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Fendi Couture Spring & Summer 2021
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Fendi Couture Spring & Summer 2021

Fashion Week “Vain trifles as they seem, clothes have, they say, more important offices than to merely keep us warm. They change our view of the world and the world’s view of us.” Virginia Woolf, Orlando   Bloomsbury to Borghese     Reflecting on transcendent romance and timeless creativity, for his debut Fendi collection Kim Jones draws on the renegade British sen­sibility of the Bloomsbury Group while paying homage to the storied history of the Roman maison. For Fendi Couture Spring / Summer 2021, seemingly diverse inspirations find common ground and are interwoven: the enduring allure of Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell’s liberated creativity explored alongside the eternal language of Italian sculpture and Fendi’s foundational codes. As Virginia Woolf wrote in Orlando: “Memory is the seamstress, and a capricious one at that.”     Adopting the time-travelling, binary-blurring novel as a central motif, temporalities are warped while exquisite femininity and mas­culine androgyny appear as fluid choices rather than innate realities. A love letter written by Virginia Woolf to Vita Sackville-West in 1928 – only three years after Fendi was founded – Orlando’s literary conceits are directly interspersed throughout the collection: some­times in the form of metal-bound book clutches, sometimes lines from the text inscribed into Mother of Pearl minaudières or leather boots. Extracts from letters written between Virginia and Vita dur­ing their decades-long courtship are read aloud by friends and family of Fendi throughout the Max Richter composition that scores the show.     Motifs discovered at Charleston farmhouse – the Sussex home of the Bloomsbury set, located only a short distance from where Jones spent much of his childhood – are revived and recontextualised through ornately beaded boots and hand-painted heels; the Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant frescoes which decorate its walls adapted in-to embroidered embellishments on gowns. “I like how this family of people – and particularly these two pioneering sisters – moved things forward,” notes Jones. “I admire the way that they lived their lives, the freedom that they created for themselves and the art that they left behind for the world.”     The hand-printed, marble-bound books published by Virginia and Leonard Woolf for Hogarth Press – displayed at the show’s accom-panying literary exhibition – offer a seamless segue into classical Italian aesthetics. Mirroring the marble palette of Rome’s Galleria Borghese, whose Bernini sculptures inform the dramatic deshabillé drapery found in the collection, they showcase the harmony between the two movements (so fascinated was Vanessa Bell by Italian Classicism that she would paint in the Borghese gardens, or reprise Old Masters to hang on the walls of Charleston). Visible in woven jacquards and on silken gowns; through intarsia furs and hand-beaded tailoring, mar­bles become a key component in the collection’s visual language.     Fendi’s own history also appears as a primary source, refracted through Jones’ contemporary perspective: the biographies of those who model the cast used to excavate the archives for formative sketch­es and decoration. The velvet ribbons of a vintage bag are transposed onto a new design; Karligraphy monograms taken from Lagerfeld’s final collection beaded onto boots.      The importance of family – both real and chosen – is celebrated through the cast who model the collection, who each inhabit glass vitrines transformed into rooms of their own. “Fendi represents arti­sanal quality of the highest order, and it is all about family,” Jones reflects. “It is in its third generation with a Fendi at its helm, and I am guest starring while bringing in the fourth. Here, I am surrounded by strong, powerful women who I love and respect, and want to bring their energy into what I do.”     #FendiCouture www.fendi.com “Vain trifles as they seem, clothes have, they say, more important offices than to merely keep us warm. They change our view of the world and the world’s view of us.” Virginia Woolf, Orlando   Bloomsbury to Borghese     Reflecting on transcendent romance and timeless creativity, for his debut Fendi collection Kim Jones draws on the renegade British sen­sibility of the Bloomsbury Group while paying homage to the storied history of the Roman maison. For Fendi Couture Spring / Summer 2021, seemingly diverse inspirations find common ground and are interwoven: the enduring allure of Virginia Woolf and Vanessa Bell’s liberated creativity explored alongside the eternal language of Italian sculpture and Fendi’s foundational codes. As Virginia Woolf wrote in Orlando: “Memory is the seamstress, and a capricious one at that.”     Adopting the time-travelling, binary-blurring novel as a central motif, temporalities are warped while exquisite femininity and mas­culine androgyny appear as fluid choices rather than innate realities. A love letter written by Virginia Woolf to Vita Sackville-West in 1928 – only three years after Fendi was founded – Orlando’s literary conceits are directly interspersed throughout the collection: some­times in the form of metal-bound book clutches, sometimes lines from the text inscribed into Mother of Pearl minaudières or leather boots. Extracts from letters written between Virginia and Vita dur­ing their decades-long courtship are read aloud by friends and family of Fendi throughout the Max Richter composition that scores the show.     Motifs discovered at Charleston farmhouse – the Sussex home of the Bloomsbury set, located only a short distance from where Jones spent much of his childhood – are revived and recontextualised through ornately beaded boots and hand-painted heels; the Vanessa Bell and Duncan Grant frescoes which decorate its walls adapted in-to embroidered embellishments on gowns. “I like how this family of people – and particularly these two pioneering sisters – moved things forward,” notes Jones. “I admire the way that they lived their lives, the freedom that they created for themselves and the art that they left behind for the world.”     The hand-printed, marble-bound books published by Virginia and Leonard Woolf for Hogarth Press – displayed at the show’s accom-panying literary exhibition – offer a seamless segue into classical Italian aesthetics. Mirroring the marble palette of Rome’s Galleria Borghese, whose Bernini sculptures inform the dramatic deshabillé drapery found in the collection, they showcase the harmony between the two movements (so fascinated was Vanessa Bell by Italian Classicism that she would paint in the Borghese gardens, or reprise Old Masters to hang on the walls of Charleston). Visible in woven jacquards and on silken gowns; through intarsia furs and hand-beaded tailoring, mar­bles become a key component in the collection’s visual language.     Fendi’s own history also appears as a primary source, refracted through Jones’ contemporary perspective: the biographies of those who model the cast used to excavate the archives for formative sketch­es and decoration. The velvet ribbons of a vintage bag are transposed onto a new design; Karligraphy monograms taken from Lagerfeld’s final collection beaded onto boots.      The importance of family – both real and chosen – is celebrated through the cast who model the collection, who each inhabit glass vitrines transformed into rooms of their own. “Fendi represents arti­sanal quality of the highest order, and it is all about family,” Jones reflects. “It is in its third generation with a Fendi at its helm, and I am guest starring while bringing in the fourth. Here, I am surrounded by strong, powerful women who I love and respect, and want to bring their energy into what I do.”     #FendiCouture www.fendi.com

