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C4P x Clay Arlington x Carhartt WIP present UNIFORM FOR CHANGE capsule
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C4P x Clay Arlington x Carhartt WIP present UNIFORM FOR CHANGE capsule

Art This Wednesday, June 16th, C4P x Clay Arlington x Carhartt WIP will present their UNIFORM FOR CHANGE collection in the Carhartt WIP brand store in Amsterdam. This unique collaborative capsule connects fashion, art and social relevance by giving artist and designer Clay Arlington carte blanche on a unique canvas; a series of Carhartt WIP utilitarian garments. All proceeds of these one-of-a-kind wearable artworks are going to Clothes for Progress partners that aim to defeat social injustice towards the Black community.      A CHARITABLE CANVAS    Together with Clothes for Progress (C4P) and Carhartt WIP, artist Clay Arlington created a limited series of collaged, hand silk screened one-of-a-kind wearable artworks, based around the title "Conditions”. The intention of this three-way collaborative capsule with Carhartt WIP was to create a uniform that reminds the wearer there is still work to be done when it comes to reaching equality for all humans. The latter being the main objective of continuous fundraising platform Clothes for Progress (C4P).    Born from a desire to put in overdue work, Clothes for Progress is a driving force of raising awareness for social injustices in the black community and fundraising organizations like the Black Archives, Black Queer and Trans Resistance Netherlands, The Netherlands Gets Better, Black Lives Matter and National Bailout, by selling clothes. All proceeds of the UNIFORM FOR CHANGE capsule collection will therefore also go to these C4P partners.      WORK IN PROGRESS UNIFORMS   In line with the Clothes for Progress heritage artist and designer Clay Arlington released his artwork of flowers, text, and iconography on Carhartt WIP’s utilitarian garments; from dungarees to jackets and trousers.    ‘I think for the most part, the work grew out of collages I was making, along with text... almost poetry. I've been using the term conditions for a while. The conditions. Ideal conditions. Weather conditions. Sufficient and necessary conditions, the conditions that make things possible. The other words are all just strong scene setting ideas, and together with the forms of people dancing, performing, I think are in some ways similar to props, or create a stage, or a scene. Burners are graffiti pieces that are so strong they burn everything around them, the month of June, tulips...I guess it's like soup, some summer soup from a city where everyone is dancing to avoid the heat.’ – Clay Arlington    So what can you expect on June 16th? A limited series of sleek white pieces contrasted with bright red and bold black graphics with a price range going from €225 to €300. Next to the limited garments, a select series of Carhartt WIP tees (€50) and posters (€25) with a print by Clay Arlington will be available at Carhartt WIP’s Amsterdam store on Utrechtsestraat 99, as well as through Clothes for Progress‘ Instagram account. Please note that due to limited capacities, a first come first serve principle is in order.     This Wednesday, June 16th, C4P x Clay Arlington x Carhartt WIP will present their UNIFORM FOR CHANGE collection in the Carhartt WIP brand store in Amsterdam. This unique collaborative capsule connects fashion, art and social relevance by giving artist and designer Clay Arlington carte blanche on a unique canvas; a series of Carhartt WIP utilitarian garments. All proceeds of these one-of-a-kind wearable artworks are going to Clothes for Progress partners that aim to defeat social injustice towards the Black community.      A CHARITABLE CANVAS    Together with Clothes for Progress (C4P) and Carhartt WIP, artist Clay Arlington created a limited series of collaged, hand silk screened one-of-a-kind wearable artworks, based around the title "Conditions”. The intention of this three-way collaborative capsule with Carhartt WIP was to create a uniform that reminds the wearer there is still work to be done when it comes to reaching equality for all humans. The latter being the main objective of continuous fundraising platform Clothes for Progress (C4P).    Born from a desire to put in overdue work, Clothes for Progress is a driving force of raising awareness for social injustices in the black community and fundraising organizations like the Black Archives, Black Queer and Trans Resistance Netherlands, The Netherlands Gets Better, Black Lives Matter and National Bailout, by selling clothes. All proceeds of the UNIFORM FOR CHANGE capsule collection will therefore also go to these C4P partners.      WORK IN PROGRESS UNIFORMS   In line with the Clothes for Progress heritage artist and designer Clay Arlington released his artwork of flowers, text, and iconography on Carhartt WIP’s utilitarian garments; from dungarees to jackets and trousers.    ‘I think for the most part, the work grew out of collages I was making, along with text... almost poetry. I've been using the term conditions for a while. The conditions. Ideal conditions. Weather conditions. Sufficient and necessary conditions, the conditions that make things possible. The other words are all just strong scene setting ideas, and together with the forms of people dancing, performing, I think are in some ways similar to props, or create a stage, or a scene. Burners are graffiti pieces that are so strong they burn everything around them, the month of June, tulips...I guess it's like soup, some summer soup from a city where everyone is dancing to avoid the heat.’ – Clay Arlington    So what can you expect on June 16th? A limited series of sleek white pieces contrasted with bright red and bold black graphics with a price range going from €225 to €300. Next to the limited garments, a select series of Carhartt WIP tees (€50) and posters (€25) with a print by Clay Arlington will be available at Carhartt WIP’s Amsterdam store on Utrechtsestraat 99, as well as through Clothes for Progress‘ Instagram account. Please note that due to limited capacities, a first come first serve principle is in order.    

The Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem re-examined the PURPOSE of the current fashion- and design system to make the world even better place by local Arnhem based initiatives
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The Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem re-examined the PURPOSE of the current fashion- and design system to make the world even better place by local Arnhem based initiatives

Fashion The Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem kicks off   The new edition of the Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem has officially started on the 3rd of June 2021.This year, together with designers, artists and partners, the festival has a hybrid character due to the current global pandemic.     Within the theme, all participants explore how they make the world a little more beautiful, cleaner and sustainable with their designs and creations. The festival organization aims to offer the visitor a general, well-grounded, compelling overview of the theme PURPOSE alongside the 10 dimensions of the Kabbalah, without any given prejudices of judgments. FDFA aims to offer the broadest spectrum of the content and thematic of PURPOSE, to make the topic widely available to each possible audience. The goal is to collaborate with the designers to look at many initiatives and inspire visitors, watchers and enthusiasts.      The festival is all about PURPOSE, but also about RE-PURPOSE. The festival zooms in on the way in which fashion and product design responds to the changing focus from material to immaterial happiness and meaning, based on the ten dimensions of Kabbalah. At least 4 videos are linked to each dimension within the theme:      How they create videos: a designer explains the ways of working and how he/she contributes to the theme.   An artistic video from a designer/stylist on a given subject within the dimensions of Purpose  Vision: a designer, entrepreneur or artist shares it’s experimental vision on the theme Rijn IJssel Purpose TV:  The local students of the Rijn Ijssel Academy head out in the streets to examine the local Arnhem population on their fashion consumption behaviours and the underlying thoughts and attitudes in a more playful and accessible format        The FDFA offers a high-quality hybrid festival from June 3 to July 3, 2021, in which online and offline events alternate and complement each other. Each week, a number of dimensions from the overarching theme "PURPOSE" are highlighted, with exhibitions, lectures, events and performances. The programming takes place mainly on Thursdays and Fridays in June and is organized in collaboration with partners of the FDFA. View the current program via this link: https://www.fdfarnhem.nl/programma     The costs of digital programming on Thursdays are free to attract the widest possible audience, to keep the program as inclusive as possible and make the program accessible to everyone. The Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem kicks off   The new edition of the Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem has officially started on the 3rd of June 2021.This year, together with designers, artists and partners, the festival has a hybrid character due to the current global pandemic.     Within the theme, all participants explore how they make the world a little more beautiful, cleaner and sustainable with their designs and creations. The festival organization aims to offer the visitor a general, well-grounded, compelling overview of the theme PURPOSE alongside the 10 dimensions of the Kabbalah, without any given prejudices of judgments. FDFA aims to offer the broadest spectrum of the content and thematic of PURPOSE, to make the topic widely available to each possible audience. The goal is to collaborate with the designers to look at many initiatives and inspire visitors, watchers and enthusiasts.      The festival is all about PURPOSE, but also about RE-PURPOSE. The festival zooms in on the way in which fashion and product design responds to the changing focus from material to immaterial happiness and meaning, based on the ten dimensions of Kabbalah. At least 4 videos are linked to each dimension within the theme:      How they create videos: a designer explains the ways of working and how he/she contributes to the theme.   An artistic video from a designer/stylist on a given subject within the dimensions of Purpose  Vision: a designer, entrepreneur or artist shares it’s experimental vision on the theme Rijn IJssel Purpose TV:  The local students of the Rijn Ijssel Academy head out in the streets to examine the local Arnhem population on their fashion consumption behaviours and the underlying thoughts and attitudes in a more playful and accessible format        The FDFA offers a high-quality hybrid festival from June 3 to July 3, 2021, in which online and offline events alternate and complement each other. Each week, a number of dimensions from the overarching theme "PURPOSE" are highlighted, with exhibitions, lectures, events and performances. The programming takes place mainly on Thursdays and Fridays in June and is organized in collaboration with partners of the FDFA. View the current program via this link: https://www.fdfarnhem.nl/programma     The costs of digital programming on Thursdays are free to attract the widest possible audience, to keep the program as inclusive as possible and make the program accessible to everyone.

illycaffè launches the new illy Art Collection by Ai Weiwei
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illycaffè launches the new illy Art Collection by Ai Weiwei

