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Young Stedelijk
1090

Young Stedelijk

Art Part of the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam is Young Stedelijk, led by Fleur Schoonhoven and a group of about 15 Ambassadors. Young Stedelijk is an initiative that offers a new generation of culture lovers the opportunity to become associated with the Stedelijk Museum. The Young Stedelijk has about 300 members. The Young Stedelijk Ambassadors have been selected on the basis of their knowledge, unique input and expertise. Together they form a diverse group of professionals who help shape the programming and membership and propose new initiatives. In March a new group of Ambassadors will be announced who will take over the baton for next year.      Young Stedelijk member:   As a Young Stedelijk member you get a look behind the scenes of the Stedelijk Museum and you meet a mix of about three hundred young (ages 20 to 40) art and culture lovers. During a series of events, including openings of Stedelijk exhibitions, art parties and visits to art fairs, galleries, auction houses and studios, you will learn more about modern and contemporary art and design and become part of the Stedelijk community. With the membership fee, a contribution is made to special projects of the Stedelijk Museum. For example, every year a work of art is announced that can be purchased thanks to Young Stedelijk.           In conversation with...   In conversation with ... New to the Young Stedelijk program is 'In Conversation with ...' - a series of conversations between Young Stedelijk ambassadors with Stedelijk artists that take place in the artist's studio. In the first edition that has already taken place, Marjolein van Zanten, designer interviewed Dirk van der Kooij in his studio in Zaandam.    Young Stedelijk offers a number of members the opportunity to attend the interview and go on a studio tour. Fragments of the interviews can be seen on Instagram via @ysamsterdam and here on the website of the Stedelijk Museum. Ace & Tate is a partner in the entire series 'In Conversation With ...'.        Special YS member: If you become a member of Young Stedelijk now, you will receive a special welcome package! In addition to your personal Young Stedelijk pass and the International Art Pass, you now also receive:             “Zeepbootje” by designer Floris Hovers      'Let me be your guide' Stedelijk collection catalog      Urban tote bag   Part of the Stedelijk Museum Amsterdam is Young Stedelijk, led by Fleur Schoonhoven and a group of about 15 Ambassadors. Young Stedelijk is an initiative that offers a new generation of culture lovers the opportunity to become associated with the Stedelijk Museum. The Young Stedelijk has about 300 members. The Young Stedelijk Ambassadors have been selected on the basis of their knowledge, unique input and expertise. Together they form a diverse group of professionals who help shape the programming and membership and propose new initiatives. In March a new group of Ambassadors will be announced who will take over the baton for next year.      Young Stedelijk member:   As a Young Stedelijk member you get a look behind the scenes of the Stedelijk Museum and you meet a mix of about three hundred young (ages 20 to 40) art and culture lovers. During a series of events, including openings of Stedelijk exhibitions, art parties and visits to art fairs, galleries, auction houses and studios, you will learn more about modern and contemporary art and design and become part of the Stedelijk community. With the membership fee, a contribution is made to special projects of the Stedelijk Museum. For example, every year a work of art is announced that can be purchased thanks to Young Stedelijk.           In conversation with...   In conversation with ... New to the Young Stedelijk program is 'In Conversation with ...' - a series of conversations between Young Stedelijk ambassadors with Stedelijk artists that take place in the artist's studio. In the first edition that has already taken place, Marjolein van Zanten, designer interviewed Dirk van der Kooij in his studio in Zaandam.    Young Stedelijk offers a number of members the opportunity to attend the interview and go on a studio tour. Fragments of the interviews can be seen on Instagram via @ysamsterdam and here on the website of the Stedelijk Museum. Ace & Tate is a partner in the entire series 'In Conversation With ...'.        Special YS member: If you become a member of Young Stedelijk now, you will receive a special welcome package! In addition to your personal Young Stedelijk pass and the International Art Pass, you now also receive:             “Zeepbootje” by designer Floris Hovers      'Let me be your guide' Stedelijk collection catalog      Urban tote bag  

DONNIE is the most colourful book of the year
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DONNIE is the most colourful book of the year

Art Donnie likes to wear dresses. But the other kids are not so understanding. In his mother’s wardrobe he discovers a wondrous world of acceptance and adventure.      Donnie is the first in a series of children’s books. In these bold and exciting stories, Donnie learns about diversity, inclusion and other topics relevant to the world today’s children grow up in. Children’s and picture books play an important role in the way children get to know the world around them. They also have a tremendous influence on the way they view society. Too often we, society, create a standard and an expectation of how one should be. ‘It’s time that sharing an inclusive, diverse and broad story becomes the standard.’ – Lisa Maschhaupt     About the creators:     Lisa Maschhaupt is a creative and social entrepreneur. She is the founder of UNBOXED; a foundation that stimulates self-acceptance for children and youngsters. She is a firm supporter and believer that everybody should have the freedom and opportunity to be themselves. Ultimately, Lisa would like to make the world a little kinder, more tolerant and colorful. www.maschhaupt.nl     Illustrator Saša Ostoja developed a distinctive signature style of naively drawn animal characters in humorous, dangerous and uncomfortable situations. Often with unexpected dark undertones. Look carefully at his work and find new interesting aspects every time. www.sasaostoja.com Donnie likes to wear dresses. But the other kids are not so understanding. In his mother’s wardrobe he discovers a wondrous world of acceptance and adventure.      Donnie is the first in a series of children’s books. In these bold and exciting stories, Donnie learns about diversity, inclusion and other topics relevant to the world today’s children grow up in. Children’s and picture books play an important role in the way children get to know the world around them. They also have a tremendous influence on the way they view society. Too often we, society, create a standard and an expectation of how one should be. ‘It’s time that sharing an inclusive, diverse and broad story becomes the standard.’ – Lisa Maschhaupt     About the creators:     Lisa Maschhaupt is a creative and social entrepreneur. She is the founder of UNBOXED; a foundation that stimulates self-acceptance for children and youngsters. She is a firm supporter and believer that everybody should have the freedom and opportunity to be themselves. Ultimately, Lisa would like to make the world a little kinder, more tolerant and colorful. www.maschhaupt.nl     Illustrator Saša Ostoja developed a distinctive signature style of naively drawn animal characters in humorous, dangerous and uncomfortable situations. Often with unexpected dark undertones. Look carefully at his work and find new interesting aspects every time. www.sasaostoja.com

Exclusive beauty editorial by Eva Wang
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Exclusive beauty editorial by Eva Wang

Beauty Exclusive beauty digital editorial by Eva Wang.     team credits: photography EVA WANG AT SAINT GERMAIN AGENCY stylist JOANA DACHEVILLE AT SAINT GERMAIN AGENCY styling assistants LEO ROUAULT & LUCA BOUDAY make-up artist ANNABELLE PETIT AT WISEANDTALENTED USING M.A.C. COSMETICS make-up assistant SARAH COURROY hair stylisy ANNE SOFIE BEGTRUP AT WISEANDTALENTED USING ORIBE PRODUCTS AND VILASPARYKKER WIGS manicurist ANAIS CORDEVANT AT SAINT GERMAIN AGENCY model VERONIKA BARON AT MAKERS casting director REMI FELIPE Exclusive beauty digital editorial by Eva Wang.     team credits: photography EVA WANG AT SAINT GERMAIN AGENCY stylist JOANA DACHEVILLE AT SAINT GERMAIN AGENCY styling assistants LEO ROUAULT & LUCA BOUDAY make-up artist ANNABELLE PETIT AT WISEANDTALENTED USING M.A.C. COSMETICS make-up assistant SARAH COURROY hair stylisy ANNE SOFIE BEGTRUP AT WISEANDTALENTED USING ORIBE PRODUCTS AND VILASPARYKKER WIGS manicurist ANAIS CORDEVANT AT SAINT GERMAIN AGENCY model VERONIKA BARON AT MAKERS casting director REMI FELIPE

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18, PLACE VENDÔME
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18, PLACE VENDÔME