VALENTINO PRESENTS THE HAUTE COUTURE SPRING/SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION
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VALENTINO PRESENTS THE HAUTE COUTURE SPRING/SUMMER 2021 COLLECTION

Fashion Week The rituals, the process, and the values of Couture are timeless. They celebrate the human: the mind that conceives and the hand that creates and gives value. Through a work process that sits above time, they produce timeless objects molded on the individual.     Time as a code and a value, to reset and reprogrammed in a Couture of today that updates classic rituals and processes through garments designed to express oneself, as anyone desires. Women, men: naturally, smoothly. A wardrobe that draws and opens up possibilities.     Verticality as a tension in which what is complex is resolved into vibrant simplicity. Fabric as a material elevated by handwork, as a texture that incites discovery and surprise. Raised on the highest heels, the long and lean silhouettes are accumulations of elements, stripped of every evident artifice, of prints and decorations, which up close appear different from how they look from afar. The pullover is in fact woven fabric; a solid surface swarms with petals, or dematerializes into folds of ribbons. Line, the texture of the fabric, the warm and cold neutrals and the acrylic glares, do all the talking. The apparent preciousness becomes silent, intimate, just as the interchangeable and protective simplicity of the pieces is intimate. Sudden, flashes of daring.     The temporal code of this recoded Couture becomes a digital tale in the collaboration with Robert Del Naja: a self-standing, complete document of the long process of the Atelier. The information on the making of, of the collection, the faces of the artisans, the time lapsed photo shoots of thework in progress on the tailoring dummy, become algorithmic sequences elaborated and set to music by the machine; trained by creative partner Mario Klingemann. The human feeds the mechanic, the manual activates a neural and digital process, in the quest for a new humanism.Through the synthetic lter of arti cial intelligence, the emotional aspect of Couture emerges,with the celebration and enhancement of human quality: a code that regenerates itself endlessly while remaining timeless.     #ValentinoHauteCouture #CodeTemporal The rituals, the process, and the values of Couture are timeless. They celebrate the human: the mind that conceives and the hand that creates and gives value. Through a work process that sits above time, they produce timeless objects molded on the individual.     Time as a code and a value, to reset and reprogrammed in a Couture of today that updates classic rituals and processes through garments designed to express oneself, as anyone desires. Women, men: naturally, smoothly. A wardrobe that draws and opens up possibilities.     Verticality as a tension in which what is complex is resolved into vibrant simplicity. Fabric as a material elevated by handwork, as a texture that incites discovery and surprise. Raised on the highest heels, the long and lean silhouettes are accumulations of elements, stripped of every evident artifice, of prints and decorations, which up close appear different from how they look from afar. The pullover is in fact woven fabric; a solid surface swarms with petals, or dematerializes into folds of ribbons. Line, the texture of the fabric, the warm and cold neutrals and the acrylic glares, do all the talking. The apparent preciousness becomes silent, intimate, just as the interchangeable and protective simplicity of the pieces is intimate. Sudden, flashes of daring.     The temporal code of this recoded Couture becomes a digital tale in the collaboration with Robert Del Naja: a self-standing, complete document of the long process of the Atelier. The information on the making of, of the collection, the faces of the artisans, the time lapsed photo shoots of thework in progress on the tailoring dummy, become algorithmic sequences elaborated and set to music by the machine; trained by creative partner Mario Klingemann. The human feeds the mechanic, the manual activates a neural and digital process, in the quest for a new humanism.Through the synthetic lter of arti cial intelligence, the emotional aspect of Couture emerges,with the celebration and enhancement of human quality: a code that regenerates itself endlessly while remaining timeless.     #ValentinoHauteCouture #CodeTemporal

GIORGIO ARMANI PRIVÉ PRESENTS THE NEW COLLECTION
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GIORGIO ARMANI PRIVÉ PRESENTS THE NEW COLLECTION