Design illycaffè presents the new illy Art Collection by Ai Weiwei, a personal interpretation of the renowned series of art cups bythe Chinese artist who is one of the 21st centuries most influential people.    This illy Art Collection has been inspired by Ai Weiwei’s famous Coloured Vases which hecreated in 2006, taking ancient Neolithic vases and dunking them into industrial paint tins to reshape their look and function. Using a process of appropriation and destruction, Ai Weiwei takes ordinary objects away from their daily context and transforms them into works of art.    “To express yourself needs a reason, but expressing yourself is the reason” the perfect summary of the life and the art of Ai Weiwei, which are closely entwined and have seen him become a conceptual artist, sculptor, painter, performer, photographer, architect and urban designer, collector, film director, actor, musician, writer and editor, blogger and selfie professional, investigative journalist, human rights activist and dissident.... a kaleidoscope of experiences and perspectives. In his illy Art Collection, Ai Weiwei echoes all of this in a familiar object and, with one of his typical unsettling acts, he invites us to explore our “position” and the perspective from which we look at the world at a given point in space and time, even just for the time it takes to enjoy a coffee.    “I am very happy to be a part of illy Art Collection. I think it is very important to give power to art and design while drinking good coffee, because it affects everybody’s life. We should enjoy it.” - Ai Weiwei   “The project with Ai Weiwei is an exceptional event -said Massimiliano Pogliani, illycaffè CEO - and we have celebrated it with a particularly valuable and refined illy Art Collection. From a great personality, that has had a huge impact on culture in recent years, speaking out about the complexity of contemporary society, often ironically, we get an optical illusion, a hidden beauty which becomes manifest if we learn to see without the misconception of using one single perspective only. To us, this is what the illy Art Collection project is: art providing an insight through beauty, and Ai Weiwei’s artwork is new and brilliant evidence of this.”   The collection by Ai Weiwei is available from May in the following formats:    4 espresso cups (decorated in gold, black, orange and green) €88,00 4 cappuccino cups (decorated in gold, black, orange and green) €108,00 2 espresso cups (decorated in gold and black) €48,00 2 cappuccino cups (decorated in gold and black) €58,00 illycaffè presents the new illy Art Collection by Ai Weiwei, a personal interpretation of the renowned series of art cups bythe Chinese artist who is one of the 21st centuries most influential people.    This illy Art Collection has been inspired by Ai Weiwei’s famous Coloured Vases which hecreated in 2006, taking ancient Neolithic vases and dunking them into industrial paint tins to reshape their look and function. Using a process of appropriation and destruction, Ai Weiwei takes ordinary objects away from their daily context and transforms them into works of art.    “To express yourself needs a reason, but expressing yourself is the reason” the perfect summary of the life and the art of Ai Weiwei, which are closely entwined and have seen him become a conceptual artist, sculptor, painter, performer, photographer, architect and urban designer, collector, film director, actor, musician, writer and editor, blogger and selfie professional, investigative journalist, human rights activist and dissident.... a kaleidoscope of experiences and perspectives. In his illy Art Collection, Ai Weiwei echoes all of this in a familiar object and, with one of his typical unsettling acts, he invites us to explore our “position” and the perspective from which we look at the world at a given point in space and time, even just for the time it takes to enjoy a coffee.    “I am very happy to be a part of illy Art Collection. I think it is very important to give power to art and design while drinking good coffee, because it affects everybody’s life. We should enjoy it.” - Ai Weiwei   “The project with Ai Weiwei is an exceptional event -said Massimiliano Pogliani, illycaffè CEO - and we have celebrated it with a particularly valuable and refined illy Art Collection. From a great personality, that has had a huge impact on culture in recent years, speaking out about the complexity of contemporary society, often ironically, we get an optical illusion, a hidden beauty which becomes manifest if we learn to see without the misconception of using one single perspective only. To us, this is what the illy Art Collection project is: art providing an insight through beauty, and Ai Weiwei’s artwork is new and brilliant evidence of this.”   The collection by Ai Weiwei is available from May in the following formats:    4 espresso cups (decorated in gold, black, orange and green) €88,00 4 cappuccino cups (decorated in gold, black, orange and green) €108,00 2 espresso cups (decorated in gold and black) €48,00 2 cappuccino cups (decorated in gold and black) €58,00

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Wanrooij Gallery in Amsterdam presents a retrospective exhibition of Leon Keerfrom
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Wanrooij Gallery in Amsterdam presents a retrospective exhibition of Leon Keerfrom

Exhibition Wanrooij Gallery in Amsterdam presents a retrospective exhibition of Leon Keerfrom 5 June until 28 August 2021. The Dutch mixed media artist is the master of optical illusion. The solo exhibition 'Forced Perspective' shows a colourful selection of new paintings, sculptures, installations, anamorphic artworks and Augmented Reality (AR). The gallery transforms into a surreal universe.     Leon Keeris one of the world’s leading artists in anamorphic art. By playing with perspectives he creates incredible new worlds. He has executed numerous 3D murals and street paintings in Europe, the United States, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Russia, Asia, Australia and New Zealand. In the Netherlands, the artist has cooperated with the Fries Museum, Museum Arnhem, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam and Van Gogh Museum.      The artist is inspired by pop surrealism and new technology. With the use of Augmented Reality he is able to show an extra dimension in his art. A message seems to be present. Current issues are reviewed, such as environmental concerns, social inequality and the livability of this world. The artworks reflect a fascination for old materials and a timeless longing for unspoiled beauty.            Leon Keerlives and works in Utrecht and a visual artist since 1997. His autonomous work has been presented at international art fairs such as Art Miami, Moniker Art Fair London, SCOPE Basel and SCOPE New York. In 2018, he won the Street Art Awards Benelux for best artist. The extensive and iconic oeuvre of Leon Keeris captured in a first monograph, titled 'In Case of lost Childhood'and released in November 2020.        Wanrooij Gallery KNSM-laan 301in Amsterdam   www.wanrooijgallery.com Wanrooij Gallery in Amsterdam presents a retrospective exhibition of Leon Keerfrom 5 June until 28 August 2021. The Dutch mixed media artist is the master of optical illusion. The solo exhibition 'Forced Perspective' shows a colourful selection of new paintings, sculptures, installations, anamorphic artworks and Augmented Reality (AR). The gallery transforms into a surreal universe.     Leon Keeris one of the world’s leading artists in anamorphic art. By playing with perspectives he creates incredible new worlds. He has executed numerous 3D murals and street paintings in Europe, the United States, Mexico, Saudi Arabia, Russia, Asia, Australia and New Zealand. In the Netherlands, the artist has cooperated with the Fries Museum, Museum Arnhem, Rijksmuseum Amsterdam and Van Gogh Museum.      The artist is inspired by pop surrealism and new technology. With the use of Augmented Reality he is able to show an extra dimension in his art. A message seems to be present. Current issues are reviewed, such as environmental concerns, social inequality and the livability of this world. The artworks reflect a fascination for old materials and a timeless longing for unspoiled beauty.            Leon Keerlives and works in Utrecht and a visual artist since 1997. His autonomous work has been presented at international art fairs such as Art Miami, Moniker Art Fair London, SCOPE Basel and SCOPE New York. In 2018, he won the Street Art Awards Benelux for best artist. The extensive and iconic oeuvre of Leon Keeris captured in a first monograph, titled 'In Case of lost Childhood'and released in November 2020.        Wanrooij Gallery KNSM-laan 301in Amsterdam   www.wanrooijgallery.com

VALENTINO COLLEZIONE MILANO PRESENTS THE PAINTER ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN
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VALENTINO COLLEZIONE MILANO PRESENTS THE PAINTER ADVERTISING CAMPAIGN

Art The art world enters the Maison Valentino universe for the newest chapter of its Advertising Campaign.     Looking to its community, Pierpaolo Piccioli continues to convey the values of authenticity and individuality by creating, and not imposing, a conversation with diverse communication channels and artists. A new method of delivering messages where the viewer is enriched by feelings and beliefs. Pierpaolo Piccioli believes art is a lens through which one can really touch the nature of the most intimate feelings.     For the artists chapter of Valentino Collezione Milano, Maison Valentino has worked with five international painters, giving them complete freedom to create a work of their choosing, which includes a Valentino Garavani accessory from the collection.     Each of the painters is an emerging talent in their area and on the global art scene. Louise Giovanelli, from the UK, created a hyper realistic painting of the Valentino Garavani Roman Stud Top Handle, while Alexis Ralaivao, from France, painted a cropped-in portrait of the same bag in a striking pink hue. Chinese painter Zhang Zihao opted to paint two subjects wearing the Valentino Garavani Crochet sneakers, while Korean artist Nahum Kim envisioned a surreal and otherworldly work featuring the Valentino Garavani Roman Stud Top Handle. Finally, Iori Nagashima, from Japan, created a work using the Valentino Garavani Roman Stud Crochet bag on a subject under rainfall. In all, each work is a testament to the freedom, voice and creativity of each artist. The art world enters the Maison Valentino universe for the newest chapter of its Advertising Campaign.     Looking to its community, Pierpaolo Piccioli continues to convey the values of authenticity and individuality by creating, and not imposing, a conversation with diverse communication channels and artists. A new method of delivering messages where the viewer is enriched by feelings and beliefs. Pierpaolo Piccioli believes art is a lens through which one can really touch the nature of the most intimate feelings.     For the artists chapter of Valentino Collezione Milano, Maison Valentino has worked with five international painters, giving them complete freedom to create a work of their choosing, which includes a Valentino Garavani accessory from the collection.     Each of the painters is an emerging talent in their area and on the global art scene. Louise Giovanelli, from the UK, created a hyper realistic painting of the Valentino Garavani Roman Stud Top Handle, while Alexis Ralaivao, from France, painted a cropped-in portrait of the same bag in a striking pink hue. Chinese painter Zhang Zihao opted to paint two subjects wearing the Valentino Garavani Crochet sneakers, while Korean artist Nahum Kim envisioned a surreal and otherworldly work featuring the Valentino Garavani Roman Stud Top Handle. Finally, Iori Nagashima, from Japan, created a work using the Valentino Garavani Roman Stud Crochet bag on a subject under rainfall. In all, each work is a testament to the freedom, voice and creativity of each artist.

