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Alled-Martinez presents the new collection for Fall & Winter 2021
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Alled-Martinez presents the new collection for Fall & Winter 2021

Fashion Week Alled-Martinez ́s Fall-Winter 2021 Collection explores the aesthetics of real experiences close to designer Archie Alled-Martinez revisiting the foundations of the brand and recalling the key terms that shape its spirit: daringness, comfort and a rather cheeky elegance.     This short film shot at designer ́s hometown stars a young cast of local collaborators of the brand fully styled in Alled-Martinez that, powered by the boldness often offered to us by night, take us to Archie ́s personal imaginarium and help us contextualising the inspirations behind his FW21.     Insisting in the importance the brand places in the cut, the textiles and a perfect fitting, Alled- Martinez rediscovers its appeal reinforcing the comfort and wearability of its garments.     To the slinky-yet-sleek tailoring, signature styles of the brand, Alled-Martinez introduces new elements that emphasize his devotion for the technical aspects of his work. Velour, devoré/see- through effect garments or the illusion moiré pieces are some of the most remarkable features this season, all of them helping defy our preconceived ideas of where the limits of knitwear can be. Alled-Martinez ́s Fall-Winter 2021 Collection explores the aesthetics of real experiences close to designer Archie Alled-Martinez revisiting the foundations of the brand and recalling the key terms that shape its spirit: daringness, comfort and a rather cheeky elegance.     This short film shot at designer ́s hometown stars a young cast of local collaborators of the brand fully styled in Alled-Martinez that, powered by the boldness often offered to us by night, take us to Archie ́s personal imaginarium and help us contextualising the inspirations behind his FW21.     Insisting in the importance the brand places in the cut, the textiles and a perfect fitting, Alled- Martinez rediscovers its appeal reinforcing the comfort and wearability of its garments.     To the slinky-yet-sleek tailoring, signature styles of the brand, Alled-Martinez introduces new elements that emphasize his devotion for the technical aspects of his work. Velour, devoré/see- through effect garments or the illusion moiré pieces are some of the most remarkable features this season, all of them helping defy our preconceived ideas of where the limits of knitwear can be.

DIOR PRESENTS THE WINTER 2021-2022 MEN'S COLLECTION
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DIOR PRESENTS THE WINTER 2021-2022 MEN'S COLLECTION

Fashion Week FOR THE WINTER 2021-2022 COLLECTION, KIM JONES CHOSE TO COLLABORATE WITH PETER DOIG, ONE OF THE MOST SINGULAR PAINTERS OF THE LAST THREE DECADES. THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR REINVENTS CEREMONIAL WEAR, A VERITABLE LIVING LINK TO HERITAGE, IN SILHOUETTES INSPIRED BY THE HOUSE’S HAUTE COUTURE SAVOIR-FAIRE AND INFUSED WITH THE BRITISH ARTIST’S BEWITCHING UNIVERSE. HIS PAINTINGS ARE TRANSPOSED ONTO THE PIECES, WHICH MORPH INTO WHITE CANVASES PUNCTUATED WITH VIRTUOSO EMBROIDERY, JACQUARDS AND VIBRANTLY HUED PRINTS. A SERIES OF HATS DESIGNED BY STEPHEN JONES ARE ENHANCED WITH ILLUSTRATIONS PRODUCED BY HAND BY PETER DOIG, EVOKING THE SYMBOLS OF HIS IMAGINATION ALONGSIDE DIOR EMBLEMS. A BOLD CELEBRATION OF THE PASSIONATE, CAPTIVATING DIALOGUE BETWEEN ART AND FASHION. FOR THE WINTER 2021-2022 COLLECTION, KIM JONES CHOSE TO COLLABORATE WITH PETER DOIG, ONE OF THE MOST SINGULAR PAINTERS OF THE LAST THREE DECADES. THE ARTISTIC DIRECTOR REINVENTS CEREMONIAL WEAR, A VERITABLE LIVING LINK TO HERITAGE, IN SILHOUETTES INSPIRED BY THE HOUSE’S HAUTE COUTURE SAVOIR-FAIRE AND INFUSED WITH THE BRITISH ARTIST’S BEWITCHING UNIVERSE. HIS PAINTINGS ARE TRANSPOSED ONTO THE PIECES, WHICH MORPH INTO WHITE CANVASES PUNCTUATED WITH VIRTUOSO EMBROIDERY, JACQUARDS AND VIBRANTLY HUED PRINTS. A SERIES OF HATS DESIGNED BY STEPHEN JONES ARE ENHANCED WITH ILLUSTRATIONS PRODUCED BY HAND BY PETER DOIG, EVOKING THE SYMBOLS OF HIS IMAGINATION ALONGSIDE DIOR EMBLEMS. A BOLD CELEBRATION OF THE PASSIONATE, CAPTIVATING DIALOGUE BETWEEN ART AND FASHION.

