction as tools to take back ownership of sexual imagery from the predominantly male gaze. Beard’s work explores themes relating to gender, sexual psychology and eroticism, forever unapologetic in her depictions of female desire.   Reflex Amsterdam is pleased to announce the artist’s first solo exhibition at the gallery. While Beard’s artistic practice encompasses different mediums, including collage, sculpture, ceramics and needlepoint, The Desire Path focuses on her painting and features work in a diversity of sizes, ranging from small studies to large-scale canvasses. The artist’s small acrylic on board works function as preliminary studies for her oil on canvas paintings, in which she instinctively chooses the colours for her compositions.   Situated between abstraction and representation, her figures are reduced to concisely defined fields of vibrant colour. Working from found images, Beard’s eye for cinematic compositions featuring close-ups and interesting angles reveal her past experience as a stylist and assistant art director in the film industry.   Perhaps the most striking aspect of Beard’s oil paintings are the brushstrokes left visible in the otherwise dense surfaces of paint. Transitioning to oil from acrylic paint in 2008, Beard started to experiment with the texture of her paintings, creating an entirely different feeling on the surface of the canvas. As Beard explains in an interview in 2018: "the brushstrokes are almost like the touch on skin, like fingerprints." Against the vigour and excitement of the artist's choice of subject matter and palette, these strokes return a touch of tenderness to the abstract scenes, creating a fascinating tension that celebrates humankind’s instinctual fascination with sex, as well as its life-affirming nature.   Helen Beard (1971) studied at Bournemouth & Poole College of Art and Design, graduating in 1992. The artist participated in Simulation Skin: Selected works from the Murderme Collection (2017) and True Colours (2018) at Newport Street Gallery in London. Her most recent exhibitions include the group show 21st Century Women (2018) curated by Jane Neal and Fru Tholstrup and the solo exhibition It’s Her Factory (2019) at Unit London. The artist’s work can be found in major collections worldwide. Beard lives and works in Brighton, UK.   The Desire Path is Beard’s first exhibition outside of the UK and marks the start of her representation at Reflex Amsterdam for the Benelux. On occasion of the exhibition, the gallery is publishing Beard’s first monograph including an essay by Matt Carey-Williams.    The exhibition is open from 14 May – 30 September 2020    www.reflexamsterdam.com   Visually exciting – bright, dynamic and voyeuristic – the work of British artist Helen Beard wields colour, texture and abstraction as tools to take back ownership of sexual imagery from the predominantly male gaze. Beard’s work explores themes relating to gender, sexual psychology and eroticism, forever unapologetic in her depictions of female desire.   Reflex Amsterdam is pleased to announce the artist’s first solo exhibition at the gallery. While Beard’s artistic practice encompasses different mediums, including collage, sculpture, ceramics and needlepoint, The Desire Path focuses on her painting and features work in a diversity of sizes, ranging from small studies to large-scale canvasses. The artist’s small acrylic on board works function as preliminary studies for her oil on canvas paintings, in which she instinctively chooses the colours for her compositions.   Situated between abstraction and representation, her figures are reduced to concisely defined fields of vibrant colour. Working from found images, Beard’s eye for cinematic compositions featuring close-ups and interesting angles reveal her past experience as a stylist and assistant art director in the film industry.   Perhaps the most striking aspect of Beard’s oil paintings are the brushstrokes left visible in the otherwise dense surfaces of paint. Transitioning to oil from acrylic paint in 2008, Beard started to experiment with the texture of her paintings, creating an entirely different feeling on the surface of the canvas. As Beard explains in an interview in 2018: "the brushstrokes are almost like the touch on skin, like fingerprints." Against the vigour and excitement of the artist's choice of subject matter and palette, these strokes return a touch of tenderness to the abstract scenes, creating a fascinating tension that celebrates humankind’s instinctual fascination with sex, as well as its life-affirming nature.   Helen Beard (1971) studied at Bournemouth & Poole College of Art and Design, graduating in 1992. The artist participated in Simulation Skin: Selected works from the Murderme Collection (2017) and True Colours (2018) at Newport Street Gallery in London. Her most recent exhibitions include the group show 21st Century Women (2018) curated by Jane Neal and Fru Tholstrup and the solo exhibition It’s Her Factory (2019) at Unit London. The artist’s work can be found in major collections worldwide. Beard lives and works in Brighton, UK.   The Desire Path is Beard’s first exhibition outside of the UK and marks the start of her representation at Reflex Amsterdam for the Benelux. On occasion of the exhibition, the gallery is publishing Beard’s first monograph including an essay by Matt Carey-Williams.    The exhibition is open from 14 May – 30 September 2020    www.reflexamsterdam.com

