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G-STAR RAW TUTU EXHIBITED AT MAISON AMSTERDAM
1851

G-STAR RAW TUTU EXHIBITED AT MAISON AMSTERDAM

Fashion The Safe Distance denim tutu found a new home at the fashion exhibition ‘Maison Amsterdam’. Created in lockdown, exhibited now the world has opened again at De Nieuwe Kerk Amsterdam.   G-Star RAW and the Dutch National Ballet have proudly beenselected to showcase at the grand fashion exhibition ‘Maison Amsterdam’ now in De NieuweKerk Amsterdam. The exhibition is open for public until April 2022 and presents over 150 creations, historical and contemporary, that tell stories of Amsterdam as a fashion capital. After gaining various awards for the Social Distance Ballet Campaign, the denim tutu will be shown as part of the exhibition. G-Star will honourably be exhibited with a multitude of internationally renowned Dutch designers such as Iris van Herpen and Viktor & Rolf.     Award-winning Safe Distance Ballet Campaign:   In June 2020 whilst the world was in lockdown, G-Star RAW and the Dutch National Ballet joined forces for a unique collaboration in which the 'new reality', social distancing, was visualized in an artistic way. The classic and modern worlds were combined and we created a unique RAW Denim tutu with a diameter of 3 meters: literally showcasing the 1.5M distance everyone had to keep. The campaign showcased dancers of the ballet trying to find their way through the streets of Amsterdam to the stage, while keeping their distance and attracted by the music curated by Joris Voorn and the Dutch Ballet Orchestra.     Collaboration with Het National Ballet:   Remi Wörtmeyer – choreographer and soloist of Het National Ballet: “The tutu is the ultimatedistancing tool. With its over size, it causes the dancers to come up with solutions in navigating pathways, passing and moving together. As the dancers navigate their way through the city they dance the dance we have all experienced when we are passing people in the street and tryingto maintain the 1.5 meter distance.”     ‘Maison Amsterdam’ is open for public until the 3rd of April 2022 at De Nieuwe Kerk, Dam, 1012NL Amsterdam. The Safe Distance denim tutu found a new home at the fashion exhibition ‘Maison Amsterdam’. Created in lockdown, exhibited now the world has opened again at De Nieuwe Kerk Amsterdam.   G-Star RAW and the Dutch National Ballet have proudly beenselected to showcase at the grand fashion exhibition ‘Maison Amsterdam’ now in De NieuweKerk Amsterdam. The exhibition is open for public until April 2022 and presents over 150 creations, historical and contemporary, that tell stories of Amsterdam as a fashion capital. After gaining various awards for the Social Distance Ballet Campaign, the denim tutu will be shown as part of the exhibition. G-Star will honourably be exhibited with a multitude of internationally renowned Dutch designers such as Iris van Herpen and Viktor & Rolf.     Award-winning Safe Distance Ballet Campaign:   In June 2020 whilst the world was in lockdown, G-Star RAW and the Dutch National Ballet joined forces for a unique collaboration in which the 'new reality', social distancing, was visualized in an artistic way. The classic and modern worlds were combined and we created a unique RAW Denim tutu with a diameter of 3 meters: literally showcasing the 1.5M distance everyone had to keep. The campaign showcased dancers of the ballet trying to find their way through the streets of Amsterdam to the stage, while keeping their distance and attracted by the music curated by Joris Voorn and the Dutch Ballet Orchestra.     Collaboration with Het National Ballet:   Remi Wörtmeyer – choreographer and soloist of Het National Ballet: “The tutu is the ultimatedistancing tool. With its over size, it causes the dancers to come up with solutions in navigating pathways, passing and moving together. As the dancers navigate their way through the city they dance the dance we have all experienced when we are passing people in the street and tryingto maintain the 1.5 meter distance.”     ‘Maison Amsterdam’ is open for public until the 3rd of April 2022 at De Nieuwe Kerk, Dam, 1012NL Amsterdam.

VALENTINO RE-SIGNIFY PART II IN BEIJING
1810

VALENTINO RE-SIGNIFY PART II IN BEIJING

Exhibition The second chapter of the re-signification of Maison Valentino’s codes by Creative Director Pierpaolo Piccioli, presents itself like a liquid reading of the elements in SKP South’s T-10 exhibition space. The signs come back into play here: Haute Couture, the Atelier, the Stud and the VLogo Signature.The contemporary and inclusive interpretations of makeup imagined by Pierpaolo Piccioli with Valentino Beauty, are dropped on SKP South’s exhibition oor like stones thrown into a pond. In the hypothetical concentric waves that rise up from these moments of impact, tensions are created between Pierpaolo Piccioli’s creative process and the works of artists who, through multiple pathways and languages, each different from each other because they are poetically personal, have ended up questioning themselves on the same themes that were explored in the selected works.     Light, shadows, darkness and the way in which light interacts with materials and with surfaces, the phenomena of re ection and refraction. The human body and the body in statue as depicted in classical sculpture all the way to digital and algorithmic representations. Every body present here, is the result of the mediation between idea, in other words an imagined and desired body, and craftwork, technical or technological ability. A three-dimensional or photographed body, reconstructed and documented, exaggerated and avatarised. And then nature, in a sort of minimalist magni cence, in lo- and analogue shots on lm transmitted onto cathode screens, or else ultra- re ned as a 3D model or in a pure abstraction that becomes a globe-shaped accumulation.     Another intersectional theme in the relationship between the works and the clothes, is the one of the city, present in varying concentrations, but the perfect setting and archetypal for the development of human activity and creativity. A city that is human poetry and life, in the way it holds within its order and chaos, traditions and revolutions. Amulti-purpose plane in which communities feed off of signs that continuously rede ne themselves, feeding off their own allusions, producing new codes, deconstructing and reassembling the existing ones. A city that is also a living stage and present beyond SKP South’s windows, a buzz that becomes part of the whole experience.     The dresses chosen by Pierpaolo Piccioli, from the Maison’s archive, from the recent and contemporary Haute Couture collections, including Valentino Of Grace and Light, Valentino Code Temporal, Valentino Act Collection, exhibited on Bonaveri mannequins, immerse themselves in this uid territory with varying intensities of presence and concentrate in moments that produce authorial relationships and equilibria with the individual works.     The relationship between clothes and works is not unequivocal and is not analytical, but is sensibly and simply perceptible and legible, or rather intuitive. Connections that are visible but unstable, because they exist in a liquid structure.     A rationally open structure that does not envisage one-way use but invites viewers to lose themselves, to explore, following what each person perceives as attractive and in which the sequence of the elements put in place does not follow a consequential or a cause and effect relationships. A rarefaction of the signs that contrast with the hypothetical impact points of the principal themes, that manifest as moments rich with sensitive stimuli, magical and kaleidoscopic boxes in which the VLogo Signature, the Stud, the Atelier and the extremely personal meaning that Pierpaolo Piccioli gives to the word Couture, manifest like lysergic mirages.     #VALENTINORESIGNIFY #VALENTINO       The second chapter of the re-signification of Maison Valentino’s codes by Creative Director Pierpaolo Piccioli, presents itself like a liquid reading of the elements in SKP South’s T-10 exhibition space. The signs come back into play here: Haute Couture, the Atelier, the Stud and the VLogo Signature.The contemporary and inclusive interpretations of makeup imagined by Pierpaolo Piccioli with Valentino Beauty, are dropped on SKP South’s exhibition oor like stones thrown into a pond. In the hypothetical concentric waves that rise up from these moments of impact, tensions are created between Pierpaolo Piccioli’s creative process and the works of artists who, through multiple pathways and languages, each different from each other because they are poetically personal, have ended up questioning themselves on the same themes that were explored in the selected works.     Light, shadows, darkness and the way in which light interacts with materials and with surfaces, the phenomena of re ection and refraction. The human body and the body in statue as depicted in classical sculpture all the way to digital and algorithmic representations. Every body present here, is the result of the mediation between idea, in other words an imagined and desired body, and craftwork, technical or technological ability. A three-dimensional or photographed body, reconstructed and documented, exaggerated and avatarised. And then nature, in a sort of minimalist magni cence, in lo- and analogue shots on lm transmitted onto cathode screens, or else ultra- re ned as a 3D model or in a pure abstraction that becomes a globe-shaped accumulation.     Another intersectional theme in the relationship between the works and the clothes, is the one of the city, present in varying concentrations, but the perfect setting and archetypal for the development of human activity and creativity. A city that is human poetry and life, in the way it holds within its order and chaos, traditions and revolutions. Amulti-purpose plane in which communities feed off of signs that continuously rede ne themselves, feeding off their own allusions, producing new codes, deconstructing and reassembling the existing ones. A city that is also a living stage and present beyond SKP South’s windows, a buzz that becomes part of the whole experience.     The dresses chosen by Pierpaolo Piccioli, from the Maison’s archive, from the recent and contemporary Haute Couture collections, including Valentino Of Grace and Light, Valentino Code Temporal, Valentino Act Collection, exhibited on Bonaveri mannequins, immerse themselves in this uid territory with varying intensities of presence and concentrate in moments that produce authorial relationships and equilibria with the individual works.     The relationship between clothes and works is not unequivocal and is not analytical, but is sensibly and simply perceptible and legible, or rather intuitive. Connections that are visible but unstable, because they exist in a liquid structure.     A rationally open structure that does not envisage one-way use but invites viewers to lose themselves, to explore, following what each person perceives as attractive and in which the sequence of the elements put in place does not follow a consequential or a cause and effect relationships. A rarefaction of the signs that contrast with the hypothetical impact points of the principal themes, that manifest as moments rich with sensitive stimuli, magical and kaleidoscopic boxes in which the VLogo Signature, the Stud, the Atelier and the extremely personal meaning that Pierpaolo Piccioli gives to the word Couture, manifest like lysergic mirages.     #VALENTINORESIGNIFY #VALENTINO      