Hedi Slimane presents "Sun of Sound"
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Hedi Slimane presents "Sun of Sound"

Exhibition Almine Rech Shanghai is thrilled to present ‘Sun of Sound’ by acclaimed French multi-disciplinary artist, photographer, and fashion designer Hedi Slimane, the fifth solo exhibition of Slimane’s work at Almine Rech since 2004, and his first exhibition in China.     ‘Sun of Sound’ also marks the artist’s rst solo exhibition since ‘Sonic’, a presentation at the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent in Paris (2014). The exhibition will be on view from Mar 19 to Apr 30, 2021.     Hedi Slimane is an artist of creative agility, whose photographic visions are nothing if not direct and intimate. The scenes he captures vibrate with intensity, but while the aura is edgy, his style envelops the elegance and drama of classic black-and-white photography. Since he began exploring photography at the age of 11, Slimane’s preference has always been for black and white and, more essentially, his interest lies in subjects that inhabit Cimmerian spaces in which the various individuals he observes are comfortable exploring themselves in the privacy of their own worlds and intimate social circles. These are worlds in which Paris-born Slimane is very much at home; his photographs emanate a sense of presence, and a process of observing that hews to intuition rather than premeditation.     For many, Slimane’s talent is most readily associated with the arena of high fashion, but his forte has always been photography. His subjects are various but core concerns draw him to the street and into the night, to youth culture, dive bars, live music, and to performers young and old, but mostly young. It’s not just any music that fascinates. Slimane has an ear, and an eye, for the raw exhilaration of the alternative scene and its nascent stars – aspiring stars who, by the very fact of being photographed by Slimane, are catapulted into the limelight. British journalist Alex Needham describes the moments Slimane captures in his photographs as showing “young fans in that golden period when the band they love is still a secret to the wider world, and a concert is a shared celebration between performers and audience.”     There is something in Slimane’s stark black-and-white style that embodies the phrase “secrets to the wider world”. It’s not that there is a conscious intent to conceal anything that you can put your nger on, but it’s there in the air of understanding that enjoins Slimane and his subjects. Far from shutting us as viewers out, this sense of presence and connection sucks us in. Staring at Slimane’s photographs, as your eye roves the dark space in which he had obviously immersed himself, the density of a crowd, and the exuberant faces of performers and fans, delivers a thrill. A sensation well described by British writer and music-maker, George the Poet, who said “Making music is like dreaming aloud.”   There are stylistic parallels in the history of photography and that can be drawn with Slimane’s oeuvre which, like numerous of his iconic images, are part of the collective unconscious of the creative milieu; instantly recognisable, the subjects immortalised through shadow and light. Slimane’s frames extend the gravitas of the best photographers of rock-and-roll – British photographer Mick Rock who captured Glam Rock in the early 1970s; Kevin Cummins who made icons of the band Joy Division and its frontman Ian Cur- tis; American/Seattle-based photographer Charles Peterson doing Grunge (birth of) who did for Kurt Cobain what Slimane did for British singer, Pete Doherty, former frontman of the Libertines, in creating portraits which immortalised the singer. The key here is that Slimane’s focus extends beyond the obvious faces of the stars to the crowds, the fans, to people igniting street culture, and beyond to a range of details, objects, and paraphernalia, more reminiscent of the 20th century giant Robert Frank. Music, the scene that surrounds it, is integral. “Music has a sense of freedom that continues to inspire me,” Slimane says. “I have never found anything else that has the same capacity to impact on popular culture.”     As mentioned, beyond the music, it’s about the things and attitudes that music, like youth culture, embraces. Slimane’s juxtaposition of intimacy and glamour, direct gazes and snatched details, of bodies special and ordinary, of proximity and distance, mirrors the way we generally look as we gaze out at the word. Our eyes seek the familiar. We pause or stumble confused and excited by what appears most unfamiliar, though ultimately settling where our natural interests and comfort zones lie. In Slimane’s case, how rich this world is. The sense that he is driven both by awe and admiration, and by naked curiosity ema- nates from the personal photographic diary posted on Slimane’s website – https://www. hedislimane.com/diary/. The collection of images shown here takes you on a journey into his life where you see what he sees. There’s lots of beauty, lots of action, and interaction, in which the overwhelming experience is the honesty of the pictures. The photographs describe what Slimane’s in to, what makes him tick, and what gets him excited; ultimately his respect for those who know how to live life freely. Beginning in 2006, the diary hops from London to Paris to LA, from skateboarders to performers to clubbers; from the “residents” of half a dozen dive bars to parties and shoots for fashion; faces, expressions natural and uninhibited. From front stage to behind the scenes, what’s remarkable is that the people Slimane photographs are so comfortably ordinary, so normal; so real. You feel right at home, even among the stars. “I like a ‘simple’ photograph,” he says, “one that does not pretend to be anything other than a captured moment in someone’s life.”   By today‘s hyper resolution digital standards, Slimane’s style is raw and gritty – there’s no retouching in the studio. His modus operandi: “I’ve always taken pictures, almost like some people take notes or write down their thoughts.” One train of thought is surely about life itself. Looking at Slimane’s photos en masse, you become aware of the gap between youth and age that he portrays. Slimane’s youth is pure and lled with possibility. The older more mature gures -- legends like Lou Reed, Joni Mitchell, Keith Richards, John Lyndon, and Jane Birkin – are the survivors. Slimane’s portraits pay unconscious homage to the fact that they made it through the treacherous extremes of their youth.   Across time and cultural discourse, we try to peg the scenes to their moment as much as to the faces and their expressions. For example, the juxtaposition of PETE, UNTITLED, the portrait of a covert Pete Doherty in 2007, with his dirty ngernails and dangerous habits, with Doherty in 2009, posed in a park like a busker on a break, with kittens in a shower of dappled sunlight, the ensemble very sur l’herbe. We look for clues, for meaning, for stories. But while it is in the nature of looking to want a simple meaning or answer, if Slimane’s photographs tell us anything at all, it is more truly what he was thinking and feeling at these profoundly sensitive moments in his life. Almine Rech Shanghai is thrilled to present ‘Sun of Sound’ by acclaimed French multi-disciplinary artist, photographer, and fashion designer Hedi Slimane, the fifth solo exhibition of Slimane’s work at Almine Rech since 2004, and his first exhibition in China.     ‘Sun of Sound’ also marks the artist’s rst solo exhibition since ‘Sonic’, a presentation at the Fondation Pierre Bergé-Yves Saint Laurent in Paris (2014). The exhibition will be on view from Mar 19 to Apr 30, 2021.     Hedi Slimane is an artist of creative agility, whose photographic visions are nothing if not direct and intimate. The scenes he captures vibrate with intensity, but while the aura is edgy, his style envelops the elegance and drama of classic black-and-white photography. Since he began exploring photography at the age of 11, Slimane’s preference has always been for black and white and, more essentially, his interest lies in subjects that inhabit Cimmerian spaces in which the various individuals he observes are comfortable exploring themselves in the privacy of their own worlds and intimate social circles. These are worlds in which Paris-born Slimane is very much at home; his photographs emanate a sense of presence, and a process of observing that hews to intuition rather than premeditation.     For many, Slimane’s talent is most readily associated with the arena of high fashion, but his forte has always been photography. His subjects are various but core concerns draw him to the street and into the night, to youth culture, dive bars, live music, and to performers young and old, but mostly young. It’s not just any music that fascinates. Slimane has an ear, and an eye, for the raw exhilaration of the alternative scene and its nascent stars – aspiring stars who, by the very fact of being photographed by Slimane, are catapulted into the limelight. British journalist Alex Needham describes the moments Slimane captures in his photographs as showing “young fans in that golden period when the band they love is still a secret to the wider world, and a concert is a shared celebration between performers and audience.”     There is something in Slimane’s stark black-and-white style that embodies the phrase “secrets to the wider world”. It’s not that there is a conscious intent to conceal anything that you can put your nger on, but it’s there in the air of understanding that enjoins Slimane and his subjects. Far from shutting us as viewers out, this sense of presence and connection sucks us in. Staring at Slimane’s photographs, as your eye roves the dark space in which he had obviously immersed himself, the density of a crowd, and the exuberant faces of performers and fans, delivers a thrill. A sensation well described by British writer and music-maker, George the Poet, who said “Making music is like dreaming aloud.”   There are stylistic parallels in the history of photography and that can be drawn with Slimane’s oeuvre which, like numerous of his iconic images, are part of the collective unconscious of the creative milieu; instantly recognisable, the subjects immortalised through shadow and light. Slimane’s frames extend the gravitas of the best photographers of rock-and-roll – British photographer Mick Rock who captured Glam Rock in the early 1970s; Kevin Cummins who made icons of the band Joy Division and its frontman Ian Cur- tis; American/Seattle-based photographer Charles Peterson doing Grunge (birth of) who did for Kurt Cobain what Slimane did for British singer, Pete Doherty, former frontman of the Libertines, in creating portraits which immortalised the singer. The key here is that Slimane’s focus extends beyond the obvious faces of the stars to the crowds, the fans, to people igniting street culture, and beyond to a range of details, objects, and paraphernalia, more reminiscent of the 20th century giant Robert Frank. Music, the scene that surrounds it, is integral. “Music has a sense of freedom that continues to inspire me,” Slimane says. “I have never found anything else that has the same capacity to impact on popular culture.”     As mentioned, beyond the music, it’s about the things and attitudes that music, like youth culture, embraces. Slimane’s juxtaposition of intimacy and glamour, direct gazes and snatched details, of bodies special and ordinary, of proximity and distance, mirrors the way we generally look as we gaze out at the word. Our eyes seek the familiar. We pause or stumble confused and excited by what appears most unfamiliar, though ultimately settling where our natural interests and comfort zones lie. In Slimane’s case, how rich this world is. The sense that he is driven both by awe and admiration, and by naked curiosity ema- nates from the personal photographic diary posted on Slimane’s website – https://www. hedislimane.com/diary/. The collection of images shown here takes you on a journey into his life where you see what he sees. There’s lots of beauty, lots of action, and interaction, in which the overwhelming experience is the honesty of the pictures. The photographs describe what Slimane’s in to, what makes him tick, and what gets him excited; ultimately his respect for those who know how to live life freely. Beginning in 2006, the diary hops from London to Paris to LA, from skateboarders to performers to clubbers; from the “residents” of half a dozen dive bars to parties and shoots for fashion; faces, expressions natural and uninhibited. From front stage to behind the scenes, what’s remarkable is that the people Slimane photographs are so comfortably ordinary, so normal; so real. You feel right at home, even among the stars. “I like a ‘simple’ photograph,” he says, “one that does not pretend to be anything other than a captured moment in someone’s life.”   By today‘s hyper resolution digital standards, Slimane’s style is raw and gritty – there’s no retouching in the studio. His modus operandi: “I’ve always taken pictures, almost like some people take notes or write down their thoughts.” One train of thought is surely about life itself. Looking at Slimane’s photos en masse, you become aware of the gap between youth and age that he portrays. Slimane’s youth is pure and lled with possibility. The older more mature gures -- legends like Lou Reed, Joni Mitchell, Keith Richards, John Lyndon, and Jane Birkin – are the survivors. Slimane’s portraits pay unconscious homage to the fact that they made it through the treacherous extremes of their youth.   Across time and cultural discourse, we try to peg the scenes to their moment as much as to the faces and their expressions. For example, the juxtaposition of PETE, UNTITLED, the portrait of a covert Pete Doherty in 2007, with his dirty ngernails and dangerous habits, with Doherty in 2009, posed in a park like a busker on a break, with kittens in a shower of dappled sunlight, the ensemble very sur l’herbe. We look for clues, for meaning, for stories. But while it is in the nature of looking to want a simple meaning or answer, if Slimane’s photographs tell us anything at all, it is more truly what he was thinking and feeling at these profoundly sensitive moments in his life.

