@
First museum in the Netherlands dedicated to New Media Art to open in Amsterdam 29 August 2020
314

First museum in the Netherlands dedicated to New Media Art to open in Amsterdam 29 August 2020

Art Nxt Museum, the first museum in the Netherlands dedicated to New Media Art, will open on 29 August 2020. Through a three-fold programme, comprising exhibitions, performances and learning and research, Nxt Museum will fuse art and technology to seek, show and question what is next The first exhibition, Shifting Proximities,will feature large-scale, multi-sensory installations by acclaimed artists and academics: Thijs Biersteker with Stefano Mancuso, Heleen Blanken with Naivi and Stijn van Beek, Roelof Knol, Marshmallow Laser Feast, Lucy McRae with Niels Wouters, and United Visual Artists (UVA) – and will include a number of newly commissioned pieces.   Nxt Museum will exhibit and commission ambitious, large-scale new media art installations born of interdisciplinary collaboration between leading and emerging artists, designers, technologists and scientists. Through immersive, multi-sensory exhibitions that shed new light on the world, visitors will be invited to engage and interact physically, conceptually and emotionally with the art. The inaugural exhibition, Shifting Proximities , will explore human experience and interaction in the face of technological and social change.     Curated by Bogomir Doringer and Jesse Damiani, the group exhibition will showcase large-scale, multi-sensory installations by some of new media art’s most prominent figures including London-based collectives United Visual Artists (UVA) and Marshmallow Laser Feast ; British-Australian sci-fi artist and body architect Lucy McRae and human-computer interaction researcherNiels Wouters in partnership with the Science Gallery Melbourne ; ecological artist Thijs Biersteker in collaboration with Italian plant neurobiologistStefano Mancuso ; Dutch visual artist Heleen Blanken with software developer Naivi and sound artist Stijn van Beek ; and audio-visual artist Roelof Knol . A number of newly-commissioned, site-specific installations, will be on public display for the first time alongside previous works that have been re-imagined for the museum’s expansive exhibition space of over 1000 sqm.     Nxt Museum is the brainchild of Merel van Helsdingen , founder and managing director. She said: “Living in London, a hub for innovation and home to some of the world's most forward-looking art institutions, inspired me to create a new space to champion the incredible art being produced today with groundbreaking tools. The Netherlands has a long tradition of leading developments in the art world and Nxt Museum has been created in this spirit. Our multi-sensory exhibitions are designed to shift not only our visitors' experience of art, but to inspire new understandings of the world around them and their place within it.”     Natasha Greenhalgh , co-founder and creative director, added: "We believe the future is collaborative. These large-scale installations are the result of convergence among leading international artists, designers, technologists and scientists. And when we welcome our first visitors in less than three months' time, we'll ask them to share in the act of creation by interacting directly with these visions of the future."     Nxt Museum’s three-fold public programme, comprising exhibitions, performance and learning and research, has been designed to appeal to a broad range of visitors and will be consistently led by the museum’s mission to incite curiosity, challenge assumptions and open minds. The museum will also host a residency programme, Nxt Lab, to facilitate collaboration between artists, designers, technologists and scientists, and allow for the invaluable exchange of skills and resources. By connecting interdisciplinary pioneers from around the world, the museum will provide a catalyst for new developments at the intersection of art, technology and humanity. Centrally located in a 2,100 sqm former production studio, Nxt Museum will open this summer with a bar-restaurant and a large terrace. The new museum will be a unique addition to the thriving creative district of Amsterdam Noord and a major new cultural destination for the city at large. Nxt Museum, the first museum in the Netherlands dedicated to New Media Art, will open on 29 August 2020. Through a three-fold programme, comprising exhibitions, performances and learning and research, Nxt Museum will fuse art and technology to seek, show and question what is next The first exhibition, Shifting Proximities,will feature large-scale, multi-sensory installations by acclaimed artists and academics: Thijs Biersteker with Stefano Mancuso, Heleen Blanken with Naivi and Stijn van Beek, Roelof Knol, Marshmallow Laser Feast, Lucy McRae with Niels Wouters, and United Visual Artists (UVA) – and will include a number of newly commissioned pieces.   Nxt Museum will exhibit and commission ambitious, large-scale new media art installations born of interdisciplinary collaboration between leading and emerging artists, designers, technologists and scientists. Through immersive, multi-sensory exhibitions that shed new light on the world, visitors will be invited to engage and interact physically, conceptually and emotionally with the art. The inaugural exhibition, Shifting Proximities , will explore human experience and interaction in the face of technological and social change.     Curated by Bogomir Doringer and Jesse Damiani, the group exhibition will showcase large-scale, multi-sensory installations by some of new media art’s most prominent figures including London-based collectives United Visual Artists (UVA) and Marshmallow Laser Feast ; British-Australian sci-fi artist and body architect Lucy McRae and human-computer interaction researcherNiels Wouters in partnership with the Science Gallery Melbourne ; ecological artist Thijs Biersteker in collaboration with Italian plant neurobiologistStefano Mancuso ; Dutch visual artist Heleen Blanken with software developer Naivi and sound artist Stijn van Beek ; and audio-visual artist Roelof Knol . A number of newly-commissioned, site-specific installations, will be on public display for the first time alongside previous works that have been re-imagined for the museum’s expansive exhibition space of over 1000 sqm.     Nxt Museum is the brainchild of Merel van Helsdingen , founder and managing director. She said: “Living in London, a hub for innovation and home to some of the world's most forward-looking art institutions, inspired me to create a new space to champion the incredible art being produced today with groundbreaking tools. The Netherlands has a long tradition of leading developments in the art world and Nxt Museum has been created in this spirit. Our multi-sensory exhibitions are designed to shift not only our visitors' experience of art, but to inspire new understandings of the world around them and their place within it.”     Natasha Greenhalgh , co-founder and creative director, added: "We believe the future is collaborative. These large-scale installations are the result of convergence among leading international artists, designers, technologists and scientists. And when we welcome our first visitors in less than three months' time, we'll ask them to share in the act of creation by interacting directly with these visions of the future."     Nxt Museum’s three-fold public programme, comprising exhibitions, performance and learning and research, has been designed to appeal to a broad range of visitors and will be consistently led by the museum’s mission to incite curiosity, challenge assumptions and open minds. The museum will also host a residency programme, Nxt Lab, to facilitate collaboration between artists, designers, technologists and scientists, and allow for the invaluable exchange of skills and resources. By connecting interdisciplinary pioneers from around the world, the museum will provide a catalyst for new developments at the intersection of art, technology and humanity. Centrally located in a 2,100 sqm former production studio, Nxt Museum will open this summer with a bar-restaurant and a large terrace. The new museum will be a unique addition to the thriving creative district of Amsterdam Noord and a major new cultural destination for the city at large.