Valentine's Day with Versace
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Valentine's Day with Versace

Accessories Inspired by love and romance, Versace presents a selection of gifting items that will make your loved one swoon over you for Valentine’s Day. Symbolizing eternal love, the gift selection features timeless designs for men and women. Women’s gifting ideas include new, romantic iterations of the Virtus bag – offered in quilted leather in a pastel palette or precious python skin. Known for her power to entrance with her hypnotic gaze, Medusa represents the power of attraction and the sensation of looking into a loved one’s eyes. The iconic symbol is featured on an array of matching jewelry for him and for her. Crafted from supple leather, a selection of men’s presents is enriched with golden Medusa studs. Imagery complements the enamored mood of the gifting selection. Presents are paired with delicate flowers that symbolize love and affection. Sensual couple portraits are adorned with golden gift accents that further the romantic sentiment. Inspired by love and romance, Versace presents a selection of gifting items that will make your loved one swoon over you for Valentine’s Day. Symbolizing eternal love, the gift selection features timeless designs for men and women. Women’s gifting ideas include new, romantic iterations of the Virtus bag – offered in quilted leather in a pastel palette or precious python skin. Known for her power to entrance with her hypnotic gaze, Medusa represents the power of attraction and the sensation of looking into a loved one’s eyes. The iconic symbol is featured on an array of matching jewelry for him and for her. Crafted from supple leather, a selection of men’s presents is enriched with golden Medusa studs. Imagery complements the enamored mood of the gifting selection. Presents are paired with delicate flowers that symbolize love and affection. Sensual couple portraits are adorned with golden gift accents that further the romantic sentiment.

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Louis Vuitton Men’s collection by Virgil Abloh Fall-Winter 2021
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Louis Vuitton Men’s collection by Virgil Abloh Fall-Winter 2021