EXHIBITION VOICES OF FASHION: BLACK COUTURE, BEAUTY & STYLES IN CENTRAAL MUSEUM UTRECHT
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EXHIBITION VOICES OF FASHION: BLACK COUTURE, BEAUTY & STYLES IN CENTRAAL MUSEUM UTRECHT

Exhibition Centraal Museum Utrecht presents the major fashion exhibition Voices of Fashion: Black Couture, Beauty & Styles, in which iconic designs, models and sources of inspiration promote a more inclusive fashion legacy. In this multi-disciplinary exhibition, fashion curator Ninke Bloemberg teams up with fashion activist, co-curator and founder of Diversity Rules, Janice Deul, to examine how Black designers have influenced the world of fashion, what stereotypes continue to exist, and how beauty is perceived. Voices of Fashion was created in close collaboration with designers, photographers and models from the Netherlands and abroad. The visually striking exhibition design is by AFARAI’s Afaina de Jong, and the exhibition is structured according to several themes.     COUTURE   The exhibition opens with a dazzling display of couture by domestic and international Black designers. To name just a few highlights: first is a highly personal installation by South African designer Thebe Magugu, who also presented this collection during the Paris Fashion Week. Magugu won the prestigious LVHM prize for young designers in 2019. Also, from South Africa, filmmaker and photographer Kristin-Lee Moolman worked with the stylist Ib Kamar to produce photographs and a film featuring Magugu’s work.   Of course the exhibition also features work by Virgil Abloh, creative director of men’s fashion at Louis Vuitton and founder of the label Off-White. Several of his ensembles are on display, including the black- and-white men’s suit consisting of woollen pants and a coat decorated with what seems to be a classic pied-de-poule pattern. On closer inspection, however, the motif turns out to be based on the shape of the African continent.   Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are represented in the exhibition with two ensembles: one which they created for Nina Ricci, consisting of silk pants and blouse and their signature ‘bucket hat’, and a second iconic design by their own Botter label. Maria Grazia Chiuri, the first-ever female creative director at fashion house Dior, worked with the African designer Pathé Ouédraogo – better known as Pathé’O – to pay tribute to the African continent, as part of Dior’s Resort 2020 collection. On display is an indigo-coloured skirt and jacket. This collaboration embodied the identity of the entire collection.   We are also proud to show an iconic evening gown made of down, from Moncler. It is the result of a collaboration between Valentino’s creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli with the Ethiopian label Lemlem, founded by model and designer Liya Kebede. The Surinamese-Dutch designer Marga Weimans launched her own label in 2006 and has presented several successful collections, investigating themes such as identity, technology and beauty. The exhibition shows an outfit from the Power of my Dreams collection, in which she infused traditional African wax prints with new meaning. We furthermore show an impressive black evening gown from her Debut collection, about which Weimans says: “It is my first collection, in which I tell a story about the sublime and seductive beauty of the Parisian couture landscape, using the archetypical ballgown as basis. I combine this with the horrors of slavery, from which the fashion industry arose. The blood, sweat and tears of ambition are mixed with the blood, sweat and tears of my enslaved ancestors.”   Stereotypes still abound: consider the Surinamese-Dutch designer Giorgio Toppin of the Xhosa label, who is regularly asked whether he makes streetwear while in fact, he specialises in men’s couture.     THE INFLUENCE OF STEETWEAR AND MUSIC   Hip-hop music has had a strong impact on everyday fashion and even couture. Cross Colours, famous for dressing ‘the Fresh Prince of Bel Air’, among others, was founded in 1989 by TJ Walker and Carl Jones. Their goal was to design clothing that is blind to prejudice. With their creations, full of symbolism and statements, the designers aim to give Black youths a voice. This goal is echoed by Dutch Black- owned brands like Patta, Daily Paper, Filling Pieces, The New Originals and HOSSELAER. These brands staked out their spot in the fashion industry by selling sneakers or T-shirts, soon followed by complete collections and sales points across the world. Such labels have become a permanent fixture of the fashion landscape. They owe their success in part to their collaborations with domestic and international labels like Nike and Adidas, but the real strength of these entrepreneurs is their sense of shared responsibility towards young people who feel unheard or misunderstood.   Political and social messages are also found in the colourful streetwear collections by Priya Ahluwalia. Her designs are always geared to sustainability, for instance by creating a series of new designs using Adidas deadstock. The creations by Farida Sedoc, artist, entrepreneur and founder of HOSSELAER are likewise suffused by statements. Especially for Voices of Fashion she made an installation using a selection of T-shirts from her private archive.     BEAUTY   Black women often were and continue to be marginalised. Their skills, beauties and body shapes are rarely celebrated and their natural Black hair is viewed as ‘unprofessional’. The cosmetics industry, with its limited colour palette, has likewise seemed to ignore them. Black women have been fighting to change this for decades. A selection of Dutch and international fashion magazine covers from the 1960s until today celebrates the diversity of Black models. This part of the exhibition includes photographs made by Kwame Brathwaite in the 1960s of the people and street images that inspired the Black is Beautiful movement in New York. The Black Panthers and icons such as Angela Davis, instantly recognisable for her large afro, contributed to the international reputation of this movement. More than 50 years on, the goal of highlighting the beauty of Black women remains relevant, although change does seem to be underway.     A BOOK, A MULTI-MEDIA TOUR, AND FRINGE PROGRAMME   The exhibition is accompanied by a lavishly illustrated book containing unique interviews and several long-reads, designed by Serana Angelista and Glamcult.Studio. The book will be published in mid- February and can be purchased in (among other outlets) the Museum Shop and from Waanders publishers.   Discover much more through the Voices of Fashion multi-media tour featuring the voices of Guillaume Schmidt (Patta), Giovanca Ostiana (singer, model, presenter) and Denise Jannah (singer).   There is also an extensive fringe programme, with the collaboration of The Black Archives, the African Fashion Research Institute, The New Originals, and others. More details of this programme will be announced online. The exhibition is sponsored by the City of Utrecht, BankGiro Loterij, Fonds 21, the   Creative Industries Fund NL, VSBfonds, Prins Bernhard Culture Fund, Mondriaan Fund and Prins Claus Fund.   Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race)Voices of fashion is part of Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race), a partnership between twelve museums in the Netherlands that are all working to embed the practices underpinning true inclusion and diversity in the DNA of the museum industry. The Centraal Museum’s partners in this venture are the Amsterdam Museum, the Bonnefanten, the Dordrechts Museum, the Frans Hals Museum, Museum Arnhem, the Rembrandt House Museum, the Rijksmuseum, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, the Van Abbemuseum, the Van Gogh Museum and the Zeeuws Museum. We hope to welcome other museums aboard in the future. The museums in this partnership will this year hold exhibitions and stage events highlighting themes of cultural diversity and slavery/the legacy of colonialism. Centraal Museum Utrecht presents the major fashion exhibition Voices of Fashion: Black Couture, Beauty & Styles, in which iconic designs, models and sources of inspiration promote a more inclusive fashion legacy. In this multi-disciplinary exhibition, fashion curator Ninke Bloemberg teams up with fashion activist, co-curator and founder of Diversity Rules, Janice Deul, to examine how Black designers have influenced the world of fashion, what stereotypes continue to exist, and how beauty is perceived. Voices of Fashion was created in close collaboration with designers, photographers and models from the Netherlands and abroad. The visually striking exhibition design is by AFARAI’s Afaina de Jong, and the exhibition is structured according to several themes.     COUTURE   The exhibition opens with a dazzling display of couture by domestic and international Black designers. To name just a few highlights: first is a highly personal installation by South African designer Thebe Magugu, who also presented this collection during the Paris Fashion Week. Magugu won the prestigious LVHM prize for young designers in 2019. Also, from South Africa, filmmaker and photographer Kristin-Lee Moolman worked with the stylist Ib Kamar to produce photographs and a film featuring Magugu’s work.   Of course the exhibition also features work by Virgil Abloh, creative director of men’s fashion at Louis Vuitton and founder of the label Off-White. Several of his ensembles are on display, including the black- and-white men’s suit consisting of woollen pants and a coat decorated with what seems to be a classic pied-de-poule pattern. On closer inspection, however, the motif turns out to be based on the shape of the African continent.   Rushemy Botter and Lisi Herrebrugh are represented in the exhibition with two ensembles: one which they created for Nina Ricci, consisting of silk pants and blouse and their signature ‘bucket hat’, and a second iconic design by their own Botter label. Maria Grazia Chiuri, the first-ever female creative director at fashion house Dior, worked with the African designer Pathé Ouédraogo – better known as Pathé’O – to pay tribute to the African continent, as part of Dior’s Resort 2020 collection. On display is an indigo-coloured skirt and jacket. This collaboration embodied the identity of the entire collection.   We are also proud to show an iconic evening gown made of down, from Moncler. It is the result of a collaboration between Valentino’s creative director Pierpaolo Piccioli with the Ethiopian label Lemlem, founded by model and designer Liya Kebede. The Surinamese-Dutch designer Marga Weimans launched her own label in 2006 and has presented several successful collections, investigating themes such as identity, technology and beauty. The exhibition shows an outfit from the Power of my Dreams collection, in which she infused traditional African wax prints with new meaning. We furthermore show an impressive black evening gown from her Debut collection, about which Weimans says: “It is my first collection, in which I tell a story about the sublime and seductive beauty of the Parisian couture landscape, using the archetypical ballgown as basis. I combine this with the horrors of slavery, from which the fashion industry arose. The blood, sweat and tears of ambition are mixed with the blood, sweat and tears of my enslaved ancestors.”   Stereotypes still abound: consider the Surinamese-Dutch designer Giorgio Toppin of the Xhosa label, who is regularly asked whether he makes streetwear while in fact, he specialises in men’s couture.     THE INFLUENCE OF STEETWEAR AND MUSIC   Hip-hop music has had a strong impact on everyday fashion and even couture. Cross Colours, famous for dressing ‘the Fresh Prince of Bel Air’, among others, was founded in 1989 by TJ Walker and Carl Jones. Their goal was to design clothing that is blind to prejudice. With their creations, full of symbolism and statements, the designers aim to give Black youths a voice. This goal is echoed by Dutch Black- owned brands like Patta, Daily Paper, Filling Pieces, The New Originals and HOSSELAER. These brands staked out their spot in the fashion industry by selling sneakers or T-shirts, soon followed by complete collections and sales points across the world. Such labels have become a permanent fixture of the fashion landscape. They owe their success in part to their collaborations with domestic and international labels like Nike and Adidas, but the real strength of these entrepreneurs is their sense of shared responsibility towards young people who feel unheard or misunderstood.   Political and social messages are also found in the colourful streetwear collections by Priya Ahluwalia. Her designs are always geared to sustainability, for instance by creating a series of new designs using Adidas deadstock. The creations by Farida Sedoc, artist, entrepreneur and founder of HOSSELAER are likewise suffused by statements. Especially for Voices of Fashion she made an installation using a selection of T-shirts from her private archive.     BEAUTY   Black women often were and continue to be marginalised. Their skills, beauties and body shapes are rarely celebrated and their natural Black hair is viewed as ‘unprofessional’. The cosmetics industry, with its limited colour palette, has likewise seemed to ignore them. Black women have been fighting to change this for decades. A selection of Dutch and international fashion magazine covers from the 1960s until today celebrates the diversity of Black models. This part of the exhibition includes photographs made by Kwame Brathwaite in the 1960s of the people and street images that inspired the Black is Beautiful movement in New York. The Black Panthers and icons such as Angela Davis, instantly recognisable for her large afro, contributed to the international reputation of this movement. More than 50 years on, the goal of highlighting the beauty of Black women remains relevant, although change does seem to be underway.     A BOOK, A MULTI-MEDIA TOUR, AND FRINGE PROGRAMME   The exhibition is accompanied by a lavishly illustrated book containing unique interviews and several long-reads, designed by Serana Angelista and Glamcult.Studio. The book will be published in mid- February and can be purchased in (among other outlets) the Museum Shop and from Waanders publishers.   Discover much more through the Voices of Fashion multi-media tour featuring the voices of Guillaume Schmidt (Patta), Giovanca Ostiana (singer, model, presenter) and Denise Jannah (singer).   There is also an extensive fringe programme, with the collaboration of The Black Archives, the African Fashion Research Institute, The New Originals, and others. More details of this programme will be announced online. The exhibition is sponsored by the City of Utrecht, BankGiro Loterij, Fonds 21, the   Creative Industries Fund NL, VSBfonds, Prins Bernhard Culture Fund, Mondriaan Fund and Prins Claus Fund.   Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race)Voices of fashion is part of Musea Bekennen Kleur (Museums Face Up to the Matter of Race), a partnership between twelve museums in the Netherlands that are all working to embed the practices underpinning true inclusion and diversity in the DNA of the museum industry. The Centraal Museum’s partners in this venture are the Amsterdam Museum, the Bonnefanten, the Dordrechts Museum, the Frans Hals Museum, Museum Arnhem, the Rembrandt House Museum, the Rijksmuseum, the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam, the Van Abbemuseum, the Van Gogh Museum and the Zeeuws Museum. We hope to welcome other museums aboard in the future. The museums in this partnership will this year hold exhibitions and stage events highlighting themes of cultural diversity and slavery/the legacy of colonialism.

Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem 2021 (FDFA)re- examines the PURPOSE of  the current fashion system
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Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem 2021 (FDFA)re- examines the PURPOSE of the current fashion system

Exhibition Arnhem, March 24, a new year, and a new world due to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, a time when people are looking en masse for a new form of reflection and immaterial possession through meaning, or PURPOSE.     Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem this year, together with designers and artists, investigates in a hybrid festival format how the desire for meaning manifests itself in fashion and design. And how the fashion system is reinventing itself.     The festival is all about PURPOSE, but certainly also about REPURPOSE and a reset of the fashion system in a contemplative way. The festival zooms in on the way in which fashion and product design responds to the changing focus from material to immaterial happiness and meaning, based on the ten dimensions.     The ten dimensions refer to domains such as consumption, equality, ratio, emotion, empathy and are derived from the Tree of Life of the Kabbalistic teaching, with the aim of finding a perfect balance through a combination of these dimensions, allowing visitors to see that contemporary ideas about meaning, sustainability and the fashion system, are not black and white, but rather look for a new balance.     FDFA offers a high-quality hybrid festival from June 3 to July 3, 2021, where online and offline events alternate and complement each other. Every week a number of dimensions from the overarching theme 'PURPOSE' are highlighted. FDFA offers depth on the theme every week by means of videos and hybrid events. The programming takes place mainly on Thursdays and Fridays in June and is organized in collaboration with partners of the FDFA.   The digital program consists of an opening week with designer talks on the theme PURPOSE within the ten dimensions. Throughout the month, the FDFA presents digital programs, such as video interviews with the talents within the dimensions, how they create videos about the creative process and craft with local Arnhem designers and substantive visual installations. The FDFA lets experts talk about the hacks for a sustainable, upcycled wardrobe, and where clothing comes from.     The FDFA gives a seminar on PURPOSE & RE-PURPOSE and within the themes talks are hosted about sustainable projects such as The Linen Project and Fashion For Good about the future of circular design and new biobased materials. The Linen Project is investigating whether it is possible to start the local production of flax, linen and (linen) products in a sustainable manner in the Netherlands, so that the quality and origin of the products can be brought back to a local level. On the interactive parts, workshops are given in crafts such as screen printing and knitting. During the Fashion Month, the final exam students of ArtEZ University of Arts and Rijn IJssel Creative Industry will show their graduation collections.   The physical program of the FDFA will consist of local, small-scale events with the local partners, a tour along different dimensions through the city, which can be taken alone, and a shop exhibition ArtEZ Toile de Luxe will be photos of ArtEZ Fashion Design Bachelor students. exhibited at various locations in the city center and the Modekwartier. Together with the PURPOSE exhibition, these form a route through the city. The program is continuous in the month of June.   The FDFA fulfills a regional platform function in the field of fashion, which links regional professionals and organizations in fashion and design and communicates current fashion and design themes. The role of the designer in the interaction with the user is central to the festival. This happens to a large extent during June Fashion Month, when FDFA bundles various initiatives and presents them to the outside world together.     The last generations in the Netherlands have grown up in a consumer society in which fast fashion, rapid trend changes and mass consumption are the norm. Property and capital are equivalent to wealth in today's Western culture. Due to the internet and social media, beauty ideals are taking on more and more unnatural forms worldwide. Driven by algorithms, the pressure to live up to these ideals is mounting. The performance society dictates an unending quest for perfection, but the downside of the quest is an increase in burnouts. And the use of antidepressants and drugs is on the rise. At the same time, a counter-movement is emerging in which the interest in mindfulness and yoga expresses itself in a search for a deeper form of meaning. In short, this group wants to rethink today's performance society. And they are trying to change the consumption patterns that underlie it.   The University of Utah concluded that spiritual experiences cause the brain to produce dopamine and provide much the same pleasure as with sex, gambling and the use of stimulants. More than ever, we seem to be looking for meaning and happiness in our lives. Happiness that we apparently don't find in our current, busy performance society. Following this trend, the Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem this year focuses on the theme of meaning with its participating designers, artists, partners and the public on the basis of the ten dimensions.     Credits: Photography: Wendelien Daan © 2020 Styling: Mary-Lou Berkulin Models: Lisette Ros, Liv ten Thije, Robin Griffin Assistant Photo: Robin Griffin Arnhem, March 24, a new year, and a new world due to the worldwide COVID-19 pandemic, a time when people are looking en masse for a new form of reflection and immaterial possession through meaning, or PURPOSE.     Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem this year, together with designers and artists, investigates in a hybrid festival format how the desire for meaning manifests itself in fashion and design. And how the fashion system is reinventing itself.     The festival is all about PURPOSE, but certainly also about REPURPOSE and a reset of the fashion system in a contemplative way. The festival zooms in on the way in which fashion and product design responds to the changing focus from material to immaterial happiness and meaning, based on the ten dimensions.     The ten dimensions refer to domains such as consumption, equality, ratio, emotion, empathy and are derived from the Tree of Life of the Kabbalistic teaching, with the aim of finding a perfect balance through a combination of these dimensions, allowing visitors to see that contemporary ideas about meaning, sustainability and the fashion system, are not black and white, but rather look for a new balance.     FDFA offers a high-quality hybrid festival from June 3 to July 3, 2021, where online and offline events alternate and complement each other. Every week a number of dimensions from the overarching theme 'PURPOSE' are highlighted. FDFA offers depth on the theme every week by means of videos and hybrid events. The programming takes place mainly on Thursdays and Fridays in June and is organized in collaboration with partners of the FDFA.   The digital program consists of an opening week with designer talks on the theme PURPOSE within the ten dimensions. Throughout the month, the FDFA presents digital programs, such as video interviews with the talents within the dimensions, how they create videos about the creative process and craft with local Arnhem designers and substantive visual installations. The FDFA lets experts talk about the hacks for a sustainable, upcycled wardrobe, and where clothing comes from.     The FDFA gives a seminar on PURPOSE & RE-PURPOSE and within the themes talks are hosted about sustainable projects such as The Linen Project and Fashion For Good about the future of circular design and new biobased materials. The Linen Project is investigating whether it is possible to start the local production of flax, linen and (linen) products in a sustainable manner in the Netherlands, so that the quality and origin of the products can be brought back to a local level. On the interactive parts, workshops are given in crafts such as screen printing and knitting. During the Fashion Month, the final exam students of ArtEZ University of Arts and Rijn IJssel Creative Industry will show their graduation collections.   The physical program of the FDFA will consist of local, small-scale events with the local partners, a tour along different dimensions through the city, which can be taken alone, and a shop exhibition ArtEZ Toile de Luxe will be photos of ArtEZ Fashion Design Bachelor students. exhibited at various locations in the city center and the Modekwartier. Together with the PURPOSE exhibition, these form a route through the city. The program is continuous in the month of June.   The FDFA fulfills a regional platform function in the field of fashion, which links regional professionals and organizations in fashion and design and communicates current fashion and design themes. The role of the designer in the interaction with the user is central to the festival. This happens to a large extent during June Fashion Month, when FDFA bundles various initiatives and presents them to the outside world together.     The last generations in the Netherlands have grown up in a consumer society in which fast fashion, rapid trend changes and mass consumption are the norm. Property and capital are equivalent to wealth in today's Western culture. Due to the internet and social media, beauty ideals are taking on more and more unnatural forms worldwide. Driven by algorithms, the pressure to live up to these ideals is mounting. The performance society dictates an unending quest for perfection, but the downside of the quest is an increase in burnouts. And the use of antidepressants and drugs is on the rise. At the same time, a counter-movement is emerging in which the interest in mindfulness and yoga expresses itself in a search for a deeper form of meaning. In short, this group wants to rethink today's performance society. And they are trying to change the consumption patterns that underlie it.   The University of Utah concluded that spiritual experiences cause the brain to produce dopamine and provide much the same pleasure as with sex, gambling and the use of stimulants. More than ever, we seem to be looking for meaning and happiness in our lives. Happiness that we apparently don't find in our current, busy performance society. Following this trend, the Fashion + Design Festival Arnhem this year focuses on the theme of meaning with its participating designers, artists, partners and the public on the basis of the ten dimensions.     Credits: Photography: Wendelien Daan © 2020 Styling: Mary-Lou Berkulin Models: Lisette Ros, Liv ten Thije, Robin Griffin Assistant Photo: Robin Griffin