Cartier and Islamic Art: In search of Modernity
1807

Cartier and Islamic Art: In search of Modernity

Exhibition The exhibition explores the origins of this in uence through the Parisian cultural context and the gure of Louis and Jacques Cartier, two of the founder’s grandsons, who played a major role in creating a new aesthetic suffused with modernity. The New York-based architectural firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) designed the exhibition’s scenography.     From October 21st, 2021 to February 20th, 2022, the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris presents ‘Cartier and Islamic Art: In Search of Modernity’, co-organized by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, and the Dallas Museum of Art, with the exceptional collaboration of the Musée du Louvre and the support of Cartier.     This exhibition shows the in uence of Islamic Art on the high jewellery Maison Cartier in its design of jewellery and precious objects from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day.   More than 500 pieces including jewellery and objects from the Cartier Collection, private and public loans, masterpieces of Islamic art, drawings, books, photographs and archival documents, trace the origins of the jeweller’s interest in Oriental motifs.     The exhibition explores the origins of this in uence through the Parisian cultural context and the gure of Louis and Jacques Cartier, two of the founder’s grandsons, who played a major role in creating a new aesthetic suffused with modernity. The New York-based architectural firm Diller Scofidio + Renfro (DS+R) designed the exhibition’s scenography.     From October 21st, 2021 to February 20th, 2022, the Musée des Arts Décoratifs in Paris presents ‘Cartier and Islamic Art: In Search of Modernity’, co-organized by the Musée des Arts Décoratifs, Paris, and the Dallas Museum of Art, with the exceptional collaboration of the Musée du Louvre and the support of Cartier.     This exhibition shows the in uence of Islamic Art on the high jewellery Maison Cartier in its design of jewellery and precious objects from the beginning of the 20th century to the present day.   More than 500 pieces including jewellery and objects from the Cartier Collection, private and public loans, masterpieces of Islamic art, drawings, books, photographs and archival documents, trace the origins of the jeweller’s interest in Oriental motifs.    

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In conversation with Mona Hatoum
1783

In conversation with Mona Hatoum

Art We had a delight speaking with artist Mona Hatoum abut her recent collaboration with ILLY.       Who is Mona Hatoum? What is your aspiration in life and what kind of message do you want to spread? Can you tell us a bit about your way of working?   I am a visual artist. I have worked in a diverse range of media starting with performance, video and photography in the early days and later working in installation, sculpture and works on paper.   I was born in Beirut into a Palestinian family. In 1975 while I was on a short visit to London - which was my first trip to Europe - the Lebanese Civil War broke out and I got stranded in London. I decided to join art school (which had been my ambition since I was a kid) and 6 years later, after finishing my studies I ended up staying in London where I am still living to this day.    I don’t have a defined or single way of working. I have always kept an experimental attitude and I like to engage in different modes of production and multiple ways of working. For instance, I am drawn to traditional crafts and the handmade, but also, I like to use industrial materials and fabrication methods. I am interested in abstraction and geometry but also like using found objects and furniture.    Similarly, there is no single message but there are recurring themes in my work of conflict, uncertainty, displacement, disorientation.  In general, I like to create work that exposes contradictions and reverberates with conflicting meanings that make you question the world around you.      Your art is unique and surprising and you use many different and unconventional media outlets. Where do you source your inspiration and how do you get your own creativity flowing?   It is very difficult to define the sources of inspiration. Often the starting point can be the space where I am exhibiting. I like to create works in reaction to the space, its peculiarities, its history or the social fabric of the location.    The inspiration often comes from chance encounters, accidental finds and a series of coincidences. I often like to spend a lot of time in the location, almost turning the project into a sort of residency, where I can work with local materials, local crafts or fabricators. Sometimes ideas come to my mind instantly on my first site visit and other times, I have ideas in my head for many years that only get made when I find the right space for them or the right circumstance to realise them.     How did the collaboration with ILLY come to life and what is your mission on this journey with the brand?   I think illy‘s artistic director Carlo Bach asked the curators Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath, I had worked with before, to suggest an artist to design a new set for illy Art Collection and they suggested me. I accepted the invitation immediately, despite the fact that I was very busy and they wanted the proposal right away. I have always admired the collection and hoped that I would one day be invited. So, I was immediately inspired and came up with the idea of using different abstractions of the distinctive pattern of the Keffieh - the Arab head scarf. Since illy Café is a 100% Arabica blend, I wanted to create cups that are “100% Arabica” too and could not think of a better symbol to use than the Keffieh. I was so happy the idea was accepted and with the help of their designers creating 3D drawings of the patterns on the cups, we chose two of the patterns in three different colours. I really enjoyed the collaboration with illy. It all went very smoothly and efficiently.      The pattern of the Keffiyeh which can be seen in the collaboration is a reoccurring element in your art pieces. What meaning does it have to you?   Yes,I have made a curious and surreal object where I embroideredthepattern of the Keffieh using long strands of human hair which flow out of the border of the cotton scarf therefore feminising this object that has a macho aura about it. And recently in my work the fishnet grid pattern has morphed into a chain-link fence that has become a bit of an obsession in an ongoing series of diverse works using pen on paper, water colour, acrylics, lithographic prints and now I was given the priviledge of decorating the illyporcelaincups.   The Keffieh is full of poetic and political symbolism. The fishnet pattern is a symbol of collectivism and is often interpreted as the joining of hands and the olive leaf on the border,for me,symbolises peace. Also, since the 60s,the Keffieh becamea potent symbol of the Palestinian cause and was also adopted by students,anti-war and anti-imperialist movements so itbecame a symbol of solidarity amongst all these movements.     How do you drink your coffee and what do you connect with this ritual?    I normally have one strong cup of filtered coffee first thing in the morning. If later in the day I feel that I need another kick, I may have a smaller cup of coffee or if I am in a café, I will have a cappuccino.  I don’t have any coffee beyond 2 pm as it would keep me up at night.     What are your plans for the future? Do you have any projects coming up?    A lot is happening now and I am most excited about three solo exhibitions which will open simultaneously in Berlin in mid-September next year and for which I would like to make a whole set of new works. After the long period of lockdown, my visit to the spaces in August inspired so many ideas. I just hope I will be able to get them all made in time.   Otherwise, I have two exhibitions opening simultaneously in Stockholm in February next year for which I am making a new work. I am also doing a site visit to Venice next week where I will potentially create a site specific work for the next Biennale. So it is very exciting and it is all go at the moment. We had a delight speaking with artist Mona Hatoum abut her recent collaboration with ILLY.       Who is Mona Hatoum? What is your aspiration in life and what kind of message do you want to spread? Can you tell us a bit about your way of working?   I am a visual artist. I have worked in a diverse range of media starting with performance, video and photography in the early days and later working in installation, sculpture and works on paper.   I was born in Beirut into a Palestinian family. In 1975 while I was on a short visit to London - which was my first trip to Europe - the Lebanese Civil War broke out and I got stranded in London. I decided to join art school (which had been my ambition since I was a kid) and 6 years later, after finishing my studies I ended up staying in London where I am still living to this day.    I don’t have a defined or single way of working. I have always kept an experimental attitude and I like to engage in different modes of production and multiple ways of working. For instance, I am drawn to traditional crafts and the handmade, but also, I like to use industrial materials and fabrication methods. I am interested in abstraction and geometry but also like using found objects and furniture.    Similarly, there is no single message but there are recurring themes in my work of conflict, uncertainty, displacement, disorientation.  In general, I like to create work that exposes contradictions and reverberates with conflicting meanings that make you question the world around you.      Your art is unique and surprising and you use many different and unconventional media outlets. Where do you source your inspiration and how do you get your own creativity flowing?   It is very difficult to define the sources of inspiration. Often the starting point can be the space where I am exhibiting. I like to create works in reaction to the space, its peculiarities, its history or the social fabric of the location.    The inspiration often comes from chance encounters, accidental finds and a series of coincidences. I often like to spend a lot of time in the location, almost turning the project into a sort of residency, where I can work with local materials, local crafts or fabricators. Sometimes ideas come to my mind instantly on my first site visit and other times, I have ideas in my head for many years that only get made when I find the right space for them or the right circumstance to realise them.     How did the collaboration with ILLY come to life and what is your mission on this journey with the brand?   I think illy‘s artistic director Carlo Bach asked the curators Sam Bardaouil and Till Fellrath, I had worked with before, to suggest an artist to design a new set for illy Art Collection and they suggested me. I accepted the invitation immediately, despite the fact that I was very busy and they wanted the proposal right away. I have always admired the collection and hoped that I would one day be invited. So, I was immediately inspired and came up with the idea of using different abstractions of the distinctive pattern of the Keffieh - the Arab head scarf. Since illy Café is a 100% Arabica blend, I wanted to create cups that are “100% Arabica” too and could not think of a better symbol to use than the Keffieh. I was so happy the idea was accepted and with the help of their designers creating 3D drawings of the patterns on the cups, we chose two of the patterns in three different colours. I really enjoyed the collaboration with illy. It all went very smoothly and efficiently.      The pattern of the Keffiyeh which can be seen in the collaboration is a reoccurring element in your art pieces. What meaning does it have to you?   Yes,I have made a curious and surreal object where I embroideredthepattern of the Keffieh using long strands of human hair which flow out of the border of the cotton scarf therefore feminising this object that has a macho aura about it. And recently in my work the fishnet grid pattern has morphed into a chain-link fence that has become a bit of an obsession in an ongoing series of diverse works using pen on paper, water colour, acrylics, lithographic prints and now I was given the priviledge of decorating the illyporcelaincups.   The Keffieh is full of poetic and political symbolism. The fishnet pattern is a symbol of collectivism and is often interpreted as the joining of hands and the olive leaf on the border,for me,symbolises peace. Also, since the 60s,the Keffieh becamea potent symbol of the Palestinian cause and was also adopted by students,anti-war and anti-imperialist movements so itbecame a symbol of solidarity amongst all these movements.     How do you drink your coffee and what do you connect with this ritual?    I normally have one strong cup of filtered coffee first thing in the morning. If later in the day I feel that I need another kick, I may have a smaller cup of coffee or if I am in a café, I will have a cappuccino.  I don’t have any coffee beyond 2 pm as it would keep me up at night.     What are your plans for the future? Do you have any projects coming up?    A lot is happening now and I am most excited about three solo exhibitions which will open simultaneously in Berlin in mid-September next year and for which I would like to make a whole set of new works. After the long period of lockdown, my visit to the spaces in August inspired so many ideas. I just hope I will be able to get them all made in time.   Otherwise, I have two exhibitions opening simultaneously in Stockholm in February next year for which I am making a new work. I am also doing a site visit to Venice next week where I will potentially create a site specific work for the next Biennale. So it is very exciting and it is all go at the moment.