Jewelry As the 90th anniversary of “Bijoux de Diamants”, the first High Jewelry collection created by Mademoiselle Chanel in 1932, approaches, CHANEL is preparing to revisit 18 place Vendôme, the House’s emblematic address.     Built in the early 18th century and listed as a Historic Monument since 1930, number 18 Place Vendôme was bought by CHANEL in 1997. After the Faubourg Saint-Honoré, the rue Cambon, the Ritz Paris, the acquisition of 18 Place Vendôme marked the culmination of a symbolic personal journey. Ten years later, in 2007, CHANEL confirmed its ambitions with a new boutique designed entirely by the American architect Peter Marino. Inspired by the couturier’s own living spaces, the boutique's décor blends Art Deco style and works of art through spaces reminiscent of the atmosphere of the rue Cambon apartment. In the same spirit, this new renovation project, led once again by Peter Marino, will offer the House's clientele a unique experience in an exclusive and precious setting. CHANEL thus reaffirms its close link with Place Vendôme all while perpetuating the history of this legendary address. This new showcase will open its doors in 2022.     In order to continue the provision of an exceptional welcome to its customers during the construction period, a temporary boutique will open on February 16th 2021 at 15, rue de la Paix. As the 90th anniversary of “Bijoux de Diamants”, the first High Jewelry collection created by Mademoiselle Chanel in 1932, approaches, CHANEL is preparing to revisit 18 place Vendôme, the House’s emblematic address.     Built in the early 18th century and listed as a Historic Monument since 1930, number 18 Place Vendôme was bought by CHANEL in 1997. After the Faubourg Saint-Honoré, the rue Cambon, the Ritz Paris, the acquisition of 18 Place Vendôme marked the culmination of a symbolic personal journey. Ten years later, in 2007, CHANEL confirmed its ambitions with a new boutique designed entirely by the American architect Peter Marino. Inspired by the couturier’s own living spaces, the boutique's décor blends Art Deco style and works of art through spaces reminiscent of the atmosphere of the rue Cambon apartment. In the same spirit, this new renovation project, led once again by Peter Marino, will offer the House's clientele a unique experience in an exclusive and precious setting. CHANEL thus reaffirms its close link with Place Vendôme all while perpetuating the history of this legendary address. This new showcase will open its doors in 2022.     In order to continue the provision of an exceptional welcome to its customers during the construction period, a temporary boutique will open on February 16th 2021 at 15, rue de la Paix.

In conversation with Lady Gaga
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In conversation with Lady Gaga