Lardini's Spring & Summer 2020 sustainable t-shirt project
311

Lardini's Spring & Summer 2020 sustainable t-shirt project

Fashion Lardini pays homage to Cuba and five hundred years of Havana, creating a collection suspended between present and past. Over five hundred artists from forty-nine countries paid tribute to the Caribbean capital with an art biennial. As part of the collection, four organic cotton T-shirts were also presented in fully sustainable and recyclable cylindrical packaging, reminiscent of the kind used for rum. The t-shirts feature illustrations created in collaboration with the illustrator Andrea Mancini, inspired by timeless images of Havana: marvellously decadent corners of the city, its colours, flavours and emotions. Available in four different illustrations: an elderly woman, a street lined with typically colourful buildings, a man playing the double base and a local car. Available on the e-commerce website Lardini.com Lardini pays homage to Cuba and five hundred years of Havana, creating a collection suspended between present and past. Over five hundred artists from forty-nine countries paid tribute to the Caribbean capital with an art biennial. As part of the collection, four organic cotton T-shirts were also presented in fully sustainable and recyclable cylindrical packaging, reminiscent of the kind used for rum. The t-shirts feature illustrations created in collaboration with the illustrator Andrea Mancini, inspired by timeless images of Havana: marvellously decadent corners of the city, its colours, flavours and emotions. Available in four different illustrations: an elderly woman, a street lined with typically colourful buildings, a man playing the double base and a local car. Available on the e-commerce website Lardini.com

With Rendez-Vous, opening 1 June, Museum Voorlinden focuses on the concept of the encounter
267

With Rendez-Vous, opening 1 June, Museum Voorlinden focuses on the concept of the encounter

Art When Voorlinden reopens on 1 June, there will be a brand-new exhibition on display: Rendez-Vous. This presentation of selected works from the museum's own collection will centre on encounters: those between Voorlinden and its visitors, between the art and viewers and between the artists and the works themselves.In Rendez-Vous, works of art come together like lovers, embracing and lending one another strength – and occasionally clashing as well. These encounters walk a fine line between convergence and confrontation, between duet and duel.   What unites these works is their sensual aspect: they invite you to come closer and allow yourself to be swept away by their scents, sounds and movements. A physical encounter is the only way to understand what makes these pieces so remarkable, as they let you feel what it means to be human.   Now that the retrospective on British artist Antony Gormley has been moved to summer 2021, Voorlinden has seized this opportunity to conduct a new experiment with the works in its collection. Unlike a typical collection presentation, this exhibition has not been assembled under a single overarching theme. Instead, it features an assemblage of different themes that will bring visitors face-to-face with a new encounter in every gallery. While there will be opportunities to appreciate new works, of course, museum-goers can also look forward to reunions with several visitor favourites.   Rendez-Vous features works by artists including Etel Adnan, Francis Alÿs, Oliver Beer, John DeAndrea, Berlinde De Bruyckere, Erik Dietman, Tracey Emin, Leandro Erlich, Lara Favaretto, Dan Flavin, Anya Gallaccio, Shilpa Gupta, William Kentridge, Guillermo Kuitca, Maha Malluh, Jacco Olivier, Pablo Picasso, Abraham Poincheval, Jeff Wall and Jonas Wood.   Director Suzanne Swarts: "The works on display in Rendez-Vous offer a tantalising glimpse of exactly what we've all been craving recently: they entice us to draw near and surrender to an encounter with their sensory qualities." When Voorlinden reopens on 1 June, there will be a brand-new exhibition on display: Rendez-Vous. This presentation of selected works from the museum's own collection will centre on encounters: those between Voorlinden and its visitors, between the art and viewers and between the artists and the works themselves.In Rendez-Vous, works of art come together like lovers, embracing and lending one another strength – and occasionally clashing as well. These encounters walk a fine line between convergence and confrontation, between duet and duel.   What unites these works is their sensual aspect: they invite you to come closer and allow yourself to be swept away by their scents, sounds and movements. A physical encounter is the only way to understand what makes these pieces so remarkable, as they let you feel what it means to be human.   Now that the retrospective on British artist Antony Gormley has been moved to summer 2021, Voorlinden has seized this opportunity to conduct a new experiment with the works in its collection. Unlike a typical collection presentation, this exhibition has not been assembled under a single overarching theme. Instead, it features an assemblage of different themes that will bring visitors face-to-face with a new encounter in every gallery. While there will be opportunities to appreciate new works, of course, museum-goers can also look forward to reunions with several visitor favourites.   Rendez-Vous features works by artists including Etel Adnan, Francis Alÿs, Oliver Beer, John DeAndrea, Berlinde De Bruyckere, Erik Dietman, Tracey Emin, Leandro Erlich, Lara Favaretto, Dan Flavin, Anya Gallaccio, Shilpa Gupta, William Kentridge, Guillermo Kuitca, Maha Malluh, Jacco Olivier, Pablo Picasso, Abraham Poincheval, Jeff Wall and Jonas Wood.   Director Suzanne Swarts: "The works on display in Rendez-Vous offer a tantalising glimpse of exactly what we've all been craving recently: they entice us to draw near and surrender to an encounter with their sensory qualities."