Fashion Week IT IS THE COLLECTIONS THAT TELL THE STORY OF GIORGIO ARMANI’S JOURNEY, HIS SENSE OF FREEDOM, HIS INDEPENDENCE FROM FLEETING TRENDS. AND IN THIS PRIVÉ COLLECTION, PRESENTED FOR THE FIRST TIME AT PALAZZO ORSINI, THE HEART OF HIS MILANESE ATELIER WHERE CLOTHES ARE CONCEIVED AND TAKE SHAPE, ONE CAN DETECT A DESIRE FOR PERFECTION AND A PLEASURE TAKEN IN LIGHT AND COLOUR; THE RESULT CONVEYS THE PROFOUND AESTHETICS OF HAUTE COUTURE TO THE YOUNGER GENERATION.     MAKING A BALANCED USE OF FLUIDITY AND PROPORTIONS, OPPOSITES ALTERNATE AND MERGE. JACKETS ARE DESIGNED TO SKIM THE BODY, AND DELICATE EMBROIDERED SLIP DRESSES FEATURE ALONGSIDE SENSUAL FLOWING SATIN TUNICS AND VOLUMINOUS DRESSES COVERED WITH CRYSTALS. PINSTRIPE FABRICS WITH A MASCULINE TEXTURE AND LAMÉ WITH GREY-GOLD HIGHLIGHTS, SATIN AND ORGANZA, TULLE AND WASHED SILK, DEFINED BY FLOUNCES AND TOUCHES OF MIDNIGHT BLUE VELVET: AN UNEXPECTED AUTUMNAL GLOW ON SUMMER LIGHTNESS.     THE COLOUR PALETTE RANGES FROM MAGENTA RED AND AQUA GREEN, PRUSSIAN BLUE AND COBALT BLUE, TO GREY AND GREIGE. THE UNEXPECTED GLOW OF MICRO-CRYSTALS AND SEQUINS SHINES OVER EVERYTHING, EMBLEMATIC OF THE EXPERT CRAFTSMANSHIP AND CAREFUL EXECUTION OF THESE GARMENTS. FLORAL EMBROIDERY ON TULLE DELICATELY BLURS THE COLOURS. A GEOMETRIC STUDY OF NECKLINES CLEVERLY DEFINES THE DRESSES. EVERYTHING IS LIGHTNESS. EVERYTHING IS COLOUR, AND A NEW JOYFULNESS.     CONTRARY TO EXPECTATIONS, DUE TO THE ONGOING HEALTH EMERGENCY, THE SHOW TOOK PLACE BEHIND CLOSED DOORS AND WITHOUT AN AUDIENCE, AND WAS STREAMED AS PART OF THE PARIS HAUTE COUTURE CALENDAR. THE SHOW WAS ALSO BROADCAST THROUGH THE BRAND’S SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS. GIORGIO ARMANI THUS CONTINUES HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE GENERAL PUBLIC, WHO WERE ABLE TO EXPERIENCE THE MAGIC OF FASHION AND ITS HIGHEST EXPRESSION, AS THEY DID IN 2007, WHEN, FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER, THEY WERE ABLE TO ATTEND THE ARMANI PRIVÉ FASHION SHOW, WHICH WAS BROADCASTED AS A LIVE STREAM FROM PARIS.     GIORGIO ARMANI SAID: ‘COUTURE IS ROOTED IN FASHION HISTORY. IT REPRESENTS THE PINNACLE OF CREATIVITY AND SARTORIAL SKILL, BUT IS A WORLD AVAILABLE ONLY TO VERY FEW. TODAY, THROUGH THE DEMOCRACY OF THE INTERNET, WE ARE ABLE TO OFFER A FRONT ROW SEAT TO EVERYONE.’ IT IS THE COLLECTIONS THAT TELL THE STORY OF GIORGIO ARMANI’S JOURNEY, HIS SENSE OF FREEDOM, HIS INDEPENDENCE FROM FLEETING TRENDS. AND IN THIS PRIVÉ COLLECTION, PRESENTED FOR THE FIRST TIME AT PALAZZO ORSINI, THE HEART OF HIS MILANESE ATELIER WHERE CLOTHES ARE CONCEIVED AND TAKE SHAPE, ONE CAN DETECT A DESIRE FOR PERFECTION AND A PLEASURE TAKEN IN LIGHT AND COLOUR; THE RESULT CONVEYS THE PROFOUND AESTHETICS OF HAUTE COUTURE TO THE YOUNGER GENERATION.     MAKING A BALANCED USE OF FLUIDITY AND PROPORTIONS, OPPOSITES ALTERNATE AND MERGE. JACKETS ARE DESIGNED TO SKIM THE BODY, AND DELICATE EMBROIDERED SLIP DRESSES FEATURE ALONGSIDE SENSUAL FLOWING SATIN TUNICS AND VOLUMINOUS DRESSES COVERED WITH CRYSTALS. PINSTRIPE FABRICS WITH A MASCULINE TEXTURE AND LAMÉ WITH GREY-GOLD HIGHLIGHTS, SATIN AND ORGANZA, TULLE AND WASHED SILK, DEFINED BY FLOUNCES AND TOUCHES OF MIDNIGHT BLUE VELVET: AN UNEXPECTED AUTUMNAL GLOW ON SUMMER LIGHTNESS.     THE COLOUR PALETTE RANGES FROM MAGENTA RED AND AQUA GREEN, PRUSSIAN BLUE AND COBALT BLUE, TO GREY AND GREIGE. THE UNEXPECTED GLOW OF MICRO-CRYSTALS AND SEQUINS SHINES OVER EVERYTHING, EMBLEMATIC OF THE EXPERT CRAFTSMANSHIP AND CAREFUL EXECUTION OF THESE GARMENTS. FLORAL EMBROIDERY ON TULLE DELICATELY BLURS THE COLOURS. A GEOMETRIC STUDY OF NECKLINES CLEVERLY DEFINES THE DRESSES. EVERYTHING IS LIGHTNESS. EVERYTHING IS COLOUR, AND A NEW JOYFULNESS.     CONTRARY TO EXPECTATIONS, DUE TO THE ONGOING HEALTH EMERGENCY, THE SHOW TOOK PLACE BEHIND CLOSED DOORS AND WITHOUT AN AUDIENCE, AND WAS STREAMED AS PART OF THE PARIS HAUTE COUTURE CALENDAR. THE SHOW WAS ALSO BROADCAST THROUGH THE BRAND’S SOCIAL MEDIA CHANNELS. GIORGIO ARMANI THUS CONTINUES HIS RELATIONSHIP WITH THE GENERAL PUBLIC, WHO WERE ABLE TO EXPERIENCE THE MAGIC OF FASHION AND ITS HIGHEST EXPRESSION, AS THEY DID IN 2007, WHEN, FOR THE FIRST TIME EVER, THEY WERE ABLE TO ATTEND THE ARMANI PRIVÉ FASHION SHOW, WHICH WAS BROADCASTED AS A LIVE STREAM FROM PARIS.     GIORGIO ARMANI SAID: ‘COUTURE IS ROOTED IN FASHION HISTORY. IT REPRESENTS THE PINNACLE OF CREATIVITY AND SARTORIAL SKILL, BUT IS A WORLD AVAILABLE ONLY TO VERY FEW. TODAY, THROUGH THE DEMOCRACY OF THE INTERNET, WE ARE ABLE TO OFFER A FRONT ROW SEAT TO EVERYONE.’

