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Louis Vuitton for Spring & Summer 2021
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Louis Vuitton for Spring & Summer 2021

Fashion Week Stepping into a territory that is still stylistically vague. A sensitive zone that erases gender and promises exponential creative possibilities. What does an in-between garment look like? What kind of cut can dissolve masculine and feminine? What wardrobe might s/he look good in? A fascinating new exploration for fashion, and the promise of a great journey that Louis Vuitton sets out to discover by abolishing these last boundaries. Finding expression in a landscape that is tenuous and vast, but also neutral: giving it colour, forging its character, inciting radicality, giving it personality. This is but the beginning of a reflection that is open, stimulating and fundamentally conscious.     What is the inspiration for this collection?   More than an inspiration, it’s a question, the very signi cant one of gender. We’re going beyond the basic idea that a woman gains power by co-opting the masculine wardrobe. What space is there for a category of clothing between feminine and masculine? It’s a growing space and its contours are ever more permeable. We’re de ning a type of clothing that lives in a non-binary zone. It’s fascinating to consider. What is a non-binary garment? Inevitably, it’s the designer’s role to o era point of view.     What’s distinctive about it?   By way of pure demonstration, it could be the structure of a jacket that’s in-between – as feminine as it is masculine. Or for example, the t-shirt dresses in the nal series. They could be dresses, but they could also be exaggerated t-shirts that skaters wear over shorts, or something basketball players might wear. Classic overcoats are nished like oversized sweaters. Phosphorescent fabrics lend the impression of movement, like mercury ‒ the chemical quicksilver ‒ or a changing sky. It’s an interplay of appearance and disappearance. Something chameleon-like.     Is it a new style?   I nd myself back to what I’ve always loved doing, which in the end de nes my work throughout my career as a designer. Stylistic hybrids. Patchworks of di erent materials. How to mix sartorial opposites, bring them together, fuse them. If you take a powerful term like ‘gender- uid’ and apply it to fashion, it’s really the idea of uidity in a garment that moves harmoniously from one to the other, and which is one and the other. That’s all the more important today, when we see how clothing can become the centre of debate about what a man or a woman should wear. How we can call someone into question based on what they wear. I was struck by a news story about English students in uniform who, during a heatwave, were so hot the boys wore the girls’ pleated skirts in protest. Society is evolving faster than protocol. Obviously, those who personify this most are those who de ne themselves as non-binary. But more and more people are totally comfortable with wearing clothes that don’t traditionally align with their gender. It’s an interesting phase, and it opens up lots of creative possibilities in fashion. Before, we always de ned the characteristics of one gender while attributing them to the other. Today, there’s this neutral zone that un-categorises everything.     Can you please describe that neutral zone?   What if being non-aligned were engaging? Being neutral can be radical. There’s nothing bland about it: neutrality can be powerful, extreme and expressive. It's a galvanising exercise. On some styles, prints are made up of words that are like positive injunctions: “Vote”, “Stand”, “Sprint.” I wanted to transliterate an energetic, vigorous, daring collection. We need that right now.     You’re showing in restrictive conditions, in which the majority of the international fashion community is unable to attend. How are you presenting your collection? We are holding a show beneath the glass roof at La Samaritaine, a symbolic place within a prestigious location in Paris – on the top oor where the peacock frescoes are. This gigantic Art Nouveau painting, which was rediscovered and restored during renovations, speaks in a way of resilience, a desire to carry on.... The physical experience of the show is di erent from the digital one. In-person guests will be surrounded by green screens, the kind used in lmmaking for integrating special e ects. While the IRL audience is watching the show, online there will be a di erent, interactive environment for those who were unable to travel. While some guests will be able to direct the camera and interact with the show, creating a personalised perspective, the entire online audience will see a special set that features scenes from the Wim Wenders lm “Wings of Desire,” a story about angels, whom liturgy tells us are sexless, but who choose to experience life thanks to the power of love. Stepping into a territory that is still stylistically vague. A sensitive zone that erases gender and promises exponential creative possibilities. What does an in-between garment look like? What kind of cut can dissolve masculine and feminine? What wardrobe might s/he look good in? A fascinating new exploration for fashion, and the promise of a great journey that Louis Vuitton sets out to discover by abolishing these last boundaries. Finding expression in a landscape that is tenuous and vast, but also neutral: giving it colour, forging its character, inciting radicality, giving it personality. This is but the beginning of a reflection that is open, stimulating and fundamentally conscious.     What is the inspiration for this collection?   More than an inspiration, it’s a question, the very signi cant one of gender. We’re going beyond the basic idea that a woman gains power by co-opting the masculine wardrobe. What space is there for a category of clothing between feminine and masculine? It’s a growing space and its contours are ever more permeable. We’re de ning a type of clothing that lives in a non-binary zone. It’s fascinating to consider. What is a non-binary garment? Inevitably, it’s the designer’s role to o era point of view.     What’s distinctive about it?   By way of pure demonstration, it could be the structure of a jacket that’s in-between – as feminine as it is masculine. Or for example, the t-shirt dresses in the nal series. They could be dresses, but they could also be exaggerated t-shirts that skaters wear over shorts, or something basketball players might wear. Classic overcoats are nished like oversized sweaters. Phosphorescent fabrics lend the impression of movement, like mercury ‒ the chemical quicksilver ‒ or a changing sky. It’s an interplay of appearance and disappearance. Something chameleon-like.     Is it a new style?   I nd myself back to what I’ve always loved doing, which in the end de nes my work throughout my career as a designer. Stylistic hybrids. Patchworks of di erent materials. How to mix sartorial opposites, bring them together, fuse them. If you take a powerful term like ‘gender- uid’ and apply it to fashion, it’s really the idea of uidity in a garment that moves harmoniously from one to the other, and which is one and the other. That’s all the more important today, when we see how clothing can become the centre of debate about what a man or a woman should wear. How we can call someone into question based on what they wear. I was struck by a news story about English students in uniform who, during a heatwave, were so hot the boys wore the girls’ pleated skirts in protest. Society is evolving faster than protocol. Obviously, those who personify this most are those who de ne themselves as non-binary. But more and more people are totally comfortable with wearing clothes that don’t traditionally align with their gender. It’s an interesting phase, and it opens up lots of creative possibilities in fashion. Before, we always de ned the characteristics of one gender while attributing them to the other. Today, there’s this neutral zone that un-categorises everything.     Can you please describe that neutral zone?   What if being non-aligned were engaging? Being neutral can be radical. There’s nothing bland about it: neutrality can be powerful, extreme and expressive. It's a galvanising exercise. On some styles, prints are made up of words that are like positive injunctions: “Vote”, “Stand”, “Sprint.” I wanted to transliterate an energetic, vigorous, daring collection. We need that right now.     You’re showing in restrictive conditions, in which the majority of the international fashion community is unable to attend. How are you presenting your collection? We are holding a show beneath the glass roof at La Samaritaine, a symbolic place within a prestigious location in Paris – on the top oor where the peacock frescoes are. This gigantic Art Nouveau painting, which was rediscovered and restored during renovations, speaks in a way of resilience, a desire to carry on.... The physical experience of the show is di erent from the digital one. In-person guests will be surrounded by green screens, the kind used in lmmaking for integrating special e ects. While the IRL audience is watching the show, online there will be a di erent, interactive environment for those who were unable to travel. While some guests will be able to direct the camera and interact with the show, creating a personalised perspective, the entire online audience will see a special set that features scenes from the Wim Wenders lm “Wings of Desire,” a story about angels, whom liturgy tells us are sexless, but who choose to experience life thanks to the power of love.