Fashion Week “Within my practice, I contribute to a Black canon of culture and art and its preservation. This is why, to preserve my own output, I record it at length.” –Virgil Abloh, A manifesto according to Virgil Abloh, 2020.     What do you want to be when you grow up? As children, our dreamsand aspirations are personi ed by archetypes: the Artist, theSalesman, the Architect, the Drifter. Familiar characters in ev-eryday society, they are inseparably de ned by their uniforms:the dress codes we associate with professions, lifestyles and knowledge. From head to toe, our minds are inherently trained to outline an archetypical wardrobe to help us identify the character of an individual. Often, these characters are tied to societal presumptions of cultural background, gender, and sexuality.     The Louis Vuitton Fall-Winter 2021 Men’s Collection investigates the unconscious biases instilled in our collective psyche by the archaic norms of society. Predetermined perceptions, they imbue our outlooks with manmade myths connected to the genetics of peo- ple, ideas and art. Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh employsfashion as a tool to change those preconceptions: keep the codes,but change the values.     The logic respects Black cultural traditions that use gures of speech (irony, punning, ri ing) to play with or reverse the conno- tations of established codes. These techniques create new meanings and subvert established canons; for example, the way a standardEnglish phrase may have an entirely di erent meaning in Blackvernacular English. Virgil Abloh applies these techniques to his design methodology, imbuing the grammar of recognised archetypeswith di erent genetics.     Informed by James Baldwin’s essay Stranger in the Village from 1953, which deals with the parallels between the author’s experi- ences as an African-American man in a Swiss village and his life in America, the show takes place between locations in Switzerlandand Paris. The frames of the performance revolve around the gu-rative notion of the art heist: the myths spun by society aroundorigin and ownership of art, visual references and those who cre-ate. (See: ‘The Performance Art Piece’.)     The conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner constructs a series of aph-orisms-as-patterns tied to these premises: “YOU CAN TELL A BOOK BYITS COVER”, “THE SAME PLACE AT THE SAME TIME”, “( SOMEWHERE SOME-HOW )”. Throughout garments and accessories, motifs and techniques play on themes of illusion, replicating the familiar through the deceptive lenses of trompe l’oeil and ltrage, and re-appropriat- ing the normal through extreme elevation. It fuels a study of the un-designed: items devoid of artisticownership and exact historical provenance. The physical show in-vitation is embodied by a balsa wood DIY model plane, an eternalsymbol of boyhood devoid of artistic ownership. Who came up with the paper cup? The metal nail? The pencil? It begs the questionof who can claim creation: who gets to make art, and who gets toconsume it. Conceived outside the art sphere, un-designed and es- sentially “normal” items represent a public domain continuously reinvented and claimed by the sector of art.     As a result, normality is accentuated: the slumber we slip intofollowing periods of social unrest. What does normality look like, what does it mean, and who has the optional privilege to embody it? Virgil Abloh brings his established idea of “Tourist vs. Pur-ist” to the forefront: his term for the outsider, who aspirestowards an esoteric domain of knowledge versus the insider, who already occupies it. The collection detects their respective codes in order to defy and unite them.     In a social climate hankering for a new normal that breaks with the archaic structure of society, archetypes become neotypes. Ifan artist doesn’t ful l our predetermined image of an artist, doesit make them any less of an artist? If a reference that originated in the sphere of the Tourist is altered into a new piece of art,can the Purist claim ownership of that reference? If Kente cloth– the fabric of Virgil Abloh’s cultural heritage – is rendered intartan, does that make Kente any less Ghanaian and tartan any less Scottish? Provenance is reality, while ownership is myth: manmadeinventions now ripe for re-invention. “Within my practice, I contribute to a Black canon of culture and art and its preservation. This is why, to preserve my own output, I record it at length.” –Virgil Abloh, A manifesto according to Virgil Abloh, 2020.     What do you want to be when you grow up? As children, our dreamsand aspirations are personi ed by archetypes: the Artist, theSalesman, the Architect, the Drifter. Familiar characters in ev-eryday society, they are inseparably de ned by their uniforms:the dress codes we associate with professions, lifestyles and knowledge. From head to toe, our minds are inherently trained to outline an archetypical wardrobe to help us identify the character of an individual. Often, these characters are tied to societal presumptions of cultural background, gender, and sexuality.     The Louis Vuitton Fall-Winter 2021 Men’s Collection investigates the unconscious biases instilled in our collective psyche by the archaic norms of society. Predetermined perceptions, they imbue our outlooks with manmade myths connected to the genetics of peo- ple, ideas and art. Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh employsfashion as a tool to change those preconceptions: keep the codes,but change the values.     The logic respects Black cultural traditions that use gures of speech (irony, punning, ri ing) to play with or reverse the conno- tations of established codes. These techniques create new meanings and subvert established canons; for example, the way a standardEnglish phrase may have an entirely di erent meaning in Blackvernacular English. Virgil Abloh applies these techniques to his design methodology, imbuing the grammar of recognised archetypeswith di erent genetics.     Informed by James Baldwin’s essay Stranger in the Village from 1953, which deals with the parallels between the author’s experi- ences as an African-American man in a Swiss village and his life in America, the show takes place between locations in Switzerlandand Paris. The frames of the performance revolve around the gu-rative notion of the art heist: the myths spun by society aroundorigin and ownership of art, visual references and those who cre-ate. (See: ‘The Performance Art Piece’.)     The conceptual artist Lawrence Weiner constructs a series of aph-orisms-as-patterns tied to these premises: “YOU CAN TELL A BOOK BYITS COVER”, “THE SAME PLACE AT THE SAME TIME”, “( SOMEWHERE SOME-HOW )”. Throughout garments and accessories, motifs and techniques play on themes of illusion, replicating the familiar through the deceptive lenses of trompe l’oeil and ltrage, and re-appropriat- ing the normal through extreme elevation. It fuels a study of the un-designed: items devoid of artisticownership and exact historical provenance. The physical show in-vitation is embodied by a balsa wood DIY model plane, an eternalsymbol of boyhood devoid of artistic ownership. Who came up with the paper cup? The metal nail? The pencil? It begs the questionof who can claim creation: who gets to make art, and who gets toconsume it. Conceived outside the art sphere, un-designed and es- sentially “normal” items represent a public domain continuously reinvented and claimed by the sector of art.     As a result, normality is accentuated: the slumber we slip intofollowing periods of social unrest. What does normality look like, what does it mean, and who has the optional privilege to embody it? Virgil Abloh brings his established idea of “Tourist vs. Pur-ist” to the forefront: his term for the outsider, who aspirestowards an esoteric domain of knowledge versus the insider, who already occupies it. The collection detects their respective codes in order to defy and unite them.     In a social climate hankering for a new normal that breaks with the archaic structure of society, archetypes become neotypes. Ifan artist doesn’t ful l our predetermined image of an artist, doesit make them any less of an artist? If a reference that originated in the sphere of the Tourist is altered into a new piece of art,can the Purist claim ownership of that reference? If Kente cloth– the fabric of Virgil Abloh’s cultural heritage – is rendered intartan, does that make Kente any less Ghanaian and tartan any less Scottish? Provenance is reality, while ownership is myth: manmadeinventions now ripe for re-invention.

Daily Paper Presents Spring/Summer 2021 Collection: Future Roots
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Daily Paper Presents Spring/Summer 2021 Collection: Future Roots