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MAIUM PRESENTS THE NEW COLLECTION FOR SPRING & SUMMER
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MAIUM PRESENTS THE NEW COLLECTION FOR SPRING & SUMMER

Fashion Designed for movement and utilising recycled PET bottles throughout their entire product range, Amsterdam’s MAIUM (my-umm) upholds their sustainable and functional credentials with the first drop of their unisex SS21 collection. Drop 1 of the collection sees the self-proclaimed "bad weather experts" debut two brand new styles; the Mac and Trench.     2020 was a year we all stood still. Emerging into a new yearly cycle, MAIUM comes equipped with renewed optimism. The SS21 collection showcases vintage silhouettes with a modern twist, reimagining the classic Mac and Trench coat inspired by a time when our world was designed for movement. Both styles stay true to MAIUM's ethos of functional, sustainable and elevated design, being fully waterproof and made from a blend of organic cotton and recycled PET.     With at least 130 days of rain every year and more than one-third of the country being below sea level, the Dutch have a reputation for creating innovative ways to keep themselves dry. MAIUM apply their signature zippers on the side of each garment to transform their raincoats and newly-launched Mac and Trench styles into ponchos, keeping your bike shielded from the rain. Designed for movement and utilising recycled PET bottles throughout their entire product range, Amsterdam’s MAIUM (my-umm) upholds their sustainable and functional credentials with the first drop of their unisex SS21 collection. Drop 1 of the collection sees the self-proclaimed "bad weather experts" debut two brand new styles; the Mac and Trench.     2020 was a year we all stood still. Emerging into a new yearly cycle, MAIUM comes equipped with renewed optimism. The SS21 collection showcases vintage silhouettes with a modern twist, reimagining the classic Mac and Trench coat inspired by a time when our world was designed for movement. Both styles stay true to MAIUM's ethos of functional, sustainable and elevated design, being fully waterproof and made from a blend of organic cotton and recycled PET.     With at least 130 days of rain every year and more than one-third of the country being below sea level, the Dutch have a reputation for creating innovative ways to keep themselves dry. MAIUM apply their signature zippers on the side of each garment to transform their raincoats and newly-launched Mac and Trench styles into ponchos, keeping your bike shielded from the rain.

THE STATEMENT PUMPS HEDDA Vagabond Shoemakers
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THE STATEMENT PUMPS HEDDA Vagabond Shoemakers

Accessories Let the chunky pumps enter with new style Hedda. This season Vagabond Shoemakers give the classic pumps a revised look and new life with contemporary details. With its refined sculptural design, flared block heels and squared-off toes, the statement-making Hedda pumps offer lots of style with no effort. They are made from smooth leather with a 70mm block heel, available in black, off-white, and golden green.       Hedda is priced at €120,00 and available at Vagabond.com, in-store, and through selected retailers. Let the chunky pumps enter with new style Hedda. This season Vagabond Shoemakers give the classic pumps a revised look and new life with contemporary details. With its refined sculptural design, flared block heels and squared-off toes, the statement-making Hedda pumps offer lots of style with no effort. They are made from smooth leather with a 70mm block heel, available in black, off-white, and golden green.       Hedda is priced at €120,00 and available at Vagabond.com, in-store, and through selected retailers.