TOMMY HILFIGER ACCELERATES TRANSITION TO A CIRCULAR BUSINESS WITH LAUNCH OF ‘TOMMY FOR LIFE’
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TOMMY HILFIGER ACCELERATES TRANSITION TO A CIRCULAR BUSINESS WITH LAUNCH OF ‘TOMMY FOR LIFE’

Design Tommy Hilfiger, announces the launch of ‘Tommyfor Life,’ a pioneering circular business model that will take pre-owned TOMMY HILFIGER and TOMMY JEANS pieces as well as damaged items from retail operations, to make them good as new or remix them into completely new styles. ‘Tommyfor Life’ products will go through a renewal process that includes professional cleaning, repairing, restoring and a strict quality assurance and control. ‘Tommy for Life’ will be piloted in the Netherlands starting today, before expanding to other European markets in 2021. ‘Tommyfor Life’ products will be available for purchase online exclusively at tommyforlife.com.      “The time to drive real, impactful change in the fashion industry is here and now, so we are committed to identifying ways to innovate our business models, practices and the way we interact with our consumers,” said Martijn Hagman, CEO, Tommy Hilfiger Global and PVH Europe. “‘Tommyfor Life’ provides solutions to one of our industry’s greatest challenges: switching from a “take-make-waste” approach to a model in which we keep products and materials in use as long as possible. Our investments in a business model that pioneers this at this scale and complexity will have true impact – not only on our brand, but on the future of the industry as a whole.”     The ‘Tommyfor Life’ program has developed three key product lines to extend the life of garments taken in:   Reloved: Previously owned products traded-in by consumers. Refreshed: Restored items from store and e-commerce returns. For example, items from the retail inventories that become unsaleable or proved defective, such as becoming stained as a result of handling, broken seams, lost buttons, etc. Remixed: Beginning in 2021, products that cannot be cleaned in full or repaired will be taken apart, with their materials used to create new, unique designs.     ‘Tommyfor Life’ is one of the initiatives tied to Tommy Hilfiger’sMake it Possible program, a bold approach to environmental and social sustainability that reinforces the organization’s commitment to create fashion that ‘Wastes Nothing and Welcomes All’. The new business model is in line with Tommy Hilfiger’s vision to make products that are fully circular and that can be part of a sustainable loop by 2030.     To participate in ‘Tommyfor Life’, consumers are invited to trade-in their pre-loved TOMMY HILFIGER and TOMMY JEANS items at TOMMY HILFIGER stores or send them via mail in exchange for discount vouchers. The value of the vouchers will depend on the type and number of items traded, regardless of their condition. In partnership with The Renewal Workshop – the leading provider of a circular solutions for apparel and textile brands – Tommy Hilfiger will sort, clean and repair donated items, restoring them to a newfound glory. What cannot be restored will be remixed into a new line of unique designs. Those that cannot be remixed will be recycled into yarns or repurposed, for instance into insulation. Nothing will go to waste.      To purchase product, trade in TOMMY HILFIGER products and learn more about the program, visit tommyforlife.com. Tommy Hilfiger, announces the launch of ‘Tommyfor Life,’ a pioneering circular business model that will take pre-owned TOMMY HILFIGER and TOMMY JEANS pieces as well as damaged items from retail operations, to make them good as new or remix them into completely new styles. ‘Tommyfor Life’ products will go through a renewal process that includes professional cleaning, repairing, restoring and a strict quality assurance and control. ‘Tommy for Life’ will be piloted in the Netherlands starting today, before expanding to other European markets in 2021. ‘Tommyfor Life’ products will be available for purchase online exclusively at tommyforlife.com.      “The time to drive real, impactful change in the fashion industry is here and now, so we are committed to identifying ways to innovate our business models, practices and the way we interact with our consumers,” said Martijn Hagman, CEO, Tommy Hilfiger Global and PVH Europe. “‘Tommyfor Life’ provides solutions to one of our industry’s greatest challenges: switching from a “take-make-waste” approach to a model in which we keep products and materials in use as long as possible. Our investments in a business model that pioneers this at this scale and complexity will have true impact – not only on our brand, but on the future of the industry as a whole.”     The ‘Tommyfor Life’ program has developed three key product lines to extend the life of garments taken in:   Reloved: Previously owned products traded-in by consumers. Refreshed: Restored items from store and e-commerce returns. For example, items from the retail inventories that become unsaleable or proved defective, such as becoming stained as a result of handling, broken seams, lost buttons, etc. Remixed: Beginning in 2021, products that cannot be cleaned in full or repaired will be taken apart, with their materials used to create new, unique designs.     ‘Tommyfor Life’ is one of the initiatives tied to Tommy Hilfiger’sMake it Possible program, a bold approach to environmental and social sustainability that reinforces the organization’s commitment to create fashion that ‘Wastes Nothing and Welcomes All’. The new business model is in line with Tommy Hilfiger’s vision to make products that are fully circular and that can be part of a sustainable loop by 2030.     To participate in ‘Tommyfor Life’, consumers are invited to trade-in their pre-loved TOMMY HILFIGER and TOMMY JEANS items at TOMMY HILFIGER stores or send them via mail in exchange for discount vouchers. The value of the vouchers will depend on the type and number of items traded, regardless of their condition. In partnership with The Renewal Workshop – the leading provider of a circular solutions for apparel and textile brands – Tommy Hilfiger will sort, clean and repair donated items, restoring them to a newfound glory. What cannot be restored will be remixed into a new line of unique designs. Those that cannot be remixed will be recycled into yarns or repurposed, for instance into insulation. Nothing will go to waste.      To purchase product, trade in TOMMY HILFIGER products and learn more about the program, visit tommyforlife.com.