Fashion Daily Paper presents their Spring/Summer 2021 collection Future Roots as they release their second drop of Spring ready silhouettes and colorways. This season Daily Paper explores ancient wisdom and traditions of pre-colonial civilisations alongside the creativity and innovation of post-colonial activist movements. Looking at the past with reverence and humility; to the present with critical wit; and to the future with an empowered optimism, Daily Paper hopes to inspire and educate the current generation to realise their potential to create diverse new identities for tomorrow.     Custom Branded Lace:   The foundation of the collection is the revival of histories and the memories of the past through a modern lens which is particularly well demonstrated in the choice of fabrics for this season. Extensive research into the origin stories of various African textiles is reinterpreted through satin scarf attachments, tailored staples, dart-waisted dresses and voluminous shirting that is cut from a custom branded white cotton broderie anglaise. The lace is embroidered with empty portrait frames, acknowledging the heroes of the past for your own interpretation that paved the way for the future to come. This season's colors include pastel turquoise, lilac and yellow, soft beige and brown, bright green and different shades of whites for an elevated Spring/Summer wardrobe.       Credits : Photography: David Nana Opoku Ansah  Creative and Art Direction: Florian Joahn  Styling: Edem Dossou Styling Assistant: Mohammed Blakk  Make Up: Elizabeth Boateng  Talents (left to right): Seth Bedzo and  Erza Tamaa     Brown Jacquard and Nostalgic Elements:   A further sense of heritage is conveyed in a newly- introduced monogram print of the Daily Paper shield, which is used on brown satin jacquard two-pieces. Elsewhere, blazers, flared trousers and pleated skirts in school- uniform-inspired checks is a nod to the student style and classrooms of the 60s and 70s where the activist mindsets were developed. With it’s nostalgic elements and historical references, the collection’s message rings clear: our future roots will always draw their power from the past.      Daily Paper presents their Spring/Summer 2021 collection Future Roots as they release their second drop of Spring ready silhouettes and colorways. This season Daily Paper explores ancient wisdom and traditions of pre-colonial civilisations alongside the creativity and innovation of post-colonial activist movements. Looking at the past with reverence and humility; to the present with critical wit; and to the future with an empowered optimism, Daily Paper hopes to inspire and educate the current generation to realise their potential to create diverse new identities for tomorrow.     Custom Branded Lace:   The foundation of the collection is the revival of histories and the memories of the past through a modern lens which is particularly well demonstrated in the choice of fabrics for this season. Extensive research into the origin stories of various African textiles is reinterpreted through satin scarf attachments, tailored staples, dart-waisted dresses and voluminous shirting that is cut from a custom branded white cotton broderie anglaise. The lace is embroidered with empty portrait frames, acknowledging the heroes of the past for your own interpretation that paved the way for the future to come. This season's colors include pastel turquoise, lilac and yellow, soft beige and brown, bright green and different shades of whites for an elevated Spring/Summer wardrobe.       Credits : Photography: David Nana Opoku Ansah  Creative and Art Direction: Florian Joahn  Styling: Edem Dossou Styling Assistant: Mohammed Blakk  Make Up: Elizabeth Boateng  Talents (left to right): Seth Bedzo and  Erza Tamaa     Brown Jacquard and Nostalgic Elements:   A further sense of heritage is conveyed in a newly- introduced monogram print of the Daily Paper shield, which is used on brown satin jacquard two-pieces. Elsewhere, blazers, flared trousers and pleated skirts in school- uniform-inspired checks is a nod to the student style and classrooms of the 60s and 70s where the activist mindsets were developed. With it’s nostalgic elements and historical references, the collection’s message rings clear: our future roots will always draw their power from the past.     

Louis Vuitton presents XS Handbags
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Louis Vuitton presents XS Handbags

Men   This season’s new pattern, the Damier motif is revamped, stretched, mirrored within the black and white checks inspired by Ska, a musical movement that originated in Jamaica in the 50s before becoming all the rage in England. Against a black and white background, the LV logo proudly displays its sa ron shade, like a nod to the brand’s distinctive colours.     As a final touch, the little animals created by Virgil Abloh and his team are tied here and there to the models: Zoooom and its friends – optimistic, mischievous creatures – show up on these miniature versions of the Keepall or Steamer, in a three-dimension knitted version or as embroidered badges on the canvas, making every handbag a unique piece with a distinctive character.   This season’s new pattern, the Damier motif is revamped, stretched, mirrored within the black and white checks inspired by Ska, a musical movement that originated in Jamaica in the 50s before becoming all the rage in England. Against a black and white background, the LV logo proudly displays its sa ron shade, like a nod to the brand’s distinctive colours.     As a final touch, the little animals created by Virgil Abloh and his team are tied here and there to the models: Zoooom and its friends – optimistic, mischievous creatures – show up on these miniature versions of the Keepall or Steamer, in a three-dimension knitted version or as embroidered badges on the canvas, making every handbag a unique piece with a distinctive character.

Exclusive editorial by Fabien Montique
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Exclusive editorial by Fabien Montique

Fashion Exclusive new digital editorial, captured by Fabien Montique.     TEAM CREDITS:  Photo: Fabien Montique  Styling: Joana Dacheville Photo Assistant - Jean-Romain Pac Casting Director: Remi Felipe Models: Mahany Pery @Oui , Emma Sainte-Rose @Oui, Marieme @Makers  Movement director: Pierre Podevyn,   Hair: Yumiko Hikage @ASG  Make up:  Yvane Rocher  @ASG  Props: Sylvain Cabouat @Walter Schupfer  Production : William Romeo , Montique & Co “Post-Production & Retouch - ink” fashion assistants :  Léo Rouault , Agathe Philippart and Joana Mahafaly   Exclusive new digital editorial, captured by Fabien Montique.     TEAM CREDITS:  Photo: Fabien Montique  Styling: Joana Dacheville Photo Assistant - Jean-Romain Pac Casting Director: Remi Felipe Models: Mahany Pery @Oui , Emma Sainte-Rose @Oui, Marieme @Makers  Movement director: Pierre Podevyn,   Hair: Yumiko Hikage @ASG  Make up:  Yvane Rocher  @ASG  Props: Sylvain Cabouat @Walter Schupfer  Production : William Romeo , Montique & Co “Post-Production & Retouch - ink” fashion assistants :  Léo Rouault , Agathe Philippart and Joana Mahafaly  