Advertising
Advertising
In conversation with Rodney Lam
290

In conversation with Rodney Lam

Fashion Special  exclusive interview with Rodney Lam.   Who are you  and what do you do?   Wow, You guys aren’t saving the difficult question for last. I always struggle to tell people who I am, or what I do, because I don’t know where to start. In the first conversation I might tell them I’m a serial entrepreneur. Later I might tell them about Daily Paper. Then that person asks me: did you make a movie? To which I confess that I produced, wrote and played the lead in my own movie. I guess, I take my inspiration from Leonardo da Vinci. He was an artist, engineer, inventor and a scholar. I think he just did what he loved with the people he liked. And to me that’s a great philosophy to live by.      How do you think Covid-19 will affect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion? Do you believe everything will just go back to normal after Covid-19, or how do you see it will be?    In the short-term it will be very hard for some Brands to survive. If they were already struggling this could be the nail in the coffin. But a lot of companies reinvented themselves during this crisis. Like people, business also had time to think about who they are. Some redesigned their collection; others changed their marketing strategy; and we all got a lot greener. Let’s hope that we don’t go back to normal. We owe it to ourselves, our customers, and last but not least, to the environment to be better.       What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined and how did you learn it?   People need less management than we assume. As managers we like to think the work stops without our direct involvement. However, workers can we very effective on their own. Working from a distance forced us to look at performance and it made other things like attendance and effort less important.      What is your favorite painting/work of art and has it inspired you for any of your work thus far?   I don’t have a specific artist or work that directly inspires me. I like the playfulness of Kaws. And especially the effect it has on fashion. I get my inspiration from music. At the Daily Paper Office, we listen to a lot of hip-hop. But in my home office I listen to Ludovico Einaudi. It really doesn’t matter if I’m crunching numbers or writing a script. It gives me the focus I need.   What has been longtime dream of yours? After already achieving so much.    I have two dreams that I still want to achieve. I hope that I will see space tourism become a real thing. I would love to go into space and see the earth from a distance. And the second thing I really want to do is build a successful movie franchise.      As a fan and a regular customer of Daily Paper, I would love to know what is in store for DP next, besides opening stores in Amsterdam, New York and London?  We’ve recently started the Unite Hub: https://www.dailypaperclothing.com/pages/unite-overview   A place where we share our inspiration online with our community. This was a great success from the beginning. It would be great to see that grow in the near future.       How do you see your entrepreneurship as a way to make difference in society?   It’s important to me to think about the legacy of what we are building. How do we change our society to give our next generations the fundamental chances that we had to work very hard for? To me it isn’t enough to inspire. I want to facilitate people achieving their dreams.     What is your advice to young entrepreneurs who are starting their own business ventures? Be patient my young padawan. Don’t be in a hurry to grow your company too fast. Work a solid foundation first. Don’t overestimate what you can do in a year. But also, don’t underestimate what you can do in five years. So instead of making a plan for a year, make a plan for five years. Think tall, start small.   What makes a successful business in your own words?   A successful company is based on a good and healthy cashflow. If you have a big company without profit or even operating on a loss, you’ll be stressed all the time. And if you only have profit on paper but not in your account, that’s even more frustrating. A friend just gave me the book: Scaling up from Vern Harnish. It will tell you everything you need to know about cashflow. My mentor always said: You keep the profit; I’ll take the cash.      Tell us something about yourself that isn't on your resume.   A lot of people are shocked when they hear I used to be a Pastor. I preached for fifteen years. And did a lot of personal coaching. I still use this in my management style. My objective is always to help other achieve their goals in business or their personal lives. The fastest way for your company to grow is to nurture employees and help them grow first.     Photo credits: Mark Bolk   You can follow Rodney on INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/rodneylam/ Special  exclusive interview with Rodney Lam.   Who are you  and what do you do?   Wow, You guys aren’t saving the difficult question for last. I always struggle to tell people who I am, or what I do, because I don’t know where to start. In the first conversation I might tell them I’m a serial entrepreneur. Later I might tell them about Daily Paper. Then that person asks me: did you make a movie? To which I confess that I produced, wrote and played the lead in my own movie. I guess, I take my inspiration from Leonardo da Vinci. He was an artist, engineer, inventor and a scholar. I think he just did what he loved with the people he liked. And to me that’s a great philosophy to live by.      How do you think Covid-19 will affect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion? Do you believe everything will just go back to normal after Covid-19, or how do you see it will be?    In the short-term it will be very hard for some Brands to survive. If they were already struggling this could be the nail in the coffin. But a lot of companies reinvented themselves during this crisis. Like people, business also had time to think about who they are. Some redesigned their collection; others changed their marketing strategy; and we all got a lot greener. Let’s hope that we don’t go back to normal. We owe it to ourselves, our customers, and last but not least, to the environment to be better.       What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined and how did you learn it?   People need less management than we assume. As managers we like to think the work stops without our direct involvement. However, workers can we very effective on their own. Working from a distance forced us to look at performance and it made other things like attendance and effort less important.      What is your favorite painting/work of art and has it inspired you for any of your work thus far?   I don’t have a specific artist or work that directly inspires me. I like the playfulness of Kaws. And especially the effect it has on fashion. I get my inspiration from music. At the Daily Paper Office, we listen to a lot of hip-hop. But in my home office I listen to Ludovico Einaudi. It really doesn’t matter if I’m crunching numbers or writing a script. It gives me the focus I need.   What has been longtime dream of yours? After already achieving so much.    I have two dreams that I still want to achieve. I hope that I will see space tourism become a real thing. I would love to go into space and see the earth from a distance. And the second thing I really want to do is build a successful movie franchise.      As a fan and a regular customer of Daily Paper, I would love to know what is in store for DP next, besides opening stores in Amsterdam, New York and London?  We’ve recently started the Unite Hub: https://www.dailypaperclothing.com/pages/unite-overview   A place where we share our inspiration online with our community. This was a great success from the beginning. It would be great to see that grow in the near future.       How do you see your entrepreneurship as a way to make difference in society?   It’s important to me to think about the legacy of what we are building. How do we change our society to give our next generations the fundamental chances that we had to work very hard for? To me it isn’t enough to inspire. I want to facilitate people achieving their dreams.     What is your advice to young entrepreneurs who are starting their own business ventures? Be patient my young padawan. Don’t be in a hurry to grow your company too fast. Work a solid foundation first. Don’t overestimate what you can do in a year. But also, don’t underestimate what you can do in five years. So instead of making a plan for a year, make a plan for five years. Think tall, start small.   What makes a successful business in your own words?   A successful company is based on a good and healthy cashflow. If you have a big company without profit or even operating on a loss, you’ll be stressed all the time. And if you only have profit on paper but not in your account, that’s even more frustrating. A friend just gave me the book: Scaling up from Vern Harnish. It will tell you everything you need to know about cashflow. My mentor always said: You keep the profit; I’ll take the cash.      Tell us something about yourself that isn't on your resume.   A lot of people are shocked when they hear I used to be a Pastor. I preached for fifteen years. And did a lot of personal coaching. I still use this in my management style. My objective is always to help other achieve their goals in business or their personal lives. The fastest way for your company to grow is to nurture employees and help them grow first.     Photo credits: Mark Bolk   You can follow Rodney on INSTAGRAM: https://www.instagram.com/rodneylam/

Moco Museum in Amsterdam reopens its doors on June 1st
286

Moco Museum in Amsterdam reopens its doors on June 1st

Art Moco Museum in Amsterdam will reopen its doors to the public on Monday the 1st of June. Safety and distancing measures will be taken according to The National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) guidelines, making sure that visitors can enjoy the (new) collections and exhibitions safely.      Social distance in the museum: Moco Museum has been very busy preparing for the reopening of the museum. Walking routes are established, and narrow passageways are equipped with Plexiglas dividers to make sure visitors can safely stroll through the museum. In addition, exhibition rooms have also been renovated. Visitors can enjoy new work by Banksy, KAWS, Mark Rothko and Tracey Emin added to the museum’s collection.  New art can also be found in the garden of the museum, including the large wooden sculpture ‘Final Days’ and the augmented reality piece ‘Companion’, both by KAWS. The AR-artwork is an exclusive artwork of which only 25 were released worldwide.  To regulate the flow of museumgoers and avoid crowds, people who would like to visit need to reserve a timeslot and buy a ticket online in advance. With each ticket purchased, visitors will receive a second entrance ticket to use in November. Reserve online tickets via: tickets.mocomuseum.com/tickets     Exhibitions are extended: The new immersive digital art exhibition ‘Reflecting Forward’ by Studio Irma, which opened right before the coronavirus outbreak, is extended until November 1stto give more art lovers the opportunity to admire this exceptional, interactive exhibition. ‘Laugh Now’ by Banksy is also extended.      Moco Open-Air Museum: The coronacrisis has challenged Moco Museum to think of new, creative ways to exhibit artwork. Together with Studio Irma, Moco Museum is working on an augmented reality version of the exhibition ‘Reflecting Forward’. Visitors can use the ‘Moco Outside’ app to get access to augmented reality experiences that are based on the ‘Reflecting Forward’ exhibition. The app will be launched in June along with a more detailed explanation.  Moco Museum in Amsterdam will reopen its doors to the public on Monday the 1st of June. Safety and distancing measures will be taken according to The National Institute for Public Health and the Environment (RIVM) guidelines, making sure that visitors can enjoy the (new) collections and exhibitions safely.      Social distance in the museum: Moco Museum has been very busy preparing for the reopening of the museum. Walking routes are established, and narrow passageways are equipped with Plexiglas dividers to make sure visitors can safely stroll through the museum. In addition, exhibition rooms have also been renovated. Visitors can enjoy new work by Banksy, KAWS, Mark Rothko and Tracey Emin added to the museum’s collection.  New art can also be found in the garden of the museum, including the large wooden sculpture ‘Final Days’ and the augmented reality piece ‘Companion’, both by KAWS. The AR-artwork is an exclusive artwork of which only 25 were released worldwide.  To regulate the flow of museumgoers and avoid crowds, people who would like to visit need to reserve a timeslot and buy a ticket online in advance. With each ticket purchased, visitors will receive a second entrance ticket to use in November. Reserve online tickets via: tickets.mocomuseum.com/tickets     Exhibitions are extended: The new immersive digital art exhibition ‘Reflecting Forward’ by Studio Irma, which opened right before the coronavirus outbreak, is extended until November 1stto give more art lovers the opportunity to admire this exceptional, interactive exhibition. ‘Laugh Now’ by Banksy is also extended.      Moco Open-Air Museum: The coronacrisis has challenged Moco Museum to think of new, creative ways to exhibit artwork. Together with Studio Irma, Moco Museum is working on an augmented reality version of the exhibition ‘Reflecting Forward’. Visitors can use the ‘Moco Outside’ app to get access to augmented reality experiences that are based on the ‘Reflecting Forward’ exhibition. The app will be launched in June along with a more detailed explanation. 