"Calm during a storm". In conversation with Toto Blaauw
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"Calm during a storm". In conversation with Toto Blaauw

Art If, as a young artist, you get to hold your first group exhibition at the Tate Modern in London, the expectations are very high. Especially when he dropped out of school at the Willem de Kooning Academy shortly before. During art school he did graduate from his propaedeutic year, what gave him the confidence to drop out.     With his contemporary work he managed to find his purpose and build a community around him. The corona era is a strange time for everyone, but Toto mainly uses it to dive deeper into his art and is more committed than ever.     While conducting this interview we realized that there will probably no longer be a pre Covid world. We have to get used to our new existence and that is intense. Life literally runs through a screen now. "For Toto, the year 2020 passed very quickly and he experienced it as monotonous: "I mainly observed and adapted on the situation so that I could convert it all into new work.     People's behaviour has also changed a lot. We now deal with each other very consciously, everything goes faster and has to be planned, nothing is spontaneous or personal anymore. Although a lot of people became more conscious of their blessings and practicing gratitude. "You don’t know what you got until its gone right.” But the bigger question is: What are we doing to make things better?"     Toto has always been inspired by his environment because imagination and the love to create were there early on.      The Amsterdam-based artist, has an Indonesian mother and a Dutch father. His  upbringing learned him about various art, music and culture. He started drawing his own characters in imaginary worlds at a very young age. Inspired by his drawings from his grandparents, cartoons and MTV in the mid 90s.     Much later in art school, Toto began to take everything a little more seriously and discovered the power of good art. On school trips to the Art Biennale in Venice and Documenta in Kasselhe felt a strong curiosity and urge to participate in this world.It’s a dream of mine to participate in one of these large art events in the near future.   For Toto, art has no rules and he feels free to make whatever he wants."My work comes from a place where love, responsibility and cultural background play an important role. I would describe it as a visual language that continues to develop and tries to touch the viewer by any means.  "The young artist is known for his mix with old and new techniques and materials. He uses humour and symbolism to give balance on the harsh realities of society, culture and race.    Duality is a concept that is often used in the characters, symbols and language of his work. It is his way of conveying what is going on in his head. His work should above all radiate tranquillity. "I feel that the world is getting busier due digitalization, performance pressure and inequality. I think humans need a moment of calmness. I try to address this need with my work. With one of my designs, Paradise, I take you back to the beginning; the creation of the earth. Around the work I made a grid that represents a kind of time machine. This allows you to look back from the present to a period of purity and calmness. A state of being free from all the noise.   Lately it has been a period of awareness for Toto. "Before Covid, I was very busy with new work and deadlines. But because we were forced to sit at home and a number of projects were cancelled, I was forced to rest. "It turned out to be a moment of reflection and good for the state of mind, but after 8 months the situation started to really feel unnatural. "This pandemic feels like a transition period, in which we need to stay mentally healthy and strong. But also need to look at ourselves as humans and make bigger and better decisions for the future.   Even though I felt a lot of frustration, It has made me stronger and focus on the goals I want to achieve. "Even though, like the rest of the world, he is undergoing a change; its purpose remains the same. "I have created my own visual language. The observant viewer often sees the specific "eyes" reflected in my work. The meaning of these eyes depend on the context. But generally reflect the motives of human nature. Every human-being is addicted, hypnotized or obsessed with something, this can be positive or negative. Another example is consciousness of the human-being, who sometimes does not realize what is really happening around him or her?   Toto has an eclectic mix of influences for his work drawing inspiration from music, books, film, architecture and conversations. The way he does research is very detailed and specific, his brain knows exactly what part of the information he loves and should take.Research is a big part of Toto’s working proces and it gives his work way more layering and depth.   He finds it interesting how Solange Knowles, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Shawn Stüssy, James Turrell and Mark Gonzales think. Their work mentality is also something he can appreciate, the work is about and for the people. Work ethics and passion are very important in our industry, you have to want to work hard because its hard especially in the current zeitgeist."      Maybe there is a lot of chaos in the world now and everything feels different, but Toto still sees the future optimistic, he has to. "I really envision a healthy future for human beings on earth and I already started to visualize this new world. “Currently I’m working on new creations and collaborative projects and undoubtedly contribute to positive changes.    Toto Blaauw will launch new work in 2021 during his new solo exhibition: “Hello New World”. That will be opening spring, more information on the location will come out soon.Follow the Numéro Netherlands site and Toto Blaauw with exact dates and the location of the exhibition.   If, as a young artist, you get to hold your first group exhibition at the Tate Modern in London, the expectations are very high. Especially when he dropped out of school at the Willem de Kooning Academy shortly before. During art school he did graduate from his propaedeutic year, what gave him the confidence to drop out.     With his contemporary work he managed to find his purpose and build a community around him. The corona era is a strange time for everyone, but Toto mainly uses it to dive deeper into his art and is more committed than ever.     While conducting this interview we realized that there will probably no longer be a pre Covid world. We have to get used to our new existence and that is intense. Life literally runs through a screen now. "For Toto, the year 2020 passed very quickly and he experienced it as monotonous: "I mainly observed and adapted on the situation so that I could convert it all into new work.     People's behaviour has also changed a lot. We now deal with each other very consciously, everything goes faster and has to be planned, nothing is spontaneous or personal anymore. Although a lot of people became more conscious of their blessings and practicing gratitude. "You don’t know what you got until its gone right.” But the bigger question is: What are we doing to make things better?"     Toto has always been inspired by his environment because imagination and the love to create were there early on.      The Amsterdam-based artist, has an Indonesian mother and a Dutch father. His  upbringing learned him about various art, music and culture. He started drawing his own characters in imaginary worlds at a very young age. Inspired by his drawings from his grandparents, cartoons and MTV in the mid 90s.     Much later in art school, Toto began to take everything a little more seriously and discovered the power of good art. On school trips to the Art Biennale in Venice and Documenta in Kasselhe felt a strong curiosity and urge to participate in this world.It’s a dream of mine to participate in one of these large art events in the near future.   For Toto, art has no rules and he feels free to make whatever he wants."My work comes from a place where love, responsibility and cultural background play an important role. I would describe it as a visual language that continues to develop and tries to touch the viewer by any means.  "The young artist is known for his mix with old and new techniques and materials. He uses humour and symbolism to give balance on the harsh realities of society, culture and race.    Duality is a concept that is often used in the characters, symbols and language of his work. It is his way of conveying what is going on in his head. His work should above all radiate tranquillity. "I feel that the world is getting busier due digitalization, performance pressure and inequality. I think humans need a moment of calmness. I try to address this need with my work. With one of my designs, Paradise, I take you back to the beginning; the creation of the earth. Around the work I made a grid that represents a kind of time machine. This allows you to look back from the present to a period of purity and calmness. A state of being free from all the noise.   Lately it has been a period of awareness for Toto. "Before Covid, I was very busy with new work and deadlines. But because we were forced to sit at home and a number of projects were cancelled, I was forced to rest. "It turned out to be a moment of reflection and good for the state of mind, but after 8 months the situation started to really feel unnatural. "This pandemic feels like a transition period, in which we need to stay mentally healthy and strong. But also need to look at ourselves as humans and make bigger and better decisions for the future.   Even though I felt a lot of frustration, It has made me stronger and focus on the goals I want to achieve. "Even though, like the rest of the world, he is undergoing a change; its purpose remains the same. "I have created my own visual language. The observant viewer often sees the specific "eyes" reflected in my work. The meaning of these eyes depend on the context. But generally reflect the motives of human nature. Every human-being is addicted, hypnotized or obsessed with something, this can be positive or negative. Another example is consciousness of the human-being, who sometimes does not realize what is really happening around him or her?   Toto has an eclectic mix of influences for his work drawing inspiration from music, books, film, architecture and conversations. The way he does research is very detailed and specific, his brain knows exactly what part of the information he loves and should take.Research is a big part of Toto’s working proces and it gives his work way more layering and depth.   He finds it interesting how Solange Knowles, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Shawn Stüssy, James Turrell and Mark Gonzales think. Their work mentality is also something he can appreciate, the work is about and for the people. Work ethics and passion are very important in our industry, you have to want to work hard because its hard especially in the current zeitgeist."      Maybe there is a lot of chaos in the world now and everything feels different, but Toto still sees the future optimistic, he has to. "I really envision a healthy future for human beings on earth and I already started to visualize this new world. “Currently I’m working on new creations and collaborative projects and undoubtedly contribute to positive changes.    Toto Blaauw will launch new work in 2021 during his new solo exhibition: “Hello New World”. That will be opening spring, more information on the location will come out soon.Follow the Numéro Netherlands site and Toto Blaauw with exact dates and the location of the exhibition.  