GIVENCHY PRESENTS THE NEW ANTIGONA BY MATTHEW M. WILLIAMS
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GIVENCHY PRESENTS THE NEW ANTIGONA BY MATTHEW M. WILLIAMS

Accessories In 2021, the House of Givenchy embarks on an exciting new chapter for its emblematic Antigona accessories line. Named after the passionate and courageous Greek heroine, the original Antigona last year celebrated its 10th anniversary as the House’s signature women’s handbag. Iconic for its architectural construction, regal lines and effortless mix of feminine and masculine traits, it has become the foundation for a burgeoning family of sleek, urban leather accessories for women and men.     For Spring-Summer 2021, Creative Director Matthew M. Williams reinterprets the icon for a new era, blending his love of industrial hardware with Givenchy hallmarks, subtly infusing the Antigona’s elegant geometry with more generous volumes, a modern attitude and a futuristic edge. Crafted from Box-finish calfskin, the new Antigona salutes its lineage with a scaled-up version of its characteristic pentagonal patch and two signatures — a 4G in front, GIVENCHY lettering in back —evoking the House’s dual character. Luxurious and distinctive 4G padlocks, custom-designed by Matthew M. Williams for Givenchy, are inspired by the celebrated “love locks” of Paris and present an open invitation to further customize the bag as the wearer wishes. Sophisticated enhancements to the Antigona include re-proportioned handles, which are now elongated and anchored lower on the bag’s body to optimize versatility of wear. A roomy central compartment features either a zip or a magnetic closure, both finished with the 4G padlock, while a version of the mini Antigona and the unisex Vertical bag come with a removable strap for cross-body wear, in leather or the new G-link chain respectively.     Matthew M. Williams also brought his visionary aesthetic to the Antigona family’s youngest sibling, the versatile, unisex Antigona Soft bag, and gave it a companion in the form of a sleek shopper tote. Now reconsidered with strong, squared lines, drop-length handles and a 4G padlock, these multi-purpose hybrids make a sophisticated statement whether in the city or on the road.     In the most masculine interpretation of the style to date, the designer presents the nonchalant Antigona U crossbody bag, also in Box-finish leather, featuring a deconstructed version of the 4G padlock that gives this accessory a unique, urban attitude.     The Antigona family of leather handbags will be available in timeless neutral colors or seasonal shades of pink or red. Meanwhile, classic Antigona styles and sizes, in Box-finish or crocodile-embossed leather, are adorned with the new G-link chain. The latest Antigona accessories will be available in Givenchy boutiques and on givenchy.com starting on February 26th, 2021. In 2021, the House of Givenchy embarks on an exciting new chapter for its emblematic Antigona accessories line. Named after the passionate and courageous Greek heroine, the original Antigona last year celebrated its 10th anniversary as the House’s signature women’s handbag. Iconic for its architectural construction, regal lines and effortless mix of feminine and masculine traits, it has become the foundation for a burgeoning family of sleek, urban leather accessories for women and men.     For Spring-Summer 2021, Creative Director Matthew M. Williams reinterprets the icon for a new era, blending his love of industrial hardware with Givenchy hallmarks, subtly infusing the Antigona’s elegant geometry with more generous volumes, a modern attitude and a futuristic edge. Crafted from Box-finish calfskin, the new Antigona salutes its lineage with a scaled-up version of its characteristic pentagonal patch and two signatures — a 4G in front, GIVENCHY lettering in back —evoking the House’s dual character. Luxurious and distinctive 4G padlocks, custom-designed by Matthew M. Williams for Givenchy, are inspired by the celebrated “love locks” of Paris and present an open invitation to further customize the bag as the wearer wishes. Sophisticated enhancements to the Antigona include re-proportioned handles, which are now elongated and anchored lower on the bag’s body to optimize versatility of wear. A roomy central compartment features either a zip or a magnetic closure, both finished with the 4G padlock, while a version of the mini Antigona and the unisex Vertical bag come with a removable strap for cross-body wear, in leather or the new G-link chain respectively.     Matthew M. Williams also brought his visionary aesthetic to the Antigona family’s youngest sibling, the versatile, unisex Antigona Soft bag, and gave it a companion in the form of a sleek shopper tote. Now reconsidered with strong, squared lines, drop-length handles and a 4G padlock, these multi-purpose hybrids make a sophisticated statement whether in the city or on the road.     In the most masculine interpretation of the style to date, the designer presents the nonchalant Antigona U crossbody bag, also in Box-finish leather, featuring a deconstructed version of the 4G padlock that gives this accessory a unique, urban attitude.     The Antigona family of leather handbags will be available in timeless neutral colors or seasonal shades of pink or red. Meanwhile, classic Antigona styles and sizes, in Box-finish or crocodile-embossed leather, are adorned with the new G-link chain. The latest Antigona accessories will be available in Givenchy boutiques and on givenchy.com starting on February 26th, 2021.