In conversation with Koen van den Broek
270

In conversation with Koen van den Broek

Art We had the pleasure of speaking with Koen van den Broek about his current retrospective exhibition at Galerie Ron Mandos titled The Beginning, and how he feels about the current state of the world.     Talk to us about your background After a classical education (mathematics and Latin), I decided to study civil engineering and architecture at the university. However, after two years I decided toquit the course and make a big change and switch to the Academy of Visual Arts in Antwerp - civil engineering and architecture lacked focus in terms of design an creativity, something I was looking for. In short: I studied art over a period of seven years. In those seven years I have attended the Academy in Antwerp, Academy St Joost in Breda and the Higher Institute of Flanders (HISK). I graduated in 2000, andin that same year I had my first solo exhibition in the Kunsthalle Z33 in Hasselt and a solo with Jay Jopling at White Cube London.   How do you think Covid-19 will affect the art industry on the short and long-term? And what impact will this crisis have on how we perceive art? Covid-19 is a nightmare for millions of people around the world, but in my opinion it is also a blessing in disguise. I feel that the lockdown has been able to temporarilyhalt the ratrace of the art world. We are in a moment of geographical and social limits, which paradoxically gives us more freedom of the mind.   How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined? In contrary from what I hear from other colleagues artists,I have been very busyduring this quarantine. This period allows me to spend a lot of time in my studio where I can focus on my paintings without interruption. Additionally, next to all the preparations that went in to my current show at Galerie Ron Mandos, I am also having a lot of virtual meetings about future projects. This time also gives me the opportunity to spend more quality time with my family, reading, and walking the dog.   What is your first memory related to art? And when did you start painting? When I was around 14 years old my uncle used to take me to a beautiful wooden cabin located in the middle of nature. My uncle, being an amateur painter, was the one who taught me how to work with oil paint and how to paint landscapes.    What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined? I enjoy driving my old Ford Mustang together with my son on roads that are normally super busy but now empty due to everyone staying at home. I learned that during Covid-19 life looks a lot like my paintings. It is a lot more agreeable. Next to that, however it’s not something I “learned”, I can’t stop watching Larry David’s ‘Curb your enthusiasm ‘.  I have to admit – I am fond of curbs.   What is the story behind both silk screenprints: Hamptons & Casting Balance? Both works address very different topics and angles of my work. Hamptons is a work based on a picture that I took west of Long Island, NY. It’s very typical for my work in terms of shadows, streets corners, and referring to details of a movies. Then, when we look at Casting Balance we see a work that was based off a pictureI took at home in my own street, which is the first time I did a painting based on an image close to home. The fragility of Casting Balance is very pure and resembles the end of the life of a small plant before the winter comes. This gives a rich amount of colors balancing in the wind as if the plant is asking to get a role in a movie,casting to be the star in my painting.   The Beginning by Koen van den Broek will be on view until Saturday 13 May at Galerie Ron Mandos in Amsterdam. To visit the exhibition a viewing appointment must be booked via +31 20 320 7036. We had the pleasure of speaking with Koen van den Broek about his current retrospective exhibition at Galerie Ron Mandos titled The Beginning, and how he feels about the current state of the world.     Talk to us about your background After a classical education (mathematics and Latin), I decided to study civil engineering and architecture at the university. However, after two years I decided toquit the course and make a big change and switch to the Academy of Visual Arts in Antwerp - civil engineering and architecture lacked focus in terms of design an creativity, something I was looking for. In short: I studied art over a period of seven years. In those seven years I have attended the Academy in Antwerp, Academy St Joost in Breda and the Higher Institute of Flanders (HISK). I graduated in 2000, andin that same year I had my first solo exhibition in the Kunsthalle Z33 in Hasselt and a solo with Jay Jopling at White Cube London.   How do you think Covid-19 will affect the art industry on the short and long-term? And what impact will this crisis have on how we perceive art? Covid-19 is a nightmare for millions of people around the world, but in my opinion it is also a blessing in disguise. I feel that the lockdown has been able to temporarilyhalt the ratrace of the art world. We are in a moment of geographical and social limits, which paradoxically gives us more freedom of the mind.   How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined? In contrary from what I hear from other colleagues artists,I have been very busyduring this quarantine. This period allows me to spend a lot of time in my studio where I can focus on my paintings without interruption. Additionally, next to all the preparations that went in to my current show at Galerie Ron Mandos, I am also having a lot of virtual meetings about future projects. This time also gives me the opportunity to spend more quality time with my family, reading, and walking the dog.   What is your first memory related to art? And when did you start painting? When I was around 14 years old my uncle used to take me to a beautiful wooden cabin located in the middle of nature. My uncle, being an amateur painter, was the one who taught me how to work with oil paint and how to paint landscapes.    What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined? I enjoy driving my old Ford Mustang together with my son on roads that are normally super busy but now empty due to everyone staying at home. I learned that during Covid-19 life looks a lot like my paintings. It is a lot more agreeable. Next to that, however it’s not something I “learned”, I can’t stop watching Larry David’s ‘Curb your enthusiasm ‘.  I have to admit – I am fond of curbs.   What is the story behind both silk screenprints: Hamptons & Casting Balance? Both works address very different topics and angles of my work. Hamptons is a work based on a picture that I took west of Long Island, NY. It’s very typical for my work in terms of shadows, streets corners, and referring to details of a movies. Then, when we look at Casting Balance we see a work that was based off a pictureI took at home in my own street, which is the first time I did a painting based on an image close to home. The fragility of Casting Balance is very pure and resembles the end of the life of a small plant before the winter comes. This gives a rich amount of colors balancing in the wind as if the plant is asking to get a role in a movie,casting to be the star in my painting.   The Beginning by Koen van den Broek will be on view until Saturday 13 May at Galerie Ron Mandos in Amsterdam. To visit the exhibition a viewing appointment must be booked via +31 20 320 7036.