Music What were your feelings when you wore the pink feather Valentino dress for the first time?   Even though the press and fans saw me wear the pink feather Valentino dress for the first time at the Venise Film Festival for the A Star is Born’s premiere, the truth is that the first time I wore this dresswas in my home with my mother in California. I was trying on different dresses for the premiere with my mom, listening to Andrea Bocelli. As soon as I was zipped up in the dress by my stylists Tom & Sandra, I turned to my mother and we both burst into tears. With her hands over her face crying, my mother proudly said “that’s the dress.” I’ll never forget this moment with my mother. I was thinkingabout it on the red carpet. This is the magic of Valentino.     Do you feel a special connection with the Italian fashion house as you have yourself Italian roots?   Coming from an Italian-American immigrant family, I represent this Italian fashion house with great pride and deep gratitude.     Inclusivity is a key value of Valentino, how do you advocate this shared value in your everyday life?   I believe kindness is a human right that should be afforded to all people. To experience it, to give it, to share it—but it must be equal to all and especially sensitive to those who’ve been disempoweredby their circumstances. This is how I live my life.     With his dresses Pierpaolo Piccioli invite women to celebrate their individuality, do you feel it when you wear one of his creation?   Why yes! For ‘Voce Viva,’ we made a beautiful film by Harmony Korine with a song from my new album called “Sine From Above.” I felt strong and alive, hearing myself echo through the forest as I was singing in this dress. It reminded me of my freedom and how I get to experience magic, a freedom & magic I wish everyone to have.       What gives you confidence?     I have to give confidence to myself for it to be real. I work on building it all the time. I focus on skillsI have, and work from there. I feel like it's building a house that’s never finished. I also remind myselfthat skills can be simple.     Can you remember the moment you first discovered your voice? Where was it? How old were you?   I believe you discover your voice when you discover yourself.     Who is the one voice that has inspired you the most in your personal life? In your career?   I would have to say my mother. And both my grandmothers. And my sister. In fact, I would have tosay my whole family. The hard working spirit, the “I’ll never give up” attitude, the style and grace while doing so. That’s my family’s voice. That’s me.     Would you say your voice is your strength?   I would say that my ability to love is my strength. I believe having a strong voice is essential to lovingthe world. I love the world so much. That’s why my voice is so loud. I want you to know how muchI love you.     Can you describe your voice?   My voice is learning. My voice is listening. My voice is expressing and sometimes changing. My voice belongs to me.     Do you believe that your voice can have a positive impact?   I believe most voices have the ability to positively impact, but all voices are impactful. This includes hateful voices, which is why hateful speech is so negatively powerful—why we need to fill the negative space with kind speech.       What advice would you give to those still out there looking for their own voices?   I would say looking for our own voices, to me, is an endless lifetime pursuit. We learn who we want to be, while we also unlearn things we realize we no longer believe. Our voice comes and goes. I would say cultivate your voice exactly as you please. Know it can be strong, and know it belongs to you.     Is there any particular scent that reminds you of a special moment of your life?   Fresh gravy on the stove, meatballs and pork sausage in my home growing up. Every Sunday at 2pm, after church. Whole family at the table. My happiest memories of all. Same scent. Every Sunday.     What does the name Voce Viva mean to you?   The voice is alive. It has its own life. It’s a force of nature. Nature is powerful. It’s important how youuse it.     How would you say that your song “Sine from above” match perfectly with the Valentino message: my voicemy strength? Why did you choose this particular song for the film?   My song ‘Sine From Above’ is about the passion I feel, when I manifest the sounds that I hear in myhead. They come in the form of song, messages, ideas, and love. This is my strength. These sounds are the function that form the basis of my voice. I hear them, and then I use them. They are how I live, how I love, how I prosper, and how I survive.       What is your own definition of beauty?     I believe beauty is the process we all go through— it’s how how we see ourselves. This can becomplicated, sometimes not easy, but the challenge of loving yourself is the most beautiful thing of all.     Do you have a beauty routine and secret tips to share?   I believe self-care routines, in and of themselves, are the best beauty tip of all. If you care for your mind, body, skin, heart & healing, you approach beauty holistically. For me, using makeup as well as perfume to transform how I feel at any moment is valuable as well. I believe that even though working on ourselves from the inside is the most crucial, I also cherish the power of visual transformation to affect how we feel inside.     What are your 5 beauty products that you always have with you?   I only carry Haus Laboratories beauty products everyday. 1. Is my trusty black calligraphy Eye-Lie-ner in shade “Punk.” 2. I always have a Le Monster Matte Lip Crayon in a neutral shade called “Power Move.” Itslightweight, bold, never bleeds and fits perfect in my purse. 3. It is right now, my new Valentino ‘Voce Viva’ perfume, to feel fresh throughout the day. 4. I have to make sure I have a Le Riot Lip Gloss because it is lip conditioning and plumping withmega watt shine, comes in many shades so there’s lots to choose from. I love the color “corset.” 5. I love having a highlighter that also doubles as a liquid shimmer eye-shadow powder.     How do you get ready for a red carpet evening?   I make sure to take good care of my skin always — my mother taught me this. I do special skin treatments the night before a red carpet and the day of. Most importantly however, it’s so importantto me that everyone who is doing hair, makeup, styling and design has a beautiful day where they feel loved and we celebrate how grateful we are to do what we love as a team with my family and friends.     When do you feel the most beautiful?   Right after I meditate. It reminds me that beauty is a state of being that's undefinable because it’sfrom within.       You are committed every day in different causes, what are the causes that matter you the most?   My charity Born This Way Foundation, that I co-founded with my mother, shares our ambitiouspassion to make positive change in the face of the world’s Mental Health Crisis. I believe it is moreimportant than ever to motivate an agenda of kindness. Kindness that leads to the healing of the mind, body & soul. Kindness that invigorates programs that are fearless in their effort to help humanity learn the importance of self-care.     What is the most daring thing you did?   Whenever someone told me I wasn’t good enough throughout my career and life, I never let it breakme. I promised myself that every time I heard “no,” it would motivate me to work harder. The mostdaring thing I did was believe in myself.     What is the strongest moment you ever lived on a stage?   I remember singing in Mexico, a song from my album Born This Way called “Americano.” I was in astadium, it was pouring rain, and I sang words about the trials and tribulations of Immigration Law in my country. Myself and the crowd both wept and cheered for freedom, it was a moment I’ll neverforget. The audience and I were aligned —our morals, our values, our politics, our voices.     What is your personal motto?   Be Kind.     Among all your songs, which ones embodies the most your personality?   I would say my song ‘911’ off Chromatica has to be one of the most personal songs I’ve ever written. It’s a dance-pop song but the words are poetry of my deeply personal reality as someone who struggles with mental health. This song is a battle cry and celebration of my radical acceptance that this is who I am.     Tell us something no one could guess about you.   I love to cook!       With your new album, what is the message you want to spread all around the world?   On my new album Chromatica, I want everyone to know that even if life is painful sometimes, youcan still dance through it. You can dance through it because you’re being brave by fighting the painand living life. This is something that should be celebrated. This is a reason to dance.     Any upcoming projects for 2021?   I’m over the moon excited about an upcoming movie I’ll be acting in, directed by new budding friend,the legendary Ridley Scott—alongside the talent of a truly humbling cast. What were your feelings when you wore the pink feather Valentino dress for the first time?   Even though the press and fans saw me wear the pink feather Valentino dress for the first time at the Venise Film Festival for the A Star is Born’s premiere, the truth is that the first time I wore this dresswas in my home with my mother in California. I was trying on different dresses for the premiere with my mom, listening to Andrea Bocelli. As soon as I was zipped up in the dress by my stylists Tom & Sandra, I turned to my mother and we both burst into tears. With her hands over her face crying, my mother proudly said “that’s the dress.” I’ll never forget this moment with my mother. I was thinkingabout it on the red carpet. This is the magic of Valentino.     Do you feel a special connection with the Italian fashion house as you have yourself Italian roots?   Coming from an Italian-American immigrant family, I represent this Italian fashion house with great pride and deep gratitude.     Inclusivity is a key value of Valentino, how do you advocate this shared value in your everyday life?   I believe kindness is a human right that should be afforded to all people. To experience it, to give it, to share it—but it must be equal to all and especially sensitive to those who’ve been disempoweredby their circumstances. This is how I live my life.     With his dresses Pierpaolo Piccioli invite women to celebrate their individuality, do you feel it when you wear one of his creation?   Why yes! For ‘Voce Viva,’ we made a beautiful film by Harmony Korine with a song from my new album called “Sine From Above.” I felt strong and alive, hearing myself echo through the forest as I was singing in this dress. It reminded me of my freedom and how I get to experience magic, a freedom & magic I wish everyone to have.       What gives you confidence?     I have to give confidence to myself for it to be real. I work on building it all the time. I focus on skillsI have, and work from there. I feel like it's building a house that’s never finished. I also remind myselfthat skills can be simple.     Can you remember the moment you first discovered your voice? Where was it? How old were you?   I believe you discover your voice when you discover yourself.     Who is the one voice that has inspired you the most in your personal life? In your career?   I would have to say my mother. And both my grandmothers. And my sister. In fact, I would have tosay my whole family. The hard working spirit, the “I’ll never give up” attitude, the style and grace while doing so. That’s my family’s voice. That’s me.     Would you say your voice is your strength?   I would say that my ability to love is my strength. I believe having a strong voice is essential to lovingthe world. I love the world so much. That’s why my voice is so loud. I want you to know how muchI love you.     Can you describe your voice?   My voice is learning. My voice is listening. My voice is expressing and sometimes changing. My voice belongs to me.     Do you believe that your voice can have a positive impact?   I believe most voices have the ability to positively impact, but all voices are impactful. This includes hateful voices, which is why hateful speech is so negatively powerful—why we need to fill the negative space with kind speech.       What advice would you give to those still out there looking for their own voices?   I would say looking for our own voices, to me, is an endless lifetime pursuit. We learn who we want to be, while we also unlearn things we realize we no longer believe. Our voice comes and goes. I would say cultivate your voice exactly as you please. Know it can be strong, and know it belongs to you.     Is there any particular scent that reminds you of a special moment of your life?   Fresh gravy on the stove, meatballs and pork sausage in my home growing up. Every Sunday at 2pm, after church. Whole family at the table. My happiest memories of all. Same scent. Every Sunday.     What does the name Voce Viva mean to you?   The voice is alive. It has its own life. It’s a force of nature. Nature is powerful. It’s important how youuse it.     How would you say that your song “Sine from above” match perfectly with the Valentino message: my voicemy strength? Why did you choose this particular song for the film?   My song ‘Sine From Above’ is about the passion I feel, when I manifest the sounds that I hear in myhead. They come in the form of song, messages, ideas, and love. This is my strength. These sounds are the function that form the basis of my voice. I hear them, and then I use them. They are how I live, how I love, how I prosper, and how I survive.       What is your own definition of beauty?     I believe beauty is the process we all go through— it’s how how we see ourselves. This can becomplicated, sometimes not easy, but the challenge of loving yourself is the most beautiful thing of all.     Do you have a beauty routine and secret tips to share?   I believe self-care routines, in and of themselves, are the best beauty tip of all. If you care for your mind, body, skin, heart & healing, you approach beauty holistically. For me, using makeup as well as perfume to transform how I feel at any moment is valuable as well. I believe that even though working on ourselves from the inside is the most crucial, I also cherish the power of visual transformation to affect how we feel inside.     What are your 5 beauty products that you always have with you?   I only carry Haus Laboratories beauty products everyday. 1. Is my trusty black calligraphy Eye-Lie-ner in shade “Punk.” 2. I always have a Le Monster Matte Lip Crayon in a neutral shade called “Power Move.” Itslightweight, bold, never bleeds and fits perfect in my purse. 3. It is right now, my new Valentino ‘Voce Viva’ perfume, to feel fresh throughout the day. 4. I have to make sure I have a Le Riot Lip Gloss because it is lip conditioning and plumping withmega watt shine, comes in many shades so there’s lots to choose from. I love the color “corset.” 5. I love having a highlighter that also doubles as a liquid shimmer eye-shadow powder.     How do you get ready for a red carpet evening?   I make sure to take good care of my skin always — my mother taught me this. I do special skin treatments the night before a red carpet and the day of. Most importantly however, it’s so importantto me that everyone who is doing hair, makeup, styling and design has a beautiful day where they feel loved and we celebrate how grateful we are to do what we love as a team with my family and friends.     When do you feel the most beautiful?   Right after I meditate. It reminds me that beauty is a state of being that's undefinable because it’sfrom within.       You are committed every day in different causes, what are the causes that matter you the most?   My charity Born This Way Foundation, that I co-founded with my mother, shares our ambitiouspassion to make positive change in the face of the world’s Mental Health Crisis. I believe it is moreimportant than ever to motivate an agenda of kindness. Kindness that leads to the healing of the mind, body & soul. Kindness that invigorates programs that are fearless in their effort to help humanity learn the importance of self-care.     What is the most daring thing you did?   Whenever someone told me I wasn’t good enough throughout my career and life, I never let it breakme. I promised myself that every time I heard “no,” it would motivate me to work harder. The mostdaring thing I did was believe in myself.     What is the strongest moment you ever lived on a stage?   I remember singing in Mexico, a song from my album Born This Way called “Americano.” I was in astadium, it was pouring rain, and I sang words about the trials and tribulations of Immigration Law in my country. Myself and the crowd both wept and cheered for freedom, it was a moment I’ll neverforget. The audience and I were aligned —our morals, our values, our politics, our voices.     What is your personal motto?   Be Kind.     Among all your songs, which ones embodies the most your personality?   I would say my song ‘911’ off Chromatica has to be one of the most personal songs I’ve ever written. It’s a dance-pop song but the words are poetry of my deeply personal reality as someone who struggles with mental health. This song is a battle cry and celebration of my radical acceptance that this is who I am.     Tell us something no one could guess about you.   I love to cook!       With your new album, what is the message you want to spread all around the world?   On my new album Chromatica, I want everyone to know that even if life is painful sometimes, youcan still dance through it. You can dance through it because you’re being brave by fighting the painand living life. This is something that should be celebrated. This is a reason to dance.     Any upcoming projects for 2021?   I’m over the moon excited about an upcoming movie I’ll be acting in, directed by new budding friend,the legendary Ridley Scott—alongside the talent of a truly humbling cast.