  FENDI presents their Men’s Fall/Winter 2021-2022 Collection
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FENDI presents their Men’s Fall/Winter 2021-2022 Collection

Fashion Week The FENDI Men’s Fall/Winter 2021-22 collection designed by Silvia Venturini Fendi is an optimistic adventure framed within a game of illusions. A cinematic sequence directed by the Italian artist Nico Vascellari sets the scene for ‘What Is Normal Today ft. Silvia’ – an exclusive dance-pop track composed by Not Waving. Appearing inside an immersive 360° mirrored tunnel, models are infinitely multiplied whilst entirely alone, as a maze of suspended doorways is framed in coloured neon beneath the pulsating ceiling of a futuristic music video.      One by one, a broad spectrum of menswear classics is twisted with FENDI playfulness, emerging from darkness into full Technicolour. The result is an unabashed celebration of colour and light, and a universal message of solidarity and connection in Surreal times. A jewel palette sees emerald, vermillion, saffron, orange, fuchsia, cobalt and periwinkle colour-blocked against black, camel and charcoal, as linings, inlays and slashed seams flash with contrasting textures and shades.     Throughout the collection, multifunctionality and form unite in reversible workwear and relaxed outerwear silhouettes. Belted overcoat and trench shapes in cashmere flannel, satin, striped fur and shearling are infused with a cozy peignoir attitude, and piped pyjama hemlines bring the indoors out and the outdoors in. Diagonal quilting inflates all manner of silk jacquard separates from a shawl collar lounge coat to pullovers, shirt jackets and bermuda shorts in a luxuriant expression of cocooning comfort, and ‘inside-out’ tailoring features deconstructed panels that expose padded FF logo linings. The conventions of ribbed and cable knitting are reimagined as long johns, cardigan scarves, mitten cuffs, and a wrapped ‘sleeve’ neck sweater for a weird and wonderful take on the ‘new normal’.     An icon of the London underground scene, the multidisciplinary artist and performer Noel Fielding provides a series of psychedelic artworks for the collection, abstracting the FENDI logo and emphasizing the season’s cosmic spirit through his multicoloured, stream-of-consciousness scribble art. Faces and creatures emerge straight out of Fielding’s dreamscape narrative accenting the collection’s straightforward silhouette with moments of Art Brut insanity. Fielding’s outré pop sensibility is the latest evolution in Silvia Venturini Fendi’s playful selection of artistic collaborators, that has previously included British artists John Booth, @HeyReilly and Sue Tilley, to name a few.     The FENDI Men’s Fall/Winter 2021-22 accessories collection revels in the bright promise of the season’s chromatic palette. The all-over treatment of colour-matched leathers, matte satin and hardware creates dipped-effect Baguette and flatpack shopper shapes, and miniature luggage styles reprise an embossed stripe FF monogram leather as backpacks and crossbody pouches. In fancy leathers, the Baguette is scaled up and down as a roomy satchel or a lanyard card holder, whilst Noel Fielding’s graphic art adorns the Peekaboo and an FF buckle tote in grainy calfskin. In ultra-classic menswear tones, shearling FF slippers and slip-on laced or buckle sabots continue the collection’s indoor-outdoor conceit, joining zip-up quilted ‘spats’ ankle boots and the FENDI Force Light FF lug-sole combat styles. The FENDI Men’s Fall/Winter 2021-22 collection designed by Silvia Venturini Fendi is an optimistic adventure framed within a game of illusions. A cinematic sequence directed by the Italian artist Nico Vascellari sets the scene for ‘What Is Normal Today ft. Silvia’ – an exclusive dance-pop track composed by Not Waving. Appearing inside an immersive 360° mirrored tunnel, models are infinitely multiplied whilst entirely alone, as a maze of suspended doorways is framed in coloured neon beneath the pulsating ceiling of a futuristic music video.      One by one, a broad spectrum of menswear classics is twisted with FENDI playfulness, emerging from darkness into full Technicolour. The result is an unabashed celebration of colour and light, and a universal message of solidarity and connection in Surreal times. A jewel palette sees emerald, vermillion, saffron, orange, fuchsia, cobalt and periwinkle colour-blocked against black, camel and charcoal, as linings, inlays and slashed seams flash with contrasting textures and shades.     Throughout the collection, multifunctionality and form unite in reversible workwear and relaxed outerwear silhouettes. Belted overcoat and trench shapes in cashmere flannel, satin, striped fur and shearling are infused with a cozy peignoir attitude, and piped pyjama hemlines bring the indoors out and the outdoors in. Diagonal quilting inflates all manner of silk jacquard separates from a shawl collar lounge coat to pullovers, shirt jackets and bermuda shorts in a luxuriant expression of cocooning comfort, and ‘inside-out’ tailoring features deconstructed panels that expose padded FF logo linings. The conventions of ribbed and cable knitting are reimagined as long johns, cardigan scarves, mitten cuffs, and a wrapped ‘sleeve’ neck sweater for a weird and wonderful take on the ‘new normal’.     An icon of the London underground scene, the multidisciplinary artist and performer Noel Fielding provides a series of psychedelic artworks for the collection, abstracting the FENDI logo and emphasizing the season’s cosmic spirit through his multicoloured, stream-of-consciousness scribble art. Faces and creatures emerge straight out of Fielding’s dreamscape narrative accenting the collection’s straightforward silhouette with moments of Art Brut insanity. Fielding’s outré pop sensibility is the latest evolution in Silvia Venturini Fendi’s playful selection of artistic collaborators, that has previously included British artists John Booth, @HeyReilly and Sue Tilley, to name a few.     The FENDI Men’s Fall/Winter 2021-22 accessories collection revels in the bright promise of the season’s chromatic palette. The all-over treatment of colour-matched leathers, matte satin and hardware creates dipped-effect Baguette and flatpack shopper shapes, and miniature luggage styles reprise an embossed stripe FF monogram leather as backpacks and crossbody pouches. In fancy leathers, the Baguette is scaled up and down as a roomy satchel or a lanyard card holder, whilst Noel Fielding’s graphic art adorns the Peekaboo and an FF buckle tote in grainy calfskin. In ultra-classic menswear tones, shearling FF slippers and slip-on laced or buckle sabots continue the collection’s indoor-outdoor conceit, joining zip-up quilted ‘spats’ ankle boots and the FENDI Force Light FF lug-sole combat styles.