SAINT LAURENT RIVE DROITE  ‘NOSES ELBOWS AND KNEES’
262

SAINT LAURENT RIVE DROITE ‘NOSES ELBOWS AND KNEES’

Art On May 18TH, the prestigious book curated by Neville Wake eld ‘Noses Elbows and Knees’ by Mario Sorrenti and John Baldessari will be exclusively available for a pre-order in Paris and Los Angeles stores.   Published at the end of 2017, the book includes the works exhibited at Half Gallery, New York (Noses Elbows And Knees exhibition, 14 December 2017 - 20 January 2018). A project under the curatorship of Neville Wake eld in New York.   The artist John Baldessari was famous for his paintings of body parts on photographs, a pinch towards Hollywood culture with his signature being the elements of color. The photographer, Mario Sorrenti, in the 90s, reinterpreted beauty photographs by questioning conventions. Together they wanted to deconstruct familiar representations by stripping off clothes and codes of society, trough fashion, collage and photography.   The book includes a certifcate of authenticity signed by Mario Sorrenti and John Baldessari. On May 18TH, the prestigious book curated by Neville Wake eld ‘Noses Elbows and Knees’ by Mario Sorrenti and John Baldessari will be exclusively available for a pre-order in Paris and Los Angeles stores.   Published at the end of 2017, the book includes the works exhibited at Half Gallery, New York (Noses Elbows And Knees exhibition, 14 December 2017 - 20 January 2018). A project under the curatorship of Neville Wake eld in New York.   The artist John Baldessari was famous for his paintings of body parts on photographs, a pinch towards Hollywood culture with his signature being the elements of color. The photographer, Mario Sorrenti, in the 90s, reinterpreted beauty photographs by questioning conventions. Together they wanted to deconstruct familiar representations by stripping off clothes and codes of society, trough fashion, collage and photography.   The book includes a certifcate of authenticity signed by Mario Sorrenti and John Baldessari.

At home with ballet dancer Rhys Kosakowski
252

At home with ballet dancer Rhys Kosakowski

Men We are delighted to share our latest collaboration with incredibly talented ballet dancer Rhys Kosakowski.   Exclusive images and a short film by Zeb Daemen.   Who are you  and what is your profession?   Well... My name is Rhys Kosakowski, and I'm a professional dancer with the Sydney Dance Company and former Ballet Dancer with The Houston Ballet Company. I am a fiery, creative and forward thinking person always looking to push myself artistically and physically. I have been merging my dance career with the fashion industry for about 5 years now and love the way movement and fashion go hand in hand. Its a beautiful thing to see all Artistic Art forms come together to make even more diverse and interesting ART.     How do you think Covid-19 will affect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion? Do you believe everything will just go back to normal after Covid-19, or how do you see it will be?   ​I don't know too much about the entire Fashion Industry but I know that it has struggled through this time with getting materials from overseas, struggling to promote labels with out being able to shoot clothes on models and have new campaigns out and just the overall loss of money most brands are facing. Knowing how fast the world moves I'm pretty certain things will go back to normal in 6 months or so but you never know. People will always love fashion, because everyone desires to look good and fantasize's about luxury products.    How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined?   I consider myself very lucky to be an artist because it means i can stay creative no matter where I am stuck in isolation... Lately to keep myself happy and motivated I've been doing repertoire memory and ballet class every morning with my Company and occasional yoga and stretching classes to maintain my body. Working out in the sun on my rooftop has been extra special because I've just moved into my new apartment and I have never had a rooftop before so very exciting. Also been doing things like potting plants, making macrame planters, drawing, cooking and self care.      What is in your planning or was in your planning for this year and how will Covid-19 effect that?   It is my first season with The Sydney Dance Company and we had about 19 tours planned this year, Nationally and Internationally. The Government has said Performances of all kinds will not take place for another 4 months. We are all hoping that we can get on stage soon after September.    What is your daily beauty routine like? And what beauty products you cannot go without?   Water and Avocados are definitely my number one beauty products, but lets talk about face products as well because i love self care especially when its to do with my skin. ​I cleanse my face with Ursa Major Fantastic Face Wash and tone straight after with Ursa Major Face Tonic. Then to hydrate i use Savant Apothecary Face Lotion. These three products i have been using for two years and could not live with out.     What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined and how did you learn it?   When i was a young kid i used to draw and sketch a lot, but haven't picked up a pencil and paper in about 10 years. My sister is an amazing artist and draws beautiful sketches of fairies and creatures covered in plants and flowers. I got inspired and started draw again during isolation and realized.... i still got it! I have fascination and love for plants so I've been enjoying sketching them on paper and taking the time to imagine what plants might look like in another world.   How old were you when you first started dancing ballet and what made you start?   ​My Mum put me into tap lessons when i was 4 and got obsessed with performing. So when i turned 9 I started Jazz and Ballet. My first professional job as a dancer was when i landed the role of Billy Elliot in Billy Elliot the Musical when i was 12 years old.     Describe to me your favourite thing about dancing. How does it make you feel when you dance?    Its a really out of this world, euphoric sort of feeling. No one can really describe it unless they experience it. The way my body feels when I'm dancing is like small vibrations or electricity connecting and moving and feeling at one with the music I'm dancing to. Its so beautiful and very addictive, clearly very addictive as i haven't been able to stop dancing for years. ​The feeling i just described and being able to portray music through my body would be my favorite thing about dancing.     What is your favorite painting and has it inspired you for any of your work thus far?   ​Would have to be Salvador Dali ' DREAM CAUSED BY THE FLIGHT OF A BEE AROUND A POMEGRANATE A SECOND BEFORE AWAKENING'   ​Its my favourite because of the way his mind wanders to other places, its definitely fictional to us but makes you think twice about what could be out there in other dimensions or other planets in the universe we have not yet discovered. This keeps me inspired because it reminds me there is always something new to discover and create.      You can follow Rhys on instagram: @rhyskosakowski We are delighted to share our latest collaboration with incredibly talented ballet dancer Rhys Kosakowski.   Exclusive images and a short film by Zeb Daemen.   Who are you  and what is your profession?   Well... My name is Rhys Kosakowski, and I'm a professional dancer with the Sydney Dance Company and former Ballet Dancer with The Houston Ballet Company. I am a fiery, creative and forward thinking person always looking to push myself artistically and physically. I have been merging my dance career with the fashion industry for about 5 years now and love the way movement and fashion go hand in hand. Its a beautiful thing to see all Artistic Art forms come together to make even more diverse and interesting ART.     How do you think Covid-19 will affect the fashion industry both long-term and short-term?  How do you see the impact of Corona crisis on the general perception of fashion? Do you believe everything will just go back to normal after Covid-19, or how do you see it will be?   ​I don't know too much about the entire Fashion Industry but I know that it has struggled through this time with getting materials from overseas, struggling to promote labels with out being able to shoot clothes on models and have new campaigns out and just the overall loss of money most brands are facing. Knowing how fast the world moves I'm pretty certain things will go back to normal in 6 months or so but you never know. People will always love fashion, because everyone desires to look good and fantasize's about luxury products.    How do you spend your Quarantine time and are you still able to create while being quarantined?   I consider myself very lucky to be an artist because it means i can stay creative no matter where I am stuck in isolation... Lately to keep myself happy and motivated I've been doing repertoire memory and ballet class every morning with my Company and occasional yoga and stretching classes to maintain my body. Working out in the sun on my rooftop has been extra special because I've just moved into my new apartment and I have never had a rooftop before so very exciting. Also been doing things like potting plants, making macrame planters, drawing, cooking and self care.      What is in your planning or was in your planning for this year and how will Covid-19 effect that?   It is my first season with The Sydney Dance Company and we had about 19 tours planned this year, Nationally and Internationally. The Government has said Performances of all kinds will not take place for another 4 months. We are all hoping that we can get on stage soon after September.    What is your daily beauty routine like? And what beauty products you cannot go without?   Water and Avocados are definitely my number one beauty products, but lets talk about face products as well because i love self care especially when its to do with my skin. ​I cleanse my face with Ursa Major Fantastic Face Wash and tone straight after with Ursa Major Face Tonic. Then to hydrate i use Savant Apothecary Face Lotion. These three products i have been using for two years and could not live with out.     What is the coolest new thing you have learnt since being quarantined and how did you learn it?   When i was a young kid i used to draw and sketch a lot, but haven't picked up a pencil and paper in about 10 years. My sister is an amazing artist and draws beautiful sketches of fairies and creatures covered in plants and flowers. I got inspired and started draw again during isolation and realized.... i still got it! I have fascination and love for plants so I've been enjoying sketching them on paper and taking the time to imagine what plants might look like in another world.   How old were you when you first started dancing ballet and what made you start?   ​My Mum put me into tap lessons when i was 4 and got obsessed with performing. So when i turned 9 I started Jazz and Ballet. My first professional job as a dancer was when i landed the role of Billy Elliot in Billy Elliot the Musical when i was 12 years old.     Describe to me your favourite thing about dancing. How does it make you feel when you dance?    Its a really out of this world, euphoric sort of feeling. No one can really describe it unless they experience it. The way my body feels when I'm dancing is like small vibrations or electricity connecting and moving and feeling at one with the music I'm dancing to. Its so beautiful and very addictive, clearly very addictive as i haven't been able to stop dancing for years. ​The feeling i just described and being able to portray music through my body would be my favorite thing about dancing.     What is your favorite painting and has it inspired you for any of your work thus far?   ​Would have to be Salvador Dali ' DREAM CAUSED BY THE FLIGHT OF A BEE AROUND A POMEGRANATE A SECOND BEFORE AWAKENING'   ​Its my favourite because of the way his mind wanders to other places, its definitely fictional to us but makes you think twice about what could be out there in other dimensions or other planets in the universe we have not yet discovered. This keeps me inspired because it reminds me there is always something new to discover and create.      You can follow Rhys on instagram: @rhyskosakowski