Hermès for  SS21
543

Hermès for SS21

Fashion Week Hermès presented the new WRTW for SS21 during Paris Fashion Week.       The growing pleasure of reconnection with the world, the infinite pleasure of beginning again. How sweet it is to live again. How urgent it is to go further. The body wraps itself in emotions, Not shying away, but playing a balancing act. A body once glimpsed through a keyhole, now fully there. Beautiful and whole. Sensuality found again. Why mask our vulnerabilities? We have uncovered our hidden flaws. We embraced our doubts with open arms, We have fashioned them. Once calm and confidence are found again, she knows everything will accelerate. Each era is its own beginning. Each afternoon a resurrection. Hermès presented the new WRTW for SS21 during Paris Fashion Week.       The growing pleasure of reconnection with the world, the infinite pleasure of beginning again. How sweet it is to live again. How urgent it is to go further. The body wraps itself in emotions, Not shying away, but playing a balancing act. A body once glimpsed through a keyhole, now fully there. Beautiful and whole. Sensuality found again. Why mask our vulnerabilities? We have uncovered our hidden flaws. We embraced our doubts with open arms, We have fashioned them. Once calm and confidence are found again, she knows everything will accelerate. Each era is its own beginning. Each afternoon a resurrection.

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Givenchy for Spring & Summer 2021
542