Luckylefthand adorns Louis Vuitton headquarters with “Nine Colours, Nine Eyes and Nine Hearts“
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Luckylefthand adorns Louis Vuitton headquarters with “Nine Colours, Nine Eyes and Nine Hearts“

Art In the 1920s, Gaston-Louis Vuitton wrote, “Let’s make the street a happy place. ” A century later, Louis Vuitton asked artist Luckylefthand to decorate the façade of its Paris headquarters located by the Pont Neuf bridge. The fresco covers 280m2 and is made up of 14 colourful, sleek and playful paintings. With this painting, Louis Vuitton and Luckylefthand want to bring positivity and positive vibes to the Pont Neuf neighbourhood during the current lockdown. Luckylefthand was given carte blanche and used a minimalist, condensed style inspired by 1960s and 70s aesthetics to transport passers-by far away on a trip to the landscapes of Hossegor, his adopted town. With colourful transitions and primitive shapes, the wall painting was created using only acrylic paints and features a number of hands, one of the artist’s cherished symbols. The hands are physically set about a metre and a half apart yet are linked in spirit as a representation of our current mindset.   “I wanted to create this wall painting to o er Parisians a colourful stroll past the 14 windows, evoking a summer holiday while still representing the temporary period we are going through. The hands placed a metre and a half apart is a nod to what we’re currently experiencing. I hope this wall painting’s bright, saturated colours and rainbows made of big, curved lines will bring the positive energy we all need right now,” the artist said about his work.   Steven Burke is a French artist born in 1982. He works in the south-west French town of Hossegor, a place that has inspired him for years. After a 15-year career in the eld of graphic design, he practises his art in search of simplicity of shapes and purity of colours to convey a positive and enthusiastic message. The symbol of the hand is often represented in compositions to suggest humankind in its most universal form. Over time, this symbol has become an invitation to the meditative state, certainly pushed by the beauty of surrounding nature. For further informations : www.luckylefthand.com In the 1920s, Gaston-Louis Vuitton wrote, “Let’s make the street a happy place. ” A century later, Louis Vuitton asked artist Luckylefthand to decorate the façade of its Paris headquarters located by the Pont Neuf bridge. The fresco covers 280m2 and is made up of 14 colourful, sleek and playful paintings. With this painting, Louis Vuitton and Luckylefthand want to bring positivity and positive vibes to the Pont Neuf neighbourhood during the current lockdown. Luckylefthand was given carte blanche and used a minimalist, condensed style inspired by 1960s and 70s aesthetics to transport passers-by far away on a trip to the landscapes of Hossegor, his adopted town. With colourful transitions and primitive shapes, the wall painting was created using only acrylic paints and features a number of hands, one of the artist’s cherished symbols. The hands are physically set about a metre and a half apart yet are linked in spirit as a representation of our current mindset.   “I wanted to create this wall painting to o er Parisians a colourful stroll past the 14 windows, evoking a summer holiday while still representing the temporary period we are going through. The hands placed a metre and a half apart is a nod to what we’re currently experiencing. I hope this wall painting’s bright, saturated colours and rainbows made of big, curved lines will bring the positive energy we all need right now,” the artist said about his work.   Steven Burke is a French artist born in 1982. He works in the south-west French town of Hossegor, a place that has inspired him for years. After a 15-year career in the eld of graphic design, he practises his art in search of simplicity of shapes and purity of colours to convey a positive and enthusiastic message. The symbol of the hand is often represented in compositions to suggest humankind in its most universal form. Over time, this symbol has become an invitation to the meditative state, certainly pushed by the beauty of surrounding nature. For further informations : www.luckylefthand.com

Breguet and historic famous women
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Breguet and historic famous women