	 Non-profit initiative Pictures for Purpose launches fundraising print sale of established and emerging artists based in the Netherlands
248

Non-profit initiative Pictures for Purpose launches fundraising print sale of established and emerging artists based in the Netherlands

Exhibition The new non-profit initiative Pictures for Purpose has launched a fundraising print sale by photographers based in the Netherlands, responding to the implications of the Covid-19 pandemic.For two weeks, works by various photographers based in the Netherlands are available for €125. Inspired by artist-led initiatives in the USA with Pictures for Elmhurst and Italy with 100 Fotografi per Bergamo the proceeds from each print sold will be shared between the Dutch Food Bank and the participating photographers. The fundraiser offers a varied and unique range of established names and emerging talent, all based in the Netherlands, including works by Viviane Sassen, Bertien van Manen, Scarlett Hooft Graafland, Awoiska van de Molen, Kyle Weeks and Hajar Benjida.  The Covid-19 pandemic presents a series of difficult challenges for those operating at various levels within the cultural sector. At times like these, Pictures for Purpose aspires to offer crucial support to members of the creative community. Participating artists can therefore opt to receive up to 50% of the proceeds of each print sold to help recoup lost income. A minimum of 50% of the proceeds are then donated to the Voedselbank. The Association of Dutch Food Banks continues to fight poverty in the Netherlands, providing food to those most in need of support. Due to the severe socioeconomic consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic, food banks are experiencing growing demand and increasing shortages. In Amsterdam, the number of households reliant on food banks has risen significantly in recent weeks and is expected to increase further in the near future. Where €5 can provide one household with food for a week, the proceeds from each print sold could support at least 10 families.   What to expect of pictures for purpose: All artists are selected with care and chosen because of their unique view and skills in contemporary photography One image per artist has been selected All prints are available for a donation of €125.00 (including tax) All prints are 210 x 297 mm in size, with a variable printed area depending on the aspect ratio of the photograph in question. All artworks are unsigned and available in an open edition Participating artists can opt to receive either 25% or 50% of the proceeds from each print sold to help recoup lost income. A minimum of 50% of the proceeds will be donated to the Dutch Food Bank.  Every artist can alternatively decide to donate all of the proceeds to the Dutch Food Bank. The fundraiser runs for two weeks from Monday May 11th until Monday May 25th. The Amsterdam-based Fotolab will provide professional printing, packaging and shipping services. A subsidised fee of €13.30 will be allocated from each print sold to production expenses.     The fundraiser runs for two weeks, from Monday May 11th until Monday May 25th through the online platform www.picturesforpurpose.org. The new non-profit initiative Pictures for Purpose has launched a fundraising print sale by photographers based in the Netherlands, responding to the implications of the Covid-19 pandemic.For two weeks, works by various photographers based in the Netherlands are available for €125. Inspired by artist-led initiatives in the USA with Pictures for Elmhurst and Italy with 100 Fotografi per Bergamo the proceeds from each print sold will be shared between the Dutch Food Bank and the participating photographers. The fundraiser offers a varied and unique range of established names and emerging talent, all based in the Netherlands, including works by Viviane Sassen, Bertien van Manen, Scarlett Hooft Graafland, Awoiska van de Molen, Kyle Weeks and Hajar Benjida.  The Covid-19 pandemic presents a series of difficult challenges for those operating at various levels within the cultural sector. At times like these, Pictures for Purpose aspires to offer crucial support to members of the creative community. Participating artists can therefore opt to receive up to 50% of the proceeds of each print sold to help recoup lost income. A minimum of 50% of the proceeds are then donated to the Voedselbank. The Association of Dutch Food Banks continues to fight poverty in the Netherlands, providing food to those most in need of support. Due to the severe socioeconomic consequences of the Covid-19 pandemic, food banks are experiencing growing demand and increasing shortages. In Amsterdam, the number of households reliant on food banks has risen significantly in recent weeks and is expected to increase further in the near future. Where €5 can provide one household with food for a week, the proceeds from each print sold could support at least 10 families.   What to expect of pictures for purpose: All artists are selected with care and chosen because of their unique view and skills in contemporary photography One image per artist has been selected All prints are available for a donation of €125.00 (including tax) All prints are 210 x 297 mm in size, with a variable printed area depending on the aspect ratio of the photograph in question. All artworks are unsigned and available in an open edition Participating artists can opt to receive either 25% or 50% of the proceeds from each print sold to help recoup lost income. A minimum of 50% of the proceeds will be donated to the Dutch Food Bank.  Every artist can alternatively decide to donate all of the proceeds to the Dutch Food Bank. The fundraiser runs for two weeks from Monday May 11th until Monday May 25th. The Amsterdam-based Fotolab will provide professional printing, packaging and shipping services. A subsidised fee of €13.30 will be allocated from each print sold to production expenses.     The fundraiser runs for two weeks, from Monday May 11th until Monday May 25th through the online platform www.picturesforpurpose.org.