In conversation with Refik Anadol
1785

In conversation with Refik Anadol

Art We had a pleasure speaking with Refik Anadol who  is a media artist, director and pioneer in the aesthetics of data and machine intelligence. His body of work locates creativity at the intersection of humans and machines. In taking the data that flows around us as the primary material and the neural network of a computerized mind as a collaborator, Anadol paints with a thinking brush, offering us radical visualizations of our digitized memories and expanding the possibilities of architecture, narrative, and the body in motion. Anadol’s site-specific AI data sculptures, live audio/visual performances, and immersive installations take many forms, while encouraging us to rethink our engagement with the physical world, its temporal and spatial dimensions, and the creative potential of machines.       Tell us a little bit about yourself and your work in general and how did you start with what you are doing?    I think my journey started almost 13 years ago as a media artist but the last 10 years I used data in my work I did pioneer many concepts and I also did some data painting and a I data sculpture, that are my kind of editions last 10 years. The last 5 years ago I became one of the first artists at google. That’s how I became an AI artist, that gave me the chance to learn AI from one of the best engineers. Now I have a team of 14 people, can speak 14 language who present 10 countries. The purpose of our studio is: make art for anyone, any age and any background which is as much as possible. We are working with technology, probably the most prolific technology in my work. Lots of collaboration with scientist, researchers and engineers. We are trying to create a new meaning in architecture, medi-art and AI. And I am teaching at UCLA.      Are you teaching online at the moment?    Yes, for the last seven years. When I got my masters of finance degree, so I am still teaching there and researching.      What subjects do you want to tackle and what do you want to evoke with your art?   I think in general, AI. So first of all, data can become a pigment and architecture can dream and hallucinate. And for me, when machinelike algorithms and competition, connect with architecture, there is a very powerful. For humanity. Also, we are living in a world where machines are taking over mini decision; what we eat, what we say, where we go is defined by machines. For me the question is: what else can we do with them. Can we use them to remember, or dream? Can collective memorization of humanity become a part of this exciting pigmentation? Can i use it taking brush? These questions are very important for my work. The whole line is connecting human emotions with machines an appreciate the physical world. So, I am not a wishful thinker, but I am trying to say that these powerful tools can be very purposeful and impactful for artistic experiences. And feel better after … especially. Even five minutes of escaping form reality is a powerful message for me.      I obviously don’t know as much as you do, but I see the art world definitely going in to the world of digitalization. That’s something that is for me quite new to understand. Given I don’t have education based on that, but it seems like something I am willing to explore.    I will explain more. Two days ago I sold my first NFT auction for 5.1 million dollars. This room that you see here, I am doing this for 10 years, a version of this sold for 5.1 million dollars. And we will have this also as NFT, this room.      Wow that is worth to explore more. But its really exciting to get back for what you do. It’s quite special. And you’re able to collab with brands such as Bulgari.    Yes that is really powerful. First of all, as an artist I have dreams. A lot of the execution could not be done without the collaboration with Bulgari, its really top notch technology, complex installation, communication, in the centre of Milan on Duomo square. These are not easy things; this needs excessive thinking and a lot of preparation.     How long have you been preparing for this amazing collaboration?   For 1 year including the AI, training, data collection.      A  lot of it is exactly inspired by flowers and nature right?    Bulgari brought this incredibly concept of metamorphosis, it was just a keyword. But for me when I heard that, I mean; can we feel metamorphosis, can we go inside by the senses, what is metamorphoses, how can we capture it as a feeling? And flora systems in nature are one the places, besides animals, where transformation happens. The questions was, what happens when we train our AI with 70 million. With a lot of species of the world. And see what’s the dream and if that dream can become a space, a sound and a scent.      Ok wow, really nice. Looking in to the nature aspect in all that, how much more do you search out of the nature aspects?    Everything comes from nature. We are all nature. Everything to be honest. So going back to the source of inspiration was the actual idea.      As your audio-visual performances are sight specific, what role does the space and location on or in your exhibit play?    At the moment we are in the heart of Milan, one of the most amazing architectural space and open for free for everyone, which is very important.      The exhibit will be in Milan untill the end of October right?    Yes. And the hope is it will travel the world. And the finale is most likely Istanbul, turkey. Where the piece will be NFT auction. So, it’s the worlds first multisensory NFT. Basically sense and smell and touch, it becomes a sculpture as an NFT form. That’s the journey.      Tell us about your collaboration with Bulgari, is this your first collaboration with a fashion and jewelry brand and if so, how does the approach differ from creating for museums?      It’s a major difference, and I know not many artist are practicing in these spectrum. But for me art and design and culture are all connect, like there is no way to separate these universes. And instead, how can we connect these universes, We are going to a decentralized universe. I am just trying to become this disruptive mind, to connect every single culture together, so it’s a powerful collaboration. It is also for me, what is inspiring is; I am mostly practicing in technology, art and science but the fashion, design and creators that are imagining this world and connecting them in their network is really inspiring. People are working with different materials and mediums, and I am super grateful to connect new audience. My aim is to make art for everyone. I have no bias, I am against bias in the audience.           The installation is truly mesmerizing, make sure to go check it out if you are in Milan during the time it displayed on Duomo.   We had a pleasure speaking with Refik Anadol who  is a media artist, director and pioneer in the aesthetics of data and machine intelligence. His body of work locates creativity at the intersection of humans and machines. In taking the data that flows around us as the primary material and the neural network of a computerized mind as a collaborator, Anadol paints with a thinking brush, offering us radical visualizations of our digitized memories and expanding the possibilities of architecture, narrative, and the body in motion. Anadol’s site-specific AI data sculptures, live audio/visual performances, and immersive installations take many forms, while encouraging us to rethink our engagement with the physical world, its temporal and spatial dimensions, and the creative potential of machines.       Tell us a little bit about yourself and your work in general and how did you start with what you are doing?    I think my journey started almost 13 years ago as a media artist but the last 10 years I used data in my work I did pioneer many concepts and I also did some data painting and a I data sculpture, that are my kind of editions last 10 years. The last 5 years ago I became one of the first artists at google. That’s how I became an AI artist, that gave me the chance to learn AI from one of the best engineers. Now I have a team of 14 people, can speak 14 language who present 10 countries. The purpose of our studio is: make art for anyone, any age and any background which is as much as possible. We are working with technology, probably the most prolific technology in my work. Lots of collaboration with scientist, researchers and engineers. We are trying to create a new meaning in architecture, medi-art and AI. And I am teaching at UCLA.      