Jewelry A symbol of elegance and technical precision, Breguet timepieces have been winning over powerful and famous admirers since the end of the eighteenth century.   Probably the first keen fan of Breguet, Queen Marie-Antoinette wore some of thewatchmaker’s most beautiful watches, such as the self-winding models, right from the beginning of her reign, and showcased their excellence to the courts of Europe. Breguet, it is said, created the famous no. 160 watch for her, the so-called “Marie-Antoinette”; it remained the most complicated watch in the history of watchmaking for a long time. In 2008, Breguet completed an identical reproduction of the once lost original design, which was found again in 2007. In another tribute to its distinguished ambassador, in 2008 as well, Breguet restored the Petit Trianon in Versailles that was so loved by the ruler – a patronage of exceptional scale. Reigns may come and go, but the infatuation with Breguet timepieces endures. They were acquired by several women from Napoléon Bonaparte’s entourage. His first wife, the Empress Joséphine, bought the no. 611 tact watch, which she later gave, inlaid with the letter “H” in diamonds, to her daughter Hortense, the Queen of Holland. His second wife, Marie- Louise of Austria, bought herself a little medallion watch. Upright and loyal, the sovereign exercised a particularly enlightened reign over Parma, with a strong interest in the status of women. Breguet timepieces also caught the attention of the Emperor’s sisters, including ElisaBonaparte, Grand Duchess of Tuscany. Armed with a keen intelligence and a passion for the best of the best, his youngest sister, Caroline Murat, Queen of Naples, commissioned a watch from Abraham-Louis Breguet that was highly original because it came on a bracelet. It was the first watch designed from the outset to be worn on the wrist.   In 1817, Breguet delivered a quarter-repeating watch, the no. 3023, to the Duchess of Wellington. The model is exhibited at the Louvre Museum and its elegant simplicity reflects the characteristic neoclassical style of the watchmaker. In the years from 1820 to 1830, several sovereigns bought Breguet timepieces, take for example Alexandra Feodorovna, Empress of Russia, or Maria Christina of the Two Sicilies, Queen of Spain. In 1831, the latter purchased a travel clock, characteristic of Breguet’s neo-classical creations. Victoria, Queen of England and Empress of India, whose reign lasted more than 60 years, features amongsome of the watchmaker’s most illustrious clients. In the twentieth century, Breguet’s designs were still in demand among countless famouswomen. One of them was Anna Gould, Duchess of Talleyrand, founder of rescue centers for the wounded in the First World War and a figure of prominence throughout Paris, who bought a silver neo-Gothic-style clock.   Today, a number of timepieces acquired by these rulers and famous personalities arepreserved in some of the world’s most acclaimed museums, including the Louvre Museum, the British Museum, several Swiss museums, and, of course, the Breguet Museum in Paris. A symbol of elegance and technical precision, Breguet timepieces have been winning over powerful and famous admirers since the end of the eighteenth century.   Probably the first keen fan of Breguet, Queen Marie-Antoinette wore some of thewatchmaker’s most beautiful watches, such as the self-winding models, right from the beginning of her reign, and showcased their excellence to the courts of Europe. Breguet, it is said, created the famous no. 160 watch for her, the so-called “Marie-Antoinette”; it remained the most complicated watch in the history of watchmaking for a long time. In 2008, Breguet completed an identical reproduction of the once lost original design, which was found again in 2007. In another tribute to its distinguished ambassador, in 2008 as well, Breguet restored the Petit Trianon in Versailles that was so loved by the ruler – a patronage of exceptional scale. Reigns may come and go, but the infatuation with Breguet timepieces endures. They were acquired by several women from Napoléon Bonaparte’s entourage. His first wife, the Empress Joséphine, bought the no. 611 tact watch, which she later gave, inlaid with the letter “H” in diamonds, to her daughter Hortense, the Queen of Holland. His second wife, Marie- Louise of Austria, bought herself a little medallion watch. Upright and loyal, the sovereign exercised a particularly enlightened reign over Parma, with a strong interest in the status of women. Breguet timepieces also caught the attention of the Emperor’s sisters, including ElisaBonaparte, Grand Duchess of Tuscany. Armed with a keen intelligence and a passion for the best of the best, his youngest sister, Caroline Murat, Queen of Naples, commissioned a watch from Abraham-Louis Breguet that was highly original because it came on a bracelet. It was the first watch designed from the outset to be worn on the wrist.   In 1817, Breguet delivered a quarter-repeating watch, the no. 3023, to the Duchess of Wellington. The model is exhibited at the Louvre Museum and its elegant simplicity reflects the characteristic neoclassical style of the watchmaker. In the years from 1820 to 1830, several sovereigns bought Breguet timepieces, take for example Alexandra Feodorovna, Empress of Russia, or Maria Christina of the Two Sicilies, Queen of Spain. In 1831, the latter purchased a travel clock, characteristic of Breguet’s neo-classical creations. Victoria, Queen of England and Empress of India, whose reign lasted more than 60 years, features amongsome of the watchmaker’s most illustrious clients. In the twentieth century, Breguet’s designs were still in demand among countless famouswomen. One of them was Anna Gould, Duchess of Talleyrand, founder of rescue centers for the wounded in the First World War and a figure of prominence throughout Paris, who bought a silver neo-Gothic-style clock.   Today, a number of timepieces acquired by these rulers and famous personalities arepreserved in some of the world’s most acclaimed museums, including the Louvre Museum, the British Museum, several Swiss museums, and, of course, the Breguet Museum in Paris.