Hugo Comte's first photo exhibition at Tase Gallery
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Hugo Comte's first photo exhibition at Tase Gallery

Photography Image-Maker Hugo Comte, launches his first collective works this February in the form of a curated book of imagery. The book is accompanied by an exhibition at the Tase Gallery, LA, where Comte will be exhibiting in the form of a one-week show of seven selected works in the brand new gallery space ( February 25th – March 3rd).     Intending to bring together women who’ve inspired him, the artist has created an object where all of his portraits can be viewed in one place. A combination of existing and never-before-seen imagery, featuring muses such as Bella Hadid, Kendall Jenner, Irina Shayk, as well as Dua Lipa, for whom Comte shot her latest album imagery. The book is a celebration of women who have always been at the centre of his artistic vision. Commanding the camera, these women aren't merely subjects; Comte aims to capture their thoughts, emotions and desires... They are watching us, allowing the viewer to gaze whilst they remain completely in control. The subjects featured all possess marked differences but each becomes synchronised, encompassed in Comte’s cinematic and dreamlike spaces and creates an intimacy between the subject and the person viewing – we become a part of their dreams. This is, in no small way, due to his meticulous creative process and almost architectural approach to space, light and atmosphere. The book also showcases never before seen works including special pieces made in collaboration with airbrush artists to repaint his imagery, as well as unique CGI pieces, designed in a similar grained texture and culminating in the recognisable style for which he’s best known. The works are extremely realistic whilst retaining an air of mystery. The book itself is paired back and minimal in approach, remaining all white externally and nameless. The aim is for the book to live and be used, the white changing with time and age. Hugo worked with Art Director David McKelvey on the 200-page collection, which boasts 85 images and has only a sole barcode on its front cover, which is a symbol of huge significance to Comte. In the similar way in which artists’ name their most famous pieces, Comte has always bestowed a barcode upon each of his images; turning something digital into a more physical and material piece. When used in the book, the barcode is given more space and importance, becoming an artwork in itself and very much a symbol of the artist's work.     We had a chance to speak with Hugo about his new exhibition and book.     Tell us about your new book, what inspired it and what is your message with the newly launched book?   'The book is a hybrid retrospective; putting into perspective archives and new work together, in order to create a new narrative and narrow my identity into a precise vision of attitudes, atmosphere and colours. Creating new narratives between the muses themselves, as well as between the muses and the viewer. The book becomes an object of synchronisation, affirmation and contemplation. A style and design manifesto defining an era for the artist and whoever projects their dreams into his imagery.    The book doesn't have a given title because I didn’t want people to associate any particular thought around this vision of women or the object itself. I wanted it to remain completely neutral and feel the collection of images are the title and don't require an additional label. The barcode is the symbol of the book, which in itself is unpronounceable and is its own language, much like Prince’s love symbol .      What is it like for you personally to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic? Have you been able to stay creative during these times? Perhaps you developed new dreams, projects, or discovered new passions?   The process of creating, selecting, and narrowing my work for this project has really highlighted what is the most exciting and important part for me and that is my process of working with these models, as well as the importance of colour. By creating a book it has made me realise who I am as an artist, and how I want to represent myself by translating my identity through design, art and communication which is very interesting.     What do you think is the most important thing about the current times? What positive aspects can we draw from this difficult period?   'I think the entire industry started to give real credit to new creatives right away; giving a voice to new creatives with way more diversity because they want to hear new thoughts and vibes, and not waiting for validation. I think this is very beautiful and exciting and very motivating for everyone'       Tell us about the inspiring people photographed for your new book. What are some of your personal highlights?   My first thought was to use only portraits of women as I feel it is the most intimate part of my work and where I express myself the best.  Groups wouldn’t allow such intimacy as a portrait does, where it's the viewer and the woman only. When I shoot an image I always try to give the feeling that the woman is not being photographed but that she is looking through the camera, which gives a direct contact between the watcher and the muse.   A model’s depth, the intensity in her intention, and the ability to synchronise this with the way she looks is the most important thing for me.   I dedicate my entire being, energy and focus to making these women as beautiful as possible. Not just a universal vision of beauty but in a very personal way. I really look at them constantly and am very present, I am completely involved and hands-on in every part of the process, and they know that my intention and only concern the whole day is to dedicate myself to them.       We also had a delight speaking with Jessie Andrews, founder of Tase Gallery in LA.     What exhibitions  do you have planned for in Tase Gallery for the coming months?   Hugo is the first exhibition outside of my own. For the month of March for Women’s Month we have rotating female artist each week that will be featured, and in April we have Claude Home who is a NYC based mid-century furniture collector who will replicate her studio at Tase. In May we’re working with ‘Structure’ a segment of Better Shelter — the Ikea Foundation and the UN created a humanitarian innovation project which finds housing solutions for refugees — they will be building a structure inside of the gallery and we will allow people to come see and donate to the NFP.        With your new opening of your own gallery, what inspired you to open it?     I wanted to change the way people interact with fashion and art. More communal than cold. Life is about community and supporting each other and now I have a space where I can do that!         Tell us something that is not on your resume.   Coffee connoisseur.      What is your biggest lesson learnt from 2020?   2020 for me was the year that made me dive deeper into what I was already doing and take time for myself. I learned who I really wanted to spend time with, what projects I actually cared about and what excites me. It helped me refine the gallery project. Made me create sustainably initiatives for Bagatiba. Plan further ahead for my ready to wear project Jeu. Now in 2021 I must put them all into effect!  Image-Maker Hugo Comte, launches his first collective works this February in the form of a curated book of imagery. The book is accompanied by an exhibition at the Tase Gallery, LA, where Comte will be exhibiting in the form of a one-week show of seven selected works in the brand new gallery space ( February 25th – March 3rd).     Intending to bring together women who’ve inspired him, the artist has created an object where all of his portraits can be viewed in one place. A combination of existing and never-before-seen imagery, featuring muses such as Bella Hadid, Kendall Jenner, Irina Shayk, as well as Dua Lipa, for whom Comte shot her latest album imagery. The book is a celebration of women who have always been at the centre of his artistic vision. Commanding the camera, these women aren't merely subjects; Comte aims to capture their thoughts, emotions and desires... They are watching us, allowing the viewer to gaze whilst they remain completely in control. The subjects featured all possess marked differences but each becomes synchronised, encompassed in Comte’s cinematic and dreamlike spaces and creates an intimacy between the subject and the person viewing – we become a part of their dreams. This is, in no small way, due to his meticulous creative process and almost architectural approach to space, light and atmosphere. The book also showcases never before seen works including special pieces made in collaboration with airbrush artists to repaint his imagery, as well as unique CGI pieces, designed in a similar grained texture and culminating in the recognisable style for which he’s best known. The works are extremely realistic whilst retaining an air of mystery. The book itself is paired back and minimal in approach, remaining all white externally and nameless. The aim is for the book to live and be used, the white changing with time and age. Hugo worked with Art Director David McKelvey on the 200-page collection, which boasts 85 images and has only a sole barcode on its front cover, which is a symbol of huge significance to Comte. In the similar way in which artists’ name their most famous pieces, Comte has always bestowed a barcode upon each of his images; turning something digital into a more physical and material piece. When used in the book, the barcode is given more space and importance, becoming an artwork in itself and very much a symbol of the artist's work.     We had a chance to speak with Hugo about his new exhibition and book.     Tell us about your new book, what inspired it and what is your message with the newly launched book?   'The book is a hybrid retrospective; putting into perspective archives and new work together, in order to create a new narrative and narrow my identity into a precise vision of attitudes, atmosphere and colours. Creating new narratives between the muses themselves, as well as between the muses and the viewer. The book becomes an object of synchronisation, affirmation and contemplation. A style and design manifesto defining an era for the artist and whoever projects their dreams into his imagery.    The book doesn't have a given title because I didn’t want people to associate any particular thought around this vision of women or the object itself. I wanted it to remain completely neutral and feel the collection of images are the title and don't require an additional label. The barcode is the symbol of the book, which in itself is unpronounceable and is its own language, much like Prince’s love symbol .      What is it like for you personally to deal with the Covid-19 pandemic? Have you been able to stay creative during these times? Perhaps you developed new dreams, projects, or discovered new passions?   The process of creating, selecting, and narrowing my work for this project has really highlighted what is the most exciting and important part for me and that is my process of working with these models, as well as the importance of colour. By creating a book it has made me realise who I am as an artist, and how I want to represent myself by translating my identity through design, art and communication which is very interesting.     What do you think is the most important thing about the current times? What positive aspects can we draw from this difficult period?   'I think the entire industry started to give real credit to new creatives right away; giving a voice to new creatives with way more diversity because they want to hear new thoughts and vibes, and not waiting for validation. I think this is very beautiful and exciting and very motivating for everyone'       Tell us about the inspiring people photographed for your new book. What are some of your personal highlights?   My first thought was to use only portraits of women as I feel it is the most intimate part of my work and where I express myself the best.  Groups wouldn’t allow such intimacy as a portrait does, where it's the viewer and the woman only. When I shoot an image I always try to give the feeling that the woman is not being photographed but that she is looking through the camera, which gives a direct contact between the watcher and the muse.   A model’s depth, the intensity in her intention, and the ability to synchronise this with the way she looks is the most important thing for me.   I dedicate my entire being, energy and focus to making these women as beautiful as possible. Not just a universal vision of beauty but in a very personal way. I really look at them constantly and am very present, I am completely involved and hands-on in every part of the process, and they know that my intention and only concern the whole day is to dedicate myself to them.       We also had a delight speaking with Jessie Andrews, founder of Tase Gallery in LA.     What exhibitions  do you have planned for in Tase Gallery for the coming months?   Hugo is the first exhibition outside of my own. For the month of March for Women’s Month we have rotating female artist each week that will be featured, and in April we have Claude Home who is a NYC based mid-century furniture collector who will replicate her studio at Tase. In May we’re working with ‘Structure’ a segment of Better Shelter — the Ikea Foundation and the UN created a humanitarian innovation project which finds housing solutions for refugees — they will be building a structure inside of the gallery and we will allow people to come see and donate to the NFP.        With your new opening of your own gallery, what inspired you to open it?     I wanted to change the way people interact with fashion and art. More communal than cold. Life is about community and supporting each other and now I have a space where I can do that!         Tell us something that is not on your resume.   Coffee connoisseur.      What is your biggest lesson learnt from 2020?   2020 for me was the year that made me dive deeper into what I was already doing and take time for myself. I learned who I really wanted to spend time with, what projects I actually cared about and what excites me. It helped me refine the gallery project. Made me create sustainably initiatives for Bagatiba. Plan further ahead for my ready to wear project Jeu. Now in 2021 I must put them all into effect! 