Are you teaching online at the moment?    Yes, for the last seven years. When I got my masters of finance degree, so I am still teaching there and researching.      What subjects do you want to tackle and what do you want to evoke with your art?   I think in general, AI. So first of all, data can become a pigment and architecture can dream and hallucinate. And for me, when machinelike algorithms and competition, connect with architecture, there is a very powerful. For humanity. Also, we are living in a world where machines are taking over mini decision; what we eat, what we say, where we go is defined by machines. For me the question is: what else can we do with them. Can we use them to remember, or dream? Can collective memorization of humanity become a part of this exciting pigmentation? Can i use it taking brush? These questions are very important for my work. The whole line is connecting human emotions with machines an appreciate the physical world. So, I am not a wishful thinker, but I am trying to say that these powerful tools can be very purposeful and impactful for artistic experiences. And feel better after … especially. Even five minutes of escaping form reality is a powerful message for me.      I obviously don’t know as much as you do, but I see the art world definitely going in to the world of digitalization. That’s something that is for me quite new to understand. Given I don’t have education based on that, but it seems like something I am willing to explore.    I will explain more. Two days ago I sold my first NFT auction for 5.1 million dollars. This room that you see here, I am doing this for 10 years, a version of this sold for 5.1 million dollars. And we will have this also as NFT, this room.      Wow that is worth to explore more. But its really exciting to get back for what you do. It’s quite special. And you’re able to collab with brands such as Bulgari.    Yes that is really powerful. First of all, as an artist I have dreams. A lot of the execution could not be done without the collaboration with Bulgari, its really top notch technology, complex installation, communication, in the centre of Milan on Duomo square. These are not easy things; this needs excessive thinking and a lot of preparation.     How long have you been preparing for this amazing collaboration?   For 1 year including the AI, training, data collection.      A  lot of it is exactly inspired by flowers and nature right?    Bulgari brought this incredibly concept of metamorphosis, it was just a keyword. But for me when I heard that, I mean; can we feel metamorphosis, can we go inside by the senses, what is metamorphoses, how can we capture it as a feeling? And flora systems in nature are one the places, besides animals, where transformation happens. The questions was, what happens when we train our AI with 70 million. With a lot of species of the world. And see what’s the dream and if that dream can become a space, a sound and a scent.      Ok wow, really nice. Looking in to the nature aspect in all that, how much more do you search out of the nature aspects?    Everything comes from nature. We are all nature. Everything to be honest. So going back to the source of inspiration was the actual idea.      As your audio-visual performances are sight specific, what role does the space and location on or in your exhibit play?    At the moment we are in the heart of Milan, one of the most amazing architectural space and open for free for everyone, which is very important.      The exhibit will be in Milan untill the end of October right?    Yes. And the hope is it will travel the world. And the finale is most likely Istanbul, turkey. Where the piece will be NFT auction. So, it’s the worlds first multisensory NFT. Basically sense and smell and touch, it becomes a sculpture as an NFT form. That’s the journey.      Tell us about your collaboration with Bulgari, is this your first collaboration with a fashion and jewelry brand and if so, how does the approach differ from creating for museums?      It’s a major difference, and I know not many artist are practicing in these spectrum. But for me art and design and culture are all connect, like there is no way to separate these universes. And instead, how can we connect these universes, We are going to a decentralized universe. I am just trying to become this disruptive mind, to connect every single culture together, so it’s a powerful collaboration. It is also for me, what is inspiring is; I am mostly practicing in technology, art and science but the fashion, design and creators that are imagining this world and connecting them in their network is really inspiring. People are working with different materials and mediums, and I am super grateful to connect new audience. My aim is to make art for everyone. I have no bias, I am against bias in the audience.           The installation is truly mesmerizing, make sure to go check it out if you are in Milan during the time it displayed on Duomo.  

Fashion & Culture Magazine Numéro Netherlands Launches New Digital Edition
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Fashion & Culture Magazine Numéro Netherlands Launches New Digital Edition

Fashion Luxury fashion and culture magazine Numéro Netherlands has created a brand new digital edition in partnership with digital platform Exact Editions. The archive currently encompasses 3 back issues, and will grow with each new issue published.     Perched at the crossroads between women’s and men’s luxury magazines and cutting-edge magazines, Numéro Netherlands explores an original vision of luxury. Each issue is innovative, transgressive, inventive and an experimentation of style. It effortlessly connects brands to art, design and contemporary aesthetic codes, reinforcing their distinctness, uniqueness and luxury brand status.     All contents pages of the new archive will be linked to facilitate quick browsing, whilst the advanced search function allows readers to pinpoint references to specific keywords at the touch of a button across web, iOS and Android platforms.     Numéro Netherlands is available in the Exact Editions individual and institutional shops here:   Individuals: https://shop.exacteditions.com/numero-netherlands Institutions: https://institutions.exacteditions.com/numero-netherlands     Editor-in-Chief, Timotej Letonja commented: “We are pleased to be offering this new digital option to subscribers old and new. Our photography and editorials are displayed compellingly across both online and web platforms, providing an aesthetically striking reading experience.”     Daryl Rayner, Managing Director of Exact Editions, said: “Numéro Netherlands joins a strong roster of luxury magazines already hosted on the platform. It will be a brilliant resource for fashion and culture aficionados and students, as well as institutional libraries. Luxury fashion and culture magazine Numéro Netherlands has created a brand new digital edition in partnership with digital platform Exact Editions. The archive currently encompasses 3 back issues, and will grow with each new issue published.     Perched at the crossroads between women’s and men’s luxury magazines and cutting-edge magazines, Numéro Netherlands explores an original vision of luxury. Each issue is innovative, transgressive, inventive and an experimentation of style. It effortlessly connects brands to art, design and contemporary aesthetic codes, reinforcing their distinctness, uniqueness and luxury brand status.     All contents pages of the new archive will be linked to facilitate quick browsing, whilst the advanced search function allows readers to pinpoint references to specific keywords at the touch of a button across web, iOS and Android platforms.     Numéro Netherlands is available in the Exact Editions individual and institutional shops here:   Individuals: https://shop.exacteditions.com/numero-netherlands Institutions: https://institutions.exacteditions.com/numero-netherlands     Editor-in-Chief, Timotej Letonja commented: “We are pleased to be offering this new digital option to subscribers old and new. Our photography and editorials are displayed compellingly across both online and web platforms, providing an aesthetically striking reading experience.”     Daryl Rayner, Managing Director of Exact Editions, said: “Numéro Netherlands joins a strong roster of luxury magazines already hosted on the platform. It will be a brilliant resource for fashion and culture aficionados and students, as well as institutional libraries.