At Home with Maggie Maurer
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At Home with Maggie Maurer

Fashion During these crazy times and being at home quarantined we had a delight speaking and creating an exlcusive story with top model Maggie Maurer.   Who are you (the long answer, no cheating by just giving your name!) and what is your profession (as in, how do you define it, rather than just the job title it has)?   Joy is my middle name.  I am from a small town in Northern New York state called Potsdam. I was born and raised there with my 2 brothers and 4 sisters . We were all home schooled. I never went to college , I started modeling when I was 25 , after a friend sent some photos of me to an agency without telling me.  I am a Model and I believe my job in to bring to life the idea from the minds of all the different creatives I have had the pleasure to work with.   How do you think Covid-19 will effect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion? Do you believe everything will just go back to normal after Covid-19, or how do you see it will be?   Let's wait and see , shall we ?   How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined?   I feel like I have just moved into my flat in London , even though I have lived here for 5 years. The slow pace has been very welcome on my end. I am with my boyfriend ( Scott Archibald ) and we have been working on some really amazing stuff. Thankfully for me he is a photographer and I have not had to succumb to  a "Zoom " or " Facetime " shoot. The voyeuristic nature of it I find disturbing.     What is in your planning for this year and how will Covid-19 effect that?   I  did plan to split my time half here (London ) and half in the states. Proved to myself yet again not to make plans.    What is your daily beauty routine like?    Same as it ever was! Apple cider vinegar mixed with water for toner, rose water, aloe vera, coconut oil with 2 drops and lavender essential oil. In that order.     What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined?   I am in the middle of my first batch of Matza ball soup. It's my favorite soup. And the mere thought of it could bring a tear of joy to my eye.   What's your work-from-home style like during these times?   Do you mean what I wear ? When I shoot at home skin is always better, so I guess naked.  Any other time I'm always in a hoodie.   Tell us something about yourself that isn't on your resume (a secret skill, a hobby, a previous job or fun fact about you).   I hate to cook the same thing twice.      What's the first place you'd want to go when it's safe again to travel and go out of our homes?   Local meaning London? I guess the pub with my mates. Travel wise I really miss LA .   What inspired you to start working in the fashion industry? And what are you most proud achieving of thus far?   Nothing really inspired me but when the opportunity came along I saw it was something that could change my life. The Years I spent working at CÉLINE will always be the thing that shaped me and gave me the understanding of the industry as a whole. You have to know what you do to be good at what you do.    What is your favourite song at the moment and why? Do you have a playlist that you would like to share with us?   I do yoga to my Friend Mona Matsuoka's DJ sets ( find on soundcloud )  April 8  Spring mix is a fav.  Where is the cool playlist on spotify , Anderson Paak  Malibu , Childish Gambino " Awaken , My love! " Nirvana Unplugged and Etta James Radio. Most of the time though I listen to whatever my boyfriend is playing.    What is the first thing you like to do when you wake up, and last thing you like to do before going to bed?   This is going to be super cringy but I never get up or go to sleep without a cuddle from Scott , human contact is so important. Second thing is a cuppa tea and cigarette out on the front steps, in the sun or rain.   PHOTO CREDITS: model: Maggie Maurer @d’management  Story Title: P(L)ANTS. Photographer: Scott Archibald @archiegram Location: Home -  Communal Back Garden, London. Wearing: Peter Do Pants @thepeterdo During these crazy times and being at home quarantined we had a delight speaking and creating an exlcusive story with top model Maggie Maurer.   