Givenchy for Spring & Summer 2021

Fashion Week “You find the pieces of the puzzle for a collection, building it from symbols and signs, but never forgetting the reality of the person who will wear it and bring it to life. The women and men should be powerful and effortless, equal and joyful, a reflection of who they really are – only more so. It’s about finding the humanity in luxury.” Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     At Matthew M. Williams’ Givenchy, ‘Hardware’ is key. Eschewing, gendered notions of jewellery and accessories, rather it is hardware that unites the women and men of Givenchy, a symbolic nexus of utility and luxury and the place where this collection began. The Lover’s Lock is a unisex object of utility, decoration, commitment and emotion; a sincere yet playful symbol of Paris – it nods to the lost locks of Le Pont des Arts – it is an object punctuated throughout this initial collection as both decoration and fastenings. It also points to Williams’ commitment to the world of Givenchy in this first proposal as thehouse’s Creative Director.     The Spring-Summer ‘21 collection explores Givenchy in the form of a stream of consciousness for Williams and is a ‘sampler’ of what is to come. Begun in the midst of a pandemic and completed within two months, this is a new beginning, yet is intermingled with elements of the archive and is a utilisation of Givenchy’s distinct lineage, pointing to the past, present and future. Above all, there is a sense of celebration, of the people who have led Williams here and those he wants to wear the clothes. This is expressed in the images that reveals the collection, a photographic study by the creative director together with the artist Heji Shin – a photographer who also gets to the heart of who a person is as much as to the clothes they wear.     From Hubert de Givenchy’s swathes of looped drapery, lighter-than-air transparencies, linear necklines and ‘Jour’ open backs, to the McQueen horn, reborn; both the classical and radical contrasts of Givenchy are embraced and shown to have always been part of the house’s history in the collection. Ultimately, it is a feeling of elegance, playfulness and pragmatism that is key to Matthew M. Williams’ vision for the house.     There is a notion of evolution, both lighthearted and serious, in this play of elements past and present. From the Tryp-toe shoe and stockings, the Horn-heel and hat together with a further examination of the Antigona bag, each is a play on and development of existing objects in the archive. They are joined by the new unisex Cut-out bag in its many iterations, as well as the G chains, objects that are destined to add to the history of the house and are interspersed throughout. Williams’ signature technical material experimentation is balanced by the traditional, natural and opulent. From the use of a cotton Ottoman for both genders in outerwear, technical taffeta in tailoring and structured Punto di Milano jersey to evoke more pure forms in dressmaking, tradition is respected yet refined and re-contextualised. At the same time, an experiment in different densities of injected foam leads to an evolution of the slide, the ultra-comfortable Marshmallow Slide is the footwear that underpins much of the collection, quite literally providing a casual, insouciant foundation for many of the more formal looks. The study of casual archetypes continues throughout the collection, including new technical coatings of denim in both paint and resin, work that is as labour intensive as the collection’s more traditional embroideries. It is a sign ofWilliams’ Californian sensibility transplanted to Europe that he approaches the two sides with equal aplomb and rigour, both classicism and subversion, with a sense of ease and respect for the humanity of the wearer infusing all. “You find the pieces of the puzzle for a collection, building it from symbols and signs, but never forgetting the reality of the person who will wear it and bring it to life. The women and men should be powerful and effortless, equal and joyful, a reflection of who they really are – only more so. It’s about finding the humanity in luxury.” Matthew M. Williams, Creative Director, Givenchy     At Matthew M. Williams’ Givenchy, ‘Hardware’ is key. Eschewing, gendered notions of jewellery and accessories, rather it is hardware that unites the women and men of Givenchy, a symbolic nexus of utility and luxury and the place where this collection began. The Lover’s Lock is a unisex object of utility, decoration, commitment and emotion; a sincere yet playful symbol of Paris – it nods to the lost locks of Le Pont des Arts – it is an object punctuated throughout this initial collection as both decoration and fastenings. It also points to Williams’ commitment to the world of Givenchy in this first proposal as thehouse’s Creative Director.     The Spring-Summer ‘21 collection explores Givenchy in the form of a stream of consciousness for Williams and is a ‘sampler’ of what is to come. Begun in the midst of a pandemic and completed within two months, this is a new beginning, yet is intermingled with elements of the archive and is a utilisation of Givenchy’s distinct lineage, pointing to the past, present and future. Above all, there is a sense of celebration, of the people who have led Williams here and those he wants to wear the clothes. This is expressed in the images that reveals the collection, a photographic study by the creative director together with the artist Heji Shin – a photographer who also gets to the heart of who a person is as much as to the clothes they wear.     From Hubert de Givenchy’s swathes of looped drapery, lighter-than-air transparencies, linear necklines and ‘Jour’ open backs, to the McQueen horn, reborn; both the classical and radical contrasts of Givenchy are embraced and shown to have always been part of the house’s history in the collection. Ultimately, it is a feeling of elegance, playfulness and pragmatism that is key to Matthew M. Williams’ vision for the house.     There is a notion of evolution, both lighthearted and serious, in this play of elements past and present. From the Tryp-toe shoe and stockings, the Horn-heel and hat together with a further examination of the Antigona bag, each is a play on and development of existing objects in the archive. They are joined by the new unisex Cut-out bag in its many iterations, as well as the G chains, objects that are destined to add to the history of the house and are interspersed throughout. Williams’ signature technical material experimentation is balanced by the traditional, natural and opulent. From the use of a cotton Ottoman for both genders in outerwear, technical taffeta in tailoring and structured Punto di Milano jersey to evoke more pure forms in dressmaking, tradition is respected yet refined and re-contextualised. At the same time, an experiment in different densities of injected foam leads to an evolution of the slide, the ultra-comfortable Marshmallow Slide is the footwear that underpins much of the collection, quite literally providing a casual, insouciant foundation for many of the more formal looks. The study of casual archetypes continues throughout the collection, including new technical coatings of denim in both paint and resin, work that is as labour intensive as the collection’s more traditional embroideries. It is a sign ofWilliams’ Californian sensibility transplanted to Europe that he approaches the two sides with equal aplomb and rigour, both classicism and subversion, with a sense of ease and respect for the humanity of the wearer infusing all.

STONE ISLAND X PERSOL
547

STONE ISLAND X PERSOL

Accessories Present pilot frame P02460S — the reinterpretation of an archive model of sunglasses from the '70s to give birth to the PO2460S pilot frame, a new exclusive style that combines the spirit and the excellence of the two Italian brands. A single style and colorway.   It is a tantalizing convergence of the two brands, each being steeped in a rich heritage of Italian design and known for their devotion to craftmanship and technology. Separately they have defined excellence in their own fields. Together, they have created a new milestone in luxury eyewear. A mix of a shared vision.     A bold pilot profile is characterized by a metal bridge with visible screws, crafted with an exclusive attention to all details to ensure maximum protection, always in style. The metal bridge is hand brushed for an exquisite opal effect, in contrast with the frame. The gunmetal frame has temples enriched by the famous stylized Arrow and Meflecto technology and features yellow temple tips with the print of the iconic Stone Island logo. The frame is sanded by hand, making sure to give a luminous effect to the Arrow. The model has light blue polarized lenses, with both Persol and Stone Island engraved logos, one for each lens.     The sunglasses come with a multi-functional box that includes the sunglasses and their dedicated case, a branded lanyard and a special cleaning kit, embodying both brands’ attitude to the function.       Present pilot frame P02460S — the reinterpretation of an archive model of sunglasses from the '70s to give birth to the PO2460S pilot frame, a new exclusive style that combines the spirit and the excellence of the two Italian brands. A single style and colorway.   It is a tantalizing convergence of the two brands, each being steeped in a rich heritage of Italian design and known for their devotion to craftmanship and technology. Separately they have defined excellence in their own fields. Together, they have created a new milestone in luxury eyewear. A mix of a shared vision.     A bold pilot profile is characterized by a metal bridge with visible screws, crafted with an exclusive attention to all details to ensure maximum protection, always in style. The metal bridge is hand brushed for an exquisite opal effect, in contrast with the frame. The gunmetal frame has temples enriched by the famous stylized Arrow and Meflecto technology and features yellow temple tips with the print of the iconic Stone Island logo. The frame is sanded by hand, making sure to give a luminous effect to the Arrow. The model has light blue polarized lenses, with both Persol and Stone Island engraved logos, one for each lens.     The sunglasses come with a multi-functional box that includes the sunglasses and their dedicated case, a branded lanyard and a special cleaning kit, embodying both brands’ attitude to the function.      