Exclusive editorial by Filip Koludrovic
881

Exclusive editorial by Filip Koludrovic

Beauty Exclusive beauty editorial by Filip Koludrovic.     An experimental beauty story approached without a moodboard, but rather using the mix of the emotions and current mental states of everyone in the studio to create something without knowing the final outcome. That was the guide we were using when we met at the end of 2020. in a half abandoned factory on the suburbs of Belgrade, Serbia.    Filip Koludrovic: For this project we decided to form a dialog, a two way flow between the photographer and the model. It's extremely important what the model will bring on set with their energy. Knowing Jovana and her art the idea came to let me document that day with my camera, and after she was to document her experience through her drawings.   Jovana Krneta: Fashion supports art. My incide world speaks through my body the same way as throughout my drawings. How I see the world from a model's point of view is connected with the lens of the camera and photographer himself. It’s all connected, it’s all one, like the universe.     Photography: Filip Koludrovic (@filipkoludrovic) Model & illustrator: Jovana Krneta (@krneta) Beauty: Dragan Vurdelja (@drvurdelja) editor: Timotej Letonja Exclusive beauty editorial by Filip Koludrovic.     An experimental beauty story approached without a moodboard, but rather using the mix of the emotions and current mental states of everyone in the studio to create something without knowing the final outcome. That was the guide we were using when we met at the end of 2020. in a half abandoned factory on the suburbs of Belgrade, Serbia.    Filip Koludrovic: For this project we decided to form a dialog, a two way flow between the photographer and the model. It's extremely important what the model will bring on set with their energy. Knowing Jovana and her art the idea came to let me document that day with my camera, and after she was to document her experience through her drawings.   Jovana Krneta: Fashion supports art. My incide world speaks through my body the same way as throughout my drawings. How I see the world from a model's point of view is connected with the lens of the camera and photographer himself. It’s all connected, it’s all one, like the universe.     Photography: Filip Koludrovic (@filipkoludrovic) Model & illustrator: Jovana Krneta (@krneta) Beauty: Dragan Vurdelja (@drvurdelja) editor: Timotej Letonja

When Dancing Stars Align: A Conversation Between Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav
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When Dancing Stars Align: A Conversation Between Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav

Men Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav, two rising stars in the world of contemporary dance, were destined to meet -- both Congolese, queer, Belgium-born artists nee under the sign of Leo in 1993. While astrological, geographical and artistic forces converged to bring these two together professionally, it wasn’t until recently that their paths crossed. Coutsier, who had already collaborated with Beyoncé, reached out to Yav in 2019 to join the “Black Is King” project. Although they didn’t get to work together then, they were each featured in the visual album -- Yav in “SCAR” and Coutsier in “SPIRIT”. After cementing their artistic individuality, they came together to harness the power of Ndeko -- a word that originates from Congo’s Lingala language, which means a strong bond, either blood-related or spiritual, whereby two people are bound by care and respect. We sat down with them to talk about race, identity and the power of movement.      Christian: The first time I heard of Nick was in January 2017. I remember someone telling me that there is a beautiful black dancer that has a very interesting way of moving. At that point, I hadn’t experienced having another black body in the space of contemporary dance. The moment Instagram started to broaden connection possibilities on the platform, that's when I really started to look for people like myself. I remember one day, Nick popped up as a “Suggestion For You”, and that’s really when I saw him for the first time.    Nick: My immediate reaction when I first heard about Christian wasn’t necessarily a defensive one, but more of a question about who that person is and why the comparison is being made. I also didn’t know if the constant comparison was positive or negative, or just a warning about this other guy. In this industry, it’s kind of a privileged place to be the only black guy. So is this other person going to be an ally or is he coming for my spot? All that thinking isn’t conscious hate, it’s just so instilled in how we think and how we are trained to think -- the so-called “There can only be one“ myth. When we physically met, it was kind of like a match made in heaven. For the first time ever, I was like “Okay wow, this is how it actually feels to have another black body in the space.”   Christian: What’s interesting is the way I first started hearing about Nick. I felt this energy as though these people were preparing me for this. I often had white allies, and now I had a black ally, which allowed me to broaden my network of people of colour and black dancers. It was one of the few times where I felt that there were no strings attached.    Nick: I like to be surrounded by people who have that talent and drive. And so when I heard about Christian, I thought “If he’s that good, then let me see how good I can be.” Competition is about pushing the other up -- inspiring and challenging each other to be the best version of ourselves.    Christian: There isn’t always a lot of space to move in contemporary dance when you are the only black person. There are certain opportunities that you can’t get because it’s a project that is told from a certain narrative.    Nick: Both of us being black, queer artists, we had to move through society in a certain way because of structural racism and homophobia. Being black we had to do this, being gay we had to do this, being second-generation immigrants, we had to do this. So it all made us who we are. And I think that the way I moved in society translated into the way I move as a dancer. The body being my main instrument, it does carry its own story. And I remember when I saw Christian move, I thought ”Wow, it is so specific” and it reminded me of the singularity of how I am trying to move. It does take time and maturity to embrace singularity as being an asset.   Christian: There is a logic to movement. It’s very easy for outsiders to say, “Oh yeah, I recognise this from ballet, or this from that.” But something I’ve often noticed with people of colour and black dancers is that the moment they do their own thing, there is something about their movement that doesn’t always appear to be what people normally perceive as logical in dance. But it’s so clear that you take it for what it is. I do think that having your own logic of movement is linked to having a lonely existence. When I started doing gymnastics as a kid, I was the only boy and the only black boy. You’re constantly on an island within a group. The way Nick moves, what happens here in his chest, it’s such a minor detail for others but then I’m like “Ah, I understand this movement.” It’s important to have representation and to see yourself in someone else, but feeling the movement is even more powerful.    Nick: I now kind of understand why we weren’t put together before because we are so powerful together. The colonial system of dividing power to better conquer is still present, including in the dance industry. Now we understand the power that we have together.    Christian: Our star signs are also identical. Over the years, I’ve met a lot of people who are Leo, but rarely someone who is a double Leo, like me. When people are double Leo, it’s so strong. Even if the personalities are different, there is something that is going to work because we’re powered by the same energetical forces within the universe.    Nick: It’s an unapologetic way of being. Something that has allowed us to be so sure and assertive about who we are was to not wait for that external validation.    Christian: In dance, the movements are stronger than myself so I don’t feel the need to adapt to other dance aesthetics. As a black man in society, however, that’s where I adapt my movements. For a very long time, when I would go to the hairdresser, I would speak in a very low voice, walk in a different way, and just adapt very small things. And I still do it because in order to survive, that’s where I really need to adapt my movements. In spaces where you’re underrepresented, people don’t always have the knowledge, desire or awareness of wanting it to be an inclusive place.    Nick: As a gay person, you need to adapt all the time, and so you just become really good at it. It shouldn’t be this way but it’s unfortunately still the case, as being your true, authentic self is still not accepted everywhere. Working with movement, the body and dance in that way allows me to make lemonade out of not-so-tasty lemons, so to speak. From a cathartic point of view, my adaptability in life does translate itself in my dancing, my work and my research around movement.   Christian: Walking in the streets as a queer man with your partner is a very precious part of me and not every place is a place to share that in the way that we would like to share it. Our society is not built on that, and that’s when I started realising that adapting isn’t always a bad thing.    Nick: When I started to create my own work, my artistic spontaneity would be sparked by sonorities and movements that would go back to my African roots. When I met Christian, it was really serendipitous because it was the moment I started to deconstruct a lot of things and give value to that part of myself. You live in this constant duality, which can be a power, but for the longest time it was something that I couldn’t identify with. I questioned my legitimacy as a black man, asking “Am I really the person who can talk about structural racism?” But being a second-generation immigrant is an identity in itself and so I gave power to my Congolese roots.    Christian: It is different when as a black person, you dance with another black person. When Nick and I were dancing during this shoot, it’s as if we were an extension of each other, almost like one body. There is a sense of home that I usually have to find within myself.    Nick: And as movement is such a big part of us, both in life and in dance, it was important for us to work with a photographer who could encapsulate all of that. Julien Vallon was a perfect fit, and we decided to name this photo series “Ndeko”, as it captures the way Christian and I feel about one another -- when you recognise yourself in the other. “I see you Ndeko”.      TEAM CREDITS:   Photographer Julien Vallon Fashion by Gabriella Norberg Talents Nick Coutsier & Christian Yav Words and edit by Berenice Magistretti editor: Timotej Letonja Nick Coutsier and Christian Yav, two rising stars in the world of contemporary dance, were destined to meet -- both Congolese, queer, Belgium-born artists nee under the sign of Leo in 1993. While astrological, geographical and artistic forces converged to bring these two together professionally, it wasn’t until recently that their paths crossed. Coutsier, who had already collaborated with Beyoncé, reached out to Yav in 2019 to join the “Black Is King” project. Although they didn’t get to work together then, they were each featured in the visual album -- Yav in “SCAR” and Coutsier in “SPIRIT”. After cementing their artistic individuality, they came together to harness the power of Ndeko -- a word that originates from Congo’s Lingala language, which means a strong bond, either blood-related or spiritual, whereby two people are bound by care and respect. We sat down with them to talk about race, identity and the power of movement.      Christian: The first time I heard of Nick was in January 2017. I remember someone telling me that there is a beautiful black dancer that has a very interesting way of moving. At that point, I hadn’t experienced having another black body in the space of contemporary dance. The moment Instagram started to broaden connection possibilities on the platform, that's when I really started to look for people like myself. I remember one day, Nick popped up as a “Suggestion For You”, and that’s really when I saw him for the first time.    Nick: My immediate reaction when I first heard about Christian wasn’t necessarily a defensive one, but more of a question about who that person is and why the comparison is being made. I also didn’t know if the constant comparison was positive or negative, or just a warning about this other guy. In this industry, it’s kind of a privileged place to be the only black guy. So is this other person going to be an ally or is he coming for my spot? All that thinking isn’t conscious hate, it’s just so instilled in how we think and how we are trained to think -- the so-called “There can only be one“ myth. When we physically met, it was kind of like a match made in heaven. For the first time ever, I was like “Okay wow, this is how it actually feels to have another black body in the space.”   Christian: What’s interesting is the way I first started hearing about Nick. I felt this energy as though these people were preparing me for this. I often had white allies, and now I had a black ally, which allowed me to broaden my network of people of colour and black dancers. It was one of the few times where I felt that there were no strings attached.    Nick: I like to be surrounded by people who have that talent and drive. And so when I heard about Christian, I thought “If he’s that good, then let me see how good I can be.” Competition is about pushing the other up -- inspiring and challenging each other to be the best version of ourselves.    Christian: There isn’t always a lot of space to move in contemporary dance when you are the only black person. There are certain opportunities that you can’t get because it’s a project that is told from a certain narrative.    Nick: Both of us being black, queer artists, we had to move through society in a certain way because of structural racism and homophobia. Being black we had to do this, being gay we had to do this, being second-generation immigrants, we had to do this. So it all made us who we are. And I think that the way I moved in society translated into the way I move as a dancer. The body being my main instrument, it does carry its own story. And I remember when I saw Christian move, I thought ”Wow, it is so specific” and it reminded me of the singularity of how I am trying to move. It does take time and maturity to embrace singularity as being an asset.   Christian: There is a logic to movement. It’s very easy for outsiders to say, “Oh yeah, I recognise this from ballet, or this from that.” But something I’ve often noticed with people of colour and black dancers is that the moment they do their own thing, there is something about their movement that doesn’t always appear to be what people normally perceive as logical in dance. But it’s so clear that you take it for what it is. I do think that having your own logic of movement is linked to having a lonely existence. When I started doing gymnastics as a kid, I was the only boy and the only black boy. You’re constantly on an island within a group. The way Nick moves, what happens here in his chest, it’s such a minor detail for others but then I’m like “Ah, I understand this movement.” It’s important to have representation and to see yourself in someone else, but feeling the movement is even more powerful.    Nick: I now kind of understand why we weren’t put together before because we are so powerful together. The colonial system of dividing power to better conquer is still present, including in the dance industry. Now we understand the power that we have together.    Christian: Our star signs are also identical. Over the years, I’ve met a lot of people who are Leo, but rarely someone who is a double Leo, like me. When people are double Leo, it’s so strong. Even if the personalities are different, there is something that is going to work because we’re powered by the same energetical forces within the universe.    Nick: It’s an unapologetic way of being. Something that has allowed us to be so sure and assertive about who we are was to not wait for that external validation.    Christian: In dance, the movements are stronger than myself so I don’t feel the need to adapt to other dance aesthetics. As a black man in society, however, that’s where I adapt my movements. For a very long time, when I would go to the hairdresser, I would speak in a very low voice, walk in a different way, and just adapt very small things. And I still do it because in order to survive, that’s where I really need to adapt my movements. In spaces where you’re underrepresented, people don’t always have the knowledge, desire or awareness of wanting it to be an inclusive place.    Nick: As a gay person, you need to adapt all the time, and so you just become really good at it. It shouldn’t be this way but it’s unfortunately still the case, as being your true, authentic self is still not accepted everywhere. Working with movement, the body and dance in that way allows me to make lemonade out of not-so-tasty lemons, so to speak. From a cathartic point of view, my adaptability in life does translate itself in my dancing, my work and my research around movement.   Christian: Walking in the streets as a queer man with your partner is a very precious part of me and not every place is a place to share that in the way that we would like to share it. Our society is not built on that, and that’s when I started realising that adapting isn’t always a bad thing.    Nick: When I started to create my own work, my artistic spontaneity would be sparked by sonorities and movements that would go back to my African roots. When I met Christian, it was really serendipitous because it was the moment I started to deconstruct a lot of things and give value to that part of myself. You live in this constant duality, which can be a power, but for the longest time it was something that I couldn’t identify with. I questioned my legitimacy as a black man, asking “Am I really the person who can talk about structural racism?” But being a second-generation immigrant is an identity in itself and so I gave power to my Congolese roots.    Christian: It is different when as a black person, you dance with another black person. When Nick and I were dancing during this shoot, it’s as if we were an extension of each other, almost like one body. There is a sense of home that I usually have to find within myself.    Nick: And as movement is such a big part of us, both in life and in dance, it was important for us to work with a photographer who could encapsulate all of that. Julien Vallon was a perfect fit, and we decided to name this photo series “Ndeko”, as it captures the way Christian and I feel about one another -- when you recognise yourself in the other. “I see you Ndeko”.      TEAM CREDITS:   Photographer Julien Vallon Fashion by Gabriella Norberg Talents Nick Coutsier & Christian Yav Words and edit by Berenice Magistretti editor: Timotej Letonja

VALENTINO: RE-SIGNIFY PART ONE SHANGHAI
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VALENTINO: RE-SIGNIFY PART ONE SHANGHAI