Who are you (the long answer, no cheating by just giving your name!) and what is your profession (as in, how do you define it, rather than just the job title it has)?   Joy is my middle name.  I am from a small town in Northern New York state called Potsdam. I was born and raised there with my 2 brothers and 4 sisters . We were all home schooled. I never went to college , I started modeling when I was 25 , after a friend sent some photos of me to an agency without telling me.  I am a Model and I believe my job in to bring to life the idea from the minds of all the different creatives I have had the pleasure to work with.   How do you think Covid-19 will effect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion? Do you believe everything will just go back to normal after Covid-19, or how do you see it will be?   Let's wait and see , shall we ?   How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined?   I feel like I have just moved into my flat in London , even though I have lived here for 5 years. The slow pace has been very welcome on my end. I am with my boyfriend ( Scott Archibald ) and we have been working on some really amazing stuff. Thankfully for me he is a photographer and I have not had to succumb to  a "Zoom " or " Facetime " shoot. The voyeuristic nature of it I find disturbing.     What is in your planning for this year and how will Covid-19 effect that?   I  did plan to split my time half here (London ) and half in the states. Proved to myself yet again not to make plans.    What is your daily beauty routine like?    Same as it ever was! Apple cider vinegar mixed with water for toner, rose water, aloe vera, coconut oil with 2 drops and lavender essential oil. In that order.     What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined?   I am in the middle of my first batch of Matza ball soup. It's my favorite soup. And the mere thought of it could bring a tear of joy to my eye.   What's your work-from-home style like during these times?   Do you mean what I wear ? When I shoot at home skin is always better, so I guess naked.  Any other time I'm always in a hoodie.   Tell us something about yourself that isn't on your resume (a secret skill, a hobby, a previous job or fun fact about you).   I hate to cook the same thing twice.      What's the first place you'd want to go when it's safe again to travel and go out of our homes?   Local meaning London? I guess the pub with my mates. Travel wise I really miss LA .   What inspired you to start working in the fashion industry? And what are you most proud achieving of thus far?   Nothing really inspired me but when the opportunity came along I saw it was something that could change my life. The Years I spent working at CÉLINE will always be the thing that shaped me and gave me the understanding of the industry as a whole. You have to know what you do to be good at what you do.    What is your favourite song at the moment and why? Do you have a playlist that you would like to share with us?   I do yoga to my Friend Mona Matsuoka's DJ sets ( find on soundcloud )  April 8  Spring mix is a fav.  Where is the cool playlist on spotify , Anderson Paak  Malibu , Childish Gambino " Awaken , My love! " Nirvana Unplugged and Etta James Radio. Most of the time though I listen to whatever my boyfriend is playing.    What is the first thing you like to do when you wake up, and last thing you like to do before going to bed?   This is going to be super cringy but I never get up or go to sleep without a cuddle from Scott , human contact is so important. Second thing is a cuppa tea and cigarette out on the front steps, in the sun or rain.   PHOTO CREDITS: model: Maggie Maurer @d’management  Story Title: P(L)ANTS. Photographer: Scott Archibald @archiegram Location: Home -  Communal Back Garden, London. Wearing: Peter Do Pants @thepeterdo

Alton Mason by Elizaveta Porodina
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Alton Mason by Elizaveta Porodina