Nxt Museum relaunched 'Shifting Proximities'
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Nxt Museum relaunched 'Shifting Proximities'

Art Nxt Museum has unlocked its doors from Saturday 5 June 2021 to stimulate and inspire the city of Amsterdam after a period of lockdown. The museum relaunches with a new artwork, Zoom Pavilion, by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer (Mexico/Canada) in collaboration with Krzysztof Wodiczko (Poland/USA), and with a full technical upgrade courtesy of Samsung. New and returning visitors can now experience the critically-acclaimed exhibition 'Shifting Proximities' until the end of 2021.     "When we first started conceptualising Nxt Museum in 2018, I never imagined our first year of opening to have such a short timespan. After being open for only 84 days, the museum had to close for another 175." says Merel van Helsdingen, Founder and Director of Nxt Museum. "During these uncertain days, the urgency of art and museums has become more visible than ever. Within cultural spaces we gain new perspectives, awaken our senses and - above all - we escape our day-to-day reality. Hopefully, museums will now cherish a permanent spot on our agendas, leisurely and politically. Let's not take them for granted."     Zoom Pavilion (2015) is an audiovisual installation that renders alarmingly visible the ubiquity of surveillance.     Twelve surveillance cameras, using facial recognition, blob tracking and subtraction algorithms, track and monitor the public and determine whether their proximity is 'suspicious'. A temporary archive of recordings is collected and projected onto one wall, showing how close two visitors have been to one another and for how long. Such surveillance techniques have been used to maintain political control (communist Poland 1947-1989), to dispel mass protests (Hong Kong 2019-2020), to identify security threats (prisons) and to control the spread of infectious diseases (COVID-19). They are also employed around the clock in the world's major cities.   Zoom Pavilion is one of seven artworks bringing a diversity of interpretations and perspectives to the theme of 'Shifting Proximities', exploring how human experience and interaction are affected by social and technological change. From the invention of the Internet, to the rise of space exploration, from 9/11, to global pandemics, these global phenomena have an immeasurable impact on how we communicate, how we move and how we live in the world. As visitors navigate through a series of large-scale multi-sensory artworks, they can experience the formation of a black hole, learn how plants communicate with one another, and become subject to the watchful eye of surveillance.   Each of the installations has been created by local and international artists, designers, technologists, scientists and musicians, fusing creative ideas with pioneering research and technological innovation. They include:Connected (2020) by audio-visual artist Roelof Knol with sound by Marc Mahfoud; Topologies #1 (2020) by United Visual Artists (UVA); Habitat (2020) by artist Heleen Blanken with software developer NAIVI and sound artist Stijn van Beek; Distortions in Spacetime (2018-2020) by audiovisual pioneers Marshmallow Laser Feast; Econtinuum (2020) by ecological artist Thijs Biersteker in collaboration with plant neurobiologist Stefano Mancuso; and Dimensional Sampling (2019-2020) by artist and coder Yuxi Cao (James) with sound artist Lau Hiu Kong (Lawrence).   Nxt Museum and Samsung Electronics Benelux have joined forces to bring art and technology to those looking for the next in contemporary culture. Founded on a shared mission to unlock creativity through technology, the partnership includes the integration of new Samsung technology throughout the museum, offering enhanced storytelling and educational insights. Jointly, they will launch Studio 404, a free, innovative education programme that invites young people in Amsterdam to learn digital skills from established experts and artists. Find more information at: nxtmuseum.com/event/studio-404/.     Address: Nxt Museum Asterweg 22 1031 HP Amsterdam Website: nxtmuseum.com Social: @nxtmuseum #nxtmuseum Nxt Museum has unlocked its doors from Saturday 5 June 2021 to stimulate and inspire the city of Amsterdam after a period of lockdown. The museum relaunches with a new artwork, Zoom Pavilion, by Rafael Lozano-Hemmer (Mexico/Canada) in collaboration with Krzysztof Wodiczko (Poland/USA), and with a full technical upgrade courtesy of Samsung. New and returning visitors can now experience the critically-acclaimed exhibition 'Shifting Proximities' until the end of 2021.     "When we first started conceptualising Nxt Museum in 2018, I never imagined our first year of opening to have such a short timespan. After being open for only 84 days, the museum had to close for another 175." says Merel van Helsdingen, Founder and Director of Nxt Museum. "During these uncertain days, the urgency of art and museums has become more visible than ever. Within cultural spaces we gain new perspectives, awaken our senses and - above all - we escape our day-to-day reality. Hopefully, museums will now cherish a permanent spot on our agendas, leisurely and politically. Let's not take them for granted."     Zoom Pavilion (2015) is an audiovisual installation that renders alarmingly visible the ubiquity of surveillance.     Twelve surveillance cameras, using facial recognition, blob tracking and subtraction algorithms, track and monitor the public and determine whether their proximity is 'suspicious'. A temporary archive of recordings is collected and projected onto one wall, showing how close two visitors have been to one another and for how long. Such surveillance techniques have been used to maintain political control (communist Poland 1947-1989), to dispel mass protests (Hong Kong 2019-2020), to identify security threats (prisons) and to control the spread of infectious diseases (COVID-19). They are also employed around the clock in the world's major cities.   Zoom Pavilion is one of seven artworks bringing a diversity of interpretations and perspectives to the theme of 'Shifting Proximities', exploring how human experience and interaction are affected by social and technological change. From the invention of the Internet, to the rise of space exploration, from 9/11, to global pandemics, these global phenomena have an immeasurable impact on how we communicate, how we move and how we live in the world. As visitors navigate through a series of large-scale multi-sensory artworks, they can experience the formation of a black hole, learn how plants communicate with one another, and become subject to the watchful eye of surveillance.   Each of the installations has been created by local and international artists, designers, technologists, scientists and musicians, fusing creative ideas with pioneering research and technological innovation. They include:Connected (2020) by audio-visual artist Roelof Knol with sound by Marc Mahfoud; Topologies #1 (2020) by United Visual Artists (UVA); Habitat (2020) by artist Heleen Blanken with software developer NAIVI and sound artist Stijn van Beek; Distortions in Spacetime (2018-2020) by audiovisual pioneers Marshmallow Laser Feast; Econtinuum (2020) by ecological artist Thijs Biersteker in collaboration with plant neurobiologist Stefano Mancuso; and Dimensional Sampling (2019-2020) by artist and coder Yuxi Cao (James) with sound artist Lau Hiu Kong (Lawrence).   Nxt Museum and Samsung Electronics Benelux have joined forces to bring art and technology to those looking for the next in contemporary culture. Founded on a shared mission to unlock creativity through technology, the partnership includes the integration of new Samsung technology throughout the museum, offering enhanced storytelling and educational insights. Jointly, they will launch Studio 404, a free, innovative education programme that invites young people in Amsterdam to learn digital skills from established experts and artists. Find more information at: nxtmuseum.com/event/studio-404/.     Address: Nxt Museum Asterweg 22 1031 HP Amsterdam Website: nxtmuseum.com Social: @nxtmuseum #nxtmuseum