Exclusive editorial starring Mike Gioia
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Exclusive editorial starring Mike Gioia

Men Exclusive editorial, captured by Diane Zhao.     TEAM CREDITS: model: Mike Gioia - Ford Models grooming by: Agata Helena Exclusive editorial, captured by Diane Zhao.     TEAM CREDITS: model: Mike Gioia - Ford Models grooming by: Agata Helena

Acne Studios Women’s Spring/Summer 2021
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Acne Studios Women’s Spring/Summer 2021

Fashion Week “I am excited by transitional moments, in-between times that are alive with possibility. This collection is about the elevation of an elemental life, about positivity, optimism and light,” says Jonny Johansson, creative director of Acne Studios.   A collection about liberation, transformation and personal rebirth. Gatherings for a spiritual moonrise, the energy of twilight, the darkness before the dawn and the impossible light of a full moon rising.   It’s about the blurring of time, the unceasing cycle of day turning to night, and vice versa; the experimentation it inspires, with clashes and contrasts, and pieces that have both a versatile presence and ease. Materials are a particular focus, with fabrics that interact and change with the light; cracked leather, pearlized cotton, metallic thread organza, iridescent paper. What may appear matt when the sun has set takes a luminescent shine after the moon rises.   Acne Studios has collaborated with the LA artist Ben Quinn, whose work is rooted in his experiences with the supernatural. His painting of a pulsating star is printed on an oversized metallic thread organza tunic, a washed linen top and wrap skirt, and tops in cotton voile or embroidered paillette top. Quinn’s image is also turned into a patchwork for sheer dresses and skirts.   Fabrics of di erent weights, weaves and textures are worn together to evoke a poetic silhouette. Crochet knits are like shing nets for bandeau tops, knickers or skirts, worn as layering pieces.Often, it’s under a translucent layer, while other times the crochet gives contrast, like under a raw-cut leather sleeveless dress.   Slouchy tailored jackets are as soft as can be, with no internal construction, even made from suit lining. Raw cut leather and suede provide moments of structure.   Luminescence is everywhere. A dip-dyed trench is in pearlescent organza, cut wide and loose. Cracked leather raw cut apron tops throw back the light, while a metallic shift dress is in crinklediridescent paper. Metallic cu s and earrings are re ective and delicate, as if hand-stamped, decoratedwith shells and stones. Transparent framed glasses let the light pass through them and are oversized enough to take in the whole of the moon.   Leather and suede bags have a weight to them with extreme oversized straps, mimicked in scale bythe garment dyed du el bags which can transition easily from day to evening to day. Flip ops havestraps of tightly braided leather, contrasting with kitten heels in raw cut fringed hemp. Spiked heels have their own attitude.   The collection represents a place that obeys its own logic and is centred around free gathering and the transition of time. “I am excited by transitional moments, in-between times that are alive with possibility. This collection is about the elevation of an elemental life, about positivity, optimism and light,” says Jonny Johansson, creative director of Acne Studios.   A collection about liberation, transformation and personal rebirth. Gatherings for a spiritual moonrise, the energy of twilight, the darkness before the dawn and the impossible light of a full moon rising.   It’s about the blurring of time, the unceasing cycle of day turning to night, and vice versa; the experimentation it inspires, with clashes and contrasts, and pieces that have both a versatile presence and ease. Materials are a particular focus, with fabrics that interact and change with the light; cracked leather, pearlized cotton, metallic thread organza, iridescent paper. What may appear matt when the sun has set takes a luminescent shine after the moon rises.   Acne Studios has collaborated with the LA artist Ben Quinn, whose work is rooted in his experiences with the supernatural. His painting of a pulsating star is printed on an oversized metallic thread organza tunic, a washed linen top and wrap skirt, and tops in cotton voile or embroidered paillette top. Quinn’s image is also turned into a patchwork for sheer dresses and skirts.   Fabrics of di erent weights, weaves and textures are worn together to evoke a poetic silhouette. Crochet knits are like shing nets for bandeau tops, knickers or skirts, worn as layering pieces.Often, it’s under a translucent layer, while other times the crochet gives contrast, like under a raw-cut leather sleeveless dress.   Slouchy tailored jackets are as soft as can be, with no internal construction, even made from suit lining. Raw cut leather and suede provide moments of structure.   Luminescence is everywhere. A dip-dyed trench is in pearlescent organza, cut wide and loose. Cracked leather raw cut apron tops throw back the light, while a metallic shift dress is in crinklediridescent paper. Metallic cu s and earrings are re ective and delicate, as if hand-stamped, decoratedwith shells and stones. Transparent framed glasses let the light pass through them and are oversized enough to take in the whole of the moon.   Leather and suede bags have a weight to them with extreme oversized straps, mimicked in scale bythe garment dyed du el bags which can transition easily from day to evening to day. Flip ops havestraps of tightly braided leather, contrasting with kitten heels in raw cut fringed hemp. Spiked heels have their own attitude.   The collection represents a place that obeys its own logic and is centred around free gathering and the transition of time.

Welcome to Loubi World!
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Welcome to Loubi World!