Fashion Alton Mason at IMG lensed by Elizaveta Porodina in editorial in our second edition.   styled by Lisa Jarvis casting by Timotej Letonja hair by Olivier Schawalder at Bryant Artists Make-Up by Cecile Paravina at Bryant Artists light director: Josef Beyer styling assistant: Stefania Mosca set designer: Nicola Scarlino set design assistant: Louise Pisselet Retouched by Sheriff Post-Production Dpt. #SecondIssue #NuméroHommeNetherlands #Nude#NuméroHomme Alton Mason at IMG lensed by Elizaveta Porodina in editorial in our second edition.   styled by Lisa Jarvis casting by Timotej Letonja hair by Olivier Schawalder at Bryant Artists Make-Up by Cecile Paravina at Bryant Artists light director: Josef Beyer styling assistant: Stefania Mosca set designer: Nicola Scarlino set design assistant: Louise Pisselet Retouched by Sheriff Post-Production Dpt. #SecondIssue #NuméroHommeNetherlands #Nude#NuméroHomme

The magic of the "Christian Dior: Designer of dreams" exhibition
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The magic of the "Christian Dior: Designer of dreams" exhibition

Exhibition In these trying times, when it is more essential than ever to be able to lose yourself in escapism and wonder, Dior is pleased to invite you to (re)live, from the comfort of home, the unique enchantment of the ‘Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams’ exhibition, held at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, from July 5, 2017 to January 7, 2018. As you set out on this unique exploration, let yourself be captivated by the visionary virtuosity of Monsieur Dior and the Creative Directors who have succeeded him – from Yves Saint Laurent to Maria Grazia Chiuri – and perpetuated his passion and sense of daring. Over seventy years of creation is revealed through iconic haute couture dresses, precious archival photographs, sketches by Christian Dior, objects, accessories, original paintings by great masters, a cabinet of curiosities conceived as a sweeping display of color, and much more. Imbued with dreams and desires, a wealth of works and emblems enchant this extraordinary celebration of beauty and elegance in all their forms.   Discover this experience on our YouTube channel and on Instagram.  In these trying times, when it is more essential than ever to be able to lose yourself in escapism and wonder, Dior is pleased to invite you to (re)live, from the comfort of home, the unique enchantment of the ‘Christian Dior: Designer of Dreams’ exhibition, held at the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris, from July 5, 2017 to January 7, 2018. As you set out on this unique exploration, let yourself be captivated by the visionary virtuosity of Monsieur Dior and the Creative Directors who have succeeded him – from Yves Saint Laurent to Maria Grazia Chiuri – and perpetuated his passion and sense of daring. Over seventy years of creation is revealed through iconic haute couture dresses, precious archival photographs, sketches by Christian Dior, objects, accessories, original paintings by great masters, a cabinet of curiosities conceived as a sweeping display of color, and much more. Imbued with dreams and desires, a wealth of works and emblems enchant this extraordinary celebration of beauty and elegance in all their forms.   Discover this experience on our YouTube channel and on Instagram. 

Galerie Ron Mandos to represent Koen van den Broek
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Galerie Ron Mandos to represent Koen van den Broek