Louis Vuitton Men's Collection LV Trainer Upcycling by Virgil Abloh Spring-Summer 2021
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Louis Vuitton Men's Collection LV Trainer Upcycling by Virgil Abloh Spring-Summer 2021

Accessories The new Spring-Summer 2021 LV Trainer Upcycling collection draw from the very first LV Trainer, unveiled during Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh’s debut Spring-Summer 2019 show for Louis Vuitton.     A sneaker with striking allure, its unique and highly circular creative production process was developed with Louis Vuitton's dedicated shoe workshop in Fiesso d’Artico according to a sustainable upcycling strategy aiming to optimize the use of existing materials. These new LV Trainers perfectly match the “upcycling ideology” conceived by Virgil Abloh for the Spring-Summer 2021 collection and the House’s commitment to imagine innovative creative circularities to further extend the sustainability of Louis Vuitton products.     The original 2019 LV Trainers have been disassembled, then transformed. Neither exactly the same, nor totally different: this new LV Trainer Upcycling, in supple calfskin and suede, with its tie-dye coloured laces, has been revamped. The low-top version is available in ve bright new shades and features a padded collar. This iconic shoe, featuring an “LV Upcycling” edging on the back, the Louis Vuitton signature on the side and Monogram owers on the sole, as well as a uorescent tag on the right foot, is embedded in House codes.     The new Spring-Summer 2021 LV Trainer Upcycling collection draw from the very first LV Trainer, unveiled during Men’s Artistic Director Virgil Abloh’s debut Spring-Summer 2019 show for Louis Vuitton.     A sneaker with striking allure, its unique and highly circular creative production process was developed with Louis Vuitton's dedicated shoe workshop in Fiesso d’Artico according to a sustainable upcycling strategy aiming to optimize the use of existing materials. These new LV Trainers perfectly match the “upcycling ideology” conceived by Virgil Abloh for the Spring-Summer 2021 collection and the House’s commitment to imagine innovative creative circularities to further extend the sustainability of Louis Vuitton products.     The original 2019 LV Trainers have been disassembled, then transformed. Neither exactly the same, nor totally different: this new LV Trainer Upcycling, in supple calfskin and suede, with its tie-dye coloured laces, has been revamped. The low-top version is available in ve bright new shades and features a padded collar. This iconic shoe, featuring an “LV Upcycling” edging on the back, the Louis Vuitton signature on the side and Monogram owers on the sole, as well as a uorescent tag on the right foot, is embedded in House codes.    

ETRO PRESENTS THEIR MEN’S FALL WINTER 2021/22 COLLECTION
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ETRO PRESENTS THEIR MEN’S FALL WINTER 2021/22 COLLECTION