Art Resigni cation is a pragmatic and conceptual process by which the Creative Director, Pierpaolo Piccioli, is defining Valentino today and its future.     From December 19th 2020 to January 17th 2021, this process and mind set becomes concrete in a physical experience within the spaces of the Power Station of Arts in Shanghai. This Brand Experience is curated by Mariuccia Casadio and Jacopo Bedussi with a setting devised by Kennedy London.   This is the rst chapter in which the iconic themes of the Maison have been drawn from the Archive and from the current collections, transplanted in a new setting and concentrated on two speci c codes: the Stud, from its beginning to its evolution until the new Valentino Garavani Roman Stud, introduced with the Valentino Diary Collection. The aesthetic universe of the Valentino Garavani Atelier, through botany and artisanal ability. A third essential and universal code is Couture, the meaning that Pierpaolo Piccioli gives to the concept of Couture: a way of being, of imagining, of dreaming. A poetic and romantic language that is also visually palpable. But most of all, a language that can be comprehensible and open to all. The visitors will be able to embrace the language of Couture conveyed on each Valentino item and collection.     Re-signification implies a relation with a memory of a documented experience, an archive. It is a reference, a retrieval of signs, colors and pre-existing codes. It is also a vital appropriation, a personal way to reinterpret them to elaborate and to contextualize into the contemporary world, revising proportions, priorities, aesthetics, techniques and functions. On these premises, the chance to translate these interior signs towards the external.     Valentino: Re-Signify Part One is not a fashion presentation. Neither is it an exhibition. It is an experience, an interactive path, conceived with the idea to trigger doubts and curiosity, with the aim to not provide answers.     It is an open system that invites the visitor to conceive diverse and personal interpretations, all authentic because possible. Past and present of the Maison merges with the contemporary artistic and visual research, from video art to underground cinema, from photography to computer graphics. All of them coexist and face each other in a space made of a variety of areas, courses and a meeting points.     A multiple and possible world, where we nd illusive architectures, creations of the Maison from the past to the present: Rockstud and Atelier Accessories, extremized silhouettes of the Of Grace and Light Haute Couture collection, together with the artworks of artists Jacopo Benassi, Cao Fei, Jonas Mekas, Stanley Mouse, Robby Müller, Quayola, Anna Ridler, Rachel Rose, Sølve Sundsbø, Natália Trejbalová and Weirdcore.     An exploration in the scienti c research eld, fantasies that merge a contemporary imaginary to the nature and to the urban environment. References to the heritage and present of Valentino, with eclectic and alternative art traces. Paradigms of a research among two centuries that evokes colors, forms and underlying structures of the Maison.     A possible world where to ponder, explore, be astonished and entertained. An invite to enjoy the pleasure of the discovery, research, loss and recovery, in a heterogeneous ow of visual suggestions among fashion, art and other. Tradition, evolution and transformation of a style and of its innate bond with the evolution of time.     #VALENTINORESIGNIFY #VALENTINO再诠释 Resigni cation is a pragmatic and conceptual process by which the Creative Director, Pierpaolo Piccioli, is defining Valentino today and its future.     From December 19th 2020 to January 17th 2021, this process and mind set becomes concrete in a physical experience within the spaces of the Power Station of Arts in Shanghai. This Brand Experience is curated by Mariuccia Casadio and Jacopo Bedussi with a setting devised by Kennedy London.   This is the rst chapter in which the iconic themes of the Maison have been drawn from the Archive and from the current collections, transplanted in a new setting and concentrated on two speci c codes: the Stud, from its beginning to its evolution until the new Valentino Garavani Roman Stud, introduced with the Valentino Diary Collection. The aesthetic universe of the Valentino Garavani Atelier, through botany and artisanal ability. A third essential and universal code is Couture, the meaning that Pierpaolo Piccioli gives to the concept of Couture: a way of being, of imagining, of dreaming. A poetic and romantic language that is also visually palpable. But most of all, a language that can be comprehensible and open to all. The visitors will be able to embrace the language of Couture conveyed on each Valentino item and collection.     Re-signification implies a relation with a memory of a documented experience, an archive. It is a reference, a retrieval of signs, colors and pre-existing codes. It is also a vital appropriation, a personal way to reinterpret them to elaborate and to contextualize into the contemporary world, revising proportions, priorities, aesthetics, techniques and functions. On these premises, the chance to translate these interior signs towards the external.     Valentino: Re-Signify Part One is not a fashion presentation. Neither is it an exhibition. It is an experience, an interactive path, conceived with the idea to trigger doubts and curiosity, with the aim to not provide answers.     It is an open system that invites the visitor to conceive diverse and personal interpretations, all authentic because possible. Past and present of the Maison merges with the contemporary artistic and visual research, from video art to underground cinema, from photography to computer graphics. All of them coexist and face each other in a space made of a variety of areas, courses and a meeting points.     A multiple and possible world, where we nd illusive architectures, creations of the Maison from the past to the present: Rockstud and Atelier Accessories, extremized silhouettes of the Of Grace and Light Haute Couture collection, together with the artworks of artists Jacopo Benassi, Cao Fei, Jonas Mekas, Stanley Mouse, Robby Müller, Quayola, Anna Ridler, Rachel Rose, Sølve Sundsbø, Natália Trejbalová and Weirdcore.     An exploration in the scienti c research eld, fantasies that merge a contemporary imaginary to the nature and to the urban environment. References to the heritage and present of Valentino, with eclectic and alternative art traces. Paradigms of a research among two centuries that evokes colors, forms and underlying structures of the Maison.     A possible world where to ponder, explore, be astonished and entertained. An invite to enjoy the pleasure of the discovery, research, loss and recovery, in a heterogeneous ow of visual suggestions among fashion, art and other. Tradition, evolution and transformation of a style and of its innate bond with the evolution of time.     #VALENTINORESIGNIFY #VALENTINO再诠释

The first international Christmas Drag Show with the cast of ‘Drag Race Holland’
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The first international Christmas Drag Show with the cast of ‘Drag Race Holland’

Culture This Christmas, multiple drag professionals will join forces to create a spectacular online Christmas show. On December 26th 2020, (boxing day) the online event “All You Need is Drag” will take place. It will be one of the most unique, online, Dutch based productions of 2020, with the entire cast of Drag Race Holland season one.     In the past year, drag had an explosive growth due to the airing of Drag Race Holland. But after the show aired, the cast of the show was not able to perform for big groups of fans due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. “That is something that needs to change”, states Danielle Jiskoot, founder of The Drag Agency. “We have to set the spotlight on the drag talents of The Netherlands in as many ways as possible.”      “All You Need is Drag“ is an online event for the whole family. Usually people would go to a Christmas show with the family, but since the pandemic has given events a problematic turn, the show will be brought to people's homes. All the cast members of Drag Race Holland season 1 will give exclusive performances made in collaboration with some of the most prominent producers, designers and choreographers to make this Christmas show a special one to remember.      Boxing Day:   The event will take place on boxing day, the 26th of December 2020, at 9PM CET (worldwide time zones available) the show will be live streamed for everybody that purchased a ticket via www.thedragarmy.com. In the show, the cast of Drag Race Holland will give a series of performances with a Christmas flavour. By giving people all over the world the chance to watch the same show, we give them the opportunity to still enjoy these holidays together even though we are separated physically.     Cast:   The entire line up for the show; Abby OMG, ChelseaBoy, Envy Peru, Janey Jacké, Madame Madness, Ma’MaQueen, Megan Schoonbrood, Patty Pam-Pam, Roem & Sederginne.     The Drag Army:   The Drag Army is the organization behind ‘All You Need is Drag’; a collective consisting of multiple prominent Dutch and Flemish entertainment professionals that all have strong connections with the drag community in The Netherlands and Belgium.        Tickets: Tickets are available via www.thedragarmy.com. Early bird tickets: €10,- Reguliere tickets: €15,- This Christmas, multiple drag professionals will join forces to create a spectacular online Christmas show. On December 26th 2020, (boxing day) the online event “All You Need is Drag” will take place. It will be one of the most unique, online, Dutch based productions of 2020, with the entire cast of Drag Race Holland season one.     In the past year, drag had an explosive growth due to the airing of Drag Race Holland. But after the show aired, the cast of the show was not able to perform for big groups of fans due to the outbreak of the COVID-19 pandemic. “That is something that needs to change”, states Danielle Jiskoot, founder of The Drag Agency. “We have to set the spotlight on the drag talents of The Netherlands in as many ways as possible.”      “All You Need is Drag“ is an online event for the whole family. Usually people would go to a Christmas show with the family, but since the pandemic has given events a problematic turn, the show will be brought to people's homes. All the cast members of Drag Race Holland season 1 will give exclusive performances made in collaboration with some of the most prominent producers, designers and choreographers to make this Christmas show a special one to remember.      Boxing Day:   The event will take place on boxing day, the 26th of December 2020, at 9PM CET (worldwide time zones available) the show will be live streamed for everybody that purchased a ticket via www.thedragarmy.com. In the show, the cast of Drag Race Holland will give a series of performances with a Christmas flavour. By giving people all over the world the chance to watch the same show, we give them the opportunity to still enjoy these holidays together even though we are separated physically.     Cast:   The entire line up for the show; Abby OMG, ChelseaBoy, Envy Peru, Janey Jacké, Madame Madness, Ma’MaQueen, Megan Schoonbrood, Patty Pam-Pam, Roem & Sederginne.     The Drag Army:   The Drag Army is the organization behind ‘All You Need is Drag’; a collective consisting of multiple prominent Dutch and Flemish entertainment professionals that all have strong connections with the drag community in The Netherlands and Belgium.        Tickets: Tickets are available via www.thedragarmy.com. Early bird tickets: €10,- Reguliere tickets: €15,-

Jade van der Mark’s new work highlights transformation of city life in the face of the Covid-19 pandemic
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Jade van der Mark’s new work highlights transformation of city life in the face of the Covid-19 pandemic