The Desire Path by Helen Beard
241

The Desire Path by Helen Beard

Art   Visually exciting – bright, dynamic and voyeuristic – the work of British artist Helen Beard wields colour, texture and abstraction as tools to take back ownership of sexual imagery from the predominantly male gaze. Beard’s work explores themes relating to gender, sexual psychology and eroticism, forever unapologetic in her depictions of female desire.   Reflex Amsterdam is pleased to announce the artist’s first solo exhibition at the gallery. While Beard’s artistic practice encompasses different mediums, including collage, sculpture, ceramics and needlepoint, The Desire Path focuses on her painting and features work in a diversity of sizes, ranging from small studies to large-scale canvasses. The artist’s small acrylic on board works function as preliminary studies for her oil on canvas paintings, in which she instinctively chooses the colours for her compositions.   Situated between abstraction and representation, her figures are reduced to concisely defined fields of vibrant colour. Working from found images, Beard’s eye for cinematic compositions featuring close-ups and interesting angles reveal her past experience as a stylist and assistant art director in the film industry.   Perhaps the most striking aspect of Beard’s oil paintings are the brushstrokes left visible in the otherwise dense surfaces of paint. Transitioning to oil from acrylic paint in 2008, Beard started to experiment with the texture of her paintings, creating an entirely different feeling on the surface of the canvas. As Beard explains in an interview in 2018: "the brushstrokes are almost like the touch on skin, like fingerprints." Against the vigour and excitement of the artist's choice of subject matter and palette, these strokes return a touch of tenderness to the abstract scenes, creating a fascinating tension that celebrates humankind’s instinctual fascination with sex, as well as its life-affirming nature.   Helen Beard (1971) studied at Bournemouth & Poole College of Art and Design, graduating in 1992. The artist participated in Simulation Skin: Selected works from the Murderme Collection (2017) and True Colours (2018) at Newport Street Gallery in London. Her most recent exhibitions include the group show 21st Century Women (2018) curated by Jane Neal and Fru Tholstrup and the solo exhibition It’s Her Factory (2019) at Unit London. The artist’s work can be found in major collections worldwide. Beard lives and works in Brighton, UK.   The Desire Path is Beard’s first exhibition outside of the UK and marks the start of her representation at Reflex Amsterdam for the Benelux. On occasion of the exhibition, the gallery is publishing Beard’s first monograph including an essay by Matt Carey-Williams.    The exhibition is open from 14 May – 30 September 2020    www.reflexamsterdam.com   Visually exciting – bright, dynamic and voyeuristic – the work of British artist Helen Beard wields colour, texture and abstraction as tools to take back ownership of sexual imagery from the predominantly male gaze. Beard’s work explores themes relating to gender, sexual psychology and eroticism, forever unapologetic in her depictions of female desire.   Reflex Amsterdam is pleased to announce the artist’s first solo exhibition at the gallery. While Beard’s artistic practice encompasses different mediums, including collage, sculpture, ceramics and needlepoint, The Desire Path focuses on her painting and features work in a diversity of sizes, ranging from small studies to large-scale canvasses. The artist’s small acrylic on board works function as preliminary studies for her oil on canvas paintings, in which she instinctively chooses the colours for her compositions.   Situated between abstraction and representation, her figures are reduced to concisely defined fields of vibrant colour. Working from found images, Beard’s eye for cinematic compositions featuring close-ups and interesting angles reveal her past experience as a stylist and assistant art director in the film industry.   Perhaps the most striking aspect of Beard’s oil paintings are the brushstrokes left visible in the otherwise dense surfaces of paint. Transitioning to oil from acrylic paint in 2008, Beard started to experiment with the texture of her paintings, creating an entirely different feeling on the surface of the canvas. As Beard explains in an interview in 2018: "the brushstrokes are almost like the touch on skin, like fingerprints." Against the vigour and excitement of the artist's choice of subject matter and palette, these strokes return a touch of tenderness to the abstract scenes, creating a fascinating tension that celebrates humankind’s instinctual fascination with sex, as well as its life-affirming nature.   Helen Beard (1971) studied at Bournemouth & Poole College of Art and Design, graduating in 1992. The artist participated in Simulation Skin: Selected works from the Murderme Collection (2017) and True Colours (2018) at Newport Street Gallery in London. Her most recent exhibitions include the group show 21st Century Women (2018) curated by Jane Neal and Fru Tholstrup and the solo exhibition It’s Her Factory (2019) at Unit London. The artist’s work can be found in major collections worldwide. Beard lives and works in Brighton, UK.   The Desire Path is Beard’s first exhibition outside of the UK and marks the start of her representation at Reflex Amsterdam for the Benelux. On occasion of the exhibition, the gallery is publishing Beard’s first monograph including an essay by Matt Carey-Williams.    The exhibition is open from 14 May – 30 September 2020    www.reflexamsterdam.com