CHANEL presents the Spring/Summer 2021 Haute Couture collection
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CHANEL presents the Spring/Summer 2021 Haute Couture collection

Fashion Week For the CHANEL Spring-Summer 2021 Haute Couture show, Virginie Viard called upon photographer, filmmaker and graphic designer Anton Corbijn to stage the silhouettes of the collection in a series of "family portraits", brought together in an album with a camellia on the cover, also painted by the Dutch artist.     In these photographs, the models from the show pose in the heart of the new Haute Couture Salons at 31 rue Cambon in Paris, redecorated in the spirit of Gabrielle Chanel by the Parisian interior designerJacques Grange, and inaugurated this month.     The CHANEL ambassadors Marion Cotillard, Penélope Cruz, Vanessa Paradis, Lily-Rose Depp and Alma Jodorowsky as well as the friends of the House Joana Preiss and Izïa Higelin were also photographed in this exceptional setting, dressed in creations from previous CHANEL collections.       #CHANELHauteCouture For the CHANEL Spring-Summer 2021 Haute Couture show, Virginie Viard called upon photographer, filmmaker and graphic designer Anton Corbijn to stage the silhouettes of the collection in a series of "family portraits", brought together in an album with a camellia on the cover, also painted by the Dutch artist.     In these photographs, the models from the show pose in the heart of the new Haute Couture Salons at 31 rue Cambon in Paris, redecorated in the spirit of Gabrielle Chanel by the Parisian interior designerJacques Grange, and inaugurated this month.     The CHANEL ambassadors Marion Cotillard, Penélope Cruz, Vanessa Paradis, Lily-Rose Depp and Alma Jodorowsky as well as the friends of the House Joana Preiss and Izïa Higelin were also photographed in this exceptional setting, dressed in creations from previous CHANEL collections.       #CHANELHauteCouture

Alled-Martinez presents the new collection for Fall & Winter 2021
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Alled-Martinez presents the new collection for Fall & Winter 2021

Fashion Week Alled-Martinez ́s Fall-Winter 2021 Collection explores the aesthetics of real experiences close to designer Archie Alled-Martinez revisiting the foundations of the brand and recalling the key terms that shape its spirit: daringness, comfort and a rather cheeky elegance.     This short film shot at designer ́s hometown stars a young cast of local collaborators of the brand fully styled in Alled-Martinez that, powered by the boldness often offered to us by night, take us to Archie ́s personal imaginarium and help us contextualising the inspirations behind his FW21.     Insisting in the importance the brand places in the cut, the textiles and a perfect fitting, Alled- Martinez rediscovers its appeal reinforcing the comfort and wearability of its garments.     To the slinky-yet-sleek tailoring, signature styles of the brand, Alled-Martinez introduces new elements that emphasize his devotion for the technical aspects of his work. Velour, devoré/see- through effect garments or the illusion moiré pieces are some of the most remarkable features this season, all of them helping defy our preconceived ideas of where the limits of knitwear can be. Alled-Martinez ́s Fall-Winter 2021 Collection explores the aesthetics of real experiences close to designer Archie Alled-Martinez revisiting the foundations of the brand and recalling the key terms that shape its spirit: daringness, comfort and a rather cheeky elegance.     This short film shot at designer ́s hometown stars a young cast of local collaborators of the brand fully styled in Alled-Martinez that, powered by the boldness often offered to us by night, take us to Archie ́s personal imaginarium and help us contextualising the inspirations behind his FW21.     Insisting in the importance the brand places in the cut, the textiles and a perfect fitting, Alled- Martinez rediscovers its appeal reinforcing the comfort and wearability of its garments.     To the slinky-yet-sleek tailoring, signature styles of the brand, Alled-Martinez introduces new elements that emphasize his devotion for the technical aspects of his work. Velour, devoré/see- through effect garments or the illusion moiré pieces are some of the most remarkable features this season, all of them helping defy our preconceived ideas of where the limits of knitwear can be.

DIOR PRESENTS THE WINTER 2021-2022 MEN'S COLLECTION
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DIOR PRESENTS THE WINTER 2021-2022 MEN'S COLLECTION