Fashion Week To unveil his Women’s & Men’s Spring-Summer 2021 collections, Christian Louboutin will host a virtual event on October 2, 2020 on the Korea-based gaming application Zepeto. Passionate about physical travels since his teenage years, Christian Louboutin - eager to explore new territories and an avid fan of new technologies - invites the international press, his friends and fans to join him for an immersive digital creative experience: Loubi World.   Modelled as a techno-kawaï version of the designer’s eternal muse - Paris - Loubi World recreates places and moments dear to him, from a terrace with an imaginary view of the City of Lights, to the Galerie Véro-Dodat where he opened his first store back in 1991, to a paved round square replete with a classic Parisian bistro, creperie, carrousel, the Morris columns, the new flagship store and the Loubi Disco.   Forever an advocate of self-expression and boundless creativity, Christian Louboutin has ensured that users have free range to be exactly who they’d like in Loubi World without any consideration of gender or style. Users are invited to create their own avatar using either facial recognition and by self-selecting their skin tone, hairstyle and outfit, as well as choose shoes and accessories from the new SS21 collection.   After entering the game, users are teleported into the Loubi Boutique, a virtual version of the newly opened store on rue Saint-Honoré in Paris, where they can try on and play with emblematic styles from the SS21 collection, before adding the final touch to their avatars’ looks: a new leather goods style from the new season.   A tribute to Christian Louboutin’s love of social interactions and his curiosity and excitement for meeting new people, avatars can interact with their friends on the Loubi Terrasse, take selfies with the designer, and shoot, through virtual reality, photos and videos that can easily be shared on Instagram, Facebook, Tik Tok, Weibo & WeChat.   The debut of a new collection calls for celebration. French DJ Zimmer will invite avatars to fire up the dance floor of the Loubi Disco, a nod to the designer’s teenage years at Le Palace. The true highlight of the night will be a special performance by US pop singer King Princess’ avatar.   Get your headphones ready to make sure you will fully experience the music in 8D audio, an innovative recording technology allowing a more immersive listening.   The event will welcome international guests & friends such as AmiAya, Eunse Ki, Julien Granel, King Princess, Koffe (CJI Model), Larsen Thompson, Miss Paris, Nicky Doll, Quincy Brown, Rina Sawayama, Shudu (CJI Model), TK Quann, Yu Yamada and many more, ... To unveil his Women’s & Men’s Spring-Summer 2021 collections, Christian Louboutin will host a virtual event on October 2, 2020 on the Korea-based gaming application Zepeto. Passionate about physical travels since his teenage years, Christian Louboutin - eager to explore new territories and an avid fan of new technologies - invites the international press, his friends and fans to join him for an immersive digital creative experience: Loubi World.   Modelled as a techno-kawaï version of the designer’s eternal muse - Paris - Loubi World recreates places and moments dear to him, from a terrace with an imaginary view of the City of Lights, to the Galerie Véro-Dodat where he opened his first store back in 1991, to a paved round square replete with a classic Parisian bistro, creperie, carrousel, the Morris columns, the new flagship store and the Loubi Disco.   Forever an advocate of self-expression and boundless creativity, Christian Louboutin has ensured that users have free range to be exactly who they’d like in Loubi World without any consideration of gender or style. Users are invited to create their own avatar using either facial recognition and by self-selecting their skin tone, hairstyle and outfit, as well as choose shoes and accessories from the new SS21 collection.   After entering the game, users are teleported into the Loubi Boutique, a virtual version of the newly opened store on rue Saint-Honoré in Paris, where they can try on and play with emblematic styles from the SS21 collection, before adding the final touch to their avatars’ looks: a new leather goods style from the new season.   A tribute to Christian Louboutin’s love of social interactions and his curiosity and excitement for meeting new people, avatars can interact with their friends on the Loubi Terrasse, take selfies with the designer, and shoot, through virtual reality, photos and videos that can easily be shared on Instagram, Facebook, Tik Tok, Weibo & WeChat.   The debut of a new collection calls for celebration. French DJ Zimmer will invite avatars to fire up the dance floor of the Loubi Disco, a nod to the designer’s teenage years at Le Palace. The true highlight of the night will be a special performance by US pop singer King Princess’ avatar.   Get your headphones ready to make sure you will fully experience the music in 8D audio, an innovative recording technology allowing a more immersive listening.   The event will welcome international guests & friends such as AmiAya, Eunse Ki, Julien Granel, King Princess, Koffe (CJI Model), Larsen Thompson, Miss Paris, Nicky Doll, Quincy Brown, Rina Sawayama, Shudu (CJI Model), TK Quann, Yu Yamada and many more, ...

UNIQLO Grote Marktstraat Opened Today
550

UNIQLO Grote Marktstraat Opened Today

Fashion The Japanese retailer UNIQLO opened the doors of its first store in The Hague and second store in The Netherlands today at 10:00am. UNIQLO announces that it is proud to be able to offer LifeWear to the residents and visitors of this dynamic city.       For the opening of the UNIQLO Grote Marktstraat store, the retailer partnered with various local talents in order to showcase their work. As part of this, two fashion students of the ROC Mondriaan school joined an upcycling project for which they created two entirely new designs using items of the UNIQLO Recycle program. The creations are on display in one of the windows of the UNIQLO Grote Marktstraat store for the month of October. In addition, a Limited Edition Eco Tote Bag has been created incorporating a unique design by local illustrator Wies van der Wal. The Tote Bag is available to purchase at UNIQLO Grote Marktstraat at a price of €1,90.     On the first floor of the UNIQLO Grote Marktstraat store, a seating area has been set up in collaboration with Studio Perspective, who promote Dutch Design furniture items which are all locally produced in a sustainable and socially responsible manner.      Honoring The Hague, known for being one of the greenest cities of the Netherlands, a real garden has been recreated at the heart of the UNIQLO Grote Marktstraat store. Inspired by the traditional Japanese Garden at Park Clingendael, the garden incorporates true Japanese elements such as bonsai trees and green moss.       The Japanese retailer UNIQLO opened the doors of its first store in The Hague and second store in The Netherlands today at 10:00am. UNIQLO announces that it is proud to be able to offer LifeWear to the residents and visitors of this dynamic city.       For the opening of the UNIQLO Grote Marktstraat store, the retailer partnered with various local talents in order to showcase their work. As part of this, two fashion students of the ROC Mondriaan school joined an upcycling project for which they created two entirely new designs using items of the UNIQLO Recycle program. The creations are on display in one of the windows of the UNIQLO Grote Marktstraat store for the month of October. In addition, a Limited Edition Eco Tote Bag has been created incorporating a unique design by local illustrator Wies van der Wal. The Tote Bag is available to purchase at UNIQLO Grote Marktstraat at a price of €1,90.     On the first floor of the UNIQLO Grote Marktstraat store, a seating area has been set up in collaboration with Studio Perspective, who promote Dutch Design furniture items which are all locally produced in a sustainable and socially responsible manner.      Honoring The Hague, known for being one of the greenest cities of the Netherlands, a real garden has been recreated at the heart of the UNIQLO Grote Marktstraat store. Inspired by the traditional Japanese Garden at Park Clingendael, the garden incorporates true Japanese elements such as bonsai trees and green moss.      