THE BOTANICAL REVOLUTION FROM 11TH OF SEPTEMBER IN CENTRAAL MUSEUM UTRECHT
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THE BOTANICAL REVOLUTION FROM 11TH OF SEPTEMBER IN CENTRAAL MUSEUM UTRECHT

Exhibition In a new exhibition, contemporary art explores the garden as a metaphor for the world today, in dialogue with modern art and old masters.      Saturday 11 September 2021 marks the opening of The Botanical Revolution – On the Necessity of Art and Gardening in Centraal Museum Utrecht. Contemporary artists reflect on society using the garden as a metaphor. What can gardens tell us about the times we live in? In addition to art works by Maria Thereza Alves, Sara Sejin Chang, Jeremy Deller, Stan Douglas, Lungiswa Gqunta, Kerry James Marshall, Henk Wildschut and others, the exhibition includes some outstanding loan pieces by both modern artists and old masters such as Vincent van Gogh, Tetsumi Kudo, Albrecht Dürer and Maria Sibylla Merian. These modern and old art works reveal the deep roots of a tradition that explores the garden as a mirror of society. The Botanical Revolutionis on display until 9 January 2022.       PARADISE:   The exhibition opens with one of the best-known gardens of all: paradise. The Garden of Eden has been a popular theme for western artists throughout the centuries. In the Biblical story, the garden is portrayed as a lush and idyllic environment. Here Adam and Eve live in harmony with each other, the world and nature. There is a rich tradition of images depicting this theme, of which a number of examples are shown in this room.      Among the art works are 16th-century prints and engravings: Adam and Eve by Albrecht Dürer and Hendrick Goltzius. These older works rub shoulders with contemporary paintings by for instance Kerry James Marshall. Vignette (2003) shows two naked black figures running past a dense, overgrown field. Also on show is a Persian paradise carpet of more than 100 years old, and the Tree trunk bench (1999) by Droog design studio, based on 17th-century landscape gardens.        FRONT YARD / BACK YARD / ALLOTMENT:   As the industrial revolution took hold over the course of the 19th century, allotment gardens were provided to the city’s labourers. Gardening was seen as a useful activity that benefits the body and mind. In today’s hectic urban lives, and certainly during the current pandemic as well, the garden remains an important refuge: a place to wind down and to enjoy another rhythm of life. At the same time, the garden stimulates us to critically reflect on ecosystems and their inhabitants.     In the second room, the visitor encounters work by Vincent van Gogh (Vegetable gardens in Montmarte, 1887) combined with the photographs that Elspeth Diederix made of her Miracle Gardenin Amsterdam: a project nominated this year for the Amsterdam Prize for the Arts.      Outside the museum gallery, Vanishing Staircaseconnects to the same theme. Here, Birthe Leemeijer encourages native plants to grow on an outdoor staircase. The project recently made the news when a municipal parks worker inadvertently burned away the young plants. The art work is now being restored, and new vegetation is emerging.      THE BOTANICAL REVOLUTION:   A garden is like a mirror of society: a place that embodies the relationship between nature and culture. The development of botany as a scientific discipline went hand in hand with an overall categorisation of the natural world. In the 18th century, this classification resulted in a hierarchy of nature, in which humankind ranks highest. Today we are starting to talk and think differently about the complex relations between different forms of life. Humans are viewed more emphatically as a part of nature, and there is an increasing focus on the intelligence of for instance plant life.     The third exhibition room displays still-lifes by Roelant Saverij and Johannes Bosschaert, depicting both native and exotic flowers. This theme, too, extends beyond the museum walls: in the museum garden, the Japanese artist Rumiko Hagiwara has placed signs by wild plants displaying the definition of the weeds. It is a simple intervention that demonstrates the consequences of the categories we use to divide up the world for our own understanding. This work resonates with the project presented on Nicolaaskerkhof, in front of the museum, where a real garden was created by Maria Thereza Alves. Titled Seeds of Change(2004), this work is about the soil that old sailing ships used as ballast, which was usually dumped again after arriving home. This soil often contained a wide variety of ungerminated seeds. By examining the plants now found in these port cities, Alves was able to reconstruct the trans-Atlantic slave trade.        GARDENING IN THE ANTHROPOCENE:   In 1972, visual artist Tetsumi Kudo wrote a manifesto titled Pollution-Cultivation-New Ecology, in which he called for a new relationship between nature, mankind and technology. In this visionary manifesto he describes how mankind is depleting the earth’s natural resources. Kudo’s vision is more relevant today than ever. The notion of the Anthropocene is becoming increasingly widespread to refer to the current era in which mankind completely dominates nature, with all due consequences. In this room, the grim situation of the global climate crisis goes hand in hand with signs of hope.      In this room Kudo’s GraftedGarden(1971) is presented a garden consisting of plastic flowers and body parts ‘grafted’ onto aluminium poles. Also on view here is the photo series Rooted, for which Henk Wildschut photographs the improvised gardens created by people living in refugee camps. In such a bleak situation, gardening still offers some comfort. The transit hall presents Lawnby the South African artist Lungiswa Gqunta, which has been purchased by Centraal Museum. Her lawn consists of broken Coke bottles, and depicts the garden as a place of privilege in South Africa.       Laurie Cluitmans, curator of contemporary art: “The garden is once again a hugely relevant theme. In an era of climate change, contemporary artists are turning to the garden, finding hope in nature’s resilience. But they are also calling for a botanical revolution, to radically redefine man’s relationship to nature.”     The exhibition design, created by design agency Formafantasma, is also inspired by gardens. The rooms are built using a modular system of walls that can be disassembled and reused in another context. The modular system is reminiscent of Japanese Zen gardens, causing the art works to gradually appear in and out of view as the visitor strolls around.        On the Necessity of Gardening; An ABC on Art, Botany and Cultivation:   In addition to an exhibition booklet, a lavishly illustrated book will be published in collaboration with Valiz. This ‘abecedarium’ explores the cultural-historical tradition of gardens and artist’s gardens, as well as concepts such as the Anthropocene. With contributions by Maria Barnas, Jonny Bruce, Laurie Cluitmans, Liesbeth M. Helmus, Erik de Jong, René de Kam, Alhena Katsof, Jamaica Kincaid, Bart Rutten, Catriona Sandilands and Patricia de Vries. The publication design is by Bart de Baets.    The exhibition is sponsored by: Van Baaren Stichting, Stichting Fonds 21, Stichting De Gijselaar-Hintzenfonds, Stichting Jaap Harten Fonds, Stichting Hendrik Muller’s Vaderlandsch Fonds, Mondriaan Fonds, Stimuleringsfonds Creatieve Industrie, Stichting Stokroos, Gemeente Utrecht, BankGiro Loterij, Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, and Munt hypotheken.       Is it possible to be a revolutionary and like flowers?A Contemporary Floriography:     Laurie Cluitmans, curator of contemporary art at Centraal Museum and responsible for The Botanical Revolution, has worked with Heske ten Cate, artistic director of Nest and Eva Burgering, assistant curator at Centraal Museum, to compile the exhibition Is it possible to be a revolutionary and like flowers?This exhibition will be presented simultaneously in art platform Nest in The Hague. The artists represented in this exhibition respond to the question asked in the title with a resounding ‘yes!’ Each artist adopts and explores his or her own perspective, but they find common ground in feminist affinities, queer longings, and ecological solidarity.     With works by Mehraneh Atashi, Rossella Biscotti, Milena Bonilla, Anne Geene, Philipp Gufler, Gluklya, Camille Henrot, Patricia Kaersenhout, Otobong Nkanga, Ruchama Noorda, Maria Pask, CPR (Charlotte Rooijackers) and Lily van der Stokker.  