Fashion Week Iconoclastic, unconventional, personal. A message of hope and faith. Since the sun always shines after the storm. Menswear Creative Director, Kean Etro, embraces an optimistic, uplifting mood for his Fall Winter 2021/22 collection, which kicks off a new chapter for the brand.     A new attitude takes center stage, with ETRO engaged in a conversation about what makes the fashion house relevant for today’s consumers. A sense of freedom runs through the lineup, where established rules are broken to create a fresh, immediate and appealing vocabulary of iconic pieces to mix and match with a frisky approach. The boundaries between daywear and evening wear blur. Function and aesthetics blend. After the long days of confinement, it is time to take the street with a fierce, bold attitude.     The playful and the ironic meet the elegant and the sumptuous in a mix of high and low, casual and elegant. Impeccable blazers with cadet details and robe coats in rich fabrications are layered on color- blocked sporty anoraks decorated with discreet Paisley patterns. Recycled wool maxi sweaters find place next to shirts featuring collars made of archival silk linings, while the Pegaso logo pops up on bomber jackets and oversized hoodies. The street cool appeal of baggy utility denim pants splashed with cashmere motifs is counterbalanced by the impeccable sartorial sophistication of camel coats and double-breasted suits featuring deconstructed fluid silhouettes. Pajama-inspired piping details enrich shirts. Quilted jackets are crafted from ETRO’s vintage upholstery textiles. Retro sport-inspired logo bands run down the legs of nylon track pants. Clashing contrasts also define the footwear selection, with beautifully constructed brogues and loafers, punctuated by studs, juxtaposed to patchwork sneakers with neon laces. Mandalas and Paisley patterns stand out on highly functional backpacks, pouches and cross body bags with multiple pockets on the straps to carry everyday essentials.     Cherry on top, a range of vests coming in a blend of wool and mohair are part of a see now-buy now genderless capsule collection immediately available, in the neon tones of blue, yellow and pink, on etro.com. Iconoclastic, unconventional, personal. A message of hope and faith. Since the sun always shines after the storm. Menswear Creative Director, Kean Etro, embraces an optimistic, uplifting mood for his Fall Winter 2021/22 collection, which kicks off a new chapter for the brand.     A new attitude takes center stage, with ETRO engaged in a conversation about what makes the fashion house relevant for today’s consumers. A sense of freedom runs through the lineup, where established rules are broken to create a fresh, immediate and appealing vocabulary of iconic pieces to mix and match with a frisky approach. The boundaries between daywear and evening wear blur. Function and aesthetics blend. After the long days of confinement, it is time to take the street with a fierce, bold attitude.     The playful and the ironic meet the elegant and the sumptuous in a mix of high and low, casual and elegant. Impeccable blazers with cadet details and robe coats in rich fabrications are layered on color- blocked sporty anoraks decorated with discreet Paisley patterns. Recycled wool maxi sweaters find place next to shirts featuring collars made of archival silk linings, while the Pegaso logo pops up on bomber jackets and oversized hoodies. The street cool appeal of baggy utility denim pants splashed with cashmere motifs is counterbalanced by the impeccable sartorial sophistication of camel coats and double-breasted suits featuring deconstructed fluid silhouettes. Pajama-inspired piping details enrich shirts. Quilted jackets are crafted from ETRO’s vintage upholstery textiles. Retro sport-inspired logo bands run down the legs of nylon track pants. Clashing contrasts also define the footwear selection, with beautifully constructed brogues and loafers, punctuated by studs, juxtaposed to patchwork sneakers with neon laces. Mandalas and Paisley patterns stand out on highly functional backpacks, pouches and cross body bags with multiple pockets on the straps to carry everyday essentials.     Cherry on top, a range of vests coming in a blend of wool and mohair are part of a see now-buy now genderless capsule collection immediately available, in the neon tones of blue, yellow and pink, on etro.com.

Ninamounah: Collection 006 for Spring / Summer 2021
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Ninamounah: Collection 006 for Spring / Summer 2021

Fashion A reflection of our most intimate surroundings. For Spring/Summer ’21 they looked inwards. Melting together deadstock materials and recalibrated signature silhouettes. Born from a moment of stillness and reassessment, our new collection comes from a feeling of hope for a bright new future.     Taking cues from traditional Dutch costume and Ninamounah’s usual threesome of leather motor suits, French corsetry and pinstripe tailored suits, the collection offers a contemporary take on familiar tropes. The ‘Kraplap’, a breastcloth garment made of stiff, starched cotton is interpreted as a tailored suit jacket and trousers.     Trousers featuring thigh high contrast panelling are informed by fishermen’s boots, while a traditional trench coat is rendered in luxurious satin hues. Inspired by motor garments, pieces feature side panelling and a relocated seam. A zipper in the waistline can be worn open to show extra skin.     By embracing the method of reclaiming used materials with a specific user’s history for our designs, Ninamounah synthesizes traces of a forlorn past with future realities. Working exclusively with fabrics and leathers that would otherwise be discarded or destroyed, we take responsibility for our planet.       Photo Woody Bos Art Direction Ferdi Sibbel Hair La Toya Velberg Make up David Koppelaarand Jan Fuite Bodypaint Julia Kiryanova   Talents: Nella (Paparazzi Models) Rogier (Success Models) Jairo (Known Model Management) Mira (Vein Agency) A reflection of our most intimate surroundings. For Spring/Summer ’21 they looked inwards. Melting together deadstock materials and recalibrated signature silhouettes. Born from a moment of stillness and reassessment, our new collection comes from a feeling of hope for a bright new future.     Taking cues from traditional Dutch costume and Ninamounah’s usual threesome of leather motor suits, French corsetry and pinstripe tailored suits, the collection offers a contemporary take on familiar tropes. The ‘Kraplap’, a breastcloth garment made of stiff, starched cotton is interpreted as a tailored suit jacket and trousers.     Trousers featuring thigh high contrast panelling are informed by fishermen’s boots, while a traditional trench coat is rendered in luxurious satin hues. Inspired by motor garments, pieces feature side panelling and a relocated seam. A zipper in the waistline can be worn open to show extra skin.     By embracing the method of reclaiming used materials with a specific user’s history for our designs, Ninamounah synthesizes traces of a forlorn past with future realities. Working exclusively with fabrics and leathers that would otherwise be discarded or destroyed, we take responsibility for our planet.       Photo Woody Bos Art Direction Ferdi Sibbel Hair La Toya Velberg Make up David Koppelaarand Jan Fuite Bodypaint Julia Kiryanova   Talents: Nella (Paparazzi Models) Rogier (Success Models) Jairo (Known Model Management) Mira (Vein Agency)

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