Dries Van Noten The collections for Women & Men S/S 2021
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Dries Van Noten The collections for Women & Men S/S 2021

Fashion Week Bold, optimistic, colourful, light, pure, fun, sculpted, easy, kinetic, frank, joyous, vivid, warm and stark, jubilant, powerful. A minimum od artifice. The visionary films of New Zealand artist Len Lye. He pioneered harnessing motion in art. Filmed in the 1920s–1940s, with colour painted and motives scratched on the celluloid, they were precursors of the psychedelia that would follow only forty years later. A fashion shoot by Viviane Sassen. An homage to the powerful role fashion editorial and imagery has played in fashion. The uplifting joy of a perfect moment. A bright windy, sunny day on the beach. Billowing pure white clouds race across a clear blue sky. Energy is high. The narrative of folklore is evoked with traditional embroidery techniques. A point of view shared for our collections for Women and Men.     FORM: The challenge was to capture movement and optimism in dress. Pure lines that span many attitudes of dress from the sublimation of couture to utility in workwear. From constructed balloon sleeves to a simple patch pocket chino. Many looks for women and men have shorts as a foundation. The lines between traditions of garment structure for men and women are blurred. High waisted skirts and pants. Exaggerated wide scooped necklines on constructed garments are mirrored in shirting. Vivid one-piece bathing suits for women for the first-ever time. Light caftans for the beach. Ties draw scalloped forms on backs.     FABRICS: The crisp and comforting simplicity of cottons. The airy light movement of organza. Contrasts in opacity and hand. Summer suiting and shirting, Large mesh, Silk organza bonded to linen, Casual sweats, chinos, silk cloque.   PRINT & EMBELLISHMENT: All printed motifs are derived from frames captured from the films of Len Lye. A new take on print and embroidery. A graphic play with light and shadow. The reality and illusion of dancing in a projection. Motifs from one printed garment invade another – prints from a skirt move onto the lapel of a jacket. What appear as simple stripes are shards of light cast through a louver shutter captured and printed. Stripes undulating across garments almost bring optical interference. The word ‘You’ is printed orembroidered on tops to encourage an end to the era of ‘Me’. The largecircle of a spotlight in vivid colours seems projected on the wearer. The romance of verdant green palm trees. The traditional craft of needlework in optic white. Laser cuts in leather seem as ‘Broderie Anglaise’ or lace. The exuberance of ruffles. Len Lye’s essay on movement in art is printed in its entirety on garments that will ‘drop’ later in the season.   ACCESSORIES:  Clutches seem caught in a vivid projection of colour and stripes. Shoes and open-toe sandals in Nappa leather mounted on our signature banana heel. Eyewear is colour coordinated with earrings and necklaces in micro beads.   PHOTOGRAPHY: Viviane Sassen   Bold, optimistic, colourful, light, pure, fun, sculpted, easy, kinetic, frank, joyous, vivid, warm and stark, jubilant, powerful. A minimum od artifice. The visionary films of New Zealand artist Len Lye. He pioneered harnessing motion in art. Filmed in the 1920s–1940s, with colour painted and motives scratched on the celluloid, they were precursors of the psychedelia that would follow only forty years later. A fashion shoot by Viviane Sassen. An homage to the powerful role fashion editorial and imagery has played in fashion. The uplifting joy of a perfect moment. A bright windy, sunny day on the beach. Billowing pure white clouds race across a clear blue sky. Energy is high. The narrative of folklore is evoked with traditional embroidery techniques. A point of view shared for our collections for Women and Men.     FORM: The challenge was to capture movement and optimism in dress. Pure lines that span many attitudes of dress from the sublimation of couture to utility in workwear. From constructed balloon sleeves to a simple patch pocket chino. Many looks for women and men have shorts as a foundation. The lines between traditions of garment structure for men and women are blurred. High waisted skirts and pants. Exaggerated wide scooped necklines on constructed garments are mirrored in shirting. Vivid one-piece bathing suits for women for the first-ever time. Light caftans for the beach. Ties draw scalloped forms on backs.     FABRICS: The crisp and comforting simplicity of cottons. The airy light movement of organza. Contrasts in opacity and hand. Summer suiting and shirting, Large mesh, Silk organza bonded to linen, Casual sweats, chinos, silk cloque.   PRINT & EMBELLISHMENT: All printed motifs are derived from frames captured from the films of Len Lye. A new take on print and embroidery. A graphic play with light and shadow. The reality and illusion of dancing in a projection. Motifs from one printed garment invade another – prints from a skirt move onto the lapel of a jacket. What appear as simple stripes are shards of light cast through a louver shutter captured and printed. Stripes undulating across garments almost bring optical interference. The word ‘You’ is printed orembroidered on tops to encourage an end to the era of ‘Me’. The largecircle of a spotlight in vivid colours seems projected on the wearer. The romance of verdant green palm trees. The traditional craft of needlework in optic white. Laser cuts in leather seem as ‘Broderie Anglaise’ or lace. The exuberance of ruffles. Len Lye’s essay on movement in art is printed in its entirety on garments that will ‘drop’ later in the season.   ACCESSORIES:  Clutches seem caught in a vivid projection of colour and stripes. Shoes and open-toe sandals in Nappa leather mounted on our signature banana heel. Eyewear is colour coordinated with earrings and necklaces in micro beads.   PHOTOGRAPHY: Viviane Sassen  