Breguet and historic famous women
227

Breguet and historic famous women

Jewelry A symbol of elegance and technical precision, Breguet timepieces have been winning over powerful and famous admirers since the end of the eighteenth century.   Probably the first keen fan of Breguet, Queen Marie-Antoinette wore some of thewatchmaker’s most beautiful watches, such as the self-winding models, right from the beginning of her reign, and showcased their excellence to the courts of Europe. Breguet, it is said, created the famous no. 160 watch for her, the so-called “Marie-Antoinette”; it remained the most complicated watch in the history of watchmaking for a long time. In 2008, Breguet completed an identical reproduction of the once lost original design, which was found again in 2007. In another tribute to its distinguished ambassador, in 2008 as well, Breguet restored the Petit Trianon in Versailles that was so loved by the ruler – a patronage of exceptional scale. Reigns may come and go, but the infatuation with Breguet timepieces endures. They were acquired by several women from Napoléon Bonaparte’s entourage. His first wife, the Empress Joséphine, bought the no. 611 tact watch, which she later gave, inlaid with the letter “H” in diamonds, to her daughter Hortense, the Queen of Holland. His second wife, Marie- Louise of Austria, bought herself a little medallion watch. Upright and loyal, the sovereign exercised a particularly enlightened reign over Parma, with a strong interest in the status of women. Breguet timepieces also caught the attention of the Emperor’s sisters, including ElisaBonaparte, Grand Duchess of Tuscany. Armed with a keen intelligence and a passion for the best of the best, his youngest sister, Caroline Murat, Queen of Naples, commissioned a watch from Abraham-Louis Breguet that was highly original because it came on a bracelet. It was the first watch designed from the outset to be worn on the wrist.   In 1817, Breguet delivered a quarter-repeating watch, the no. 3023, to the Duchess of Wellington. The model is exhibited at the Louvre Museum and its elegant simplicity reflects the characteristic neoclassical style of the watchmaker. In the years from 1820 to 1830, several sovereigns bought Breguet timepieces, take for example Alexandra Feodorovna, Empress of Russia, or Maria Christina of the Two Sicilies, Queen of Spain. In 1831, the latter purchased a travel clock, characteristic of Breguet’s neo-classical creations. Victoria, Queen of England and Empress of India, whose reign lasted more than 60 years, features amongsome of the watchmaker’s most illustrious clients. In the twentieth century, Breguet’s designs were still in demand among countless famouswomen. One of them was Anna Gould, Duchess of Talleyrand, founder of rescue centers for the wounded in the First World War and a figure of prominence throughout Paris, who bought a silver neo-Gothic-style clock.   Today, a number of timepieces acquired by these rulers and famous personalities arepreserved in some of the world’s most acclaimed museums, including the Louvre Museum, the British Museum, several Swiss museums, and, of course, the Breguet Museum in Paris. A symbol of elegance and technical precision, Breguet timepieces have been winning over powerful and famous admirers since the end of the eighteenth century.   Probably the first keen fan of Breguet, Queen Marie-Antoinette wore some of thewatchmaker’s most beautiful watches, such as the self-winding models, right from the beginning of her reign, and showcased their excellence to the courts of Europe. Breguet, it is said, created the famous no. 160 watch for her, the so-called “Marie-Antoinette”; it remained the most complicated watch in the history of watchmaking for a long time. In 2008, Breguet completed an identical reproduction of the once lost original design, which was found again in 2007. In another tribute to its distinguished ambassador, in 2008 as well, Breguet restored the Petit Trianon in Versailles that was so loved by the ruler – a patronage of exceptional scale. Reigns may come and go, but the infatuation with Breguet timepieces endures. They were acquired by several women from Napoléon Bonaparte’s entourage. His first wife, the Empress Joséphine, bought the no. 611 tact watch, which she later gave, inlaid with the letter “H” in diamonds, to her daughter Hortense, the Queen of Holland. His second wife, Marie- Louise of Austria, bought herself a little medallion watch. Upright and loyal, the sovereign exercised a particularly enlightened reign over Parma, with a strong interest in the status of women. Breguet timepieces also caught the attention of the Emperor’s sisters, including ElisaBonaparte, Grand Duchess of Tuscany. Armed with a keen intelligence and a passion for the best of the best, his youngest sister, Caroline Murat, Queen of Naples, commissioned a watch from Abraham-Louis Breguet that was highly original because it came on a bracelet. It was the first watch designed from the outset to be worn on the wrist.   In 1817, Breguet delivered a quarter-repeating watch, the no. 3023, to the Duchess of Wellington. The model is exhibited at the Louvre Museum and its elegant simplicity reflects the characteristic neoclassical style of the watchmaker. In the years from 1820 to 1830, several sovereigns bought Breguet timepieces, take for example Alexandra Feodorovna, Empress of Russia, or Maria Christina of the Two Sicilies, Queen of Spain. In 1831, the latter purchased a travel clock, characteristic of Breguet’s neo-classical creations. Victoria, Queen of England and Empress of India, whose reign lasted more than 60 years, features amongsome of the watchmaker’s most illustrious clients. In the twentieth century, Breguet’s designs were still in demand among countless famouswomen. One of them was Anna Gould, Duchess of Talleyrand, founder of rescue centers for the wounded in the First World War and a figure of prominence throughout Paris, who bought a silver neo-Gothic-style clock.   Today, a number of timepieces acquired by these rulers and famous personalities arepreserved in some of the world’s most acclaimed museums, including the Louvre Museum, the British Museum, several Swiss museums, and, of course, the Breguet Museum in Paris.

Luckylefthand adorns Louis Vuitton headquarters with “Nine Colours, Nine Eyes and Nine Hearts“
228

Luckylefthand adorns Louis Vuitton headquarters with “Nine Colours, Nine Eyes and Nine Hearts“

Art In the 1920s, Gaston-Louis Vuitton wrote, “Let’s make the street a happy place. ” A century later, Louis Vuitton asked artist Luckylefthand to decorate the façade of its Paris headquarters located by the Pont Neuf bridge. The fresco covers 280m2 and is made up of 14 colourful, sleek and playful paintings. With this painting, Louis Vuitton and Luckylefthand want to bring positivity and positive vibes to the Pont Neuf neighbourhood during the current lockdown. Luckylefthand was given carte blanche and used a minimalist, condensed style inspired by 1960s and 70s aesthetics to transport passers-by far away on a trip to the landscapes of Hossegor, his adopted town. With colourful transitions and primitive shapes, the wall painting was created using only acrylic paints and features a number of hands, one of the artist’s cherished symbols. The hands are physically set about a metre and a half apart yet are linked in spirit as a representation of our current mindset.   “I wanted to create this wall painting to o er Parisians a colourful stroll past the 14 windows, evoking a summer holiday while still representing the temporary period we are going through. The hands placed a metre and a half apart is a nod to what we’re currently experiencing. I hope this wall painting’s bright, saturated colours and rainbows made of big, curved lines will bring the positive energy we all need right now,” the artist said about his work.   Steven Burke is a French artist born in 1982. He works in the south-west French town of Hossegor, a place that has inspired him for years. After a 15-year career in the eld of graphic design, he practises his art in search of simplicity of shapes and purity of colours to convey a positive and enthusiastic message. The symbol of the hand is often represented in compositions to suggest humankind in its most universal form. Over time, this symbol has become an invitation to the meditative state, certainly pushed by the beauty of surrounding nature. For further informations : www.luckylefthand.com In the 1920s, Gaston-Louis Vuitton wrote, “Let’s make the street a happy place. ” A century later, Louis Vuitton asked artist Luckylefthand to decorate the façade of its Paris headquarters located by the Pont Neuf bridge. The fresco covers 280m2 and is made up of 14 colourful, sleek and playful paintings. With this painting, Louis Vuitton and Luckylefthand want to bring positivity and positive vibes to the Pont Neuf neighbourhood during the current lockdown. Luckylefthand was given carte blanche and used a minimalist, condensed style inspired by 1960s and 70s aesthetics to transport passers-by far away on a trip to the landscapes of Hossegor, his adopted town. With colourful transitions and primitive shapes, the wall painting was created using only acrylic paints and features a number of hands, one of the artist’s cherished symbols. The hands are physically set about a metre and a half apart yet are linked in spirit as a representation of our current mindset.   “I wanted to create this wall painting to o er Parisians a colourful stroll past the 14 windows, evoking a summer holiday while still representing the temporary period we are going through. The hands placed a metre and a half apart is a nod to what we’re currently experiencing. I hope this wall painting’s bright, saturated colours and rainbows made of big, curved lines will bring the positive energy we all need right now,” the artist said about his work.   Steven Burke is a French artist born in 1982. He works in the south-west French town of Hossegor, a place that has inspired him for years. After a 15-year career in the eld of graphic design, he practises his art in search of simplicity of shapes and purity of colours to convey a positive and enthusiastic message. The symbol of the hand is often represented in compositions to suggest humankind in its most universal form. Over time, this symbol has become an invitation to the meditative state, certainly pushed by the beauty of surrounding nature. For further informations : www.luckylefthand.com

loading
More articles