Art Now more than ever, it is important to remember that communal engagement with art is crucial in these challenging times. To the best of our ability, we are going to continue doing what we do best, which is to provide our community with beautiful works of art. For that reason, we are delighted to share with you that as of today Galerie Ron Mandos will be representing the acclaimed Belgian artist Koen van den Broek.   On Wednesday 15 April 2020 we will be welcoming you all to the opening of  The Beginning, Van den Broek’s inaugural solo-exhibition with Galerie Ron Mandos which will, due to our current reality, take place online in our recently launched GRM Online Viewing Room.   ABOUT KOEN VAN DEN BROEK Born in 1973 in Bree, Belgium Lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium The work of the Belgian painter Koen van den Broek (1973, Bree BE) draws heavily on the imagery found in America’s urban landscapes. The artist photographs a slice of reality, which he then transforms into a painting. The process of painting renders the image more abstract: details are accentuated, superfluous elements ignored, light and shadow heightened. Perspectival lines and planes of colour break free from photographed reality to create a new pictorial tension. The abstracted image is particularly radical in two series: Flock, and Bird. This strategy infuses his oeuvre with echoes of the American wasteland, as much as it references the work of painters like Henri Matisse, Clyfford Still and Franz Kline. Works by Koen van den Broek are represented in major public collections, including the LACMA, Los Angeles; SMAK, Ghent; M HKA, Antwerp; Busan Museum of Art, Busan; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Deurle. His work has been presented at the Venice Biennial (2015 & 2017); White Cube, London; Kunstmuseum, Bonn; Royal Museum of Fine Arts of Antwerp and Brussels; Seoul Arts Centre, Seoul; Kunsthalle, Mannheim; Royal Academy, London; MAS, Antwerp, and Kunsthal, Rotterdam; His work can also be found in numerous public spaces in Belgium, such as the Hofkamer, Antwerp; ‘t Zilte, MAS, Antwerp; AZ Hospital, Sint-Maarten, and the Provinciehuis, Hasselt. Now more than ever, it is important to remember that communal engagement with art is crucial in these challenging times. To the best of our ability, we are going to continue doing what we do best, which is to provide our community with beautiful works of art. For that reason, we are delighted to share with you that as of today Galerie Ron Mandos will be representing the acclaimed Belgian artist Koen van den Broek.   On Wednesday 15 April 2020 we will be welcoming you all to the opening of  The Beginning, Van den Broek’s inaugural solo-exhibition with Galerie Ron Mandos which will, due to our current reality, take place online in our recently launched GRM Online Viewing Room.   ABOUT KOEN VAN DEN BROEK Born in 1973 in Bree, Belgium Lives and works in Antwerp, Belgium The work of the Belgian painter Koen van den Broek (1973, Bree BE) draws heavily on the imagery found in America’s urban landscapes. The artist photographs a slice of reality, which he then transforms into a painting. The process of painting renders the image more abstract: details are accentuated, superfluous elements ignored, light and shadow heightened. Perspectival lines and planes of colour break free from photographed reality to create a new pictorial tension. The abstracted image is particularly radical in two series: Flock, and Bird. This strategy infuses his oeuvre with echoes of the American wasteland, as much as it references the work of painters like Henri Matisse, Clyfford Still and Franz Kline. Works by Koen van den Broek are represented in major public collections, including the LACMA, Los Angeles; SMAK, Ghent; M HKA, Antwerp; Busan Museum of Art, Busan; San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, and Museum Dhondt-Dhaenens, Deurle. His work has been presented at the Venice Biennial (2015 & 2017); White Cube, London; Kunstmuseum, Bonn; Royal Museum of Fine Arts of Antwerp and Brussels; Seoul Arts Centre, Seoul; Kunsthalle, Mannheim; Royal Academy, London; MAS, Antwerp, and Kunsthal, Rotterdam; His work can also be found in numerous public spaces in Belgium, such as the Hofkamer, Antwerp; ‘t Zilte, MAS, Antwerp; AZ Hospital, Sint-Maarten, and the Provinciehuis, Hasselt.

Fondation Louis Vuitton presents Digital Events
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Fondation Louis Vuitton presents Digital Events