Giorgio Armani Men's and women's collections Spring/Summer 2021
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Giorgio Armani Men's and women's collections Spring/Summer 2021

Fashion Week These are timeless thoughts, as narrated by the voice of renowned and multi-awarded Italian actor Pierfrancesco Favino in the 20-minutes video-documentary that precedes and introduces the Giorgio Armani Spring/Summer 2021 show, and that, through an emotional edit of images, memories and archive interviews spans decades of Armani's dazzlingly consistent style, before making way to the new collection, broadcasted for the first time on television.   In the video-documentary, Giorgio Armani's language evolves relentlessly, whilst staying firm in its roots. It swings in subtle balances between rigour and sensuality, city and exoticism, purity and slight concessions to eccentricity. It is the result of a process of subtraction, which captures time and sublimates it, creating fashion that goes beyond fashion. Each new collection adds headwords to an expanding vocabulary, while reiterating a sense of elegance which puts the person at the centre.   For the Spring/Summer 2021 collection, silhouettes, for both men and women, are essential, soft, fluid: a blend of pure lines and neutral colours —grey, beige, black, blue— that light up with occasional geometries, swarming with rhythmic patterns, following an idea of ton sur ton that is real but also metaphorical, but never prevails over the rest. What emerges is the personality of a woman and a man who are free from aesthetic constraints, careful instead to express themselves through what they wear. Whether everything is matte or shimmering, it is the sense of measure that keeps asserting itself, overcoming time. These are timeless thoughts, as narrated by the voice of renowned and multi-awarded Italian actor Pierfrancesco Favino in the 20-minutes video-documentary that precedes and introduces the Giorgio Armani Spring/Summer 2021 show, and that, through an emotional edit of images, memories and archive interviews spans decades of Armani's dazzlingly consistent style, before making way to the new collection, broadcasted for the first time on television.   In the video-documentary, Giorgio Armani's language evolves relentlessly, whilst staying firm in its roots. It swings in subtle balances between rigour and sensuality, city and exoticism, purity and slight concessions to eccentricity. It is the result of a process of subtraction, which captures time and sublimates it, creating fashion that goes beyond fashion. Each new collection adds headwords to an expanding vocabulary, while reiterating a sense of elegance which puts the person at the centre.   For the Spring/Summer 2021 collection, silhouettes, for both men and women, are essential, soft, fluid: a blend of pure lines and neutral colours —grey, beige, black, blue— that light up with occasional geometries, swarming with rhythmic patterns, following an idea of ton sur ton that is real but also metaphorical, but never prevails over the rest. What emerges is the personality of a woman and a man who are free from aesthetic constraints, careful instead to express themselves through what they wear. Whether everything is matte or shimmering, it is the sense of measure that keeps asserting itself, overcoming time.

DIOR for Spring & Summer 2021
527

DIOR for Spring & Summer 2021

Fashion Week For the Dior spring-summer 2021 ready-to-wear show, Maria Grazia Chiuri continues her committed reflection on the origins of fashion, and the meaning of cut and creation, as artistic lexicons in perpetual movement. Inspired by the work of Lucia Marcucci - an emblematic figure of the Italian avant-garde who designed the show's scenography - she chose the aesthetics of collage and visual poetry as a new space for expression. Patchworks of scarves in a mix of paisley and floral motifs, punctuated with lace fragments, accessorize a series of dresses and pants, opening up infinite possibilities for the imagination. Fascinated by the power of thought embodied by authors such as Virginia Woolf and Susan Sontag, the Creative Director of Dior women’s collections revisits the concept of clothing in its essence, from men’s shirts to sleek coats, celebrating the skills of cultures around the world, from Japan to Indonesia. A striking and magnetic choral work transcended by the female voices of the Sequenza 9.3 ensemble - directed by Catherine Simonpietri - (re)interpreting Lucia Ronchetti's Sangu di rosa and the Voceri tradition, like an ode to beauty in all its plurality. The ultimate surprise of this collective odyssey comes in the form of a unique visual work bridging reality and fiction by the filmmaker Alina Marazzi, a tribute to Lucia Marcucci mixing texts and textiles, voices and images. For the Dior spring-summer 2021 ready-to-wear show, Maria Grazia Chiuri continues her committed reflection on the origins of fashion, and the meaning of cut and creation, as artistic lexicons in perpetual movement. Inspired by the work of Lucia Marcucci - an emblematic figure of the Italian avant-garde who designed the show's scenography - she chose the aesthetics of collage and visual poetry as a new space for expression. Patchworks of scarves in a mix of paisley and floral motifs, punctuated with lace fragments, accessorize a series of dresses and pants, opening up infinite possibilities for the imagination. Fascinated by the power of thought embodied by authors such as Virginia Woolf and Susan Sontag, the Creative Director of Dior women’s collections revisits the concept of clothing in its essence, from men’s shirts to sleek coats, celebrating the skills of cultures around the world, from Japan to Indonesia. A striking and magnetic choral work transcended by the female voices of the Sequenza 9.3 ensemble - directed by Catherine Simonpietri - (re)interpreting Lucia Ronchetti's Sangu di rosa and the Voceri tradition, like an ode to beauty in all its plurality. The ultimate surprise of this collective odyssey comes in the form of a unique visual work bridging reality and fiction by the filmmaker Alina Marazzi, a tribute to Lucia Marcucci mixing texts and textiles, voices and images.

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