Fashion Week FOR THE WINTER 2021-2022 COLLECTION, KIM JONES CHOSE TO COLLABORATE WITH PETER DOIG, ONE OF THE MOST SINGULAR PAINTERS OF THE LAST THREE DECADES. THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR REINVENTS CEREMONIAL WEAR, A VERITABLE LIVING LINK TO HERITAGE, IN SILHOUETTES INSPIRED BY THE HOUSE’S HAUTE COUTURE SAVOIR-FAIRE AND INFUSED WITH THE BRITISH ARTIST’S BEWITCHING UNIVERSE. HIS PAINTINGS ARE TRANSPOSED ONTO THE PIECES, WHICH MORPH INTO WHITE CANVASES PUNCTUATED WITH VIRTUOSO EMBROIDERY, JACQUARDS AND VIBRANTLY HUED PRINTS. A SERIES OF HATS DESIGNED BY STEPHEN JONES ARE ENHANCED WITH ILLUSTRATIONS PRODUCED BY HAND BY PETER DOIG, EVOKING THE SYMBOLS OF HIS IMAGINATION ALONGSIDE DIOR EMBLEMS. A BOLD CELEBRATION OF THE PASSIONATE, CAPTIVATING DIALOGUE BETWEEN ART AND FASHION. FOR THE WINTER 2021-2022 COLLECTION, KIM JONES CHOSE TO COLLABORATE WITH PETER DOIG, ONE OF THE MOST SINGULAR PAINTERS OF THE LAST THREE DECADES. THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR REINVENTS CEREMONIAL WEAR, A VERITABLE LIVING LINK TO HERITAGE, IN SILHOUETTES INSPIRED BY THE HOUSE’S HAUTE COUTURE SAVOIR-FAIRE AND INFUSED WITH THE BRITISH ARTIST’S BEWITCHING UNIVERSE. HIS PAINTINGS ARE TRANSPOSED ONTO THE PIECES, WHICH MORPH INTO WHITE CANVASES PUNCTUATED WITH VIRTUOSO EMBROIDERY, JACQUARDS AND VIBRANTLY HUED PRINTS. A SERIES OF HATS DESIGNED BY STEPHEN JONES ARE ENHANCED WITH ILLUSTRATIONS PRODUCED BY HAND BY PETER DOIG, EVOKING THE SYMBOLS OF HIS IMAGINATION ALONGSIDE DIOR EMBLEMS. A BOLD CELEBRATION OF THE PASSIONATE, CAPTIVATING DIALOGUE BETWEEN ART AND FASHION.

Valentine's Day with Versace
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Valentine's Day with Versace

Accessories Inspired by love and romance, Versace presents a selection of gifting items that will make your loved one swoon over you for Valentine’s Day. Symbolizing eternal love, the gift selection features timeless designs for men and women. Women’s gifting ideas include new, romantic iterations of the Virtus bag – offered in quilted leather in a pastel palette or precious python skin. Known for her power to entrance with her hypnotic gaze, Medusa represents the power of attraction and the sensation of looking into a loved one’s eyes. The iconic symbol is featured on an array of matching jewelry for him and for her. Crafted from supple leather, a selection of men’s presents is enriched with golden Medusa studs. Imagery complements the enamored mood of the gifting selection. Presents are paired with delicate flowers that symbolize love and affection. Sensual couple portraits are adorned with golden gift accents that further the romantic sentiment. Inspired by love and romance, Versace presents a selection of gifting items that will make your loved one swoon over you for Valentine’s Day. Symbolizing eternal love, the gift selection features timeless designs for men and women. Women’s gifting ideas include new, romantic iterations of the Virtus bag – offered in quilted leather in a pastel palette or precious python skin. Known for her power to entrance with her hypnotic gaze, Medusa represents the power of attraction and the sensation of looking into a loved one’s eyes. The iconic symbol is featured on an array of matching jewelry for him and for her. Crafted from supple leather, a selection of men’s presents is enriched with golden Medusa studs. Imagery complements the enamored mood of the gifting selection. Presents are paired with delicate flowers that symbolize love and affection. Sensual couple portraits are adorned with golden gift accents that further the romantic sentiment.

Louis Vuitton Men’s collection by Virgil Abloh Fall-Winter 2021
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Louis Vuitton Men’s collection by Virgil Abloh Fall-Winter 2021