Exhibition Jade van der Mark will exhibit a new body of work in a solo show in London in December, which explores contemporary society, both before and after the coronavirus pandemic, and examines the dichotomy of crowds and human intimacy.     Dutch painter van der Mark, now based in London, uses cities and crowds as a source of inspiration, sketching in the heart of the capital and documenting the vibrancy of urban life. Her large-scale portraits of cities’ inhabitants highlight issues of overpopulation, isolation, greed and oppression, while through colourful and lively figures her works remind us of our shared humanity. Playful but profound, her paintings make the mundane vibrant and beautiful, with an edge of melancholia.     Thick coats of oil paint give life to monumental textured canvases, rich in detail and complexity and majestic in size. The use of bold and abstracted colour palettes conveys a sense of sculptural depth, amplifying their gravitas. As each layer may take up to a week to dry, van der Mark’s paintings are the result of a laboured process lasting up to eight months. Containing multiple stories, which over the course of completion have been altered or painted over, her works unveil hidden narratives that encourage deeper reflection.       Diving into diverse identities, van der Mark reveals a vast network of personal stories that share the same spaces but lack connection. Colourful figures are representative of the artist’s belief in a shared humanity.      Set in decontextualized city spaces, van der Mark’s paintings speak to an overwhelming sense of disconnect that resonates globally. Works created in early 2020 depict crowded scenes, where figures are frozen in the chaos of rush hour, their stress and exhaustion evident in their expressions.      We’re All Human, for example, presents a densely populated crowd sprawling across a wide canvas, measuring over four meters in length and almost three in height. What seem like hundreds of city dwellers, distinguished through lively clothing and colourful faces, move across all directions. With almost no negative spaces between them, individuals remain fully engrossed in their own worlds, often shielded by phones, headphones and masks.     Works created during the 2020 lockdown, instead turn to empty spaces, the absence of crowds, and the disconnect that arises as a result of social distancing. Others recount a society in lockdown, with surreal depictions of supermarket queues, and voyeuristic views of figures isolating inside apartments. The works juxtapose with those created pre lockdown, forcing viewers to reflect on how significantly city life has changed, and asking them not to recall the chaos with rose tinted glasses.      Works such as Judgementand Greedare influenced by the artist’s fashion background, and depict the materialism, and harsh elitism of the fashion world. The figures in Greed queue frantically to get into a large Louis Vuitton store, while Judgementtransports viewers to the front row of a catwalk, where haughty influencers and celebrities scrutinise parading models.      The attention to texture is crucial to van der Mark’s practice as a whole, which combines a passion of painting with an education in Fashion, obtained at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague. A self-taught weaver, she weaves her paintings into elaborate and distinctive items of clothing, works of art in and of themselves. During Milan Fashion Week 2016 she was awarded the Dutch Fashion Award for her exceptional designs.     One of the most exciting young artists to come out of the Dutch art scene, van der Mark was born in the town of Bergen, often regarded as an artists’ town due of its remarkable natural light. Home to the Bergen School of painters in the early 20thcentury, Bergen has been referred to as the birthplace of Dutch expressionism.      Van der Mark spent lockdown at her home in Amsterdam, and feels the coronavirus pandemic has forced us all to slow down, in a way that was highly necessary in our fast paced society. Used to painting in isolation, she has used this time to reflect on the way the virus has simultaneously bought society closer by affecting everyone, but also torn us apart as a result of social distancing.     Van der Mark comments,  “Whilst lockdown has forced us into physical isolation, we had all become more isolated in modern society. Moving around the world, and in cities such as Amsterdam and London, I’ve noticed that no matter the size of the crowd, people still seem, and are, isolated. Lockdown has highlighted this, but it’s also given us the gift of realising the loss of our connection to each other. I hope my paintings remind the viewer of this, whether in a crowd or alone, that we do have a connection, and it vital for us all to remember and nurture this connection.”     Van der Mark has showcased her work widely in the Netherlands and internationally, exhibiting in Amsterdam, Brussels, London, Dubai and Milan. These include a 2018 solo show at ING Headquarters in Amsterdam and participation in Salone Mobile Design Week in Milan in 2016.     Jade Van der Mark’s solo show will open in London in December 2020.      www.jadevandermark.com Jade van der Mark will exhibit a new body of work in a solo show in London in December, which explores contemporary society, both before and after the coronavirus pandemic, and examines the dichotomy of crowds and human intimacy.     Dutch painter van der Mark, now based in London, uses cities and crowds as a source of inspiration, sketching in the heart of the capital and documenting the vibrancy of urban life. Her large-scale portraits of cities’ inhabitants highlight issues of overpopulation, isolation, greed and oppression, while through colourful and lively figures her works remind us of our shared humanity. Playful but profound, her paintings make the mundane vibrant and beautiful, with an edge of melancholia.     Thick coats of oil paint give life to monumental textured canvases, rich in detail and complexity and majestic in size. The use of bold and abstracted colour palettes conveys a sense of sculptural depth, amplifying their gravitas. As each layer may take up to a week to dry, van der Mark’s paintings are the result of a laboured process lasting up to eight months. Containing multiple stories, which over the course of completion have been altered or painted over, her works unveil hidden narratives that encourage deeper reflection.       Diving into diverse identities, van der Mark reveals a vast network of personal stories that share the same spaces but lack connection. Colourful figures are representative of the artist’s belief in a shared humanity.      Set in decontextualized city spaces, van der Mark’s paintings speak to an overwhelming sense of disconnect that resonates globally. Works created in early 2020 depict crowded scenes, where figures are frozen in the chaos of rush hour, their stress and exhaustion evident in their expressions.      We’re All Human, for example, presents a densely populated crowd sprawling across a wide canvas, measuring over four meters in length and almost three in height. What seem like hundreds of city dwellers, distinguished through lively clothing and colourful faces, move across all directions. With almost no negative spaces between them, individuals remain fully engrossed in their own worlds, often shielded by phones, headphones and masks.     Works created during the 2020 lockdown, instead turn to empty spaces, the absence of crowds, and the disconnect that arises as a result of social distancing. Others recount a society in lockdown, with surreal depictions of supermarket queues, and voyeuristic views of figures isolating inside apartments. The works juxtapose with those created pre lockdown, forcing viewers to reflect on how significantly city life has changed, and asking them not to recall the chaos with rose tinted glasses.      Works such as Judgementand Greedare influenced by the artist’s fashion background, and depict the materialism, and harsh elitism of the fashion world. The figures in Greed queue frantically to get into a large Louis Vuitton store, while Judgementtransports viewers to the front row of a catwalk, where haughty influencers and celebrities scrutinise parading models.      The attention to texture is crucial to van der Mark’s practice as a whole, which combines a passion of painting with an education in Fashion, obtained at the Royal Academy of Arts in The Hague. A self-taught weaver, she weaves her paintings into elaborate and distinctive items of clothing, works of art in and of themselves. During Milan Fashion Week 2016 she was awarded the Dutch Fashion Award for her exceptional designs.     One of the most exciting young artists to come out of the Dutch art scene, van der Mark was born in the town of Bergen, often regarded as an artists’ town due of its remarkable natural light. Home to the Bergen School of painters in the early 20thcentury, Bergen has been referred to as the birthplace of Dutch expressionism.      Van der Mark spent lockdown at her home in Amsterdam, and feels the coronavirus pandemic has forced us all to slow down, in a way that was highly necessary in our fast paced society. Used to painting in isolation, she has used this time to reflect on the way the virus has simultaneously bought society closer by affecting everyone, but also torn us apart as a result of social distancing.     Van der Mark comments,  “Whilst lockdown has forced us into physical isolation, we had all become more isolated in modern society. Moving around the world, and in cities such as Amsterdam and London, I’ve noticed that no matter the size of the crowd, people still seem, and are, isolated. Lockdown has highlighted this, but it’s also given us the gift of realising the loss of our connection to each other. I hope my paintings remind the viewer of this, whether in a crowd or alone, that we do have a connection, and it vital for us all to remember and nurture this connection.”     Van der Mark has showcased her work widely in the Netherlands and internationally, exhibiting in Amsterdam, Brussels, London, Dubai and Milan. These include a 2018 solo show at ING Headquarters in Amsterdam and participation in Salone Mobile Design Week in Milan in 2016.     Jade Van der Mark’s solo show will open in London in December 2020.      www.jadevandermark.com

‘Tales’ van Bosch
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‘Tales’ van Bosch