In a new exhibition, contemporary art explores the garden as a metaphor for the world today, in dialogue with modern art and old masters.      Saturday 11 September 2021 marks the opening of The Botanical Revolution – On the Necessity of Art and Gardening in Centraal Museum Utrecht. Contemporary artists reflect on society using the garden as a metaphor. What can gardens tell us about the times we live in? In addition to art works by Maria Thereza Alves, Sara Sejin Chang, Jeremy Deller, Stan Douglas, Lungiswa Gqunta, Kerry James Marshall, Henk Wildschut and others, the exhibition includes some outstanding loan pieces by both modern artists and old masters such as Vincent van Gogh, Tetsumi Kudo, Albrecht Dürer and Maria Sibylla Merian. These modern and old art works reveal the deep roots of a tradition that explores the garden as a mirror of society. The Botanical Revolutionis on display until 9 January 2022.       PARADISE:   The exhibition opens with one of the best-known gardens of all: paradise. The Garden of Eden has been a popular theme for western artists throughout the centuries. In the Biblical story, the garden is portrayed as a lush and idyllic environment. Here Adam and Eve live in harmony with each other, the world and nature. There is a rich tradition of images depicting this theme, of which a number of examples are shown in this room.      Among the art works are 16th-century prints and engravings: Adam and Eve by Albrecht Dürer and Hendrick Goltzius. These older works rub shoulders with contemporary paintings by for instance Kerry James Marshall. Vignette (2003) shows two naked black figures running past a dense, overgrown field. Also on show is a Persian paradise carpet of more than 100 years old, and the Tree trunk bench (1999) by Droog design studio, based on 17th-century landscape gardens.        FRONT YARD / BACK YARD / ALLOTMENT:   As the industrial revolution took hold over the course of the 19th century, allotment gardens were provided to the city’s labourers. Gardening was seen as a useful activity that benefits the body and mind. In today’s hectic urban lives, and certainly during the current pandemic as well, the garden remains an important refuge: a place to wind down and to enjoy another rhythm of life. At the same time, the garden stimulates us to critically reflect on ecosystems and their inhabitants.     In the second room, the visitor encounters work by Vincent van Gogh (Vegetable gardens in Montmarte, 1887) combined with the photographs that Elspeth Diederix made of her Miracle Gardenin Amsterdam: a project nominated this year for the Amsterdam Prize for the Arts.      Outside the museum gallery, Vanishing Staircaseconnects to the same theme. Here, Birthe Leemeijer encourages native plants to grow on an outdoor staircase. The project recently made the news when a municipal parks worker inadvertently burned away the young plants. The art work is now being restored, and new vegetation is emerging.      THE BOTANICAL REVOLUTION:   A garden is like a mirror of society: a place that embodies the relationship between nature and culture. The development of botany as a scientific discipline went hand in hand with an overall categorisation of the natural world. In the 18th century, this classification resulted in a hierarchy of nature, in which humankind ranks highest. Today we are starting to talk and think differently about the complex relations between different forms of life. Humans are viewed more emphatically as a part of nature, and there is an increasing focus on the intelligence of for instance plant life.     The third exhibition room displays still-lifes by Roelant Saverij and Johannes Bosschaert, depicting both native and exotic flowers. This theme, too, extends beyond the museum walls: in the museum garden, the Japanese artist Rumiko Hagiwara has placed signs by wild plants displaying the definition of the weeds. It is a simple intervention that demonstrates the consequences of the categories we use to divide up the world for our own understanding. This work resonates with the project presented on Nicolaaskerkhof, in front of the museum, where a real garden was created by Maria Thereza Alves. Titled Seeds of Change(2004), this work is about the soil that old sailing ships used as ballast, which was usually dumped again after arriving home. This soil often contained a wide variety of ungerminated seeds. By examining the plants now found in these port cities, Alves was able to reconstruct the trans-Atlantic slave trade.        GARDENING IN THE ANTHROPOCENE:   In 1972, visual artist Tetsumi Kudo wrote a manifesto titled Pollution-Cultivation-New Ecology, in which he called for a new relationship between nature, mankind and technology. In this visionary manifesto he describes how mankind is depleting the earth’s natural resources. Kudo’s vision is more relevant today than ever. The notion of the Anthropocene is becoming increasingly widespread to refer to the current era in which mankind completely dominates nature, with all due consequences. In this room, the grim situation of the global climate crisis goes hand in hand with signs of hope.      In this room Kudo’s GraftedGarden(1971) is presented a garden consisting of plastic flowers and body parts ‘grafted’ onto aluminium poles. Also on view here is the photo series Rooted, for which Henk Wildschut photographs the improvised gardens created by people living in refugee camps. In such a bleak situation, gardening still offers some comfort. The transit hall presents Lawnby the South African artist Lungiswa Gqunta, which has been purchased by Centraal Museum. Her lawn consists of broken Coke bottles, and depicts the garden as a place of privilege in South Africa.       Laurie Cluitmans, curator of contemporary art: “The garden is once again a hugely relevant theme. In an era of climate change, contemporary artists are turning to the garden, finding hope in nature’s resilience. But they are also calling for a botanical revolution, to radically redefine man’s relationship to nature.”     The exhibition design, created by design agency Formafantasma, is also inspired by gardens. The rooms are built using a modular system of walls that can be disassembled and reused in another context. The modular system is reminiscent of Japanese Zen gardens, causing the art works to gradually appear in and out of view as the visitor strolls around.        On the Necessity of Gardening; An ABC on Art, Botany and Cultivation:   In addition to an exhibition booklet, a lavishly illustrated book will be published in collaboration with Valiz. This ‘abecedarium’ explores the cultural-historical tradition of gardens and artist’s gardens, as well as concepts such as the Anthropocene. With contributions by Maria Barnas, Jonny Bruce, Laurie Cluitmans, Liesbeth M. Helmus, Erik de Jong, René de Kam, Alhena Katsof, Jamaica Kincaid, Bart Rutten, Catriona Sandilands and Patricia de Vries. The publication design is by Bart de Baets.    The exhibition is sponsored by: Van Baaren Stichting, Stichting Fonds 21, Stichting De Gijselaar-Hintzenfonds, Stichting Jaap Harten Fonds, Stichting Hendrik Muller’s Vaderlandsch Fonds, Mondriaan Fonds, Stimuleringsfonds Creatieve Industrie, Stichting Stokroos, Gemeente Utrecht, BankGiro Loterij, Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, and Munt hypotheken.       Is it possible to be a revolutionary and like flowers?A Contemporary Floriography:     Laurie Cluitmans, curator of contemporary art at Centraal Museum and responsible for The Botanical Revolution, has worked with Heske ten Cate, artistic director of Nest and Eva Burgering, assistant curator at Centraal Museum, to compile the exhibition Is it possible to be a revolutionary and like flowers?This exhibition will be presented simultaneously in art platform Nest in The Hague. The artists represented in this exhibition respond to the question asked in the title with a resounding ‘yes!’ Each artist adopts and explores his or her own perspective, but they find common ground in feminist affinities, queer longings, and ecological solidarity.     With works by Mehraneh Atashi, Rossella Biscotti, Milena Bonilla, Anne Geene, Philipp Gufler, Gluklya, Camille Henrot, Patricia Kaersenhout, Otobong Nkanga, Ruchama Noorda, Maria Pask, CPR (Charlotte Rooijackers) and Lily van der Stokker. 