Fashion Week “Within my practice, I contribute to a Black canon of culture and art and its preservation. This is why, to preserve my own output, I record it at length.” –Virgil Abloh, A manifesto according to Virgil Abloh, 2020.     What do you want to be when you grow up? As children, our dreamsand aspirations are personi ed by archetypes: the Artist, theSalesman, the Architect, the Drifter. Familiar characters in ev-eryday society, they are inseparably de ned by their uniforms:the dress codes we associate with professions, lifestyles and knowledge. From head to toe, our minds are inherently trained to outline an archetypical wardrobe to help us identify the character of an individual. Often, these characters are tied to societal presumptions of cultural background, gender, and sexuality.     The Louis Vuitton Fall-Winter 2021 Men’s Collection investigates the unconscious biases instilled in our collective psyche by the archaic norms of society. Predetermined perceptions, they imbue our outlooks with manmade myths connected to the genetics of peo- ple, ideas and art. Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh employsfashion as a tool to change those preconceptions: keep the codes,but change the values.     The logic respects Black cultural traditions that use gures of speech (irony, punning, ri ing) to play with or reverse the conno- tations of established codes. These techniques create new meanings and subvert established canons; for example, the way a standardEnglish phrase may have an entirely di erent meaning in Blackvernacular English. Virgil Abloh applies these techniques to his design methodology, imbuing the grammar of recognised archetypeswith di erent genetics.     Informed by James Baldwin’s essay Stranger in the Village from 1953, which deals with the parallels between the author’s experi- ences as an African-American man in a Swiss village and his life in America, the show takes place between locations in Switzerlandand Paris. The frames of the performance revolve around the gu-rative notion of the art heist: the myths spun by society aroundorigin and ownership of art, visual references and those who cre-ate. (See: ‘The Performance Art Piece’.)     The conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner constructs a series of aph-orisms-as-patterns tied to these premises: “YOU CAN TELL A BOOK BYITS COVER”, “THE SAME PLACE AT THE SAME TIME”, “( SOMEWHERE SOME-HOW )”. Throughout garments and accessories, motifs and techniques play on themes of illusion, replicating the familiar through the deceptive lenses of trompe l’oeil and ltrage, and re-appropriat- ing the normal through extreme elevation. It fuels a study of the un-designed: items devoid of artisticownership and exact historical provenance. The physical show in-vitation is embodied by a balsa wood DIY model plane, an eternalsymbol of boyhood devoid of artistic ownership. Who came up with the paper cup? The metal nail? The pencil? It begs the questionof who can claim creation: who gets to make art, and who gets toconsume it. Conceived outside the art sphere, un-designed and es- sentially “normal” items represent a public domain continuously reinvented and claimed by the sector of art.     As a result, normality is accentuated: the slumber we slip intofollowing periods of social unrest. What does normality look like, what does it mean, and who has the optional privilege to embody it? Virgil Abloh brings his established idea of “Tourist vs. Pur-ist” to the forefront: his term for the outsider, who aspirestowards an esoteric domain of knowledge versus the insider, who already occupies it. The collection detects their respective codes in order to defy and unite them.     In a social climate hankering for a new normal that breaks with the archaic structure of society, archetypes become neotypes. Ifan artist doesn’t ful l our predetermined image of an artist, doesit make them any less of an artist? If a reference that originated in the sphere of the Tourist is altered into a new piece of art,can the Purist claim ownership of that reference? If Kente cloth– the fabric of Virgil Abloh’s cultural heritage – is rendered intartan, does that make Kente any less Ghanaian and tartan any less Scottish? Provenance is reality, while ownership is myth: manmadeinventions now ripe for re-invention. “Within my practice, I contribute to a Black canon of culture and art and its preservation. This is why, to preserve my own output, I record it at length.” –Virgil Abloh, A manifesto according to Virgil Abloh, 2020.     What do you want to be when you grow up? As children, our dreamsand aspirations are personi ed by archetypes: the Artist, theSalesman, the Architect, the Drifter. Familiar characters in ev-eryday society, they are inseparably de ned by their uniforms:the dress codes we associate with professions, lifestyles and knowledge. From head to toe, our minds are inherently trained to outline an archetypical wardrobe to help us identify the character of an individual. Often, these characters are tied to societal presumptions of cultural background, gender, and sexuality.     The Louis Vuitton Fall-Winter 2021 Men’s Collection investigates the unconscious biases instilled in our collective psyche by the archaic norms of society. Predetermined perceptions, they imbue our outlooks with manmade myths connected to the genetics of peo- ple, ideas and art. Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh employsfashion as a tool to change those preconceptions: keep the codes,but change the values.     The logic respects Black cultural traditions that use gures of speech (irony, punning, ri ing) to play with or reverse the conno- tations of established codes. These techniques create new meanings and subvert established canons; for example, the way a standardEnglish phrase may have an entirely di erent meaning in Blackvernacular English. Virgil Abloh applies these techniques to his design methodology, imbuing the grammar of recognised archetypeswith di erent genetics.     Informed by James Baldwin’s essay Stranger in the Village from 1953, which deals with the parallels between the author’s experi- ences as an African-American man in a Swiss village and his life in America, the show takes place between locations in Switzerlandand Paris. The frames of the performance revolve around the gu-rative notion of the art heist: the myths spun by society aroundorigin and ownership of art, visual references and those who cre-ate. (See: ‘The Performance Art Piece’.)     The conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner constructs a series of aph-orisms-as-patterns tied to these premises: “YOU CAN TELL A BOOK BYITS COVER”, “THE SAME PLACE AT THE SAME TIME”, “( SOMEWHERE SOME-HOW )”. Throughout garments and accessories, motifs and techniques play on themes of illusion, replicating the familiar through the deceptive lenses of trompe l’oeil and ltrage, and re-appropriat- ing the normal through extreme elevation. It fuels a study of the un-designed: items devoid of artisticownership and exact historical provenance. The physical show in-vitation is embodied by a balsa wood DIY model plane, an eternalsymbol of boyhood devoid of artistic ownership. Who came up with the paper cup? The metal nail? The pencil? It begs the questionof who can claim creation: who gets to make art, and who gets toconsume it. Conceived outside the art sphere, un-designed and es- sentially “normal” items represent a public domain continuously reinvented and claimed by the sector of art.     As a result, normality is accentuated: the slumber we slip intofollowing periods of social unrest. What does normality look like, what does it mean, and who has the optional privilege to embody it? Virgil Abloh brings his established idea of “Tourist vs. Pur-ist” to the forefront: his term for the outsider, who aspirestowards an esoteric domain of knowledge versus the insider, who already occupies it. The collection detects their respective codes in order to defy and unite them.     In a social climate hankering for a new normal that breaks with the archaic structure of society, archetypes become neotypes. Ifan artist doesn’t ful l our predetermined image of an artist, doesit make them any less of an artist? If a reference that originated in the sphere of the Tourist is altered into a new piece of art,can the Purist claim ownership of that reference? If Kente cloth– the fabric of Virgil Abloh’s cultural heritage – is rendered intartan, does that make Kente any less Ghanaian and tartan any less Scottish? Provenance is reality, while ownership is myth: manmadeinventions now ripe for re-invention.