SWATCH AND MoMA COLLABORATE TO LAUNCH SPECIAL EDITION WATCHES
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SWATCH AND MoMA COLLABORATE TO LAUNCH SPECIAL EDITION WATCHES

Watches Swatch announces the launch of special edition designs with The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) as part of its Museum Journey series. The watches will be available at Swatch stores worldwide and swatch.com as well as global MoMA Design Stores and store.moma.org, starting on March 4, 2021.     The assortment features six unique creations inspired by artworks in MoMA’s Collection, including The Starry Night (1889) by Vincent van Gogh, Hope, II (1907-1908) by Gustav Klimt, The Dream (1910) by Henri Rousseau,Composition in Oval with Color Planes 1 (1914) by Piet Mondrian, The City and Design, The Wonders of Life on Earth, Isamu Kurita (1966) by Tadanori Yokoo, and New York (1968) by Tadanori Yokoo. These watches can be purchased individually or as a collector’s edition. Swatch and MoMA developed a special box for the collector’s edition inspired by the Blade Stair, a prominent architectural feature of MoMA.     Swatch has also collaborated with artist Beatriz Milhazes to include three of her works from MoMA’s collection— Suculentas Beringelas (Succulent Eggplants) (1996), O Espelho (The Mirror) (2000), and Meu Bem (2008)--on the Swatch X You platform. Swatch X You allows customers to create their own customized watch style on swatch.com, and in select Swatch stores. Additionally, a limited run of one design from each artwork by Milhazes will be available at the MoMA Design Stores in New York.     “We’re proud to continue MoMA’s ongoing relationship with Swatch through this new collection of watches inspired by artworks from MoMA’s collection. MoMA’s commitment to good design as a part of everyday life is exempli ed by Swatch watches,” said Robin Sayetta, Associate Director of Business Development for MoMA.     “We’re proud to continue MoMA’s ongoing relationship with Swatch through this new collection of watches inspired by artworks from MoMA’s collection. MoMA’s commitment to good design as a part of everyday life is exempli ed by Swatch watches,” said Robin Sayetta, Associate Director of Business Development for MoMA.     “Swatch is very happy to celebrate a new step in its rich history with MoMA, which includes several Swatch watches in the Museum’s permanent collection. It is a true honor to be able to reinterpret masterpieces by Vincent van Gogh, Gustav Klimt, and Piet Mondrian and highlights our dedication to art and artists of the 20th century,” said Carlo Giordanetti, CEO of the Swatch Art Peace Hotel. “We are also delighted to include watches designed around the works of highly acclaimed contemporary artists, Tadanori Yokoo and Beatriz Milhazes, the latter of whom is joining our special Swatch X You program.”     Swatch X MoMA will be available on March 4, 2021 at Swatch locations globally and MoMA Design Stores. Swatch announces the launch of special edition designs with The Museum of Modern Art (MoMA) as part of its Museum Journey series. The watches will be available at Swatch stores worldwide and swatch.com as well as global MoMA Design Stores and store.moma.org, starting on March 4, 2021.     The assortment features six unique creations inspired by artworks in MoMA’s Collection, including The Starry Night (1889) by Vincent van Gogh, Hope, II (1907-1908) by Gustav Klimt, The Dream (1910) by Henri Rousseau,Composition in Oval with Color Planes 1 (1914) by Piet Mondrian, The City and Design, The Wonders of Life on Earth, Isamu Kurita (1966) by Tadanori Yokoo, and New York (1968) by Tadanori Yokoo. These watches can be purchased individually or as a collector’s edition. Swatch and MoMA developed a special box for the collector’s edition inspired by the Blade Stair, a prominent architectural feature of MoMA.     Swatch has also collaborated with artist Beatriz Milhazes to include three of her works from MoMA’s collection— Suculentas Beringelas (Succulent Eggplants) (1996), O Espelho (The Mirror) (2000), and Meu Bem (2008)--on the Swatch X You platform. Swatch X You allows customers to create their own customized watch style on swatch.com, and in select Swatch stores. Additionally, a limited run of one design from each artwork by Milhazes will be available at the MoMA Design Stores in New York.     “We’re proud to continue MoMA’s ongoing relationship with Swatch through this new collection of watches inspired by artworks from MoMA’s collection. MoMA’s commitment to good design as a part of everyday life is exempli ed by Swatch watches,” said Robin Sayetta, Associate Director of Business Development for MoMA.     “We’re proud to continue MoMA’s ongoing relationship with Swatch through this new collection of watches inspired by artworks from MoMA’s collection. MoMA’s commitment to good design as a part of everyday life is exempli ed by Swatch watches,” said Robin Sayetta, Associate Director of Business Development for MoMA.     “Swatch is very happy to celebrate a new step in its rich history with MoMA, which includes several Swatch watches in the Museum’s permanent collection. It is a true honor to be able to reinterpret masterpieces by Vincent van Gogh, Gustav Klimt, and Piet Mondrian and highlights our dedication to art and artists of the 20th century,” said Carlo Giordanetti, CEO of the Swatch Art Peace Hotel. “We are also delighted to include watches designed around the works of highly acclaimed contemporary artists, Tadanori Yokoo and Beatriz Milhazes, the latter of whom is joining our special Swatch X You program.”     Swatch X MoMA will be available on March 4, 2021 at Swatch locations globally and MoMA Design Stores.

ART DIALOGUES: LIVING HERITAGE AND INSPIRING FUTURE
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ART DIALOGUES: LIVING HERITAGE AND INSPIRING FUTURE

Art On February 21st the State Hermitage Museum and Maison Cartier will hold an international online conference “Cartier Art Dialogues” to celebrate the opening of the exhibition “Cartier: Passing on heritage and savoir faire. Masterpieces from the Hermitage Museum and the Cartier Collection”. The conference is organized in collaboration with Cartier’s partneruniversities around the world and will take place in the General Staff Building of the State Hermitage Museum.     Cartier is especially proud to host this conference to encourage dialogues between generations, countries, different styles and forms of art.     In today’s context building and maintaining bridges between history and modernity, craftsmanship and innovative technologies is crucial more than ever. Both the State Hermitage Museum and Maison Cartier find it important to preserve heritage, expand it and explore new territories while staying true to its values and identity.     Renown professionals and international experts will gather offline and online to discuss the“living heritage” and the importance of cross-generational dialogues, to talk about trends and new formats of art with a special focus on the transformations in opera, theatre and ballet. Participants will also take a glance at the digital and technological facets of fashion, architecture, blockchain and the art market of tomorrow.     The lineup of speakers and moderators includes: Mikhail Piotrovsky - Director of The State Hermitage MuseumCyrille Vigneron - President & CEO, CartierHervé Chandès - General Director, Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporainPierre Rainero - Image, Style and Heritage Director, CartierAlber Elbaz - Creative Director of AZ FactoryGolshifteh Farahani - Iranian actress of theatre and cinema and environmental activist Mélanie Laurent - French director and actress and environmental activist Junya Ishigami - Japanese architect, founder of junya.ishigami+associates Diana Vishneva – National artist of Russia, prima ballerina at the Mariinsky theatre, Founder and Artistic Director of the international contemporary dance festival Context. Diana Vishneva Stefano Boeri - Italian architect and urban planner, President of Fondazione Triennale Milano, architect of the Bosco Verticale in Milan Solano Benitez - Paraguayan architect, Golden Lion Award winner at Venice Biennial 2016 Jason Bailey - Founder of the art & tech platform Artnome.com Teodor Currentzis - Founder and Artistic Director of the musicAeterna Orchestra and Choir Nanne Dekking - Founder andCEO ofArtoryLLC, New York andArtory GmbH, Berlin. Member on the Board of the Hermitage Foundation in Amsterdam Anita Gigovskaya - President of Condé Nast Russia Ekaterina Inozemtseva -Chief curator at Garage Museum of Contemporary Art Varvara Melnikova - CEO of the Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture and Design Dmitri Ozerkov - Director of Contemporary Art Department of the State Hermitage Museum,and Head of Hermitage 20/21 Project for Contemporary Art Laurent Salomé - Director of the National Museum of Versailles Palace Sarah Sze - American contemporary artist, sculptorNadia Taiga - Executive Director at Snark.art And other international personalities from art and culture.     Registration and more information about the program, timing and speakers are available on the website https://cartier-artdialogues.com On February 21st the State Hermitage Museum and Maison Cartier will hold an international online conference “Cartier Art Dialogues” to celebrate the opening of the exhibition “Cartier: Passing on heritage and savoir faire. Masterpieces from the Hermitage Museum and the Cartier Collection”. The conference is organized in collaboration with Cartier’s partneruniversities around the world and will take place in the General Staff Building of the State Hermitage Museum.     Cartier is especially proud to host this conference to encourage dialogues between generations, countries, different styles and forms of art.     In today’s context building and maintaining bridges between history and modernity, craftsmanship and innovative technologies is crucial more than ever. Both the State Hermitage Museum and Maison Cartier find it important to preserve heritage, expand it and explore new territories while staying true to its values and identity.     Renown professionals and international experts will gather offline and online to discuss the“living heritage” and the importance of cross-generational dialogues, to talk about trends and new formats of art with a special focus on the transformations in opera, theatre and ballet. Participants will also take a glance at the digital and technological facets of fashion, architecture, blockchain and the art market of tomorrow.     The lineup of speakers and moderators includes: Mikhail Piotrovsky - Director of The State Hermitage MuseumCyrille Vigneron - President & CEO, CartierHervé Chandès - General Director, Fondation Cartier pour l’art contemporainPierre Rainero - Image, Style and Heritage Director, CartierAlber Elbaz - Creative Director of AZ FactoryGolshifteh Farahani - Iranian actress of theatre and cinema and environmental activist Mélanie Laurent - French director and actress and environmental activist Junya Ishigami - Japanese architect, founder of junya.ishigami+associates Diana Vishneva – National artist of Russia, prima ballerina at the Mariinsky theatre, Founder and Artistic Director of the international contemporary dance festival Context. Diana Vishneva Stefano Boeri - Italian architect and urban planner, President of Fondazione Triennale Milano, architect of the Bosco Verticale in Milan Solano Benitez - Paraguayan architect, Golden Lion Award winner at Venice Biennial 2016 Jason Bailey - Founder of the art & tech platform Artnome.com Teodor Currentzis - Founder and Artistic Director of the musicAeterna Orchestra and Choir Nanne Dekking - Founder andCEO ofArtoryLLC, New York andArtory GmbH, Berlin. Member on the Board of the Hermitage Foundation in Amsterdam Anita Gigovskaya - President of Condé Nast Russia Ekaterina Inozemtseva -Chief curator at Garage Museum of Contemporary Art Varvara Melnikova - CEO of the Strelka Institute for Media, Architecture and Design Dmitri Ozerkov - Director of Contemporary Art Department of the State Hermitage Museum,and Head of Hermitage 20/21 Project for Contemporary Art Laurent Salomé - Director of the National Museum of Versailles Palace Sarah Sze - American contemporary artist, sculptorNadia Taiga - Executive Director at Snark.art And other international personalities from art and culture.     Registration and more information about the program, timing and speakers are available on the website https://cartier-artdialogues.com

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