Exhibition As per the French government’s directive, the Fondation Louis Vuitton is closed, and all its events and activities cancelled until further notice. During these exceptional circumstances the Fondation continues to share content with its public and community allowing them to relive or discover certain exhibitions, concerts, masterclasses and events that it has offered since its 2014 opening. Each week the Fondation sets 3 digital events: - Wednesday at 6 p.m. a visit of an exhibition with commentary by the curators - Friday at 8:30 p.m. a concert held at the Auditorium - Sunday at 5:30 p.m. a concert by the graduates of the Classe d’Excellence de Violoncelle led by Gautier Capuçon  Program #FLVfromhome for the week of March 23:     Wednesday March 25 – 6 p.m. "In Tune with the World", exhibition presented from 11 April 2018 to 27 August 2018 (2018, 18 min., French version with English subtitles) Ever since the first exhibition of emblematic works from its collection, during the 2014 inauguration of the building designed by Frank Gehry, the Fondation Louis Vuitton has regularly exhibited different collection displays. Some followed the four main categories that inform the making of the Collection (Contemplative, Expressionist, Pop, Music & Sound), and others were dedicated to contemporary art from specific regions of the world such as dedicated to China (2016) and Africa (2017).   Throughout the galleries, "In Tune with the World" (11th April - 27th August 2018) unveiled a new selection of artists from the collection, using several different media, bringing together modern and contemporary works.   Head curator: Suzanne Pagé Curators: Angéline Scherf, Ludovic Delalande and Claire Staebler The exhibition film "In Tune with the World" is available Wednesday at 6 p.m.:https://youtu.be/x48D3ZVes_0     Friday March 27 – 8:30 p.m. Concert by Lang Lang (recorded on the 28 October 2014, 62 min.)   After starting his career with a dazzling debut in Carnegie Hall in 2001, the prodigy has earned his place among the world's greatest talents, with an aura that now extends far beyond the confines of the classical repertoire. Lang Lang has become the piano phenomenon of the 21st-century.  His worldwide concerts have been met with great acclaim, especially his versions of Liszt, who ranks as one of his favourite composers.   Program: Mozart, Chopin, Liszt, Tchaïkovski The concert by Lang Lang is available Friday at 8:30 p.m.: https://youtu.be/7j36IbYG2NE     Sunday March 29– 5:30 p.m. “Violoncelles, vibrez !” - documentary on the Classe d’Excellence de Violoncelle (2014, 54 min., French version) The documentary looks at the work of Gautier Capuçon with his 6 graduates from the promotion 1 of the Classe d’Excellence de Violoncelle. The 6 students of season 1 were selected by audition by Gautier Capuçon who then accompanied them from December 2014 to June 2015. A musical immersion in the heart of Frank Gehry’s building.  The documentary “Violoncelles, vibrez !” is available Sunday at 5:30 p.m.: https://youtu.be/9oSaP_ueN_0   As per the French government’s directive, the Fondation Louis Vuitton is closed, and all its events and activities cancelled until further notice. During these exceptional circumstances the Fondation continues to share content with its public and community allowing them to relive or discover certain exhibitions, concerts, masterclasses and events that it has offered since its 2014 opening. Each week the Fondation sets 3 digital events: - Wednesday at 6 p.m. a visit of an exhibition with commentary by the curators - Friday at 8:30 p.m. a concert held at the Auditorium - Sunday at 5:30 p.m. a concert by the graduates of the Classe d’Excellence de Violoncelle led by Gautier Capuçon  Program #FLVfromhome for the week of March 23:     Wednesday March 25 – 6 p.m. "In Tune with the World", exhibition presented from 11 April 2018 to 27 August 2018 (2018, 18 min., French version with English subtitles) Ever since the first exhibition of emblematic works from its collection, during the 2014 inauguration of the building designed by Frank Gehry, the Fondation Louis Vuitton has regularly exhibited different collection displays. Some followed the four main categories that inform the making of the Collection (Contemplative, Expressionist, Pop, Music & Sound), and others were dedicated to contemporary art from specific regions of the world such as dedicated to China (2016) and Africa (2017).   Throughout the galleries, "In Tune with the World" (11th April - 27th August 2018) unveiled a new selection of artists from the collection, using several different media, bringing together modern and contemporary works.   Head curator: Suzanne Pagé Curators: Angéline Scherf, Ludovic Delalande and Claire Staebler The exhibition film "In Tune with the World" is available Wednesday at 6 p.m.:https://youtu.be/x48D3ZVes_0     Friday March 27 – 8:30 p.m. Concert by Lang Lang (recorded on the 28 October 2014, 62 min.)   After starting his career with a dazzling debut in Carnegie Hall in 2001, the prodigy has earned his place among the world's greatest talents, with an aura that now extends far beyond the confines of the classical repertoire. Lang Lang has become the piano phenomenon of the 21st-century.  His worldwide concerts have been met with great acclaim, especially his versions of Liszt, who ranks as one of his favourite composers.   Program: Mozart, Chopin, Liszt, Tchaïkovski The concert by Lang Lang is available Friday at 8:30 p.m.: https://youtu.be/7j36IbYG2NE     Sunday March 29– 5:30 p.m. “Violoncelles, vibrez !” - documentary on the Classe d’Excellence de Violoncelle (2014, 54 min., French version) The documentary looks at the work of Gautier Capuçon with his 6 graduates from the promotion 1 of the Classe d’Excellence de Violoncelle. The 6 students of season 1 were selected by audition by Gautier Capuçon who then accompanied them from December 2014 to June 2015. A musical immersion in the heart of Frank Gehry’s building.  The documentary “Violoncelles, vibrez !” is available Sunday at 5:30 p.m.: https://youtu.be/9oSaP_ueN_0  

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