Daily Paper Presents Spring/Summer 2021 Collection: Future Roots
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Daily Paper Presents Spring/Summer 2021 Collection: Future Roots

Fashion Daily Paper presents their Spring/Summer 2021 collection Future Roots as they release their second drop of Spring ready silhouettes and colorways. This season Daily Paper explores ancient wisdom and traditions of pre-colonial civilisations alongside the creativity and innovation of post-colonial activist movements. Looking at the past with reverence and humility; to the present with critical wit; and to the future with an empowered optimism, Daily Paper hopes to inspire and educate the current generation to realise their potential to create diverse new identities for tomorrow.     Custom Branded Lace:   The foundation of the collection is the revival of histories and the memories of the past through a modern lens which is particularly well demonstrated in the choice of fabrics for this season. Extensive research into the origin stories of various African textiles is reinterpreted through satin scarf attachments, tailored staples, dart-waisted dresses and voluminous shirting that is cut from a custom branded white cotton broderie anglaise. The lace is embroidered with empty portrait frames, acknowledging the heroes of the past for your own interpretation that paved the way for the future to come. This season's colors include pastel turquoise, lilac and yellow, soft beige and brown, bright green and different shades of whites for an elevated Spring/Summer wardrobe.       Credits : Photography: David Nana Opoku Ansah  Creative and Art Direction: Florian Joahn  Styling: Edem Dossou Styling Assistant: Mohammed Blakk  Make Up: Elizabeth Boateng  Talents (left to right): Seth Bedzo and  Erza Tamaa     Brown Jacquard and Nostalgic Elements:   A further sense of heritage is conveyed in a newly- introduced monogram print of the Daily Paper shield, which is used on brown satin jacquard two-pieces. Elsewhere, blazers, flared trousers and pleated skirts in school- uniform-inspired checks is a nod to the student style and classrooms of the 60s and 70s where the activist mindsets were developed. With it’s nostalgic elements and historical references, the collection’s message rings clear: our future roots will always draw their power from the past.      Daily Paper presents their Spring/Summer 2021 collection Future Roots as they release their second drop of Spring ready silhouettes and colorways. This season Daily Paper explores ancient wisdom and traditions of pre-colonial civilisations alongside the creativity and innovation of post-colonial activist movements. Looking at the past with reverence and humility; to the present with critical wit; and to the future with an empowered optimism, Daily Paper hopes to inspire and educate the current generation to realise their potential to create diverse new identities for tomorrow.     Custom Branded Lace:   The foundation of the collection is the revival of histories and the memories of the past through a modern lens which is particularly well demonstrated in the choice of fabrics for this season. Extensive research into the origin stories of various African textiles is reinterpreted through satin scarf attachments, tailored staples, dart-waisted dresses and voluminous shirting that is cut from a custom branded white cotton broderie anglaise. The lace is embroidered with empty portrait frames, acknowledging the heroes of the past for your own interpretation that paved the way for the future to come. This season's colors include pastel turquoise, lilac and yellow, soft beige and brown, bright green and different shades of whites for an elevated Spring/Summer wardrobe.       Credits : Photography: David Nana Opoku Ansah  Creative and Art Direction: Florian Joahn  Styling: Edem Dossou Styling Assistant: Mohammed Blakk  Make Up: Elizabeth Boateng  Talents (left to right): Seth Bedzo and  Erza Tamaa     Brown Jacquard and Nostalgic Elements:   A further sense of heritage is conveyed in a newly- introduced monogram print of the Daily Paper shield, which is used on brown satin jacquard two-pieces. Elsewhere, blazers, flared trousers and pleated skirts in school- uniform-inspired checks is a nod to the student style and classrooms of the 60s and 70s where the activist mindsets were developed. With it’s nostalgic elements and historical references, the collection’s message rings clear: our future roots will always draw their power from the past.     

Louis Vuitton presents XS Handbags
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Louis Vuitton presents XS Handbags

Men   This season’s new pattern, the Damier motif is revamped, stretched, mirrored within the black and white checks inspired by Ska, a musical movement that originated in Jamaica in the 50s before becoming all the rage in England. Against a black and white background, the LV logo proudly displays its sa ron shade, like a nod to the brand’s distinctive colours.     As a final touch, the little animals created by Virgil Abloh and his team are tied here and there to the models: Zoooom and its friends – optimistic, mischievous creatures – show up on these miniature versions of the Keepall or Steamer, in a three-dimension knitted version or as embroidered badges on the canvas, making every handbag a unique piece with a distinctive character.   This season’s new pattern, the Damier motif is revamped, stretched, mirrored within the black and white checks inspired by Ska, a musical movement that originated in Jamaica in the 50s before becoming all the rage in England. Against a black and white background, the LV logo proudly displays its sa ron shade, like a nod to the brand’s distinctive colours.     As a final touch, the little animals created by Virgil Abloh and his team are tied here and there to the models: Zoooom and its friends – optimistic, mischievous creatures – show up on these miniature versions of the Keepall or Steamer, in a three-dimension knitted version or as embroidered badges on the canvas, making every handbag a unique piece with a distinctive character.

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