Music As an earnest, toothy twelve-year-old, Zanna van Vorstenbosch was runner-up in the Junior Eurovision Song Contest. Twelve years later, working as van Bosch, the Dutch model-turned-sea- siren returns to her founding passion with her forthcoming debut LP, Speed of Wood (2021).     Watch the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xu9fZfu5BQU     Having glided like an unbothered sylph through a New York City most can only imagine, she stayed gold, never forgot herself. “Modeling opened the world to me,” she writes, “but music secures a space in it.” From her vantage at photo shoots she saw something all around her:   “The need to prove that we are successful in a material way,” she writes, was “prioritized without balance (both a balance within ourselves and with the world outside ourselves) and without attention to how to deal with mental health, relationships, stress, or how to dream, or how to love.” The protective barricade of wealth also forbade entrance to beautiful risk and hard truth— while letting slip through the paranoia and bloated self-regard which flourish when too few people are brave enough to tell us the truth.   So she wrote this song about it. “Count your prey, play your games,” she begins, “so much to prove, so little to gain.”     Interesting piano work, excellent drumming, well-wrought song structure, and the haunted wind of Old-World witchery all support a majestic vocal performance. (Wait for it.) And if, as you listen, you begin to think of Nico, Anika, or PJ Harvey, you’re not entirely right, but you’re not entirely wrong.     If “Tales,” as a song, is an indemnification of status without stature, money without meaning, and the loneliness of empty achievement, the video, Zanna says, is a ritual attempt to heal them, to bring them into a shadow-place free of arrogance, free of sight, free of the safe, overdetermined meanings toward which we strive: A Holy Virgin sits forbidding in theatre eyebrows behind an open veil, awaiting the return of her prodigals. Tears spill through a suffocating shroud. What is the difference between protection and imprisonment?     A woman sings directly into (or maybe under) dark water. Her wail ripples through it, elocuting the abyss beneath all she denounces, all she means to save, and she does not drown. What does it mean to sing lyrics against words? “The moment that you have your mind made up, the moment that you think it’s a certain way,” Zanna writes, “you lose that beauty. You can’t put your words on it, you can’t put your fingers on it. The moment that it’s in between, that’s where you can start to understand, that’s where you get fulfilled.”     “If you want to find some meaning to life” she sings, “don’t be too proud to say you know you’re blind.”     - Written by Alan Bajandas As an earnest, toothy twelve-year-old, Zanna van Vorstenbosch was runner-up in the Junior Eurovision Song Contest. Twelve years later, working as van Bosch, the Dutch model-turned-sea- siren returns to her founding passion with her forthcoming debut LP, Speed of Wood (2021).     Watch the video here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Xu9fZfu5BQU     Having glided like an unbothered sylph through a New York City most can only imagine, she stayed gold, never forgot herself. “Modeling opened the world to me,” she writes, “but music secures a space in it.” From her vantage at photo shoots she saw something all around her:   “The need to prove that we are successful in a material way,” she writes, was “prioritized without balance (both a balance within ourselves and with the world outside ourselves) and without attention to how to deal with mental health, relationships, stress, or how to dream, or how to love.” The protective barricade of wealth also forbade entrance to beautiful risk and hard truth— while letting slip through the paranoia and bloated self-regard which flourish when too few people are brave enough to tell us the truth.   So she wrote this song about it. “Count your prey, play your games,” she begins, “so much to prove, so little to gain.”     Interesting piano work, excellent drumming, well-wrought song structure, and the haunted wind of Old-World witchery all support a majestic vocal performance. (Wait for it.) And if, as you listen, you begin to think of Nico, Anika, or PJ Harvey, you’re not entirely right, but you’re not entirely wrong.     If “Tales,” as a song, is an indemnification of status without stature, money without meaning, and the loneliness of empty achievement, the video, Zanna says, is a ritual attempt to heal them, to bring them into a shadow-place free of arrogance, free of sight, free of the safe, overdetermined meanings toward which we strive: A Holy Virgin sits forbidding in theatre eyebrows behind an open veil, awaiting the return of her prodigals. Tears spill through a suffocating shroud. What is the difference between protection and imprisonment?     A woman sings directly into (or maybe under) dark water. Her wail ripples through it, elocuting the abyss beneath all she denounces, all she means to save, and she does not drown. What does it mean to sing lyrics against words? “The moment that you have your mind made up, the moment that you think it’s a certain way,” Zanna writes, “you lose that beauty. You can’t put your words on it, you can’t put your fingers on it. The moment that it’s in between, that’s where you can start to understand, that’s where you get fulfilled.”     “If you want to find some meaning to life” she sings, “don’t be too proud to say you know you’re blind.”     - Written by Alan Bajandas

Reflex Amsterdam is delighted to present a set of recent works by Daniel Firman
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Reflex Amsterdam is delighted to present a set of recent works by Daniel Firman

Art Reflex Amsterdam is delighted to present a set of recent works by Daniel Firman. All sculptures in the exhibition Switch Up revolve around the idea of the body and the object: the body with the object; the body without an object; the object without the body. The exhibition is constructed like a crossfade where each sculpture becomes like a planar surface on which movement from one work to another is activated.      Attitude and Gathering, two of the most important series of works from the artist, in conjunction with a third more recent one, Plastic Confetti, give this show all the dimensions of an extremely contemporary vision of our world.      Daniel Firman: "The Switch Up exhibition shows a compendium of decisions where identity is erased in favor of a globalization of information where, more broadly, object and matter end up taking their own authority and lasting autonomy. It would seem that the indecision to do with or without defines us today in a world that is constantly changing, in this contemporary intoxication of stop and go."     Firman nevertheless refers to the constructions of a work whose heritage is made from gesture, molding, nesting and collage. Impacted and overwhelmed, the works by the artist seem to give us a realistic vision, with quirky and joyful humour, of a 'chaotic' world. It gives a vision of resistance orchestrated like dance movements where the bodies perform in order to irreversibly avoid a slippage, a collapse.      Switch Up is Firman’s first solo exhibition in The Netherlands and the artist’s first show with the gallery. In close collaboration with the artist the gallery is publishing a book, including all work from the last six years, as well as the latest works included in the exhibition. Opening, reception and book signing with time slots will be announced as soon as situation allows.       Daniel Firman (1966) is a French artist working in both Bordeaux and New York. His work has been exhibited, amongst others, at: Palais de Tokyo, Paris, France (2008), Venice Biennial, Venice, Italy (2009), Kunsthalle Wien, Austria (2012), National Gallery of Australia (2017), Ceysson & Bénétière Gallery, New York, USA (2019) and Reflex Amsterdam (2020).      www.reflexamsterdam.com Reflex Amsterdam is delighted to present a set of recent works by Daniel Firman. All sculptures in the exhibition Switch Up revolve around the idea of the body and the object: the body with the object; the body without an object; the object without the body. The exhibition is constructed like a crossfade where each sculpture becomes like a planar surface on which movement from one work to another is activated.      Attitude and Gathering, two of the most important series of works from the artist, in conjunction with a third more recent one, Plastic Confetti, give this show all the dimensions of an extremely contemporary vision of our world.      Daniel Firman: "The Switch Up exhibition shows a compendium of decisions where identity is erased in favor of a globalization of information where, more broadly, object and matter end up taking their own authority and lasting autonomy. It would seem that the indecision to do with or without defines us today in a world that is constantly changing, in this contemporary intoxication of stop and go."     Firman nevertheless refers to the constructions of a work whose heritage is made from gesture, molding, nesting and collage. Impacted and overwhelmed, the works by the artist seem to give us a realistic vision, with quirky and joyful humour, of a 'chaotic' world. It gives a vision of resistance orchestrated like dance movements where the bodies perform in order to irreversibly avoid a slippage, a collapse.      Switch Up is Firman’s first solo exhibition in The Netherlands and the artist’s first show with the gallery. In close collaboration with the artist the gallery is publishing a book, including all work from the last six years, as well as the latest works included in the exhibition. Opening, reception and book signing with time slots will be announced as soon as situation allows.       Daniel Firman (1966) is a French artist working in both Bordeaux and New York. His work has been exhibited, amongst others, at: Palais de Tokyo, Paris, France (2008), Venice Biennial, Venice, Italy (2009), Kunsthalle Wien, Austria (2012), National Gallery of Australia (2017), Ceysson & Bénétière Gallery, New York, USA (2019) and Reflex Amsterdam (2020).      www.reflexamsterdam.com

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