Explore the Mural for Pride by Queer artist Sarah Naqvi for Calvin Klein
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Explore the Mural for Pride by Queer artist Sarah Naqvi for Calvin Klein

Art Calvin Klein celebrites Pride throughout the year. This year the theme of the Pride campaign is ‘celebrating defining moments in the queer and trans journey’. Previously you could have seen talents like Honey Dijon and Omar Ayuso in the campaign. Coinciding with this campaign, Calvin Klein is collaborating with four queer artists to creatively express their defining moments in the form of murals.     Each talent conveyed the transformative events that shaped their lives in different countries across Europe at different moments in time. Their artwork and personal experiences can be further explored through a QR code activation, leading to calvinklein.com.     While each artist stands out for their own background and creative talent, they are all united in their shared passion for — and impact on — the LGBTQIA+ community. For Amsterdam Calvin Klein worked with the talented Sarah Naqvi.     @naqvi_sarah (25) - Artist   Sarah Naqvi (she/they) created Etymologies of Erasure in Amsterdam (Hazenstraat 18 as of July 30)   Living between Mumbai and Amsterdam, Sarah Naqvi is a contemporary artist whose work covers themes such as gender, sexuality, race, religion and body positivity. Sarah’s mural represents an imaginary landscape with characters reflecting queer ecologies and erased histories that are essential for queer people and their empowerment. The multidisciplinary mural is a collage of textures, scans, hand-painting and green-screens. Sarah says, “The central figure sat under the tree is an image of me from a time I didn’t recognize myself, and then me now liberated, imputed digitally and captured in my home environment.”     The moment: “In that rare conversation with my family about queerness, in explaining to them in the sweetest of words what it meant, in that moment I saw myself also redefining the terms of my own existence for the first time.”       Pride should be every day, every minute & every moment. Calvin Klein celebrites Pride throughout the year. This year the theme of the Pride campaign is ‘celebrating defining moments in the queer and trans journey’. Previously you could have seen talents like Honey Dijon and Omar Ayuso in the campaign. Coinciding with this campaign, Calvin Klein is collaborating with four queer artists to creatively express their defining moments in the form of murals.     Each talent conveyed the transformative events that shaped their lives in different countries across Europe at different moments in time. Their artwork and personal experiences can be further explored through a QR code activation, leading to calvinklein.com.     While each artist stands out for their own background and creative talent, they are all united in their shared passion for — and impact on — the LGBTQIA+ community. For Amsterdam Calvin Klein worked with the talented Sarah Naqvi.     @naqvi_sarah (25) - Artist   Sarah Naqvi (she/they) created Etymologies of Erasure in Amsterdam (Hazenstraat 18 as of July 30)   Living between Mumbai and Amsterdam, Sarah Naqvi is a contemporary artist whose work covers themes such as gender, sexuality, race, religion and body positivity. Sarah’s mural represents an imaginary landscape with characters reflecting queer ecologies and erased histories that are essential for queer people and their empowerment. The multidisciplinary mural is a collage of textures, scans, hand-painting and green-screens. Sarah says, “The central figure sat under the tree is an image of me from a time I didn’t recognize myself, and then me now liberated, imputed digitally and captured in my home environment.”     The moment: “In that rare conversation with my family about queerness, in explaining to them in the sweetest of words what it meant, in that moment I saw myself also redefining the terms of my own existence for the first time.”       Pride should be every day, every minute & every moment.

Hotel Arts Barcelona
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Hotel Arts Barcelona

Travel An iconic hotel with cutting-edge design.     The transparency of glass, the warmth of wood and the sophistication of fine fabrics come together in every room at Hotel Arts. They blend in different ways to lend each space distinct personality and character, always under the paradigm of contemporary and refined style. With the start of its construction in 1991, its unique design revolutionized the city’s urban landscape at a historic moment of transformation. More than 20 years later, the architecture of Hotel Arts is only one of the reasons why this landmark hotel is an unmistakable icon of Barcelona.     The Penthouses     What do you feel like today? Without even leaving the building, you can enjoy a wide range of options from breakfast until bedtime. Savor delicious Mediterranean cuisine at Hotel Arts’ five restaurants, designed for every time of day.       360° views   If there’s one hotel that lets you enjoy a complete panoramic view of the entire city, it’s Hotel Arts, offering 360° views. A stunning observation deck allows you to lose yourself in the depths of the Mediterranean, follow the horizon to the coast and then in take the unmistakable skyline of Barcelona, with all its iconic buildings, including the Sagrada Familia and the Collserola Tower.     Five incredible restaurants   What do you feel like today? Without even leaving the building, you can enjoy a wide range of options from breakfast until bedtime. Savor delicious Mediterranean cuisine at Hotel Arts’ five restaurants, designed for every time of day.     An oasis of gardens in vibrant Barcelona   Nature becomes a source of inspiration with endless green spaces and landscaped areas. A stunning, natural outdoor environment in the shadow of Frank Gehry’s iconic golden sculpture: El Peix. Amidst the green of the vegetation and the blue of the Mediterranean you’ll find the pool and the outdoor gardens, small peaceful refuges where you can get lost in a good book, relax in the sun or enjoy one of our many cocktails and culinary options.     Original works of art   We aren’t called Hotel Arts for nothing. Art is the hotel’s common thread and leitmotif: in every room and every hall you’ll find an original piece of art, all by Spanish artists, many of them Catalan.     A Spa at the 43rd floor   Forget everything you’ve seen so far. Only at 43 The Spa can you enjoy deep relaxation at a height of almost 150 meters (490 feet), while watching the Mediterranean fade into the horizon. The top two floors of Hotel Arts are home to this urban sanctuary devoted to personal wellness. In addition to losing track of time in its aquatic area with a whirlpool, ice shower, steam bath and dry sauna, you can also choose from different treatments starring products from the prestigious Natura Bissé brand.     Designed by architect Bruce Graham   The famed architect Bruce Graham was commissioned to erect this monumental project that forever changed the city’s skyline. Its construction began in 1991, for the occasion of the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, but it didn’t open its doors as Hotel Arts until 1994.     "The hotel is located on a top location on the beach of Barcelona with spectacular views, magnificent facilities such as many delicious restaurants as well as several pools including an infinity pool and a graeat SPA. Definitely a great stay and looking forward to staying there again on my trip to Barcelona." - Timotej Letonja     Visit their website for more information:  https://www.hotelartsbarcelona.com/en/   And visit this link to explore the current  available offers: https://www.hotelartsbarcelona.com/en/barcelona-hotel-special-offers/ An iconic hotel with cutting-edge design.     The transparency of glass, the warmth of wood and the sophistication of fine fabrics come together in every room at Hotel Arts. They blend in different ways to lend each space distinct personality and character, always under the paradigm of contemporary and refined style. With the start of its construction in 1991, its unique design revolutionized the city’s urban landscape at a historic moment of transformation. More than 20 years later, the architecture of Hotel Arts is only one of the reasons why this landmark hotel is an unmistakable icon of Barcelona.     The Penthouses     What do you feel like today? Without even leaving the building, you can enjoy a wide range of options from breakfast until bedtime. Savor delicious Mediterranean cuisine at Hotel Arts’ five restaurants, designed for every time of day.       360° views   If there’s one hotel that lets you enjoy a complete panoramic view of the entire city, it’s Hotel Arts, offering 360° views. A stunning observation deck allows you to lose yourself in the depths of the Mediterranean, follow the horizon to the coast and then in take the unmistakable skyline of Barcelona, with all its iconic buildings, including the Sagrada Familia and the Collserola Tower.     Five incredible restaurants   What do you feel like today? Without even leaving the building, you can enjoy a wide range of options from breakfast until bedtime. Savor delicious Mediterranean cuisine at Hotel Arts’ five restaurants, designed for every time of day.     An oasis of gardens in vibrant Barcelona   Nature becomes a source of inspiration with endless green spaces and landscaped areas. A stunning, natural outdoor environment in the shadow of Frank Gehry’s iconic golden sculpture: El Peix. Amidst the green of the vegetation and the blue of the Mediterranean you’ll find the pool and the outdoor gardens, small peaceful refuges where you can get lost in a good book, relax in the sun or enjoy one of our many cocktails and culinary options.     Original works of art   We aren’t called Hotel Arts for nothing. Art is the hotel’s common thread and leitmotif: in every room and every hall you’ll find an original piece of art, all by Spanish artists, many of them Catalan.     A Spa at the 43rd floor   Forget everything you’ve seen so far. Only at 43 The Spa can you enjoy deep relaxation at a height of almost 150 meters (490 feet), while watching the Mediterranean fade into the horizon. The top two floors of Hotel Arts are home to this urban sanctuary devoted to personal wellness. In addition to losing track of time in its aquatic area with a whirlpool, ice shower, steam bath and dry sauna, you can also choose from different treatments starring products from the prestigious Natura Bissé brand.     Designed by architect Bruce Graham   The famed architect Bruce Graham was commissioned to erect this monumental project that forever changed the city’s skyline. Its construction began in 1991, for the occasion of the 1992 Olympic Games in Barcelona, but it didn’t open its doors as Hotel Arts until 1994.     "The hotel is located on a top location on the beach of Barcelona with spectacular views, magnificent facilities such as many delicious restaurants as well as several pools including an infinity pool and a graeat SPA. Definitely a great stay and looking forward to staying there again on my trip to Barcelona." - Timotej Letonja     Visit their website for more information:  https://www.hotelartsbarcelona.com/en/   And visit this link to explore the current  available offers: https://www.hotelartsbarcelona.com/en/barcelona-hotel-special-offers/

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